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contents S U M M E R 2 0 17 | W W W. F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

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4 Food for Thought Session is Over and Summer is Here From the Chairman’s Desk Never Let Down Your Guard 4  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 8  Path to Power Bob Johnston, CEO of The Melting Pot 12  National Restaurant Association FRLA and NRA Renew Partnership 13  Chefs that Sizzle Zach Weston, Instructor at FSU Dedman School 14  of Hospitality

Tourism Day Recap The Partnership for Florida’s Tourism 18  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 26  Awards Congratulations to Andrew Reiss, Lino Maldonado and FRLA’s 41 

Restaurant Neighbor Award Winners

43 ENGAGE Program A Toast to Success Hospitality Management Degree FSU Panama City Campus 43  Movers and Shakers 48  Support CORE 54  Emergency Management Prepare for Hurricane Season 55  Trade Show Master Emerging Trends at the 2017 Florida Restaurant 55  & Lodging Show

FRLA’s Corporate Calendar 57 

SPECIAL FEATURES

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52 w w w.FRL A .org

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VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

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Legislative Report

Florida Tourism Is Hot!

FRLA is Advocating for Fair, Reasonable and Balanced Legislation

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“The Working Lunch” 42 

A La Carte 44 

ProStart 52 

FRLA’s Special Beverage Section

From kombucha to craft beer, find out about what’s happening in the beverage world and bring more to your bottom line A Podcast From Align Public Strategies

Industry Information You Need to Know Scholarships Awarded to Competition Winners

ON THE COVER: Dave Reid and Paul Avery with World of Beer are brewing a global evolution.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Session is Over and Summer is Here Time to Sip, Savor and Repeat It’s hard to believe summer is already here! But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered and invite you to celebrate the season with this year’s FR&L Magazine Beverage Edition. From bourbon to kombucha, we’re ready to take a sip, sit back and reflect on how lucky we are to live in the Sunshine State. I’m so proud of our members who responded to the call of duty when it came to fight for VISIT FLORIDA. Together, with our industry partners, we rose to the occasion and prevailed with $76 million for our state’s destination marketing arm, bringing a remarkable conclusion to our industry’s tenacious fight for funding. I’m grateful for the leadership of Governor Rick Scott and the Florida Legislature, who continue to fight for tourism jobs and keep our state competitive as a travel destination. At Florida Tourism Day in Tallahassee, the industry had more than 600 members walking the hall of Florida’s Capitol. For the full recap and photographs, turn to page 18. Florida’s hospitality industry can celebrate

several other successes this session that will significantly benefit our members. Funding from the BP Oil Settlement was preserved for tourism-related purposes and reforms were passed to protect businesses from “drive-by” lawsuits. FRLA also prevailed in a critical lawsuit against the City of Miami Beach minimum wage ordinance. Check out all of FRLA’s advocacy successes on pages 20-23. We must remain vigilant as an industry to educate our legislators. Over the next few months, FRLA will be working with its local chapters to advocate for Florida’s #1 industry. FRLA’s Engage program is already claiming victory, including in the EscaRosa Chapter of FRLA. Read more on page 43. Our industry continues to support its future leaders through the FRLA Educational Foundation (FRLAEF). With 47 schools participating, FRLAEF conducted its annual ProStart Culinary Team Competition and Hospitality & Tourism Management Competition (HTMP) in Orlando. Two teams even went on to

represent Florida at the NRA National ProStart Invitational, placing in the Top 20. Read more about these inspirational students on pages 52-53. Whether it be through advocacy, community initiatives or business partnerships, our incredible members continue to make enormous impacts across the state. It’s amazing, all that we’ve accomplished together. I look forward to seeing you all at FRLA’s upcoming events. See page 57. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Never Let Down Your Guard As I write, the FRLA delegation has just returned from the National Restaurant Association’s annual Public Affairs Conference. During our time in Washington, D.C., we got a feel for the current political climate. And even though we should have found a very business-friendly atmosphere during our lobbying visits, we were compelled to remind Republican and Democrat legislators alike to keep our business interests top of mind as they address the issues of the day. As we have seen at the state level in Florida, having a unified government controlled by a single (presumably), business-friendly party offers no guarantee that our industries will not be impacted in a negative way. No matter how favorable the political landscape on the surface, we must never let down our guard. During our visits with legislators and their staff, we focused on three key areas: health care, tax reform and debit card swipe fees. The timing of our visit relative to health care was interesting, given the Republicans’ inability to get reform measures to the finish line. Among the implications for our businesses: We (and even more importantly, our employees) are saddled with the burden of the 30-hour definition of a full-time employee. This artifact of the Affordable Care Act has depressed the earning 4  SU M M ER

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capacity of many hourly employees. As long as it remains in place, we will suffer from the flexibility we need to best manage our business. It also suppresses the culture of meritocracy that has always been part and parcel of the restaurant and lodging industries. On tax reform, we stressed three key points: Lower the rate of taxation, achieve parity between C-Corp and pass-through business entities, and preserve the 45(B) FICA tax reimbursement. And as for debit card swipe fees, our concern is that a sweeping repeal of the Dodd-Frank Consumer Protection and Wall Street Reform Act would take with it the protections we gained from being hit with outrageous (and non-negotiable) debit card swipe fees (which would in turn probably result in those fees nearly doubling). Just as a total repeal of the ACA would eliminate the benefit of having preemption on menu labeling, so too would a total repeal of Dodd-Frank throw us into an unfavorable position. We did not confine our discussion to these topics. As time permitted, we reinforced our positions on ADA lawsuit reform by asking for support of H.R. 620, the ADA Education and Reform Act, the main thrust of which is a provision allowing a business 120 days to correct identified barriers to access before litigation

could proceed. We also lobbied for the elimination of the Renewable Fuel Standard (which drives up the cost of food), and for a common sense approach to immigration reform, which includes improving border security while still facilitating travel and tourism, refining and implementing the E-Verify system, and creating a viable temporary-worker visa program. So as you can see, there was plenty to discuss. Despite Republican control of government, there is still ample opportunity for policies and regulations to be developed that are against our interest. We have experienced that recently in our own state, and it is no different at the federal level. We urge all of our members to remain active and engaged!

Don Fox 2017 Chairman of the Board

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Don Fox

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Kevin Speidel

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Chau Nguyen

Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Orlando DIRECTORS

Olivia Hoblit

Seaside Amelia Inn, Fernandina Beach

Alan Palmieri

Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando

Sheldon Suga

Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Lino Maldonado

Wyndham Vacation Rentals, Fort Walton Beach PRESIDENT/CEO

Carol B. Dover, FMP EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

Rowland Publishing, Inc.

1932 MICCOSUKEE ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 Phone: 850-878-0554 Fax: 850-807-5037

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion d effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


The Key West Songwriters Festival had more than 20,000 attendees this year.

FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA proudly sponsored the Key West Songwriters Festival.

Dancing on the Drive was a blast! Photo by Steven Miller

The Clearwater Beach Taste Fest showcased restaurants from around the area as a kickoff to their restaurant week.

Songwriters showcased favorite and famous tunes at Wellington Weekend, a Great Florida Event. 8  SU M M ER

2017

The Great Florida Events Program sponsored by FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA promotes in-state tourism by providing advertising for festivals and events throughout the Sunshine State. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Gladiator Polo was one of the Great Florida Events that FRLA sponsored this year.

The National Salute to America’s Heroes was held on Memorial Day weekend on Miami Beach.

Pink & Swine is a new favorite of Tallahasseans.

South Walton Beaches Food and Wine Festival featured more than 800 wines. w w w.FRL A .org

Pink & Swine, sponsored by FRLA, offered food, beverages and tunes.

UNwineD was a new and very successful Great Florida Event in Panama City Beach earlier this spring. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

9


SUPPORT THE NRA AND FRLA PACS

2017 GOLF CHAIRS • Robin Sorensen, Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs • Kevin Speidel, VP of Resort Operations, Hilton Grand Vacations

• Jason Emmett, President, Duffy’s Sports Grill • Sheldon Suga, Lodging Director, Hawks Cay BrionPrice.Co

m Photogra phy

2017 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE: ADAM COREY, Tallahassee Hospitality Group, LLC HARRY PRICE, Coca-Cola North America LINO MALDONADO, Wyndham Vacation Rentals JOHN HORNE, Ana Maria Oyster Bar MONIQUE YEAGER, Tijuana Flats JASON FIALKOFF, VGM Client Rewards MIKE VINIK, BJ's Restaurants JAN GAUTAM, IHRMC and AAHOA MIKE VENEZIANO, The Doherty Group DAVE REID, World of Beer DON DONLEY, Tommy Bahama Restaurant JONATHAN RAZ, Waldorf Astoria CHARLY ROBINSON, F and D Kitchen FRANK ZUMBO, Miami Marriott Airport Campus MATT HALME, Instant STEVE KEUP, Florida Region Hersha Hospitality CHRIS FRAWLEY, Miller's Ale House Restaurants RON GREEN, Another Broken Egg

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SPONSORSHIPS/TEAMS AVAILABLE, PLEASE CONTACT MLORD@FRLA.ORG 850.224.2250 EXT. 258

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Now, FPL Food is able to oversee every aspect of production, from birthing to feeding, finishing and finally, processing. “At its heart, it’s about the breed, the feed and the care,” he says. This passion for local beef has also inspired FPL Food to partner with the Florida Department of Agriculture, taking part in their Fresh From Florida program. A Southeast seal of excellence, the Florida-born and raised cattle in this program are brought to – François Léger, Georgia to be harvested and processed, delivering product FPL Food’s founder to customers in Florida within and president a matter of days. “It’s really great to do so much with the tools and talent we have. I am lucky enough to have found a situation, found a place, where I can realize a dream of mine and help be part of something bigger.”

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Bob Johnston CEO, THE MELTING POT

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? Working for my brothers who were one of the first franchisees of The Melting Pot.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? Being young, and as a newcom-

er to the business, I felt that others would judge how “sharp” I was by how swiftly I would answer questions. I learned that this was wrong. A quick bad answer is still a bad answer! So I learned early on not to rush to answer questions asked of me, unless I was certain of the correct response.

How has participation in the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association positively affected your business? FRLA has been an outstanding resource and support. During the opening of the Bonnet Creek complex, the Association provided invaluable support in maneuvering through the myriad of regulations, as well as with staff training. I have always appreciated the networking opportunities afforded by

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FRLA; I’ve made numerous key contacts and forged many long-term friendships. I look to FRLA when benchmarking key measures within the industry and often as a resource when hiring key positions. In addition, I look to FRLA to continue to be the voice of the industry in matters of legislation within the state of Florida.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career?

The ability and willingness to talk to anyone about anything and take away something valuable that helps me. Lifelong learning.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? Other than

my brothers Mike and Mark, I was helped by a number of our vendor partners like Steve McKeon of Roth Kase (now known as Emmi Roth, one of our cheese manufacturers and suppliers). I am also mentored by our board of advisors, which includes Nancy Schneid (former Outback brands marketing executive), Paul Avery (now CEO of World of

Beer) and Joe Bourdow (former president of Valpak and International Franchise Association activist).

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? The greatest impact of our

charitable and community outreach efforts is the impact it has had on our team. They love being a part of something significant and they want to work for a company that gets involved and cares about more than just making a dollar. They take pride in diving in and helping out.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Take the time

to find your own development opportunities after assessing what your needs are. Be honest with yourself about this. Create an open, candid and caring work environment where you can see yourself as others see you. Obtain your success by first helping others to succeed.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


PA R T N E R S H I P

FRLA and NRA Renew Partnership

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his spring the long-standing, longbeneficial relationship between the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association and the National Restaurant Association was formally renewed. In a meeting with high level NRA staff, the two premier hospitality advocacy organizations strengthened their partnership in service to the hospitality industry with the inking of a new Unified Partnership Agreement. This framework, over a year in development, is designed to serve both organizations and the industry for the next several years. FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover welcomed NRA President and CEO Dawn

Sweeney and six NRA staffers from Chicago and Washington, D.C. during the height of activities for Florida Tourism Day 2017. Senior teams from both groups then spent the next day finalizing the agreement, capping the momentous occasion with a champagne toast on the FRLA’s newly renovated balcony, and celebrating as Florida becomes the 50th and final state to enter the new partnership. Florida’s dynamic and diverse hospitality industry plays an important role in the industry’s national footprint, and FRLA’s engagement is crucial to the success of the new partnership. While FRLA and NRA have partnered for many years, offering dual membership and

joint products and services for their membership and the industry at large, this new agreement expands and solidifies that. FRLA and NRA’s chief mission will be to better serve the evolving industry at both the state and national level, through an even tighter alliance between the two organizations. Increased synergy and benefits, in service to the hospitality industry, is aimed for much success in the coming years.

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Chefs That Sizzle

Zach Weston INSTRUCTOR AT FSU DEDMAN SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY Describe your role with FSU’s Dedman School of Hospitality and the Little Dinner Series. I teach the cater-

ing management classes at the Dedman School of Hospitality, and these classes are responsible for hosting the Ashby Stiff Little Dinner Series. The Program starts in the classroom, where my role is a traditional college instructor, and by the fourth week, we move into the kitchen and dining rooms, where my role is then chef-oriented. Students at the Dedman School of Hospitality must complete a mandatory catering management course and are tasked with carrying on the 60-year tradition of the Little Dinner Series (LDS). During the regular semester, the LDS is a 12-event, upscale, four-course banquet complete with wine pairings and a cocktail reception. Students in the catering management classes are divided into management teams and spend the first half of the semester developing an LDS theme and working under the direction of an instructor and support staff to plan every detail of the event. For each event, the students not managing the dinner are employees of the management team. By the end of the semester, each student has planned, developed and managed a dinner and has worked for the other teams as stewards, cooks, servers and bar assistants. Delivering the LDS to dining rooms full of paying customers is a full-spectrum, managerial, hands-on way for students to hone management skills and gain experience in the food and beverage industry. During every LDS, we serve between 70 and 90 guests, and sales are open to the public. What inspires your menus? Our menus are always theme-driven, and we never serve the same dish or menu twice. In an operation where every little detail changes completely from one service to the next, balance and restraint are big inspirations for me. Transferring from the foodservice industry into academia was a big adjustment, as I spent nearly 10 years working in fine dining kitchens surrounded by professional cooks and chefs who have strong intuitions for feasibility, logistics and quality. Hospitality students have not necessarily developed this intuition yet and frequently develop far-reaching menu ideas uninfluenced by the realities of equipment, labor, budget and space constraints. It’s a fascinating process to work one-on-one with them to reel in ideas and steer them toward the consistent level of food and service quality that we strive for at the LDS.

Hot Chef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 14  SU M M ER

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For these reasons, balance and restraint are my biggest inspiration. I work closely with each student team and LDS support staff to ensure that themes are diverse, interesting, executable within budget constraints and delivered at a level of quality. We prepare everything from scratch, from stocks and sauces to desserts and pastry, and if we reach too far, we risk the theme not carrying through, or worse, we risk sacrificing honest quality for flashy concept. Finally, creating a balance for the guest is crucial, too. If we can evoke a certain degree of nostalgia and work to balance a comforting familiarity with the right amount of experimentation, we can give guests something they’ve never had before without bringing them too far out of their comfort zone. Do you create menu items to complement local produce, meats and seafood? Absolutely! Tallahassee and the

surrounding areas are rich with local farms growing amazing produce, not to mention the Gulf of Mexico being 45 minutes away and the Atlantic a short two-hour drive. This part of the country is amazingly beautiful and agriculturally diverse, and we take advantage of these resources at every opportunity.

Please describe some of your most popular menu items/ themes. Our themes at the LDS are extremely diverse! The stu-

dents are steered in different directions according to the themes, and we work hard to ensure that themes are not too similar in any one LDS season. I occasionally outlaw themes for a year or two if they have been done too frequently. The most popular themes are the ones that balance nostalgia and comfort with the right amount of outside-the-box elements. If we can balance that dynamic, we can create a vibe that is simultaneously warm, familiar and slightly edgy. We want guests to leave feeling that they’ve experienced something special and unique. What is your “sizzle” or cuisine and food that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using? I simply love food,

and I really love simple food. I have a deep appreciation for all sides of the art and craft of cooking, from the upper echelons of fine dining to the humblest local taco joints and diners. I don’t have a “specialty” dish, but I truly hope that my cooking style conveys sincerity, honesty and hard work.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bimonthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

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TOURISM

First Quarter of 2017 Sets Florida Visitation Record The Legislature’s Full Funding for VISIT FLORIDA Keeps Momentum Going

F

lorida tourism set another record by welcoming the highest number of quarterly visitors in the state’s history with 31.1 million in the first quarter of 2017. This represents a 2.5 percent increase over the same period in 2016. To add to this great news, during the recent special session called by Governor Scott, the Legislature allocated $76 million to fully fund VISIT FLORIDA to continue to market Florida as a premier vacation destination worldwide. Governor Scott said, “I called a special session to fight for jobs, tourism and education, and I am proud to announce a major win for Florida families. This special session, we’ve increased the per-pupil spending to an all-time high, we’ve established a flexible, transparent economic development program and we’ve fully funded VISIT FLORIDA so we can continue to break visitation records. We know that the most important things to a family are a good-paying job and a great education for their children, and these major

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investments will help us continue to create opportunities across our state for generations to come.” VISIT FLORIDA President & CEO Ken Lawson said, “This victory would not have been possible without the help of the Governor, the Legislature and all of our Industry Partners. Thanks to your dedication and support, VISIT FLORIDA is now fully funded and we can continue aggressively marketing our state to visitors around the world. With Governor Scott leading the way, partners such as Jungle Island, Sawgrass Recreation Park, Medieval Times, ResortQuest and thousands more can continue attracting record numbers of visitors to businesses across the state. I am forever grateful for your hard work.” Estimates from VISIT FLORIDA show a record 27.1 million domestic visitors traveled to Florida in Q1 2017, reflecting a 3.2 percent increase over the same period last year. Estimates also show that 2.7 million overseas visitors and 1.3 million Canadians came to

the Sunshine State in January-March 2017. Total enplanements at Florida’s 18 major airports in Q1 2017 increased 1.6 percent over the same period the previous year, with a record 22.7 million enplaned passengers. For Q1 2017, the number of rooms sold grew by 2.2 percent and the hotel occupancy rate rose 0.7 percent compared to Q1 2016. Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association President & CEO Carol Dover said, “Florida’s hospitality industry is thrilled our elected leaders coalesced to invest in VISIT FLORIDA. The overall health of Florida’s economy depends on visitors selecting the Sunshine State as their leading destination. With 31.1 million visitors in the first quarter of 2017, this optimal funding builds on the state’s marketing momentum and attracts commerce that benefits local businesses and state revenues.”

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T O U R I S M D AY

RECORD NUMBER OF INDUSTRY LEADERS MAKE AN IMPACT ON FLORIDA TOURISM DAY

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lorida Tourism Day 2017 set records in attendance with more than 600 FRLA members, tourism leaders and professionals coming to Tallahassee March 14 to represent their industry. Attendees began at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center where they heard from industry leaders including FRLA President/CEO, Carol Dover, VISIT FLORIDA CEO, Ken Lawson, and legislators including Senator Jack Latvala, Senate Majority Leader Wilton Simpson and House Majority Leader Ray Rodrigues. Attendees then headed to the Florida State Capitol and met with legislators in both houses to show support for fully funding VISIT FLORIDA and to showcase its impact on the tourism industry. Thank you to all of the legislators who met with us, speakers and to the sponsors and our attendees for traveling from all over this beautiful state.

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1. Tourism Day Rally with Gov. Scott. 2. FRLA members attended meetings with elected officials during the afternoon. 3. A strong contingency of Chapter members and leadership attended Tourism Day. 4. FRLA held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for our newly renovated headquarters during the Tourism Day reception. 5. Senate Majority Leader Wilton Simpson at Tourism Day. 6. Senator Jack Latvala and Dan Murphy enjoyed FRLA’s Tourism Day 2017 Reception. 7. The Partnership for Florida’s Tourism 18  SU M M ER

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T O U R I S M D AY

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12 held a fantastic street party to conclude Tourism Day festivities. 8. FRLA’s Tourism Day Reception welcomed members, guests and elected officials. 9. House Majority Leader Ray Rodrigues at Tourism Day. 10. Senator Jack Latvala at Tourism Day. 11. The FRLA Team preparing for legislative meetings on Tourism Day. 12. FRLA members made a difference at the 2017 Tourism Day.

w w w.FRL A .org

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2017 LEGISLATIVE REPORT VISIT FLORIDA The overall economic vitality of the state relies heavily on tourism and the ability of VISIT FLORIDA to attract the millions of visitors who generate billions of dollars in spending. In 2016, the Sunshine State proudly welcomed 113 million visitors. This marks the sixth consecutive record year for visitation and demonstrates the power of tourism marketing. The success of our hotels, restaurants and attractions contributes to a stronger state economy and creates more opportunities for Florida’s families. Acting as the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, VISIT FLORIDA is the catalyst that brings the public and private sectors together, creating programs that promote Florida and its vibrant communities. After becoming President and CEO of VISIT FLORIDA, Ken Lawson immediately began to make a good faith effort in transparency and accountability. VISIT FLORIDA entered into a legally binding contractual agreement with the state that includes: new contract requirements, posting contracts online, new staff travel procedures, new purchasing rules to improve efficiency, new ethics requirements and public records training for staff. ELIMINATION OF VISIT FLORIDA: AMENDED HB 7005 (sponsored by Representative Renner, R – Palm Coast) HB 7005 was a bill that started with the complete elimination of VISIT FLORIDA and Enterprise Florida. After over 20,000 emails, phone calls and letters to Legislators and countless hours of public testimony by the hospitality industry, HB 7005 was amended to preserve 20  SU M M ER

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the state’s tourism marketing corporation. TRANSPARENCY OF VISIT FLORIDA: ADOPTED IN THE BUDGET PROCESS HB 9 (sponsored by Representative Renner, R – Palm Coast) SB 1306 (sponsored by Senator Montford, D – Quincy) SB 1076 (sponsored by Senator Passidomo, R – Naples) HB 889 (sponsored by Representative Gruters, R – Sarasota) HB 9 and SB 13061 represent an effort to create stand-alone bills with VISIT FLORIDA, not tying it to the fate of Enterprise Florida. Both bills grow government and put arbitrary restrictions on VISIT FLORIDA that seriously impact the ability of VISIT FLORIDA to act expeditiously in times of disaster. Transparency and accountability language, from HB 9, was inserted into the conforming bill. SB 1076 and HB 889 also tackled the issue of transparency and accountability with VISIT FLORIDA. The bill sponsors worked with VISIT FLORIDA and the Governor’s office to create common sense legislation that would not threaten the effectiveness of VISIT FLORIDA and would not kill jobs. SB 1076 and HB 889 were never heard in the committee process. VISIT FLORIDA BUDGET*: $76 MILLION (SPECIAL SESSION) HB 1A (sponsored by Representative Renner, R – Palm Coast) SB 2A (sponsored by Senator Latvala, R – Clearwater) Thanks, in part, to the outcry of the hospitality industry, Governor Scott, Senate President Negron and House Speaker Corcoran agreed to

a three-day special session to address VISIT FLORIDA, Enterprise Florida, Education and the medical use of marijuana. HB 1A and SB 2A both included transparency and accountability reform and increased the budget of VISIT FLORIDA to $76 million, but there were differences relating to the one-to-one match calculations. Senate budget chief Jack Latvala amended HB 1A, creating four private match categories, and removed limitations for destination marketing organizations, allowing tourist development tax dollars to be used as matching funds.

As an industry that prides itself on giving customers a warm welcome and providing outstanding service, HB 727 will continue to strengthen the services provided to guests who have disabilities.

VACATION RENTAL/AIRBNB

Both the Senate and the House agreed to the amended bill and overwhelmingly voted in favor of fully funding VISIT FLORIDA. *UPDATED TO INCLUDE THE RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL SESSION.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) Since 2012, nearly 6,000 ADA compliance lawsuits have been filed in Florida, making the state one of the most victimized states in the nation for “drive-by lawsuits.” The abuse is generally restricted to a handful of law firms that file lawsuits by the hundreds against unsuspecting hoteliers, restauranteurs and other local businesses.

voluntarily hire a state certified expert to identify violations of the ADA. After the inspection, the expert will recommend a plan that will correct the violations within a reasonable time frame. If the business is sued for an ADA violation, that business could file the plan with the courts showing their willingness to fix the ADA issues, providing the courts with a tool to deny claims for attorneys’ fees and costs.

In 2011, Florida preempted vacation rental regulation to the state, preventing local governments from enacting any new law that restricted the use of vacation rentals, prohibited vacation rental or regulated vacation rentals based on their classification, use or occupancy. In 2014, the Legislature revised the preemption of 2011 so that local governments can regulate vacation rentals, provided the regulations do not regulate the duration or frequency of vacation rentals. VACATION RENTAL REGULATION: DIED ON SPECIAL ORDER CALENDAR SB 188 (sponsored by Senator Steube, R – Sarasota)

ACCESSIBILITY OF PLACES OF PUBLIC ACCOMODATION: PASSED

HB 425 (sponsored by Representative La Rosa, R – Saint Cloud)

SB 1398 (sponsored by Senator Stewart, D – Orlando)

HB 425 restricts local governments’ ability to regulate vacation rentals, requiring all properties to be treated the same regardless of whether they are used for vacation rentals or residential property. The bill would reduce the

HB 727 (sponsored by Rep. Leek, R – Daytona Beach and Rep. Edwards, D – Sunrise) This legislation will give businesses the opportunity to

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regulatory burden on active duty military personnel, temporary duty military personnel, or disabled veterans with a 30% or greater disability rating.

DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO: PASSED

HB 425 also requires a vacation rental to submit a vacation rental license, copy of certificate of registration and emergency contact information, but the information contained in the documents can only be used for informational purposes.

HB 689 (sponsored by Representative Burton, R – Lakeland)

ALCOHOL ISSUES

This legislation clarifies the responsibilities of the Division of Alcohol Beverages and Tobacco, as well as revising provisions relating to alcoholic beverage licenses, employment of minors, relating to special licenses and record requirement for caterers, and requirements for annual license tax for distillery and craft distilleries.

Unlike most other consumer goods, the market for alcohol in the United States has a long history of regulation from both state and federal governments. Since the repeal of Prohibition in the United States, Florida has abided by a strict threetiered system to regulate alcoholic beverages. Any business that sells alcohol in Florida must obtain one of these three licenses: manufacturer, distributor or vendor. With new industries popping up across the nation, Florida is starting to realize just how antiquated the three-tier system has become. SEPARATION OF ALCOHOL: PASSED* SB 106 (sponsored by Senator Flores, R – Miami) HB 81 (sponsored by Representative Avila, R – Hialeah) SB 106 provides a free market approach to reducing burdensome regulations by allowing businesses that already legally sell beer, wine and spirits to sell all of the beverages within the same store. This legislation does not require a business to change, but simply gives businesses with at least 10,000 sq. ft. of public retail space the option to eliminate the Prohibitionera alcohol law with a fouryear phase-in. * — VETOED BY THE GOVERNOR

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SB 400 (sponsored by Senator Perry, R – Gainesville)

HB 689 provides necessary and long overdue language as it relates to the Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco, Department of Business and Professional Regulations.

HB 689 also amends the definition of wine to include sake. CRAFT DISTILLERIES: PASSED SB 166 (sponsored by Senator Steube, R – Sarasota) HB 141 (sponsored by Representative Stevenson, R – St. Augustine and Representative Raschein, R – Key Largo) The bill increases the number of factory sealed containers of distilled spirits that can be sold in a face-to-face transaction, from a maximum of four containers to a maximum of six containers of each brand, per year. BEVERAGE LAW: DIED IN MESSAGES SB 388 (sponsored by Senator Hutson, R – Palm Coast) HB 423 (sponsored by Representative La Rosa, R – Saint Cloud) This legislation expands the “Tied House Evil” exemption for certain theme park vendors to include agreements between a vendor and an importer. The arm’s length transaction must be a written agreement for naming

rights and must not involve the sale or distribution of malt beverages between the manufacturer or importer, or its distributor, and a vendor.

DRUGS AND ALCOHOL: DIED IN COMMITTEE

The bill also permits vendors to accept no more than 10 cases per year of glassware from distributors.

HB 983 (sponsored by Representative Altman, R – Indialantic)

CRAFT BREWERIES: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 554 (sponsored by Senator Young, R – Tampa) HB 679 (sponsored by Representative Clemons(C), R – Jonesville) SB 554 allows a craft brewery with a retail vendor’s license to sell, transport and deliver its own beer in brewery owned vehicles. A brewery may only self-distribute to a vendor in 1/6th keg, pony keg or a keg, and must have a yearly production volume of less than 7,000 kegs of malt beverages. This legislation allows brew pubs to transfer beer to a restaurant, of common owner affiliation, which is part of a restaurant group of no more than 15 restaurants. MALT BEVERAGES: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 1040 (sponsored by Senator Steube, R – Sarasota) HB 853 (sponsored by Representative Goodson, R – Merritt Island) SB 1040 and HB 853 amends the “Tied House Evil Law” and authorizes vendors to accept glassware from distributors subject to the following conditions: glassware was received at no charge for on-premises consumption and glassware advertises a permanent and prominent brand name. It also limits the number of pieces authorized per calendar year and restricts the vendor from selling or returning glassware for cash, credit or replacement. This legislation also specifies that glassware may not be used to persuade or require the use of one manufacturer, distiller, brewer, vintner or wholesaler.

SB 1254 (sponsored by Senator Rouson, D – St. Petersburg)

SB 1254 and HB 986 amends the Florida Statute to place liability for injury or damage caused by knowingly providing an alcoholic beverage to a person who is visibly intoxicated, a minor (without making reasonable inquiries of age) or a person who is habitually addicted to alcoholic beverages. Also, any person who controls a property and has actual knowledge that alcoholic beverages are in possession of or being consumed by a minor in or at the property and fails to take reasonable steps to prevent the consumption commits a misdemeanor in the second degree.

FRANCHISEE/ FRANCHISOR A franchise is the agreement or license between two legally independent parties which gives a person or group of people (franchisee) the right to market a product or service using the trademark or trade name of another business (franchisor). A franchisee agreement is the most important document of the franchisee/franchisor relationship. This document legally binds both parties, laying out the rights and obligations of each. SEPARATION OF ALCOHOL: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 750 (sponsored by Senator Latvala, R – Clearwater) HB 1069 (sponsored by Representative Brodeur, R – Sanford) Florida currently regulates franchising through its antifraud, unfair trade practices, and by creating rights for violations of federal franchise disclosure laws. » F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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SB 750 and HB 1069 proposed a fundamental alteration of franchise relationships, focusing mostly on franchise terminations, non-renewals and transfers. These bills contain numerous provisions harmful to franchising, franchisors, franchisees and the public alike. But, the bills particularly target franchisors, drastically restricting their ability to protect their brands.

TAXES Florida is the only state that imposes a specific business rent tax. Florida charges 6% on the total rent paid for any commercial property including storefronts, offices and warehouses, creating a clear competitive disadvantage for Florida’s businesses. BUSINESS RENT TAX: PASSED SB 378 (sponsored by Senator Flores, R – Miami) HB 223 (sponsored by Representative Ahern, R – Seminole) SB 838 (sponsored by Senator Perry, R – Gainesville) HB 7109 (sponsored by Representative Boyd, R – Bradenton) For several years, one of Governor Scott’s priorities has been to reduce the tax on commercial leases, commonly known as the business rent tax. Several bills were filed this year with that goal in mind. After much debate on the proper way to begin the reduction of the business rent tax, HB 7109 was the only successful piece of legislation to reduce the tax. HB 7109 is a large tax package presented by the House that reduces the business rent tax from 6.0% to 5.8%.

GAMBLING Gambling in Florida is predominantly carried out in either a loose collection of “pari-mutuel” betting facilities, often called “racinos,” 22  SU M M ER

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concentrated in South Florida or at the casinos authorized by the 2010 Seminole Gaming Compact. Pari-mutuels are facilities that hold gambling events like horse races, greyhound races or jai alai matches where any gambling wins come from the money provided by losing bets. These businesses are regulated by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation’s Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering. GAMBLING: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 008 (sponsored by Senator Galvano, R – Bradenton) HB 7037 (sponsored by Representative La Rosa, R – Saint Cloud) After months of working on competing gambling legislation, the House and Senate could not agree on a deal before the end of session. The failing of the gaming bills this year was largely in part to philosophical differences between the two chambers. The House bill wanted to ban pari-mutuels from adding slot machines in the eight counties where voters have authorized the games – Brevard, Duval, Gadsden, Lee, Hamilton, Palm Beach, St. Lucie and Washington counties. The House believes that gambling impacts adjacent cities and counties, not just the counties where slots are added. The Senate was adamant that the eight counties should be able to proceed and respect the decision of the eight counties. The Florida Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on a case related to a small horserace track in Gadsden County. That county voted to allow slot machines at the pari-mutuel. If the court favors the track, it would allow the slot machines there without any action by the Legislature. The fate of the Seminole compact is still unclear as lawmakers could not agree on legislation

LABOR ISSUES

to ratify a gambling agreement with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: DIED IN MESSAGES

BEACH RENOURISHMENT

SB 1582 (sponsored by Senator Bradley, R – Orange Park)

Recognizing the importance of the state’s beaches, the Florida Legislature in 1986 adopted a posture of protecting and restoring the state’s beaches through a comprehensive beach management planning program. Under the program, the Department of Environment Protection’s Division of Water Restoration Assistance evaluates beach erosion problems throughout the state, seeking viable solutions.

HB 7085 (sponsored by Representative Burgess, R – Zephyrhills) Workers’ compensation rate increases are negatively affecting businesses throughout Florida. After two Florida Supreme Court rulings and a 14.5% increase in rates, Florida lawmakers are attempting to fix the issue. This legislation would close a “statutory gap” in disability benefits and extend them from the existing 104 to 260 weeks, require carriers to grant or deny benefits quickly, and ensure appointment of a worker representative to a state panel that sets medical reimbursement rates.

The primary vehicle for implementing the beach management planning recommendations is the Florida Beach Management Funding Assistance Program, which is a program established for the purpose of working in concert with local, state and federal government entities to achieve the protection, preservation and restoration of the coastal sandy beach resources of the state.

The bill will allow judges of compensation claims to award as much as $180 per hour if he or she considers that justified. MINIMUM WAGE: NEVER HEARD IN COMMITTEE

COASTAL MANAGEMENT: DIED IN COMMITTEE

SB 160 (sponsored by Senator Rodrigues, D – Miami)

SB 1590 (sponsored by Senator Latvala, R – Clearwater) HB 1213 (sponsored by Representative Peters, R – St. Petersburg and Representative Moraitis, R – Fort Lauderdale) SB 1590 revises the beach nourishment and inlet management project funding criteria and requires a minimum distribution of the lesser of 7.6 percent of the funds remaining after the payment of debt service or $50 million to be appropriated annually from the Land Acquisition Trust Fund for projects that preserve and repair the state’s beaches in accordance with the revised project funding criteria. In the final budget a total of $50 million was allocated for beach renourishment.

HB 945 (sponsored by Representative Jacquet, D – West Palm Beach) SB 160 and HB 945 will increase the state minimum wage by the rate of inflation for 12 months plus $1 in 2017 and an additional $1.50 for each subsequent year. Currently, Florida adjusts the state minimum wage annually based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as part of the Minimum Wage Act. Since the beginning of indexing in 2005, the minimum wage rate has increased an average of fifteen cents per year. Currently, Florida’s minimum wage is $8.10 per hour and the federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour.

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BUDGET

TRIUMPH FUNDING: PASSED

BUDGET: EXTENDED SESSION

SB 364 (sponsored by Senator Gainer, R – Panama City)

House and Senate leaders finished work on a proposed $83 billion state budget, but were forced to extend session until Monday, May 8, to allow for the 72 hour “cooling off period.”

HB 7077 (sponsored by Representative Trumbull, R – Panama City)

There is speculation that Governor Scott will use his veto pen, after lawmakers rejected several of the Governor’s budget priorities, including the push for $100 million in VISIT FLORIDA funding. Depending on the use of Governor Scott’s veto authority, the Legislature could reconvene to override any veto by the Governor. The approval of the budget is the one duty the Legislature is required to complete each session.

In 2013, the Legislature created Triumph Gulf Coast, Inc. to ensure economic damage settlement funds coming to the state would both benefit the eight disproportionately affected counties and be properly accounted for. The Triumph Gulf Coast Board is tasked to make awards to programs and projects that meet the priorities for economic recovery, diversification and enhancement of the disproportionately affected counties. HB 7077 permits funds to be used toward tourism and economic development and requires each board of county commissioners in the eight counties to solicit proposed projects and programs from

other elected local governing boards within the county and provide Triumph Gulf Coast with a list of proposed pro-jects and programs located within its county. The submitted list must include projects and programs submitted by other elected local governing boards and recommendations by the board of county commissioners. Triumph Gulf Coast must allocate at least 5% of the initial $300 million to projects and programs in each county, and must allocate at least 4% of future settlement funds to projects and programs in each county. Remaining funds are unrestricted and can be appropriated at the discretion of Triumph Gulf Coast, provided they meet other legal requirements. The eight Florida counties disproportionately affected by the Deepwater Horizon Spill include: Bay, Escambia, Franklin, Gulf, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton and Wakulla Counties.

HOSPITALITY EDUCATION PROGRAM (HEP): FULLY FUNDED HEP provides important workforce-related training and transition programs through Florida’s public school system to students interested in pursuing careers in the hospitality industry. The money in the Division of Hotels and Restaurants’ Trust Fund is derived from a $10 license surcharge paid exclusively by Florida’s restaurant and lodging establishments for the sole purpose of funding this important program. Approximately 30,000 students and more than 250 high schools participate in HEP. This program helps the hospitality industry grow its future workforce by producing a pool of certified and immediately employable workers with the proper skill set to be an asset to the industry.

LEGISLATIVE SCORECARD 2017 PASSED

FAILED

*

ISSUE

ISSUES OVERVIEW

ELIMINATION OF VISIT FLORIDA

HB 7005 called for the complete elimination of VISIT FLORIDA, but after 20,000 emails and letters from the hospitality industry, the bill was amended to preserve the state’s tourism marketing corporation.

VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING

After Governor Scott, President Negron and Speaker Corcoran agreed to a three-day special session, the Florida Legislature voted to fully fund VISIT FLORIDA at $76 million.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

Gives businesses the opportunity to voluntarily hire a state certified expert to identify ADA violations. Provides businesses with relief from “drive-by lawsuits.”

VACATION RENTALS

Restricts the ability of local governments to regulate vacation rentals.

SEPARATION OF ALCOHOL

Repeals the antiquated separation requirement, allowing the sale of alcohol alongside beer and wine in the same aisle, and within the same store.

FRANCHISEE/FRANCHISOR AGREEMENT

Proposed a fundamental change between the franchisee/franchisor relationship.

BUSINESS RENT TAX

Reduces the business rent tax from 6% to 5.8%

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

After two Florida Supreme Court rulings and a 14.5% increase in rates, this legislation closes the “statutory gap” in disability benefits and places a cap on attorney’s fees.

GAMBLING

After the House and Senate approved their separate gaming bills, negotiations to reach a compromise failed and the conference committees were dissolved.

MINIMUM WAGE

Increased the state minimum wage by rate of inflation for 12 months plus $1 in 2017 and $1.50 each subsequent year. The minimum wage bill was never heard in a committee.

TRIUMPH FUNDING

Provides relief to the eight counties affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Permits funds to be used towards tourism and economic development. * — Vetoed by the Governor

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Americans with Disabilities Act By RICHARD TURNER, FRLA’S GENERAL COUNSEL AND VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

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hile other issues dominated the headlines, a bill critical to the hospitality industry made its way through the legislature and will soon be on the Governor’s desk. HB 727 passed unanimously in both chambers and addresses accessibility to places of public accommodation. Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act over 20 years ago, all places open to the public have made great strides to ensure access to all citizens and visitors. Hospitality is the essence of our industry. Be it at a restaurant, hotel or theme park, we want all of our guests to be comfortable and have an enjoyable time. Each and every day, we strive to provide guests, who include the entire spectrum of the population, the best possible experience.

This bipartisan bill sponsored by Representative Leek and Senator Stewart, is an acknowledgement of a serious problem facing the hospitality industry. For years, the Americans with Disabilities Act has been the pole star for making sure all guests receive accommodations to make their stay enjoyable. Unfortunately, a small group of individuals have twisted the good intent of the ADA into a full-time industry of frivolous lawsuits — sometimes to the extent that these lawsuits are predatory in nature. The bill is good public policy. It provides Florida businesses a resource to correct deficiencies and to efficiently resolve disputes involving ADA issues that are found to exist. It requires a remediation plan that identifies the deficiency and the corrective action to be taken. The courts can consider the

remediation plan, make a determination if the lawsuit was filed in good faith, and what effect, if any, such good faith measures to comply may have on attorney fees. But making another law is only a partial solution. It is up to the hospitality industry to assist the Department of Business and Professional Regulation in the development of rules to make this new program work effectively. This is a real opportunity for the hospitality industry to have a say in correcting an abuse against frivolous lawsuits. If this bill does anything, it reaffirms the commitment of our elected officials to ensure that the intent and purpose of the ADA is fully and fairly complied with while, at the same time, reducing frivolous lawsuit abuses. It is one of those bills that should have made the headlines.

Sake Classification Bill Update By RICHARD TURNER, FRLA’S GENERAL COUNSEL AND VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

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here is no better example of “unintended consequences” and government authority than the following story. It all started on a cold January day in 2017 when the Division of Alcoholic Beverages (ABT) issued an innocuous and routine “Industry Notice.” The subject matter of the Industry Notice dealt with spirituous seltzer beverages. Because of the growing number of new alcoholic beverage products entering the market, the intent of the Industry Notice was to clarify classifications of beverages to ensure consistency and compliance with registration and reporting. The classification of alcoholic beverages is really simple. There are three basic categories: Liquor/Spirits, Malt Beverages (beer) and Wine. How complicated can it be? Keep reading; as anyone who is familiar with Florida Beverage Code knows, it can get complicated quickly. As ABT addressed the spirituous seltzer beverage issue in their Industry Notice, it inadvertently and most definitely 24  SU M M ER

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unintentionally caused an entire segment of the restaurant industry to be at serious risk. It turns out that classifying sake is not as simple as it seems. Technically, in order to be a beer, it must contain malt. Technically, in order to be wine it must be derived from fresh fruits, berries or grapes. Pretty much everything else falls into the Liquor/Spirits category. The problem with sake is that it is made from rice. It has no malt. Rice is not a fruit, berry or grape. By default it falls into the liquor/spirit category. It’s not just state government who has trouble with classifying sake. The federal government does, too. The federal government, under IRS law, taxes sake as a beer, but issues a Wine Certificate of Label Approval (COLA), and therefore, Florida has traditionally classified sake as a wine. Enter the Industry Notice. By inadvertently causing sake to be classified as a liquor/spirit, a great number of Asian-themed restaurants were in danger of not being able to buy or sell sake. The

reason being is that in order to sell liquor or spirits, one must have either a quota license, or qualify for an exception to the quota law, such as a restaurant (SRX) license. Most restaurants that serve sake only have a beer and wine license. Few would qualify for an SRX, as the vast majority cannot meet the seating or square footage requirements. What would be more devastating to an Asian-themed restaurant than no longer being able to legally serve sake? Enter ABT, FRLA and several folks like Jason Unger of Gray-Robinson Law Firm. Once notified of the problem, ABT immediately took steps to resolve the issue. As luck would have it, a DBPR bill (HB 689) was going through the process and an amendment was placed on the bill that once and for all settled how sake would be classified. The bill, which passed both chambers, is on the governor’s desk for signature. If HB 689 becomes law, sake will be classified as a wine. All doubt has been removed. No liquor license needed. Crisis averted. We can all go back to eating. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

MBA IN HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT Let your degree take you places Florida Atlantic University’s 23-month MBA in Hospitality & Tourism Management prepares graduates for leadership roles in one of the world’s most dynamic industries. Traditional core MBA courses are blended with hospitality-specific classes to prepare leaders for executive level careers in this rapidly expanding industry. The program is designed with the highest level of CONVENIENCE in mind. Students can attend on campus, fully online, or combine both methods to easily accommodate life’s other responsibilities. Our LOW TUITION has ranked us 1st in Florida and 5th in the U.S. for return on investment in an MBA. The same tuition applies to everyone – in-state, national or global. Program coordinators offer PERSONALIZED ASSISTANCE with registration, ordering textbooks, and academic and career advising

Apply Today HOSPITALITY.FAU.EDU 561.297.6000

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The Florida team visited with Sarah Callaway, legislative assistant to Congressman Tom Rooney (FL-17), during NRA Public Affairs Conference.

National ProStart Invitational 2017 students from Florida placed in the top 20.

FRLA’s First Coast Chapter’s Bust-A-Clay was a lot of fun for everyone! 26  SU M M ER

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We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

FRLA Northwest and Tallahassee Regional Director, Nick Lowe, threw out the first pitch for a Florida State University baseball game on May 9.

Broward Excellence in Education Gala was enjoyed by all. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

FRLA members received the NRA Restaurant Neighbor Award. For more information see, page 41.

National Restaurant Association Public Affairs Conference attendees visited with Representative Kathy Castor.

Roundtable and back-of-the-house tour with Suncoast Chapter members and Representative Vern Buchanan partnering with the NRA and AHLA.

Florida members of AAHOA present Richard Turner, Dannette Lynch and the FRLA with AAHOA’s highest advocacy honor, the “Friend of the Hotelier Award,” at the 2017 Legislative Action Summit in Washington, D.C. The award is a working replica of a hotel room lock and key. w w w.FRL A .org

Broward Excellence in Education Gala.

FRLA members visited with elected officials during the National Restaurant Association’s Public Affairs Conference in Washington, D.C. this spring. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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HISPANIOLA-DANCER PHOTO COURTESY OF EMERIL’S TCHOUP CHOP

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heers! We hope you enjoy the Beverage Edition of Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine! Culinary cocktails, handcrafted cocktails made from artisan spirits, craft beer and boutique wineries seem to be on the forefront of the beverage industry this year. Each has its own distinctive draw to for beverage connoisseurs, and there seem to be more beverage aficionados than ever. From a great soft drink, a housemade lemonade, a specialty iced tea or a favorite coffee to a classic cocktail, a Florida w w w.FRL A .org

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brewed craft beer, some bubbly or a fantastic wine, nothing sets the tone for any gathering like the beverage. A great beverage enhances a guest’s experience. Beverages are as important as any food that is ordered by a guest. Understand your patrons; make thoughtful decisions on your beverage offerings, and it will add more to your operation’s bottom line. Our beverage edition contributors and advertisers have made every effort to inspire and appeal to your senses. Sit back and relax with a cold one and peruse the magazine. Happy summer! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

S T. A U G U S T I N E D I S T I L L E R Y

ST. AUGUSTINE DISTILLERY BOURBON PROGRAM

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istilled and bottled on-site in the nation’s oldest city, St. Augustine Distillery’s bourbon spirits are created using local ingredients to capture the distinctive flavors of the Sunshine State. Unveiled last September, the artisanal distillery’s Florida Double Cask Bourbon has already won a Gold Medal in The Fifty Best (2017), Gold Medal in MicroLiquor Awards (2016) and was given a prestigious industry rating of 93 by The Tasting Panel Magazine’s editor-in-chief, Anthony Dias Blue. Located in the historic downtown neighborhood of Lincolnville, St. Augustine Distillery opened its doors in March of 2014 and currently handcrafts award-winning bourbon, port finished bourbon, rum, gin and vodka. Owned by Philip McDaniel and Mike Diaz, the distillery is located between the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean — creating a unique maritime environment in which to age its barrels. “Barrels impact and impart flavor at temperatures above 40 degrees,” explains McDaniel, the distillery’s co-founder and CEO. “Because of the year-round heat, at our distillery we have a running joke that our barrels ‘age in dog years.’ As a result, we are discovering that our bourbon develops its oak, color and flavor profile significantly faster than in any other part of the USA.” St. Augustine Distillery’s Florida Double Cask Bourbon is made from a wheated-barley mash bill and comes in at 93.8 proof. Tasting notes describe it as full-bodied, deep and complex with notes of caramel, dark fruit, oak and dark chocolate. It’s a flavor profile that was created with the help of some very well-known industry legends: Jake Norris, the founding distiller of Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey, who helped develop the recipe; and Dave Pickerell, former Master Distiller for Maker’s Mark, who worked with St. Augustine Distillery’s head distiller, Lucas Smith, on the initial blends and barrel selection. This winter, the distillery unveiled its Florida Port Finished Bourbon, which takes its Florida Double Cask Bourbon and finishes it in port barrels from neighboring San Sebastian Winery. The release has already been awarded a Triple Gold Medal in MicroLiquor Awards (2016). “When we started the project, we committed to making the best bourbon possible,” says co-founder and CFO, Mike Diaz. “It’s been an interesting and educational journey. For me, the best part of our five-year-long bourbon program coming to fruition is seeing the innovative cocktails that the best bartenders around the state are coming up with using our spirits.”

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ISLAND OASIS

THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

ISLAND OASIS®: THE BLENDED BEVERAGE GROWTH SOLUTION

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oday’s operators and consumers demand products that both taste good and meet their nutrition needs. Kerry®, the Taste and Nutrition company, offers Island Oasis branded beverage mixes that are perfectly positioned to meet these demands with a portfolio of all-natural, frozen products. The Island Oasis product line features a broad range of frozen fruit purees and dairy-based beverages, all with no artificial colors or flavoring and 100% of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C. Island Oasis products are sold in more than 25 countries and can be found on menus at restaurants, bars, hotels, theme parks, colleges and many other operator establishments. The Island Oasis frozen lineup also includes the highly nutritious V8 V-Fusion® branded smoothie mixes and FUEL® protein powders and supplements. Island Oasis also offers shelf stable mix products for operators with limited refrigeration space.

UNIQUE EQUIPMENT In the pursuit of the world’s finest frozen drinks, Island Oasis has engineered and patented its own blender technology. The company’s state-of-the-art ice shaver blenders guarantee perfect frozen drink consistency every time.

UNRIVALED SUPPORT Island Oasis provides exceptional support services from concept to delivery. This includes recipe creation by our mixologists, who are

skilled in beverage development, nutrition science expertise, technical support response within 24 hours and complimentary customizable merchandising and promotional materials.

INNOVATION – NEW PRODUCTS To accelerate growth, Island Oasis is constantly innovating and introducing new products that meet consumer and operator demands. Watermelon is a trending flavor in America, with a 37% growth on restaurant menus over the past four years (Datassential Menu Trends, 2017). The new frozen watermelon flavor from Island Oasis is refreshing, made with all-natural ingredients, offers reduced sugar per serving and may be used to make frozen cocktails, smoothies or drinks on the rocks. Consumers today demand fewer carbohydrates and more protein, which are critical factors in the growth of the Greek yogurt category. The new Island Oasis frozen non-fat Greek yogurt offers less carbohydrates and more protein in a pourable format. It can be combined with other fruit flavors to create a nutritious, tangy frozen beverage treat. Both of these new products are firsts in the frozen mix and puree category. To learn more about Island Oasis and Kerry, visit kerryfoodservice.com or kerry.com.

Kerry is responding to consumer demand for real ingredients with better, more authentic and nutritious taste experiences. With 40 years’ experience and 24,000 staff on six continents, Kerry has a renewed focus on taste and nutrition where the science of taste merges with the science of nutrition. We combine our deep understanding of taste with our in-depth knowledge of people, culture, life stage and daily nutritional needs. By partnering with Kerry, customers are taken on a journey to make food, beverage and pharma products that people enjoy and feel better about. We call this Leading to Better. w w w.FRL A .org

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THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

MIXED DRINKS

KOMBUCHA AND ITS GROWING POPULARITY BY STELLA QUINTERO

↑ A Pair of Pears Emeril’s Tchoup Chop’s “A Pair of Pears” — an Asian-inspired variation of the Cosmopolitan. INGREDIENTS • 1.5 oz. Asian/Bartlett pear infused Japanese shochu (homemade) • 0.75 oz. Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur • 0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice • 2 oz. white cranberry juice Garnish: lemon twist Chill the fruit, rum, wine and orange juice. Slice the lemon, lime and orange into thin rounds and place in a large glass pitcher. Add the rum and sugar. Chill in refrigerator for two hours to develop the flavors. When ready to serve, crush the fruit lightly with a wooden spoon and stir in the wine and orange juice. Adjust sweetness to taste. (allrecipes.com)

↑ The Hazelwood

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he beverage market is more dynamic than ever, and it seems like every day we have a new drink that will make us healthier and “cleaner.” Recent trends show that kombucha is a beverage to watch. According to Markets and Markets Research Company, “the kombucha market is the fastest-growing market in the functional beverage category.” The popularity of kombucha is such that kombucha sales jumped nearly five times between 2013 and 2015, to about $600 million a year, and its market is expected to grow 25% each year to 2020, according to Markets and Markets Research Company.

WHAT IS KOMBUCHA AND WHY IS IT REGARDED AS A HEALTHY POTION? Kombucha is a fermented beverage of black tea and sugar, which can also be made with green tea It originated in the Far East around 2,000 years ago. It contains a colony of bacteria and yeast that generate the fermentation process when combined with sugar. After the fermentation process, kombucha becomes carbonated and contains vinegar, b-vitamins, enzymes, probiotics, acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid. Though the benefits of kombucha are primarily based on personal reports and a few animal studies, kombucha’s reported benefits include: improved digestion, increased energy, increased immune support, reduced joint pain, weight loss, cleansing and detoxification, and even cancer prevention. According to nutritionist Ellie Krieger, “Most of the curative claims about kombucha are unfounded.” She continues to say that “some benefits are likely since kombucha, when raw or unpasteurized, is rich in probiotics: good gut bacteria (like

those in yogurt) that have been known to boost immunity and overall health.” In Florida, there are now more places that produce kombucha. To improve the flavor profile, these producers add fruits and other aromatics. The production of kombucha is a craft and has been compared to the very popular craft beer wave. According to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, kombucha tea can be produced with an end result of alcohol that can go from trace levels up to 2.5% alcohol concentration. If end product fermentation test results indicate an alcohol by volume level greater than 0.5%, the kombucha tea is considered an alcoholic beverage and is subject to state regulation by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco (ABT). Currently, there are some restaurants and bars that make cocktails with kombucha. Some say that this is like combining the cure with the poison. Kombucha might be a good alternative to those wanting to try something new. For those who believe in kombucha’s health benefits and have experienced the positive effects of consuming kombucha, it is a great thing to have it more readily available not only at health food stores but also to be able to order it at restaurants. If you have not tried kombucha, perhaps it is something you should consider. Just remember to be careful and listen to your body, because it is not for everyone, and as much as kombucha offers great health benefits, it has adverse effects on some people. Cheers! Stella Quintero is an instructor in the Special Programs, Hospitality Management Program of Florida Atlantic University.

by Jessie Lane of Ice Plant Bar INGREDIENTS • 2 oz. Florida Double Cask Bourbon • 0.5 oz. lemon juice • 0.5 oz. hazelnut orgeat • 0.75 oz. Maletti • 2 dashes Scrappy’s Orleans bitters Combine all ingredients and shake with ice. Strain over pebble ice. Garnish with spritzes of Absinthe and a sprig of mint. 32  SU M M ER

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COCA-COLA

THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

UNLOCKING THE AWAY-FROMHOME BEVERAGE OPPORTUNITY BY BRAD SPICKERT

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ost foodservice operators don’t realize how large the growth opportunity is for away-from-home beverages. The Coca-Cola Company conducted an in-depth away-from-home landscape study last year, finding that the average American experiences 22 away-from-home situations each week in which he or she could consume food or beverages. Altogether, there are about 5 billion total weekly life situations, and only half of those situations currently include a beverage. That leaves two-and-a-half billion untapped opportunities each week for a beverage sale. Our research also found that moods and motivations can predict consumer behavior even better than demographic factors. Where people are, what they’re doing and how they feel all impact their motive in that situation, which ultimately affects their beverage selection. For example, when people feel excited, they want to indulge. Maybe they’re celebrating a special event with friends and want to kick back with a drink they can really enjoy. The ideal beverage in this case may be a carbonated soft drink, iced tea or hot brewed coffee. So how do operators use these insights to tap into the beverage opportunity and grow sales? Once they understand the way people feel and make decisions in certain life situations, operators can market beverages in a more targeted way to drive sales. For example, every week, there are roughly 800 million situations in which people commute to and from work without consuming a beverage. This presents a major opportunity for convenience retailers to reach out to stressed commuters through radio or billboard advertising, inviting them to purchase and enjoy beverages like carbonated soft drinks, hot coffee and smoothies. We equip our customers with insights like these because we want to be their most trusted business partner, and we know the power of beverages in their success. Brad Spickert is the Vice President of National Foodservice & On-Premise Marketing at The Coca-Cola Company, where he leads the efforts to create differentiated value for the company’s extensive network of foodservice customers. SOURCE: Coca-Cola Away-from-Home Landscape Study, 2016

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THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

WORLD OF BEER

FLORIDA-BASED WORLD OF BEER HAS GONE GLOBAL The World of Beer is no longer just about great beer.

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ith more than 500 craft beers available in every location, the name, World of Beer, originally referred to the vast selection of craft beers curated from around the world. Much has changed with this rapidly growing chain since former COO of Bloomin Brands, Paul Avery, took controlling interest and became World of Beer’s President/CEO in 2013. Four years later, what began as a craft beer retailer has grown into a thriving full service tavern-restaurant with 75 locations operating in 23 states and three countries, including Seoul, South Korea and Shanghai, China; soon to include a fourth with an executed formal development agreement for India. With strong interest in WOB International, which is anticipated to grow as more locations open and the brand continues to gain an international following, the current focus is on South America and Southeast Asia. US growth is thriving as well, with several new corporate and franchise stores opening in 2017. Currently, the chain includes a successful free standing prototype, professional sports venues, numerous in-line locationsand the brand’s first location in a military installation expected to open in 4Q ’17. The brand does well in almost any footprint. Perhaps more impactful than the success of the franchise expansion has been the evolution of World of Beer (or simply “WOB” to its loyal fans) from beer retailer, to bar, to tavern restaurant. WOB now serves a delicious, master-chef concepted menu featuring daily lunch and dinner shareables and a Sunday brunch with bottomless Mimosas and Bloody Marys. The successful introduction of the tavern menu required a delicate balance of drawing new customers and diners into what was 34  SU M M ER

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previously known as a pub, without alienating the strong following of craft beer aficionados who had grown to love WOB as a place to sample the best beer selection in town. Despite the challenge, Avery saw the addition of food as instrumental to the long-term success of the concept, and by 2017, 95% of WOB locations were successfully serving the complete menu. “I never viewed the introduction of food as an either/or proposition,” recalls Avery. “Craft beer drinkers also like to eat great food. There is no question WOB is the leader in craft beer quality and selection. The challenge was to create a menu that would complement and enhance the experience. What we had up to that point was THE place for the avid craft beer drinker. To sustain and grow the business, we needed to have broader appeal. By adding the right mix of food, craft cocktails and wines, we weren’t turning away from the beer connoisseurs. Instead, we were creating a place craft beer lovers could enjoy more frequently, because they could have a great meal and be joined by people who were not exclusively interested in beer.” If anyone has the experience to successfully transition the brand to full service dining, it is Paul Avery. Avery joined Outback Steakhouse in 1988 after the chain had just opened its first location in Tampa. By the time he left in 2010, Outback was a global brand with more than 1,200 locations, and he had risen to COO of OSI Restaurant Partners, overseeing the operations of several brands, including Outback Steakhouse, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Bonefish Grill, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse and Roy’s Pacific Rim Cuisine. In 2013, after several years of focus with a non-profit association dedicated to rare disease therapeutics (which he still supports),

Avery says, “I had a strong inclination to ‘get back in the game’ and develop a team, brand and enterprise again. World of Beer offered the opportunity to work with two of my prior industry associates, Ben Novello and Jim Pollard, and a business with strong momentum, culture and a commitment to quality.” With the crafting of a giant pretzel served with homemade beer cheese and stoneground mustard dipping sauces, the operation was on its way. Don’t be fooled by the success of the pretzel; this innovative menu is no pub grub. The menu showcases an artisan’s touch applied to customer favorites. In keeping with the concept, many of the housemade scratch menu items are beer-infused versions of popular tavern fare, including the top-selling Chimay burger, IPA Salmon and Guinness Bratwurst Sandwich. As the menu developed, focus shifted to the enormous operational challenge of preparing both corporate and franchise locations, hundreds of employees and dozens of franchise owners for full service restaurant operations. Everything needed to be created, or at minimum, revised. Staff training, food prep and service standards, purchasing, delivery … all while the taverns continued to operate. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


WORLD OF BEER

THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

To conquer the operational mountain, Avery turned to wellknown industry leader, Dave Reid, former FRLA Chairman and EVP of Miller’s Ale House, who had been instrumental in growing that concept from four units to 72 units. Reid joined WOB in 2016, first as VP of Operations, and has recently been promoted to Chief Operating Officer. Reid has implemented new systems, controls and training that immediately has had a positive impact, resulting in operational improvements, customer satisfaction and increased profits. Central to Reid’s philosophy is that the WOB staff (a.k.a. “WOB Stars”) play the strongest role in continuing to grow the concept into a huge success. “Our team talks a lot about the ‘why’ factor with a customer’s decision to visit a WOB. ‘Why choose World of Beer vs. a competitor?’ Sure, we have the best beer selection in the industry and a great food offering. But that’s not enough. We call our employees WOB Stars, because they are on stage when they are working. Their primary job is to create more loyal WOB customers, and they do that by treating every customer like they are the most important customer in the world.” Certainly, the changes in staff attentiveness and service focus are obvious to the loyal WOB customer. At the same time, much of Reid’s impact may be less visible to the customer, but has greatly enhanced the brand’s profitability and therefore its attractiveness to investors. Reid infuses in his team an intense focus on running smart P&Ls, reducing waste, and managing controllable expenses. His enthusiasm for constant improvement is infectious and in just a few months, his programs have resulted in hundreds of thousands in additional revenue to the bottom line. (continued on page 50) w w w.FRL A .org

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RCS is a subsidiary of The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association

license, you have the option to earn status as a responsible vendor under Florida law. In order to be a Florida Responsible Vendor, you must ensure alcohol is sold and served responsibly, which includes: ü Understanding the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (F.S. 561.701-706) ü Ensuring managers and bartenders are trained within 15 days of hire, other employees within 30 days of hire, and all employees attend refresher training every 120 days ü Providing training as required in the act ü Maintaining training records in a secure location ü Displaying proper signage near the bar You don’t have to do this alone! Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) stands ready to assist you and your staff. RCS alcohol compliance training is the essential tool for maintaining your status as a responsible vendor. Keep the following in mind regarding your alcohol compliance training. ü Respond to your trainer when you are called to schedule training. In order to remain in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, you and your employees must attend a training once every four months. ü Be involved in the training. Share with your training manager any issues you or your staff have encountered since your last RCS training. ü Make sure you schedule enough time for each class. The Responsible Vendor Act dictates some of the class curriculum. For example, we are required to talk about alcoholic beverage laws, laws regarding alcohol service, recognizing the effects of alcohol and illegal drugs on the body, and how to deal with intoxicated guests. In order to cover the required training curriculum, your trainer needs 45 minutes to one hour. When you cut the time short and your trainer is not able to cover the required information, your alcoholic beverage license could be in jeopardy. ü Finally, as a manager, the program works best when you are a part of it. The law requires you to attend, just like your employees. It’s a good example for your employees and demonstrates you are a leader in your own alcohol sales program. “The RCS Responsible Vendor Program works best when implemented by like-minded people working towards the common goal of the responsible sale of alcohol and protecting the beverage license.” 36  SU M M ER

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The Florida Responsible Vendor Act (F.S. 561.701-706) must be trained. Managers and bartenders must be trained within 15 days of hire and all other employees within 30 days of hire. Stay One Step Ahead of Underage Drinkers with a 2017 ID Checking Guide

This is the primary purpose of RCS online training — to provide a convenient way for you to satisfy this NEW HIRE element of compliance. Existing employees should attend live training every four months. There may be legitimate and unavoidable instances of employees missing a mandatory, live training. We recommend the absent employees complete online training as evidence of due diligence, however, you should know that doing so does not necessarily meet the full, absent employees commit any violations cited in the act before attending a subsequent live session, protections challenged. It is important to inform employees that online training is not an acceptable substitute for attendance at live training.

In our continuing effort to provide the highest quality Alcohol Compliance Training in Florida, RCS offers online training in English and Spanish. This is one more tool you can use to ensure your entire staff is in compliance with the act and that your alcoholic beverage license and your business will remain protected. 800.537.9863 www.rcstraining.com w w w.FRL A .org

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Myth: Responsible Vendor Training is mandatory in Florida. Fact: Although Responsible Vendor Training helps an alcoholic beverage licensee comply with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, which affords certain protections to the license, it is not mandatory in Florida. Myth: Fact: The Florida Responsible Vendor Act, Florida Statute 561.701-706, protects an establishment’s alcoholic beverage license. Licensed alcohol establishments that comply with the act and train employees in responsible alcohol service practices based on the requirements listed in the statute, can lessen penalties against the license if an

Myth: The RCS Responsible Vendor Training program, TIPS® training, and ServSafe® Alcohol are all the same training program. Fact: The RCS Responsible Vendor Training program is owned by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and meets all statutory requirements to qualify your alcoholic beverage license under the Florida Responsible Vendor Act. TIPS® training and ServSafe® Alcohol are excellent programs recognized in several other states, however, they may not meet Florida requirements for achieving responsible vendor status with the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation’s Division of Alcoholic Beverages & Tobacco. Myth: Online alcohol training is an effective training tool. Fact: In-person seminars are optimal for employee training. Pre-recorded seminars and PowerPoint webinars do not allow for personal eye contact where a trainer can temper information based on non-verbal feedback. Information presented in person is more memorable, and key ideas are easier to understand, learn and retain. In live training, a relationship is formed with the trainer, and questions can be asked and answered by knowledgeable staff who are armed with the latest information and Myth: Any government issued ID is acceptable for the sale and service of alcohol in Florida. Fact: There are four acceptable forms of ID for the sale and service of alcohol in Florida: 1. State issued driver’s license, foreign or domestic 2. State issued ID 3. Active military ID 4. Passport 38  SU M M ER

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Vice President, FRLA Education & Training and former Director, Division of Hotels & Restaurants geoff@frla.org 850.879.2581

Regional Manager Northwest Florida 850.380.8839 ahackle@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Broward/Miami-Dade Counties 954.709-0804 rbarrera@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Orlando 386.690.8264 jhayman@frla.org

Regional Sales Manager Miami-Dade County 850.566.9928 lmoreno@frla.org

Regional Manager Southwest Florida 239.273.3299 dtalbott@frla.org

850.224.2250 lsumner@frla.org

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Regional Training Manager Space Coast 407.683.1205 jpittman@frla.org

850.224.2250 mcollins@frla.org

Regional Sales Manager Suncoast and Central Florida 941.773.0519 emaxham@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Tampa Bay 941.773.3095 jmaxham@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Licensing & Regulatory Coordinator Northeast Coast 850.933.9958 352.250.2130 malford@frla.org vkonters@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Broward and Palm Beach Counties 954.579.5399 pmadamba@frla.org

850.224.2250 acarlisle@frla.org

Regional Manager Florida Panhandle 850.933.3764 cmook@frla.org

Regional Manager Northeast Florida 850.559.7499 jshermetaro@frla.org

Regional Sales Manager Southeast Florida 954.448.4687 sdespreaux@frla.orgs

Regional Training Manager South Orlando 203.721.5421 jdonnelly@frla.org

Regional Manager Nature Coast/Pinellas 352.213.2322 rcurcio@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Palm Beach County 561.427.4738 sdick@frla.org

Regional Training Manager Miami-Dade County 786.975.3348 lbatista@frla.org

800.537.9863 www.rcstraining.com F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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WARNING ONE ALCOHOL RELATED VIOLATION CAN LEAD TO YOUR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE BEING SUSPENDED OR REVOKED.

Protect your license with alcohol compliance training!

IMPORTANT! If you serve a minor, you can go to jail for up to 60 days and be fined $500! Remember your training! To protect your liquor license, and be in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, make sure your staff: 1. Checks the ID of anyone who looks younger than 30 2. Ensures the birthday on the ID is on or before today’s date 1996 3. Asks a manager if they have any questions or concerns about an ID’s validity 4. Does not serve an empty seat or multiple drinks to one person 5. Understands they have the right to refuse service if they are not certain the person is at least 21

CONTACT FRLA’S REGULATORY COMPLIANCE SERVICES TODAY FOR A FREE TRAINING CONSULTATION

regcomplianceusa.com • 800-537-9863 • facebook.com/regcomplianceusa


C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S

Reiss, Maldonado Receive Awards →

The North American Food Equipment Manufacturers (NAFEM) recently conferred Doctorate of Foodservice (DFS) awards, presented at each NAFEM show to allied hospitality association leaders in recognition of their contributions to the industry. Honorees were recognized at the All-Industry Awards Breakfast during The NAFEM Show at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. Former FRLA Chairmen of the Board Andrew Reiss and Lino Maldonado were recipients of this coveted award. Congratulations!

FRLA Members Win 2017 NRA Restaurant Neighbor Award Congratulations to FRLA members Gecko Hospitality Group, Duffy’s Sport’s Grill and Johnny Huston’s Grille & Bar for being honored with the 2017 National Restaurant Association’s Restaurant Neighbor Award at the NRA Public Affairs Conference in Washington, DC. The award recognizes the outstanding community service and involvement of each of these operations.

Andrew Reiss was awarded a Doctorate of Foodservice from the NAFEM. Lino Maldonado (not pictured) was also awarded a Doctorate of Foodservice.

F L O R I D A R E S TA U R A N T & L O D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY CELEBRATION AT T H E 2 0 1 7 T R A D E S H O W

Save The Date SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 HYATT REGENCY ORLANDO

B E N E F I T I N G T H E F R L A E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N D AT I O N I N S P I R I N G T O M O R R O W ’ S H O S P I TA L I T Y L E A D E R S 6:00 PM Welcome Reception 7:00 PM Installation and Awards Dinner 8:00 PM Awards Party Celebration Cocktail Attire Ticket Price: $150

Sponsorships Available, please contact Molly Lord at mlord@frla.org or 850-224-2250 ext. 258

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ENGAGE

Working Lunch Podcast! Don’t Miss It! Be on the lookout for Working Lunch at FRLA’s upcoming Marketing + Operations Summit Explain to readers about the premise behind your podcast, Working Lunch.

The premise is fairly simple. Joining us for 20 minutes a week will make you among the most informed people regarding issues, policies and politics impacting the restaurant industry. The entire point of view of the show is from the purview of the operator — what matters to them and how all these issues impact their business. We set 42  SU M M ER

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out to make every episode accessible and understandable to everyone in the restaurant industry, whether they are an owner, a manager, a franchisee or corporate officer. How do you choose topics for Working Lunch? We look for the most immediate

issues affecting operators and, just as importantly, the emerging issues that aren’t getting necessary attention from other media outlets. Every day, we are collecting information

from restaurant industry executives, political operatives in statehouses and city halls around the country, and national and local news publications. We pick the issues and events that ultimately matter most to operators and provide the necessary context so the information is meaningful and actionable. Can you tell readers about some of the topics that Working Lunch has covered? Every week we examine developments F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


ENGAGE

A Toast to Success!

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in core business model issues affecting operators around mandated wages and benefits, taxes, regulations, immigration, food policy and the list goes on. Additionally, we discuss external issues impacting the restaurant business environment, like the labor movement, the political climate, impacts of automation and other important emerging trend lines. Our role is to connect the dots — to explain how all of these factors come together to impact not only your bottom lines today, but to prepare you for what’s coming. Why do you think Working Lunch is valuable to the industry? We are

at a point when the industry is being bombarded by issues all over the country at every level of the government. Additionally, in the world of social media and immediate public reaction, our employees and customers are nearly as in tune with these issues as the

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operators. Restaurant operators need to understand what is happening, why it’s happening, how it impacts their business models and, most importantly, how to prepare for it. How can we find Working Lunch?

There are a couple of ways. Our clients get it every Friday afternoon with our weekly updates. Additionally, each weekly episode of Working Lunch is carried by Nation’s Restaurant News and Convenience Store News. It’s also easy to find by going to iTunes and subscribing to “The Working Lunch.” Align Public Strategies produces Working Lunch. Can you explain to readers what Align Public Strategies does? Align Public

Strategies is a full-service public affairs and creative firm that helps corporate brands, governments and nonprofits navigate the outside world and inform their internal decision making.

lease join us in celebrating the second major success of the FRLA’s new EscaRosa Engage program. Due to the diligent efforts to collect more than 500 signed petitions in support of Sunday Alcohol Sales, the Santa Rosa Board of County Commissioners (SRBCC) voted unanimously to pass an ordinance to standardize the times that alcohol can be purchased countywide. The countywide win was on the heels of the successful passage of a similar local ordinance in the City of Milton, which was strongly supported by the FRLA and EscaRosa Engage participants. The SRBCC meeting was attended by several FRLA members, including Mike Thomas with Grover T’s and Joe Abston with the Tin Cow who carried with them the support from over 500 petition signatories and spoke in support of the economic benefits of being able to sell alcohol countywide on Sundays. Restaurants, retail establishments and other groups were all united in the effort and spoke in support of the passage of the ordinance. Upon approval, the new ordinance was immediately transmitted and recorded with the state. For more information about the EscaRosa Chapter, contact Corey Mobley at cmobley@frla.org.

FSU Panama City Now Offers Hospitality Management Degree

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lorida State University’s Panama City campus will begin offering a bachelor’s degree program in hospitality management and tourism in the fall of 2017. The program will be a part of the Dedman School of Hospitality. For information about the program, contact admissions@pc.fsu.edu. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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A LA CARTE

DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL VALIDATES WORKERS’ COMP RATE INCREASE By RICHARD TURNER, FRLA’S GENERAL COUNSEL AND VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS It was bad enough that the Legislature left town without addressing Workers’ Compensation. The entire business community was in agreement that changes were necessary to control the ever-rising costs of Workers’ Compensation insurance. The recent rate increases were caused by a series of court decisions last year that ruled parts of the Workers’ Compensation system and limits on attorney fees were unconstitutional. Only a day after adjournment of the Legislature, the First District Court of Appeal validated a 14.5% increase in Workers’ Compensation Insurance by overruling a lower court decision that limited attorney fees. The results of inaction by the Legislature and the ruling of the First District Court of Appeal validating a significant increase in Workers’ Compensation premiums will soon be felt by every business in Florida.

FDA EXTENDS MENU LABELING COMPLIANCE DATE TO 2018 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is extending the compliance date for menu labeling requirements from May 5, 2017 to May 7, 2018. This extension allows for further consideration of what opportunities there may be to reduce costs and enhance the flexibility of these requirements beyond those reflected in the interim final rule. The extension will be effective on May 4, 2017, when the Federal Register publishes the extension in advance of the May 5 compliance date. The 60-day comment period will begin on May 4, 2017.

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NOMINATIONS 2017 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE HOTEL OR RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE FOR THE 2017 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS! FRLA is receiving nominations through July 30 for the following award categories: • Restaurant General Manager of the Year • Hotel General Manager of the Year • Restaurant Employee of the Year • Hotel Employee of the Year • Chef of the Year

A panel of judges consisting of restaurateurs, hoteliers and allied members will select the top three nominees in each category. Following the judging process, FRLA will notify the nominators and the top three nominees in each category. The winners will be announced at the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Gala on September 11, 2017, held in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. Nomination form is available on www.frla.org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Payment Solutions to Help Your Restaurant Grow

Sterling Payment Technologies is a trusted hospitality industry partner with products and services designed to help your restaurant thrive – backed by personal expert support from our Tampa, Florida headquarters. • Specialization in hospitality POS systems and software • EMV solutions with both tip adjust and point-to-point encryption • Secure, reliable payment processing • Honesty and transparency in pricing

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH A HOSPITALITY-FOCUSED PROCESSOR. VISIT:

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OR CALL:

855-795-0635


A LA CARTE

FOODFINDER GOES NATIONAL FoodFinder’s growth reached a new level in late spring when FoodFinder.US launched nationally. The site includes over 1,000 full-time feeding sites across the state of Florida, including food pantries, soup kitchens and emergency feeding locations offered by private organizations, faith-based communities and more. Simply open the website and the user’s location is shown, along with the closest free food resources within five miles of the user. The FoodFinder apps and the FoodFinder.US website will eventually feature 100% of all of the USDA-approved summer feeding sites across the nation. That’s over 50,000 locations nationwide, and nearly 4,000 in Florida alone! HOW YOU CAN HELP: 1. Download the FoodFinder smartphone app – just search “FoodFinder Fighting hunger” (available on both the Apple App Store and Google Play) and share it with your friends and family on all your social networks. 2. Bookmark www.FoodFinder.US and share with anyone who needs help, or who might know someone who does.

TOP TRENDS! ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. Craft/artisan spirits 2. Onsite barrel-aged drinks 3. Locally produced wine/spirits/beer 4 . Regional signature cocktails 5. Culinary cocktails

NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. Housemade/artisan soft drinks 2 . Gourmet lemonade 3. Locally/house roasted coffee 4. Specialty iced tea 5 . Cold brew coffee SOURCE: National Restaurant Association — Restaurant.org/FoodTrends

FLORIDA’S 2017 LODGING INDUSTRY BY THE NUMBERS*

3,240

properties in the hotel industry

357,000

91.3 MILLION

occupied room nights annually

guest rooms

*SOURCE: American Hotel & Lodging Association based on 2015 data 46  SU M M ER

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Exclusive 5% health care 5% pricing and solutions for FRLA members from UnitedHealthcare Save with rate discounts up to*

on Medical Plans on Specialty Benefits

*Some restrictions apply.

Together, the National Restaurant Association (NRA), Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and UnitedHealthcare offer special advantages for FRLA members: } Health reform guidance and solutions amid the shifting political landscape and ever-changing health care environment } Exclusive savings on group medical plans and specialty benefits for NRA/FRLA members* } Wellness programs and services designed to enhance employee health and productivity Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business, and why others in the hospitality industry are choosing UnitedHealthcare for their health care solutions.

Contact your broker, the FRLA or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at (301) 865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

In their own words: Why choose UnitedHealthcare? “Our relationship with UnitedHealthcare pre-dates the turbulent challenges of the Affordable Care Act. They helped us navigate those waters with great success. And while uncertainty abounds in the current political and legislative environment, one thing is certain: We can rely on UnitedHealthcare to deliver solutions that will fit the ever-changing marketplace.” Don Fox Chief Executive Officer Firehouse of America, LLC (dba Firehouse Subs) “As a growing independent family of restaurants in the highly competitive hospitality industry, we rely heavily on our partnership with UnitedHealthcare for their expertise and guidance in the protection and benefit coverage areas in which they are the experts. With a dedicated staff to respond to our inquiries and guide us on complex matters facing our business, UnitedHealthcare works closely with our insurance broker to provide us with a professional suite of services and the personal attention we have come to rely on. Our partnership with UnitedHealthcare comprises an invaluable component of our strategic and operational plans, and delivers the peace of mind that comes with knowing we have the coverage and resources we need so that we can devote our time to managing our business.” Michael Quillen President Gecko’s Hospitality Group

*Some restrictions apply. ©2017 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. D30099 4/17

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REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

BAY

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION

DIXIE

DANNETTE LYNCH DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

727.642.3404

HILLSBOROUGH, LAKE, PINELLAS, POLK, SPACE COAST, VOLUSIA

dannette@frla.org

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

CLAY

LAFAYETTE

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

LEVY MARION

727.953.6803

VOLUSIA

CITRUS, FIRST COAST, MARION, NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

LAKE

CITRUS SUMTER

904.880.6964

cbergamo@frla.org

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO ORANGE

JODI CROSS 561.410.0035

PALM BEACH & TREASURE COAST

PASCO

jcross@frla.org

POLK

PINELLAS

LOIS CROFT 239.339.7692

INDIAN RIVER

MANATEE

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

SAINT LUCIE DESOTO

BAY, FORGOTTEN COAST, NORTHWEST FLORIDA

MARTIN CHARLOTTE

MONROE

lhernandez@frla.org

HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

rgreen@frla.org

LYNNE HERNANDEZ 305.710.3962

BREVARD

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

lcroft@frla.org

RAY GREEN 850.545.5901

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

561.744.7669

LEE

GLADES

HENDRY

PALM BEACH

888.612.7115 BROWARD

NICK LOWE 850.661.4256

MARCO ISLAND

nlowe@frla.org

COREY MOBLEY 850.375.8373

ESCAROSA

CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

BROWARD

asallee@frla.org

MARJORIE STONE 850.524.1747 48  SU M M ER

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MONROE

cmobley@frla.org

ROSIE RICCARDI 407.304.8773

COLLIER

TALLAHASSEE

844.253.0850

CENTRAL FLORIDA

mstone@frla.org F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Movers & Shakers Pati Flowers Pati Flowers has recently joined the RCS team as RCS Regional Manager. Prior to this appointment, Pati served RCS clients in the Keys as a contract trainer for over a year. Having resided and worked in the Keys for most of the past 40 years, Pati brings a remarkable depth of relationships and local market knowledge to her new role. Pati’s past experience includes service as Training and Development Manager in human resources for a large northeast regional grocer, where she served several regions building relationships between management and front line employees. She facilitated employee development workshops in Workplace Change, Sexual Harassment

Awareness, Issue Free Workplaces, Valuing Differences, Drugs and Alcohol in the Workplace and New Employee Orientation, eventually gravitating to Table & Vine, a beer, wine and spirits superstore. With additional professional stops at Hot Tin Roof, Louie’s Backyard and Little Palm Island, Pati brings deep Keys’ insider knowledge to the team. Her human resource and training background, combined with excellent experience as a master bartender, wine steward and manager with responsibility for all aspects of food and beverage operations, make her a natural fit for RCS. On a personal note, Pati is a Florida Notary and a member of the clergy who regularly

performs weddings in Key West. We are delighted Pati has taken on this new challenge and wish her great success in the Florida Keys!

John Zimmerman Moves to First Watch John Zimmerman has recently moved to First Watch as Vice President, Quality Assurance & Food Safety from Sysco. Congratulations!

Southern Living Magazine Recognizes 4 Rivers Smokehouse

Geoff Luebkemann, Vice President of Education and Training, was honored recently with the Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Award. Selected by Volunteer Florida and the Governor, Geoff received this special recognition for his exemplary volunteer service to the State Emergency Response Team, Emergency Service Function 18 (ESF 18). Last year, during Hurricane Hermine and Hurricane Matthew, he spearheaded efforts to coordinate the industry’s efforts to assist the facilitation of lodging needs for evacuees and recovery responders. FRLA President and CEO, Carol Dover, noted, “I’m extremely proud of Geoff’s admirable service on behalf of the FRLA. Through his leadership and dedication, Florida’s hospitality industry can quickly mobilize and provide critical assistance to our local communities.” The award was presented by Chester Spellman, chief executive officer of Volunteer Florida at the Emergency Management Convening in Tampa. The nomination came from Larry McIntyre, emergency coordination officer at the Department of Economic Opportunity for ESF 18. Thank you for all your hard work, and congratulations, Geoff! w w w.FRL A .org

Armando Rosario Inducted into the Bartender Hall of Fame Armando Rosario was inducted into Bartender Magazine’s Bartender Hall of Fame recently in Orlando, Florida. Rosario is the Director of Mixology for Southern Glazer, the largest wholesaler of wine, spirits and non-alcoholic drinks in the world. Rosario is known for his philosophy of “make it fresh … keep it simple.” Congratulations Armando!

BRION PRICE PHOTOGRAPHY

Geoff Luebkemann Received Volunteer Award

Winter Park’s 4 Rivers Smokehouse was recently recognized by Southern Living Magazine in the South’s Best Barbecue Joints 2017. Congratulations John Rivers and the 4 Rivers team!

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Don’t Let FOGs into our Wastewater Systems

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ats, oils and grease (FOG) are liquid wastes resulting from the processes utilized in restaurants and other food service establishments. FOGs are a problem to the community if disposed directly into a sewer. FOGs coat and accumulate in wastewater collection and treatment systems’ pipes and related equipment and can become clogged, causing extreme problems, such as backups and overflows. FOGs should be collected in equipment located in food service operations; the best-known piece of equipment is the grease trap. Local county public health programs have adopted rules addressing this situation and providing guidance to minimize the accumulation of FOGs. These rules require the use of a grease trap in all food service establishments. In addition, the grease trap must be in working order and be correctly maintained. Grease traps must be cleaned on a regular basis in accordance with local ordinances. Honc Industries can provide a turn-key approach to restaurants that need to repair or replace FOG intercepting devices.

(continued from page 35)

Says Paul Avery, “Dave Reid has been a tremendous contributor to the WOB team, and I couldn’t be more pleased with his leadership style and results. During the past year, Dave’s impact on the business has been dramatic. Complemented by his great sense of humor and fun, Dave has implemented procedures, improved communications and has shown an attention to detail that has elevated the team in a big way. His depth of knowledge of the industry and broad industry relationships are impressive. Our entire team feels fortunate and proud to have Dave Reid as chief operating officer of our company.” In addition to food, WOB has developed a craft spirit program, which Avery says is primarily, “a vehicle to broaden the appeal of WOB. With our commitment to quality products and brands, exceptional relationships in the spirits industry, experience in beverage program development and favorable margins, 50  SU M M ER

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the introduction of a craft spirit program was an obvious enhancement to the WOB menu.“ When it comes to fun, WOB sets the industry standard as being a destination for consumers to engage, explore, play and enjoy. WOB has incorporated several entertaining games to keep customers on their feet and connected: Darts, Jenga, Ring Toss and even Nintendo, played in a comfy seating area designed with big screen TVs and red leather Chesterfield sofas. With customer experience central to WOB’s focus, evolution of the brand naturally includes enhancing how customers explore the vast beer selection. Next up for WOB is the rollout of a new, free customer loyalty app. An update to the popular WOB app, this new release will award tokens that can be cashed in for discounts. It also touts a proprietary ALEgorithum that lets users rate the beers they drink, allowing the app to learn user preferences, and offer suggestions based on past ratings. There have been a lot of changes since Avery took over, though he credits much of the brand’s success to the team he has built. Much of this team has roots in OSI: Jim Pollard and Ben Novello, who originally discovered World of Beer, and Donnie Everts, VP of International Development, who Paul

says adds vast experience developing Outback in 23 countries prior to joining WOB. In addition, leading the development efforts for the past several years, Tim Martin brings extraordinary experience developing such industry brands as Ruby Tuesday, Outback, Bonefish Grill and Applebees. Says Avery, “Martin’s strength in site selection and construction have delivered what today is a well-defined footprint, investment level and attractive tavern with broad appeal.” Experienced leadership, steady profit trends, well-received menu and craft spirits rollouts and international expansion. It’s cheers to a bright future for this exciting Florida-based chain!

HISTORY The original World of Beer was founded in 2007 in Tampa, Florida by Scott Zepp and Matt LaFon as a package house. Zepp and LaFon noticed many of their craft beer aficionado customers tended to linger at the counter talking beer with fellow craft followers. Recognizing the need for a place where true beer lovers could convene, the childhood friends developed World of Beer. With success came opportunity for growth, and in 2010, the two joined forces with former Outback Steakhouse executives Ben Novello and Jim Pollard to take the brand national. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Kyle Martin FPL energy expert

Smart technology is helping businesses across Florida. And now, what powers that technology is smart, too. You can save energy and money when you schedule a free FPL Business Energy Evaluation at FPL.com/BizEasyToSave.

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OUR FUTURE

$1.4 Million in Scholarships Awarded to Florida High School Students Participating in ProStart Culinary Team Competition

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he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) held the 17th Annual ProStart Culinary Team Competition in March at the Rosen Plaza Hotel in Orlando. A total of 47 schools participated in the competition, with 15 schools winning top awards throughout the day’s events. More than $1.4 million in scholarships were distributed to the winning schools. All winners and participants are participants in Florida’s ProStart program, which is a career technical education program where high school students learn from an industry-derived curriculum that teaches culinary techniques and restaurant management skills. More than 20,000 students from across the state are enrolled in the program. The four main event competitions included: the Cracker Barrel Management Competition, the Johnson & Wales University

Culinary Competition, the Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition and the Coca-Cola Company Waiters Relay Competition. Tarpon Springs High School won first place in the overall competition. East Ridge High School in Clermont took home second place in the overall competition, with South Lake High School in Groveland placing third. “These talented students represent the future of Florida’s hospitality industry, and we are extremely proud to help support their education by awarding more than $1 million in scholarships. We are passionate about investing in these inspiring, young leaders of the trade and are thrilled to celebrate their incredible talents and pursuit of successful careers,” said Carol Dover, president and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association.

Overall Competition Winners

Fifth Place Seabreeze High School Instructor: Samantha Crouch

consisting of fruits and vegetables. Contestants explained nutritional information, product availability and preparation techniques.

Cracker Barrel Management Competition Winners

First Place Estero High School Instructor: Jeremy Jasper

First Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan Second Place East Ridge High School Instructor: Ken Pitts Third Place South Lake High School Instructors: Candy Huxhold and John Thunberg Fourth Place J.P. Taravella High School Instructor: Scott Goodman Fifth Place Leto High School Instructor: Debra Hladky

Johnson & Wales University Culinary Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative abilities during the competition through the preparation of a meal consisting of: starter (such as soup, salad or appetizer), protein (such as meat, fish or fowl), starch, vegetable and dessert. First Place Leto High School Instructor: Debra Hladky Second Place J.P. Taravella High School Instructor: Scott Goodman Third Place Mainland High School Instructors: Jason Kester and Troy Logan Fourth Place Eastside High School Instructor: Billie DeNunzio 52  SU M M ER

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Participating teams demonstrated their knowledge of the restaurant and food service industry by developing a business proposal for a new restaurant concept. The business proposal consisted of a defined restaurant concept, supporting menu and supporting marketing plan. Teams prepared a comprehensive written proposal, verbal presentation and visual display. First Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan Second Place Holmes County High School Instructor: April Coe Third Place South Lake High School Instructors: Candy Huxhold and John Thunberg

Second Place (three way tie) Dixie Hollins High School Instructor: Christy Rabich East Ridge High School Instructor: Ken Pitts Hialeah Gardens High School Instructor: James Bryant Third Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan Fourth Place Northeast High School Instructors: John Beck and Curtis Serata Fifth Place Lake Minneola High School Instructors: Nick Sandora and Lance Bowles

Coca-Cola Company Waiters Relay Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their ability to duplicate a table setting while racing against the clock. First Place East Ridge High School Instructor: Ken Pitts Second Place South Lake High School Instructors: Candy Huxhold and John Thunberg Third Place Stoneman Douglas High School Instructor: Ashley Kurth Fourth Place J.P. Taravella High School Instructor: Scott Goodman Fifth Place Mainland High School Instructors: Jason Kester and Troy Logan

Fourth Place Terry Parker High School Instructors: Ginger Stehlin and Dean Hanapel Fifth Place Northeast High School Instructors: John Beck and Curtis Serata

Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative ability during the competition through the preparation of an edible centerpiece F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


OUR FUTURE

Congratulations to the 2017 HTMP Competition winners!

F

RLA’s Educational Foundation hosted the 14th annual Hospitality and Tourism Management Competition (HTMP) in March at the Rosen Plaza Hotel in Orlando. A total of 10 Florida HTMP schools took part in the two-day competition. During the competition, students presented two case studies to judges, completed a night audit, worked on a hospitality project and participated in a knowledge bowl.

Overall Competition Winners First Place Forest Hill High School Instructor: Diana Sardina Second Place Oak Ridge High School Instructor: Vanessa Zameza Third Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory

Second Place South Broward High School Instructor: Vicky Edgcomb Students: Theodore Walker, Brandon Propescu, Linda Mujica, Sydney Vassell Third Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory Students: Christopher Real, Ralph Motola, Annahy Salas, Florencia Olivera

Knowledge Bowl Competition

Hotel Operations Competition First Place Oak Ridge High School Instructor: Vanessa Zameza Students: Nikosi Ellison, Jacklyn Nepalis, Laira Ceneus

First Place Forest Hill High School Instructor: Diana Sardina Students: Carolina Diaz, Jamie Cooney, Yanet Trista, Adriana Hernandez

Second Place Forest Hill High School Instructor: Diana Sardina Students: Carolina Diaz, Jamie Cooney, Yanet Trista, Adriana Hernandez

Second Place Miami Sunset High School Instructor: Milagros Perez Students: Tameria Benjamin, Luis Gonzalez, Yamig Torres, Genesis Torrez

Third Place Winter Park High School Instructor: Meg Pietkiewicz Students: Carly Auerbach, Shanara Ramirez, Kelly Kearney, Caroline Farr

Third Place Oak Ridge High School Instructor: Vanessa Zameza Students: Nikosi Ellison, Jacklyn Nepalis, Laira Ceneus

Hospitality Project Competition First Place Forest Hill High School Instructor: Diana Sardina Students: Carolina Diaz, Jamie Cooney, Yanet Trista, Adriana Hernandez

UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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GLOBAL SPONSORS

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FRLA CARES

Support

F

or food and beverage service employees, a life-altering circumstance like a medical diagnosis, a car accident or a house fire can quickly become unmanageable financially and emotionally. Luckily, for those employees caring for children, CORE can provide support. CORE is a national 501(c)(3) organization that supports children of food and beverage service employees navigating life-altering circumstances. Since 2004, CORE has provided support to almost 200 families across the country, and the industry and has raised over $2.1 million. When food and beverage service families struggle to stay afloat during a medical diagnosis or family death, accident or loss of home from fire or natural disaster, CORE helps them stay on top of house payments, bills and medical or equipment costs. CORE can also purchase clothing and toys, or send food and other necessities. When a parent or child passes away, CORE can pay for a funeral or memorial, or help plan a family retreat to recenter and grieve. CORE knows that the core of the food and beverage service industry is the food and beverage service employees and the families they work to support, and the core of the families is the children. For the Sokol family, CORE was an invaluable resource during an unexpected medical crisis. Olivia Sokol and her parents, Justin and Nardia, became a part of the CORE Family in August of 2016, when Olivia was just five months old. Justin was working at Cuba Libre Restaurant and Rum Bar in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Nardia was in her fourth year of medical school at Temple University when Nardia was admitted to the emergency room for severe abdominal pains. Doctors discovered that she had a previously undiagnosed congenital malformation of her bowels which eventually caused her intestines to wrap around themselves, creating a life-threating loss of circulation to her intestines and other organs. They operated immediately, untangling her bowels and repositioning them correctly, and also

removed her appendix. A few days later, they had to operate once again due to unexplained internal bleeding. Thankfully, Nardia survived the surgeries and began recovering. After four weeks in the hospital, she was able to resume medical school and begin her five-month, multi-state externship endeavor, while Justin stayed in Pennsylvania with Olivia. During Nardia’s health scare, CORE paid for rent and daycare for Olivia and sent the family a package full of clothes and toys. CORE also bought plane tickets for Justin and Olivia to fly to Denver for Thanksgiving and provided support for travel to Pittsburgh for Christmas, so they could be with Nardia as a family over the holiday! Justin recently gave CORE a family update, saying that Nardia is fully recovered and Olivia is healthy and growing quickly. We are honored to have been able to help the Sokol family! There’s a way for everyone to support CORE and give back to our own! You can refer a food and beverage service family for support at COREgives.org, become a COREporate Member or Ambassador, or host your own promotion or event to benefit CORE. For more information, visit us at COREgives.org or call 404-655-4690.

(Top Photo) Justin and Nardia Sokol with their daughter, Olivia. (Bottom Photo) Olivia Sokol 54  SU M M ER

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B E P R E PA R E D

Food Safety and Emergency Preparedness by Melanie Cornman

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ummer 2017 is fast approaching, and that means hurricane season is almost here as well. Now is the time to start preparing a food safety plan for your business in the event of a hurricane or emergency situation. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants has the responsibility of inspecting public food and lodging establishments, and that includes responding to emergency conditions. Although division personnel are not first responders following a disaster, inspectors are dispatched to affected locations after a disaster has hit. The division conducts disaster inspections for any affected areas and answers any questions the licensee may have regarding food safety, contaminated food equipment or any other food protection concerns. Listed below are some common issues that inspectors might review after an emergency: • Is the establishment open and operating? • Does the establishment have any type of structural damage? • Does the establishment have electrical power? • Did the establishment have an interruption in power — and for how long? • Does the establishment have running water under pressure? • Is a boil water notice in effect? • Does the establishment have proper wastewater disposal? All public food service establishments are required to take responsive action if they experience power outage, flooding, potable water disruption or an event that could compromise food safety. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants provides online guidelines and safety tips to assist operators before and after

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emergency conditions at myfloridalicense.com/ dbpr/hr/information/documents/2013-07.pdf. Here are some helpful tips to promote food safety during a disaster. •A  dd bags of ice or dry ice to refrigerators and freezers prior to the event in case power is lost. •D  o not operate your establishment if it has no electrical power or potable water under pressure. •K  eep all refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to maintain temperature while power is out. •O  nce power has been restored, identify all foods that may have been above 41 degrees Fahrenheit or below 135 degrees Fahrenheit for more than four hours. Foods identified must be properly discarded. •M  aintain hot food at temperatures of 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above and cold foods at temperatures of 41 degrees Fahrenheit or below. •U  se single service articles whenever possible. Discard single service items, such as paper or plastic plates, cups, plastic utensils, lids, straws, etc., if the items have been exposed to water or other contamination. •K  eep food covered and protected from dust, dirt, insects, vermin and other contaminants. Wash hands with potable or boiled water. • I f a boil water notice has been issued by the local county health department, it means the water supply may have been contaminated.

Do not serve water in any form, and disconnect or turn off water vending machines, drinking fountains, misters, ice-making units and post-mix beverage machines until the boil water notice has been lifted. All water filters on equipment should be removed and replaced if it is not designed to be cleaned in place. After the boil water notice has been lifted, you should allow water to run for 5 minutes at each faucet to safely flush the lines. Complete guidelines for operation can be found at myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/hr/information/ documents/boilwaternotice.pdf. Operators can find additional resources for providing safe food during an emergency event from the FDA at fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/retailfoodprotection/fooddefenseemergencyresponseretail/default.htm. Being prepared and following the tips above can greatly help any business following an emergency. Let’s work together to keep Florida’s citizens and visitors safe during this hurricane season! Melanie Cornman is a deputy district manager for Florida’s Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

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OUR FUTURE

Master Emerging Trends at the 2017 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show

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rom Sunday, Sept. 10 through Tuesday, Sept. 12, over 8,000 restaurant and foodservice industry professionals will gather for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show being held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando. During this extraordinary threeday event, attendees will find new ideas, new products and new solutions. The trade show and conference, produced by Urban Expositions and sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, will offer educational programs, special events, new food products, and equipment and services from over 450+ leading industry suppliers. “The energy and excitement on the show floor is always fantastic, fueled by all of the special events and seminars, new product announcements and culinary competitions. We invite all professionals in the restaurant and foodservice industry throughout Florida and the Southeast to join us for this important industry event,” said Mike Carlucci, Senior Vice President, Specialty Shows at Urban Expositions. “We are working closely with the FRLA again this year to create a must-attend event for their members and all buyers of restaurant and foodservice equipment, technology, food products and services where they will have the opportunity to discover many innovative and dynamic new products and services for the industry and attend dozens of special events." Highlights for the show include the presentation of the prestigious Torch Award,

The Rapid Fire Appetizer Competition, Food Trends Experience, the well-respected ACF Culinary Competitions, Beer, Wine & Spirits Pavilion, Japan Pavilion, Key Buyer Alliance, Education Station and the FRLA/NRA Bob Leonard Golf Classic. The trade show’s floor will feature 450+ leading restaurant and foodservice vendors and purveyors. All attendees have access to 30+ free education sessions, part of the Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum, providing the gold-standard, industry-leading educational content

that is practical and relevant for today's foodservice professional. Industry leaders deliver real, applicable business lessons, the latest information on trends and best practices in the market, and their own opinions of what creates success. The show will be held Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017 from 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; Monday, Sept. 11, 2017 from 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; and Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017 from 11 a.m.–4 p.m. The 2017 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show is sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (frla.org). For more information on exhibiting or attending, visit the official Show website at flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com. The trad show and conference is managed and produced by Urban Expositions, owned by Clarion Events, produces and manages a portfolio of 36 events, serving eight industry sectors, including Gift, Souvenir, Art, Aviation, Foodservice, Pet, Auto and Gaming. For more information, visit urban-expo.com or visit clarionevents.com.

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2017 CORPORATE EVENTS CALENDAR MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT AUGUST 2 3

Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa Fort Lauderdale, Florida

NRA/FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC SEPTEMBER 9

The FRLA hosts a full slate of industry events throughout the state. Visit frla.org and click on the orange button, “FIND A CHAPTER,” to get plugged in with your local FRLA Representative. For a full listing of FRLA corporate and regional events, visit frla.org/events.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS AND GET PLUGGED IN

Championsgate Golf Course Orlando, Florida

FALL BOARD MEETING SEPTEMBER 10 11

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW SEPTEMBER 10 12

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY SEPTEMBER 11

Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, Florida

EMAIL OR CALL MOLLY LORD, DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE EVENTS, AT MLORD@FRLA.ORG OR 850.224.2250 EXT. 258


E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

CITY

SEPT LOCATION

JUN

JUL

AUG

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

13

25

22

26

Ramada Inn

BOCA RATON

14

12

9

6

Hilton Garden Inn

BRANDON

16

-

-

-

Embassy Suites

DAYTONA BEACH

21

19

16

20

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

FORT LAUDERDALE

27

25

29

26

Embassy Suites

FORT MYERS

1

6

3

7

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

15

27

17

21

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

6

11

8

5

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

1

11

3

7

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

19

26

21

18

Islander Resort

JACKSONVILLE

8

5

2

19

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

6

11

8

21

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

6

11

8

5

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

26

13

10

8

Seralago Hotel & Suites Maingate East

LAKELAND

9

17

21

18

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

8

12

9

7

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

20

27

22

21

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

6

11

8

7

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

NAPLES

15

13

17

21

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

20

18

17

21

Homewood Suites by Hilton Ocala at Heath Brook

ORLANDO ENGLISH

6

11

8

6

Rosen Inn International

ORLANDO ENGLISH FRLA SHOW

14

11

1

1

Orange Country Convention Center

ORLANDO SPANISH

13

11

8

5

Rosen Inn International

ORANGE PARK

20

25

22

19

Hilton Garden Inn

PANAMA CITY

-

11

8

19

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall

PENSACOLA

1

18

3

7

Hilton Garden Inn Airport

PORT RICHEY

14

13

10

7

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

21

25

15

26

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST. AUGUSTINE

29

27

31

28

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST. PETERSBURG

12

10

14

18

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

12

10

14

11

Hilton Garden Inn Central

TAMPA - ENGLISH

-

24

2

12

Hilton Garden Inn

TAMPA - SPANISH

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

12

10

7

5

Ramada

WEST PALM BEACH

26

24

21

19

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

safestaff.org 58  SU M M ER

2017

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


s r o t i s i V e r o M t A c D I a r R t t O A L F T I S I V p i a h s h r e n wit t r a P g n i t e k r Ma

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.


DON’T GET BURNED

BY YOUR TAXES

ACTOR. NOT ACTUAL CHEF. DRAMATIZATION. NOT AN ACTUAL EVENT.

MENU OF SERVICES • Florida sales tax audits, appeals and litigation • Criminal sales tax defense • Corporate sales and transactions support • IRS services including audit, appeals, collection, tax court litigation 100+ Years of Cumulative Experience

• Tobacco tax, wholesale alcohol tax, and other tax issues

Call 888.444.9568 or visit www.FloridaSalesTax.com PARTNERS: Joseph C. Moffa, CPA, Esq. | James H. Sutton, Jr., CPA, Esq., LLM | Gerald J. Donnini II, Esq., LLM | JerryDonnini@FloridaSalesTax.com OFFICES: Fort Lauderdale, Tampa, Tallahassee

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Summer 2017  
Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Summer 2017  

The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association.

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