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AD NEW FLORIDA TOURISM NUMBERS Breaking Records CHEFS THAT SIZZLE John Rivers SPECIAL LODGING SECTION Partnerships, Training, Tips and Statistics


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contents S P R I N G 2 0 17 W W W. F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4 Food for Thought We Must Advocate Passionately to Protect Hospitality From the Chairman’s Desk Making Advocacy Our Individual Responsibility 4  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 8   E 9 meril’s Florida Season Five 10 FRLA’s New Chairman and Executive Committee 12  Path to Power Peter Kacheris, Managing Director at Waldorf Astoria

9

Orlando & Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek

Chefs that Sizzle John Rivers, Owner and Head Chef, 4 Rivers Smokehouse 14  16  Cajun Caviar Natural Color, Delicate Flavor 18 FRLA New Members Second Half of 2016 20  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 36  New Product Fintech 38  Marketing Tips Text Signal 41  Engage Statewide Momentum 51  FRLA Gives Back The Breast Cancer Research Foundation 54  FRLA’s Corporate Calendar 55  Prostart Regional Workshops 56  Movers and Shakers

SPECIAL FEATURES

20

11

Fighting for Florida Tourism

23

VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

25

Legislative Update

26

A Letter from Don Fox

New President and CEO, Ken Lawson

FRLA is Advocating for Fair, Reasonable and Balanced Legislation

FRLA’s Special Lodging Section

See All that the Lodging Industry Is Doing for Our Guests and Industry Employees

40 Tourism Matters  2016 Visitor Numbers Breaking Records

55 w w w.FRL A .org

ADA Website Compliance 40 

A La Carte 43 

Secrets of Success 47 

FoodFinder 47 

In Passing 57 

What Restaurants Need to Know About Website Accessibility Claims

Industry Information You Need to Know Pelican Grand Resort

Helping Food Insecurity in Florida and Georgia

Paying Tribute to Thom Stork and Robert A. “Bob” Riedel

ON THE COVER: The beautiful Waldorf Astoria Orlando

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

3


FROM THE CHAIRMANS DESK

We Must Advocate Passionately to Protect Hospitality As we prepare for Florida’s legislative session to kick into high gear, the hospitality industry is facing an unprecedented challenge from powerful Florida lawmakers who want to eliminate VISIT FLORIDA, the state’s tourism marketing corporation. Within the next few weeks, legislators will begin the budget process. While the power of the “purse strings” ultimately lies with the Florida legislature, Governor Rick Scott has recommended a $76 million investment in VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing efforts. As a direct result of an increase in the state’s investment in tourism marketing, Florida has enjoyed six consecutive years of record-breaking visitation. It is imperative that we build on the successes of Florida’s hospitality and tourism industry by committing the necessary dollars to VISIT FLORIDA that will create jobs and generate revenue for the state. We must protect the tourism industry,

Florida’s top employer and chief economic driver, not only for the industry’s 1.4 million employees, but for the local communities whose livelihood is contingent on bringing tourists to the Sunshine State. In 2015, more than 106 million visitors came to Florida, spending $108.8 billion and generating $11.3 billion in state and local tax revenue. Get educated about the power of tourism on pages 58–59. Collectively, we have a responsibility to advocate for our industry, and it is important that we are vigilant in educating our local and state elected officials. Tourism Day will occur on March 14 in Tallahassee. This is your opportunity to fight for Florida’s tourism industry. It is vital FRLA members are at the table — and not on the menu. Register to participate at TourismWorksForFlorida.org. As the voice of Florida’s hospitality industry, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association will continue to advocate for fair,

reasonable and balanced legislation that encourages continued growth of our industry and the state. To gain insight into additional legislative issues facing our industry, visit page 24. Together, hospitality is louder and united, we are stronger. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Making Advocacy Our Individual Responsibility As I write, we are less than one week removed from the Presidential Inauguration. As the Trump administration prepares to take the reins of the executive branch of government, we are excited by the opportunity it represents. There will be many issues on the table that effect all members of the hotel and restaurant communities, and we are in a terrific position, by virtue of the strength of the FRLA, to ensure the interests of our industries are well represented. However, we cannot rely on FRLA staff alone to carry the load. When called upon, we must lend our individual pens, keyboards and voices to the chorus advocating for change. During the months ahead, we will experience times when a call to action is necessary. And when the call comes, we

4  S P R I N G

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must not shrink from it. Even in a state as business friendly as Florida, it is important that we remind our state government officials that the success of the restaurant and hotel industries translates into success for the citizens of Florida. One would not think that such a reminder is needed, but it seems that at least some of our legislators need a vibrant reminder from time to time. When the issues are national, we must demonstrate the level of leadership that is to be expected from a best in class state association. As with state affairs, we cannot rely on FRLA staff alone to carry the torch. We must all be involved. As the year progresses, I ask that every member of the FRLA think about how they can make a difference at a time when we can have more impact than ever before. If

we embrace advocacy and work for positive change through the regulatory and legislative processes, we may well make 2017 the best year we have had in a very, very long time.

Don Fox 2017 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SUPPORT THE NRA AND FRLA PACS

2017 GOLF CHAIRS • Robin Sorensen, Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs • Lino Maldonado, Vice President of Operations, Gulf Region Wyndham Vacation Rentals • Jason Emmett, BrionPrice.Co

2017 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE ADAM COREY, Tallahassee Hospitality Group LLC HARRY PRICE, Coca-Cola North America BRUCE CRAUL, Legendary Inc. JOHN HORNE, Anna Maria Oyster Bar MONIQUE YEAGER, Tijuana Flats JEN OSGOOD, Cintas JASON FIALKOFF, VGM Client Rewards MIKE VINIK, BJ’s Restaurants JAN GAUTAM, IHRMC and AAHOA MIKE VENEZIANO, The Doherty Group RAY HOLDEN, Miller’s Ale House DAVE REID, World of Beer

m Photogra phy

SPONSORSHIPS/TEAMS AVAILABLE, PLEASE CONTACT MSTONE@FRLA.ORG 850-524-1747


 CHAIRMAN

Don Fox

Firehouse of America, LLC, Jacksonville VICE-CHAIR

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Worldwide, Fort Lauderdale SECRETARY-TREASURER

Chau Nguyen

Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Orlando

Hospitality Specialists 

• • • •

Worker’s Compensation Liquor Liability General Liability Property & Casualty

Seaside Amelia Inn, Fernandina Beach

Alan Palmieri

Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando

Brown & Brown Insurance of Florida, Inc. 1201 Cypress Creek Road Suite 130 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Contact: Brendan Griffin 954-331-1375 bgriffin@bbftlaud.com

DIRECTORS

Olivia Hoblit

Sheldon Suga

Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Lino Maldonado

Wyndham Vacation Rentals, Fort Walton Beach PRESIDENT/CEO

Carol B. Dover, FMP EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

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6  S P R I N G

2017

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion d effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FRLA sponsored events and festivals and finished the year out with some really great events that attracted thousands of travelers to the venues.

The Florida Citrus Parade in Orlando featured floats made of citrus fruit.

The Space Coast Crab Smash brought visitors to this unique area to enjoy fun, a cooking competition and crab!

Ormond Beach Mainstreet Riverfest. 8  S P R I N G

2017

Florida-Georgia Line concert goers spent some time at the restaurants and bars of Church Street Station before heading over to the concert.

Pre-Gaming at the NFL Pro Bowl on Church Street! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Emeril Lagasse with Chef Art Smith at Homecoming.

Chef Miguel Aguilar and Emeril Lagasse at Wynwood Kitchen.

Emeril’s Florida Season 5 Emeril Lagasse and son E.J. with Dave Rauschkolb at Taco Bar.

The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) is proud to present season five of Emeril’s Florida on the Cooking Channel. Emeril’s Florida is a 13-episode series highlighting the Sunshine State through the eyes of Emeril on location with a focus on food, cooking, events and activities around the state. Throughout the fifth season, Emeril will be visiting Florida’s top restaurants and resorts from Miami and West Palm Beach to 30A in the Panhandle, Clearwater Beach, Tampa, Orlando and Tarpon Springs. He will also prepare some of his favorite recipes that often feature some of the best seafood Florida has to offer. FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA sponsor the series. For additional information on the show, including links to previous episodes, please visit the Cooking Channel at cookingchanneltv.com.

Emeril Lagasse at Sergio’s. w w w.FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

FRLA Welcomes

New Chairman and Executive Committee

T

he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) is thrilled to announce their new 2017 Chairman of the Board and 2017 Executive Committee for the current calendar year. Beginning on January 1, Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer for Firehouse of America, LLC, will serve as FRLA’s 2017 Chairman of the Board. Fox is Chief Executive Officer of Firehouse of America, LLC, in which he leads the strategic growth of Firehouse Subs, one of America’s leading fast-casual restaurant brands. Under his leadership, the brand has grown to more than 1,030 restaurants in 44 states, Puerto

“I am so humbled for the opportunity serve as the Chair man of Florida’s pr emier non-pr ofit hospitality trade association and excited to collaborate with several accomplished industry peers. My priority focus for the year is to motivate members of our association, and operators in the r estaurant community, to concentrate on their team members and employees who r eally make the industry run. My overall goal will be to pr otect the industry fr om bur densome gover nment r egulations, as well as to pr eserve Florida’s competitive edge as the leading destination for mor e than 106 million visitors.”

Rico and Canada, and is recognized as one of the best franchises in the country. Fox sits on various boards of influence in the restaurant community and is a respected speaker, commentator and published author. He was recognized by Nation’s Restaurant News as 2011’s Operator of the Year. In 2013, he received the prestigious Silver Plate Award from the International Food Manufacturers Association (IFMA), was recognized by FastCasual.com as the No.1 Executive in the fast-casual restaurant community and received the National Restaurant Association’s Advocacy Leadership Award. “Don Fox is a proven leader with decades of restaurant experience and tremendous passion for the hospitality industry. FRLA is truly fortunate to welcome such a distinguished trailblazer to lead our association through 2017. With Chairman Fox at the helm and our extremely proficient 2017 Executive Committee, I am confident Florida’s hospitality industry will overcome diverse challenges and enjoy numerous achievements in the year ahead,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO, Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association.

FRLA congratulates the following 2017 Executive Board Members: CHAIRMAN

Don Fox

Firehouse of America, LLC, Jacksonville VICE-CHAIR

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Worldwide, Fort Lauderdale SECRETARY-TREASURER

Chau Nguyen

Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Orlando DIRECTORS

Olivia Hoblit

Seaside Amelia Inn, Fernandina Beach

Alan Palmieri

Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando

Sheldon Suga

Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Lino Maldonado

Wyndham Vacation Rentals, Fort Walton Beach

— DON FOX, CEO OF FIREHOUSE OF AMERICA, LLC AND 2017 FRLA CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 10  S P R I N G

2017

Learn more about the 2017 FRLA Executive Committee at FRLA.org/leadership. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


TOURISM

Fighting for Florida Tourism Don Fox, FRLA 2017 Chairman of the Board

A

t a time of year when every Floridian should be especially thankful for the arrival of tourists across the state, some of our lawmakers in Tallahassee seem to have taken on the role of the Grinch who stole Christmas. The escalating attacks against VISIT FLORIDA — a proven marketing effort that has driven millions of additional visitors to our great State — defy common sense. And if not common sense, then certainly good business sense. Those who say that tourism numbers would be the same in the absence of the efforts of VISIT FLORIDA are misguided. My intention here is not to school them on some of the most basic, foundational elements of business and marketing, but simply to point out to them (and the citizens who hold them ultimately accountable) that investing in tourism is a sound and important practice. A failure to optimize tourism is a failure to drive vital revenue into the state. Strip away the incremental tax revenue generated by VISIT FLORIDA (tax revenue FAR in excess of the cost of the marketing efforts), and you are faced with one of two things: increasing taxes on Floridians or reducing government

w w w.FRL A .org

services. What would you have? I know what I think is best, and I suspect most Floridians would agree: Pull out all of the stops to drive tourism so that the tax burden on Floridians can be reduced. Yet despite the obvious, some of our lawmakers seem to have adopted a campaign to stop VISIT FLORIDA dead in its tracks. Despite abundant evidence of the return on investment that taxpayers have received from VISIT FLORIDA, they would, for reasons that seem more emotional than rational, strip it of funding in whole or in part, and be willing to risk declines in tax revenue driven by tourism. Think about it: OF COURSE the marketing of our state as a premier tourist destination increases tourism. And so to suggest that in the absence of marketing, there would not be a reduction in tourism, is simply foolishness. Try that approach in business. Stop the promotion and marketing of your business, and only one thing happens. Business goes down. If our legislators need a lesson in basic business, I beg them to not learn at the expense of hardworking, taxpaying Floridians. There are elements of the VISIT FLORIDA campaign that are worth discussing in an open

forum. Some people are not happy, for a variety of reasons, with a handful of the marketing tactics that have been employed (though frankly, the opposition to these ideas seem to be on emotional grounds, as opposed to an intellectually honest discussion of the business merits of those tactics). Those discussions should be carried out. But to call for a reduction in funding for VISIT FLORIDA (or worse yet, its complete dismantling), is nothing short of irresponsible. I would respectfully ask the members of the Legislature to step back and take a sound and reasoned approach when putting forward their concerns. Their current tact is taking Florida in the wrong direction. Don Fox is Chief Executive Officer of Firehouse of America, LLC, in which he leads the strategic growth of Firehouse Subs, one of America’s leading fast-casual restaurant brands. Under his leadership, the brand has grown to more than 1,030 restaurants in 44 states, Puerto Rico and Canada, and is recognized as one of the best franchises in the country. Fox is a restaurant industry veteran with 42 years of experience and 2017 Chairman of the Board for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Peter Kacheris

MANAGING DIRECTOR AT WALDORF ASTORIA ORLANDO & HILTON ORLANDO BONNET CREEK

Peter Kacheris began his career in 1978 with Marriott Hotels & Resorts holding positions in operations, sales and marketing at various properties before being promoted to cluster general manager for the JW Marriott Lenox in Atlanta. In 2006, he was tapped as hotel manager for the Orlando World Center Marriott in Orlando and soon thereafter named general manager of the JW Marriott Grande Lakes hotel complex comprising a 1,000 room JW Marriott hotel and a 582 room Ritz Carlton, one of the first luxury hotels in the Orlando market. In 2006 Kacheris joined Starwood Hotels as complex general manager of the 2,265-room Walt Disney World® Swan and Dolphin Resort. And in 2008 he joined Hilton Hotels as Managing Director of Waldorf Astoria Orlando & Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek. Currently, Kacheris is responsible for daily operations of the 498-room Waldorf Astoria Orlando (the first new-build Waldorf Astoria outside of NYC) and the 1,001-room Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek. He’s also responsible for the award-winning Waldorf Astoria Golf Club, the Waldorf Astoria Spa and more than a dozen dining and lounge experiences, including the acclaimed Bull & Bear® restaurant.

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? From a young age,

I was always fascinated with travel, and I loved talking with people to learn about the fascinating places they had been. This led me to my first hotel job at the Nordic Hills Resort. I loved engaging with our guests: listening to their travel stories and personal histories always piqued my interest.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? The customer is King. Listen to your guests, and focus on delivering products or services they want. This leads to increased revenue and profitability and high levels of guest satisfaction. This has remained steadfast throughout the years. 12  S P R I N G

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Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? Absolutely. Many

wonderful, caring, smart, professional people have crossed my path over my career, and each have made their mark. One of my earliest mentors was Carol Brooks, the sales leader at Nordic Hills Resort — the first hotel I worked for. She would receive letters about the high levels of service that my team (banquet set-up) and I delivered, and she would observe how I interacted with our customers. She saw my potential and took me under her wing in the sales department. She trained me, relentlessly, and took my abilities to another level. I also owe her for introducing me to my wife, Maribeth! Many years later, I was working for Marriott as a DOSM, opening a hotel in Chicago. I worked very closely with the GM, Dick Feller, who took a personal interest in my career development, as he learned that my goal was to run a hotel. He guided my transition from sales into operations and took a big chance on me when he promoted me to Resident Manager. This was one of the most significant moves in my career — setting on my path to where I am now. It’s been an incredible journey.

How has participation in the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association positively affected your business? FRLA has been an out-

standing resource and support. During the opening of the Bonnet Creek complex, the association provided invaluable support in maneuvering through the myriad of regulations, as well as with staff training. I have always appreciated the networking opportunities afforded by FRLA; I’ve made numerous key contacts and forged many long-term friendships. I look to FRLA when benchmarking key measures within the industry and often as a resource when hiring key positions. In addition, I look to FRLA to continue to be the voice of the industry in matters of legislation within the state of Florida.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? The

single greatest factor in the success of my career has been the incredible people I have surrounded myself with. I have been very fortunate to work with high performing individuals at all levels — superiors, peers and support teams. When you have the right people around you, you can have great success. I am also blessed with a loving and supportive family — my wife Maribeth and my sons Will and Matt, who are my strength and inspiration.

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? I’ve always believed strongly in supporting the community in which you live and work. In Orlando there is a significant population of homeless people with children. Our company and our team members have been active in working with and supporting organizations working tirelessly to positively impact this community, like United Way. Our involvement with these organizations has also exposed our business to other individuals and companies who support these organizations — individuals and companies who often become our customers.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? We are, and always

have been, a tight knit community. It’s heartwarming — and very much an extension of the hospitality industry we love and serve. Continue the comaraderie, always.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Chefs That Sizzle

John Rivers

OWNER AND HEAD CHEF OF 4 RIVERS SMOKEHOUSE Describe your restaurant concept. 4 Rivers Smokehouse

is a family-owned brand specializing in 30-day aged smoked Angus brisket and homestyle sides, as well as bold twists of flavor and ingredient combinations with Signature Stackers and From the Farm offerings. At the helm is chef-owner John Rivers who strives to support the local community through exceptional products, steadfast customer service and uncompromised integrity.

What inspires your menus? Many things, first and foremost featur-

ing the highest quality smoked meat selection along with a broad range of mouthwatering homestyle sides made in house each day. Do you create menu items to complement local produce, meats and seafood? Over the years, I’ve pulled what I feel is

the “best-in-show” in protein preparation from each of the different regions and created our de-regionalized barbecue menu. We put a strong emphasis on fresh, high-quality food; everything in our smokehouse is cooked on-site, every single day. Please describe some of your most popular menu items.

• Our 18-hour smoked Signature Angus Brisket • Texas Destroyer — Signature Angus brisket, topped with onion rings, jalapeños, melted provolone, served on a bun and smothered in 4R Signature Sauce. • 4R BBQ Beans with brisket and pork. What is your “sizzle” or cuisine and food that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using? Our 30-day aged,

18-hour smoked Angus brisket is what makes 4 Rivers unique … it’s part of the our DNA. Long before I ever dreamed of opening a smokehouse, I became passionate about perfecting the art of smoking the perfect, succulent brisket. I spent 18 years pursuing this challenge, testing and re-testing cook times, temperatures, weights and rubs, along with taste-testing my way through the great American barbeque meccas, before I could finally celebrate brisket success. And the fact that I can share that delicious result with our guests is my ultimate reward. Please describe the your “Barbecue Ministry” and the beginnings of 4Rivers Smokehouse. Our Business: 4 Rivers

HotChef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 14  S P R I N G

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Smokehouse began with the launch of the “Barbecue Ministry” in 2004, when Chef John Rivers hosted a cookout fundraiser to support a local family whose young daughter was battling cancer. This one event sparked a passionate commitment to support local schools, churches and charitable organizations, and a few years later, smoking thousands of pounds of meat out of a garage just wouldn’t cut it anymore. After trials, tribulations and a whole lot of burnt ends, 4Rivers finally flipped that “Hot Brisket Now” sign on in October of 2009. Within the first hour, a line had formed out the door … and then quickly around the corner. Today, we have 13 locations across the state of Florida with active plans for continued expansion. Our latest endeavor, The COOP, is a restaurant celebrating the homestyle fare of the South. We have welcomed more than 1,000 amazing folks to the 4 Rivers family, including our in-house bakery, The Sweet Shop. The Barbecue Ministry remains our foundation and focus, and will continue to until the cows come home. What do you attribute your success in the restaurant business to? I believe a successful restaurant is the direct result

of a strong culture, and 4 Rivers is all about the culture. People think it’s about the brisket and they think it’s about the product, but it’s about so much more than that. It’s about having fun, being thankful for our blessings and giving back to the community. It’s not about what we do; it’s about why we do it. In addition, Rivers is the founder of the 4R Foundation, helping those in need in the communities that 4 Rivers serves. This spring, he is hosting Pink & Swine — an event benefiting FSU’s Dedman School of Hospitality and the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bimonthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


APRIL

07

2017

TA L L A H A S S E E , F L

A night of extraordinary food and fine wine under the stars.

CORE supports children of food + beverage employees . navigating life-altering circumstances/conditions. Learn how you can help at COREgives.org

COREgives.org w w w.FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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CAVIAR

Cajun Caviar

C

ajun Caviar™ is a luscious caviar processed and packed by hand using traditional Russian methods. The roe used for this caviar is from the Choupiquet (Amia calva) also known as the Bowfin. This prehistoric ganoid class fish is found in the fresh waters of the Atchafalaya Basin and is one of only three true caviar producing species found in the USA (sturgeon, paddlefish and bowfin). The caviar is naturally black with an earthy flavor and a delicate sweet and slightly salty balance. It is free of artificial additives, colorings or pre-

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servatives. Offering a less than 5% salt content, Cajun Caviar™ ranks among the finest Malossol caviars in the world. Cajun Caviar™ is owned and operated by the wives of three well-known chefs, and one of these ladies is a chef herself. Alden Lagasse, Amy Hollister Wilson and Chef Alison Vega-Knoll are friends and share a love for fine foods and the South. Alden Lagasse is a quintessential Southerner and wife of Chef Emeril Lagasse. She has always had a passion for hospitality and entertaining and considers her Southern heritage a great foundation that has enhanced her life and culinary style. Amy Hollister Wilson grew up in a family of restaurateurs. Her grandfather, mother and brother all had restaurants in New England that have blended her palate and love for fine foods and champagne. Her business background is in sales, and she holds an MBA. Chef AlisonVega-Knoll was drawn to cooking at an early age being exposed to French cooking from her grandmother mixed with the Creole flavors of New Orleans. She has had restaurants in both New Orleans and in Antigua, and she currently operates Station 6 with her husband Drew.

Chef Tory McPhail of the legendary Commander’s Palace noted, “With Commander's Palace being such an iconic Louisiana Restaurant, we try to focus on local products. Cajun Caviar™ comes from a unique species that is indigenous to Louisiana out of the Atchafalaya Basin. This is why Cajun Caviar fits perfectly on our menu and makes us proud to use it.” For more information about Cajun Caviar™, visit cajuncaviar.com. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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FRLA New Members •Quantum • Biopower, Southington, CT •AM • Business Solutions, Altamonte Springs, FL •Art • of Taste Orlando, Altamonte Springs, FL •Costa • Condo Resort, Aventura, FL •Gr8Taste • Water, Aventura, FL •Industry • Revolutions, Aventura, FL •Art • Institute of Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton, FL •E-Council • Inc.com, Boca Raton, FL •Pellegrino’s • Ristorante, Boca Raton, FL •PWI • Construction, Boca Raton, FL •Sculpture • Hospitality of Boca Raton & Deerfield Beach, Boca Raton, FL •Shangri-La • Springs Restaurant, Bonita Springs, FL •Raider • Rooter, Boynton Beach, FL •Birdrock • Taco Shack, Bradenton, FL •Brooksville • Main Street, Brooksville, FL •Homewood • Suites, Cape Canaveral, FL •Sage • Bistro, Cape Canaveral, FL •Big • Blue Brewing LLC, Cape Coral, FL •Mr • Brews Taphouse, Cape Coral, FL •HUB • Hospitality, Clearwater, FL •Rusty’s, • Clearwater Beach, FL •Nolan’s • Irish Pub, Cocoa Beach, FL •Runyon’s, • Coral Springs, FL •Panacea • Oyster Co-Op Corp, Crawfordville, FL •A • Crystal River Kayak Co & Dive Center, Crystal River, FL •Oyster’s • Restaurant & Catering, Crystal River, FL •Plantation • on Crystal River, Crystal River, FL •Nova • Southeastern University, Davie, FL •Audrey’s • Beach House, Daytona Beach, FL •Bethune-Cookman • University, Daytona Beach, FL •Bath • Fitter, Deerfield Beach, FL •21 • Drops, Delray Beach, FL •Banyan • Restaurant & Bar, Delray Beach, FL •Beach • Bao, Delray Beach, FL •Che!!! • Restaurant, Delray Beach, FL •Acentria, • Destin, FL •Village • Door, Destin, FL •Atlantic • Staffing & Cleaning Services, Fort Lauderdale, FL •B • Ocean Resort Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Birch • Patio Motel, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Broward • Center for the Performing Arts, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Broward • College, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Broward • County Public Schools, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Brown • & Brown Insurance of Florida, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Buchanan • Ingersoll & Rooney PC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Champion • Supply Co LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Char-Hut, • Fort Lauderdale, FL •Danto • Builders LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •E/G • of Florida Insurance & Risk Management, Fort Lauderdale, FL

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•Everglades • Holiday Park, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Galt • Villas Inn, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Granada • Inn, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Greenwave • Oil Recovery, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Harmonies • Brew LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Leadership • Broward Foundation, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Napoli • Belmar Resort, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Nationwide • Payment Systems, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Patriot • National Inc, Fort Lauderdale, FL •PayMyTab • LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Premier • Hospitality Services, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Shooters • Waterfront, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Suits • Stilettos and Lipstick, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Symphony • At the Waterways, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Travel • Tech Strategies LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL •Whole • Foods Market, Fort Lauderdale, FL •City • Tavern, Fort Myers, FL •Kitchen-Monkey.com, • Fort Myers, FL •Gulf • Breeze Condos, Fort Myers Beach, FL •Main • Street Fort Pierce, Fort Pierce, FL •Virginia • College, Fort Pierce, FL •AJ’s • On The Bayou, Fort Walton Beach, FL •AJ’s • Oyster Shanty, Fort Walton Beach, FL •Money • Tree ATM, Fort Walton Beach, FL •Gator’s • Dockside, Gainesville, FL •TXTSignal.com, • Gainesville, FL •V • Pizza, Gainesville, FL •Casino • Beach Bar & Grille, Gulf Breeze, FL •Military • Appreciation App, Gulf Breeze, FL •Sail • Inn, Gulf Breeze, FL •The • Historic Peninsula Inn, Gulfport, FL •Caribbean • Resort Suites, Hollywood, FL •JR • United Industries Inc, Hollywood, FL •Servpro • of Hollywood, Hollywood, FL •The • Charter House, Hollywood, FL •Villa • Europa Hotel, Hollywood, FL Swamp Tours, Homestead, FL •Everglades • •Coquina • Cove, Indian Rocks Beach, FL •Sarah’s • Seaside, Indian Rocks Beach, FL •Pine • Lodge Nature Coast Inn, Inglis, FL •Mama’s • Kuntry Kafe, Inverness, FL •Motor • City, Inverness, FL •1000 • Riverside, Jacksonville, FL •Mack’s • Tenders on the Go, Jacksonville, FL •Martin • Interiors Inc, Jacksonville, FL •Retirement • Resources Inc, Jacksonville, FL •The • Blind Rabbit Riverside, Jacksonville, FL •V • Pizza, Jacksonville, FL •Waste • Management Inc of Florida, Jacksonville, FL •Monkey’s • Uncle Tavern, Jacksonville Beach, FL •V • Pizza, Jacksonville Beach, FL •Aaron’s • Table & Wine Bar, Jupiter, FL •FRLA, • Jupiter, FL •Duffy’s • Sports Grill Kendall, Kendall, FL •24 • North Hotel, Key West, FL

•Hilton • Garden Inn, Key West, FL •Key • West Bed & Breakfast, Key West, FL •Schooner • Wharf Bar & Grill, Key West, FL •Tom • Sawyer’s Keyboard Advertising Specialties, Key West, FL •Borinquen • Restaurant & Pizzeria, Kissimmee, FL •Culver’s, • Kissimmee, FL •Experience • Kissimmee, Kissimmee, FL •Seralago • Hotel & Suites, Kissimmee, FL •Chefs • De France, Lake Buena Vista, FL •Raglan • Road Irish Pub & Restaurant, Lake Buena Vista, FL •Sara’s • Brewhaus & Grill, Lake City, FL •F&D • Kitchen & Bar, Lake Mary, FL •Brasa • Latina Restaurant, Lakeland, FL •Mason’s • Live, Lakeland, FL •BB&T • Insurance Services Inc, Lakewood Ranch, FL •4145 • By The Sea Inn & Suites, Lauderdale By The Sea, FL •Santa • Barbara, Lauderdale By The Sea, FL •Sunny • Shores Inn & Suites, Lauderdale By The Sea, FL •Amore • Restaurant, Longboat Key, FL •BJ’s • Brewhouse, Lutz, FL •Cafe • Liberty, Lutz, FL •Luke’s • Kitchen & Bar, Maitland, FL •Greater • Marathon Chamber of Commerce, Marathon, FL •HUB • International Florida, Melbourne, FL •American • Da Tang Unique Restaurant LLC, Miami, FL •Appelrouth • Farah & Co PA, Miami, FL •Centro, • Miami, FL •City • Works, Miami, FL •East • Miami, Miami, FL •El • Churrasco Steakhouse, Miami, FL •Four • Seasons Hotel Miami, Miami, FL •Legendary • Wine Imports, Miami, FL •Mr • Green’s Produce, Miami, FL •One • Two Tree Inc, Miami, FL •Shutts • & Bowen LLP, Miami, FL •The • Brick, Miami, FL •Waste • Management Inc of Florida, Miami, FL •Elevate • & Co LLC, Miami Beach, FL •Fisher • Island Club, Miami Beach, FL •Four • Seasons Hotel The Surf Club, Miami Beach, FL •Mondrian • South Beach, Miami Beach, FL •St • Regis Bal Harbour, Miami Beach, FL •The • Miami Beach Edition, Miami Beach, FL •ROI • Media Consultants Inc, Miramar, FL •Buffalo • Jack’s Legendary Wings, Miramar Beach, FL •Poppy’s • Seafood Factory, Miramar Beach, FL •Main • Street of Monticello FL Inc, Monticello, FL •Catch • 41 Bar “N” Grill, Naples, FL •Le • Moulin LLC, Naples, FL •Best • Western Navarre Waterfront, Navarre, FL •Cactus • Flower, Navarre, FL F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Second Half of 2016 •National • Event Rentals LLC, Navarre, FL •Anchor • Inn NSB, New Smyrna Beach, FL •Dockside • Oyster Bar & Cafe, Niceville, FL •Amici • Imports USA LLC, North Palm Beach, FL •Worksite • Employee Leasing, North Port, FL •Malibu • Resort, North Redington Beach, FL •Sun • Dek Beach House, Ocean Ridge, FL •3 • in 1 Cafe Inc, Ocoee, FL •High • Noon Cafe At OK Corral, Okeechobee, FL •OK • Corral Gun Club & Cabins, Okeechobee, FL •Hotel • Makeover Tampa Bay, Oldsmar, FL •Ace • Cafe, Orlando, FL •Azteca • D’Oro, Orlando, FL •Benefit • Advisors Inc, Orlando, FL •Brownie’s • Septic & Plumbing, Orlando, FL •Camilotti • Ristorante & Steaks LLC, Orlando, FL •Chef • Eddie’s Restaurant, Orlando, FL •Chicken • Bites LLC, Orlando, FL •Church • Street District, Orlando, FL •Cintas • Corp, Orlando, FL •College • Park Partnership Main Street, Orlando, FL •Downing • Management, Orlando, FL •Fat • Tuesday, Orlando, FL •Florida’s • Finest Linen Service, Orlando, FL •Grand • Bohemian Hotel Orlando, Orlando, FL •Harbortouch • Point of Sale, Orlando, FL •Haven • Orlando, Orlando, FL •Hilton • Grand Vacations (Orlando Resorts), Orlando, FL •Holiday • Inn, Orlando, FL •Home2 • Suites Orlando I-Drive, Orlando, FL •Izziban • Sushi, Orlando, FL •Johnny’s, • Orlando, FL •Kres • Chophouse, Orlando, FL •Mark’s • Jamaican Bar & Grill, Orlando, FL •Mellow • Mushroom, Orlando, FL •Mind • Menu, Orlando, FL •Orlando • Meats, Orlando, FL •ProvInsure • Inc, Orlando, FL •Rico • Foods Company, Orlando, FL •The • Boheme Restaurant, Orlando, FL •The • Largo Group, Orlando, FL •Toothsome • Chocolate Emporium & Savory Fest Kitchen, Orlando, FL •Waste • Management Inc of Florida, Orlando, FL •Wolfgang • Puck Express, Orlando, FL •Wonder • Emporium, Orlando, FL •CO2Meter • Inc, Ormond Beach, FL •Tideline • Ocean Resort & Spa, Palm Beach, FL •Roundtable • Consulting Group, Palm Beach Gardens, FL •Shipyard • Bar & Grill, Panama City, FL •Wheelhouse • Sandwich & Deli, Panama City, FL •Sabal • Palms Inn, Passe-a-Grille Beach, FL •The • Chefs’ Warehouse, Pembroke Park, FL •Party • Connection DJs, Pembroke Pines, FL •Pops • Corn, Pembroke Pines, FL •Cactus • Flower Cafe, Pensacola, FL •TEL • Staffing & HR, Pensacola, FL w w w.FRL A .org

•South • Plantation High, Plantation, FL •Bahama • Beach Club, Pompano Beach, FL •BrewFish • Bar & Grill, Pompano Beach, FL •Cottages • by the Ocean, Pompano Beach, FL •Deja • Blue Restaurants, Pompano Beach, FL •JP • Taravella High School, Pompano Beach, FL •Pelican • Place Apartments, Pompano Beach, FL •Pineapple • Place, Pompano Beach, FL •Sunny • Place, Pompano Beach, FL •Woody’s • BBQ, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL •Harbortouch • Point of Sale, Port Orange, FL •Rheem • Manufacturing, Port Orange, FL •Black • Sails Bar & Grille, Port Saint Lucie, FL •La • Fiorentina, Punta Gorda, FL •Amici • 30A Italian Kitchen LLC, Rosemary Beach, FL •Captevrix, • Saint Augustine, FL •Vilano • Beach Main Street, Saint Augustine, FL •Jalapenos • Mexican Restaurant, Saint Cloud, FL •Mi • Casa Restaurant & Bakery, Saint Cloud, FL •Florida • Orange Grove Winery, Saint Petersburg, FL •I• Do Windows of Tampa Bay LLC, Saint Petersburg, FL •The • Cider Press Cafe, Saint Petersburg, FL •Uncle • Maddio’s, Saint Petersburg, FL •Watergarden • Inn At the Bay, Saint Petersburg, FL •Negril • Cuisine, Sanford, FL •White • Sands Restaurant Development, Santa Rosa Beach, FL •Blend, • Sarasota, FL •Miguel’s • Restaurant, Sarasota, FL •PNC • Bank, Sarasota, FL •Sarasota • Lanes, Sarasota, FL •State • Street Eating House & Cocktails, Sarasota, FL •Stottlemyer’s • Smokehouse, Sarasota, FL •Bay • Palms Waterfront Resort & Marina, St Pete Beach, FL •Bayview • Plaza Waterfront Resort, St Pete Beach, FL •Beach • House Suites, St Pete Beach, FL •Havana • Inn, St Pete Beach, FL •Mastry’s • Brewing Co, St Pete Beach, FL •Woody’s • BBQ, Starke, FL •Burrito • Boarder, Tallahassee, FL •Fat • Noodle Bar, Tallahassee, FL •Island • Wing Company, Tallahassee, FL •Krewe • De Gras, Tallahassee, FL •Proof • Brewing Co, Tallahassee, FL •Red • Hills International Horse Trials, Tallahassee, FL •Saltwater • Seafood Company, Tallahassee, FL •Sherwin • Williams, Tallahassee, FL •Southern • Public House, Tallahassee, FL •Table • 23, Tallahassee, FL •The • Blu Halo, Tallahassee, FL •Township, • Tallahassee, FL •Vertigo • Burgers & Fries, Tallahassee, FL

•Zaxby’s, • Tallahassee, FL •Baden • Tax Management, Tampa, FL •Fan • Connect, Tampa, FL •Fat • Dog Spirits LLC, Tampa, FL •Franklin • Manor, Tampa, FL •Legacy • Concessions LLC, Tampa, FL •RedCell • Technologies, Tampa, FL •Reliatex • Inc, Tampa, FL •Roger • West, Tampa, FL •Superior • Staffing & Payroll Solutions, Tampa, FL •University • of South Florida, Tampa, FL •Vuelo • Mexican Grill, Tampa, FL •Waste • Management Inc of Florida, Tampa, FL •Gold • Meat, Tavares, FL •Oceana • Coffee, Tequesta, FL •Space • Coast Fun Guide, Titusville, FL •Culver’s • of Venice, Venice, FL •Original • Word of Mouth, Venice, FL •GetPEOQuotes.com, • Vero Beach, FL •Lambeth • Groves, Vero Beach, FL •Perfect • Stix, Vero Beach, FL •Uncorked • - Savor Food & Wine Events, Webster, FL •Oli’s • Fashion Cuisine, Wellington, FL •Career • Source Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL •Fit • for Life LLC, West Palm Beach, FL •Miami • Subs, West Palm Beach, FL •The • Regional Kitchen & Public House, West Palm Beach, FL •Vinyl • Repair Master, West Palm Beach, FL •Roll-A-Cover • Int’l, Windermere, FL •Tough • Grip, Windermere, FL •Harbortouch • Point of Sale, Winter Garden, FL •Auctions • by Design, Winter Park, FL •Umi • Japanese Restaurant, Winter Park, FL •Georgia • Pacific Consumer Products LP, Atlanta, GA •White • & Hodge Co Inc, Atlanta, GA •Dinova, • Johns Creek, GA •Impact • Mailers LLC, Marietta, GA •Thrive • Farmers International Inc, Roswell, GA •Key • Benefit Administrators, Indianapolis, IN •Empire • Marketing Group, Goldsboro, NC •Five • D LLC, Walpole, NH •SingleCare, • Columbus, OH •Matt • & Steve’s, Mississauga, ON •The • Hershey Company, Hershey, PA •Captain • D’s, Nashville, TN •The • Living Company, Dallas, TX •Magnate • Custom Construction, Houston, TX •Matthews • Southwest, Lewisville, TX •Caffe • Umbria Coffee Roasters, Seattle, WA

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H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in

hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry

and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing

together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your

area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

FRLA Chapter Presidents Retreat.

FRLA with Billy Dean joining Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

Broward Chapter Holiday Bash was a lot of fun!

The Northwest Florida Chapter’s Coastal Boil was a success! 20  S P R I N G

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Estero High School ProStart students with teacher Jeremy Jasper. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

2017 Hillsborough Chapter Board installation: (left to right) David Stefan, Jim Walker, Eric Potts, Javier Rasmussen, Dominic Provenzano, Paul Joseph, Dannette Lynch, Jerry Soles and Chris Cona; Not pictured: Andy Brouillard.

FRLA Executive Committee members enjoyed themselves at the Chapter Presidents’ Retreat. Pictured here are Chairman Don Fox, Alan Palmieri and Sheldon Suga.

The Palm Beach Chapter holiday celebration and installation was fun!

Dan Murphy - FRLA, Tony Davenport - RPA, Wayne Gretsky hockey great, and Todd Cicero - Zenith Insurance enjoyed themselves at the Zenith Insurance Company Annual Agent Retreat!

FRLA members and guests enjoyed the FaBLE Conference in Idaho.

The Nashville Comes Home Tour hit several spots around the state, including City Tavern in Southwest Florida. w w w.FRL A .org

Nashville Comes Home Tour Sponsored by BMI visited Table 23 in Tallahassee. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

MBA IN HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT Let your degree take you places Florida Atlantic University’s 23-month MBA in Hospitality & Tourism Management prepares graduates for leadership roles in one of the world’s most dynamic industries. Traditional core MBA courses are blended with hospitality-specific classes to prepare leaders for executive level careers in this rapidly expanding industry. The program is designed with the highest level of CONVENIENCE in mind. Students can attend on campus, fully online, or combine both methods to easily accommodate life’s other responsibilities. Our LOW TUITION has ranked us 1st in Florida and 5th in the U.S. for return on investment in an MBA. The same tuition applies to everyone – in-state, national or global. Program coordinators offer PERSONALIZED ASSISTANCE with registration, ordering textbooks, and academic and career advising

Apply Today HOSPITALITY.FAU.EDU 561.297.6000

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Meet VISIT FLORIDA’s New President & CEO,

Ken Lawson For this legislative issue of Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine, VISIT FLORIDA would like to introduce you to our new President & CEO Ken Lawson. Ken, who was the unanimous selection of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors, assumed his new role on January 11. A native Floridian and former U.S. Marine Corps Judge Advocate General, he has spent 12 years serving and protecting the public in numerous regulatory positions, including his most recent work overseeing — among other divisions — restaurants, hotels and vacation rentals with the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation (DBPR). During his six-year tenure with them, he managed a team of 1,600 employees charged with licensing and regulating more than 1 million businesses and professionals throughout the state. In a message to the industry he sent on his first day, Ken outlined his plan for the near term. “In the days to come, I will be meeting with each of my new staff individually to hear their ideas for moving forward successfully. I will be personally reviewing all aspects of the day-to-day operations of this great organization to ensure we are fully accountable to the governor, a Legislature and the taxpayers of Florida in all our endeavors. “In the weeks and months ahead, I will be traveling the state to meet with our industry partners to better understand what they need from VISIT FLORIDA. I will also be walking the halls of the Florida capitol to speak directly with legislators about the vital role VISIT FLORIDA plays in growing the state’s economy by increasing tourism revenue.” He concluded by stating, “VISIT FLORIDA and the entire Florida tourism industry have a great deal to be proud of with five years of record visitation, visitor spending and tourism-related employment. I want to work closely with you all to take that unprecedented growth to the next level. I value the input and expertise of our industry leaders and partners, and would be happy to hear from you at klawson@visitflorida.org.” Carol Dover, President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and a member of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors, said, “Ken will be a tremendous asset to VISIT FLORIDA and ensures the organization will be well-positioned to continue to play a key role in promoting the state to visitors around the globe. VISIT FLORIDA needs a CEO with his impeccable capabilities and strong sense of responsibility to the public sector, and I am honored and privileged that he has agreed to take this significant leadership role.”

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“VISIT FLORIDA and the entire Florida tourism industry have a great deal to be proud of with five years of record visitation, visitor spending and tourismrelated employment.” — KEN LAWSON, President/CEO of VISIT FLORIDA

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L E G I S L AT I V E U P D AT E

2017 LEGISLATIVE ISSUES

As Florida’s voice of the hospitality industry, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association will continue to advocate for fair, reasonable, and balanced legislation that encourages continued growth for our industry and the state. To share insight into the issues we face, we have highlighted the following topics that we feel are critical to your businesses and to the community. Stay informed at FRLA.org/government-relations. VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING With 85 million visitors in the first three quarters of the year, 2016 is on track to be the sixth consecutive record year for Florida tourism. VISIT FLORIDA, acting as the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, is the catalyst that brings the public and private sectors together to create programs that promote the Sunshine State to travelers around the globe. Each year, the Florida Legislature appropriates public funding to be allocated for tourism marketing. VISIT FLORIDA is required to match those public funds dollar-for-dollar, which is done by actively recruiting the state’s tourism industry to invest as Partners through cooperative advertising campaigns, promotional programs and many other pay-to-play ventures. According to the EDR ROI study of VISIT FLORIDA, for every $1 the state invests in VISIT FLORIDA, the state sees a $3.20 return in tax revenue. FRLA supports fully funding VISIT FLORIDA.

TOURIST DEVELOPMENT TAX (BED TAX) Each year, local governments are requesting or authorizing the use of bed tax dollars for purposes beyond the scope of promoting tourism.

source for local governments to provide essential services. Florida’s hoteliers have never pushed to repeal or lower the Tourist Development Tax.

and even enroll their kids in school using the hotel address, essentially engaging in activities that indicate more of a landlord/tenant relationship.

FRLA supports the repeal of the 2016 law and opposes any use of the tourist development taxes for purposes other than those permitted by law.

Due to these activities, the sheriff, or other law enforcement agencies will insist such evictions should fall under Chapter 83 – Landlord Tenant Law.

AIRBNB Launched in 2008, Airbnb is an online community marketplace allowing people to list, find, and book rental accommodations. The company does not abide by the same rules and regulations, or pay the same taxes as all other public lodging establishments that are licensed through the state. Mega-commercial operators are buying properties and renting them like hotels, but are not complying with the health and safety codes, tax obligations, or zoning requirements. Analysis shows that 30% of Airbnb revenue comes from full time operators. FRLA supports the statewide compliance of all lodging establishments to register with the state, collect taxes, and protect consumers with adequate insurance, preventing unfair advantages.

QUICK EVICTIONS UNDER 509

In 2016, there was an assault on the Tourist Development Tax by three northwest counties wanting to use TDT dollars to fund public safety services.

An unfortunate trend that has recently emerged in Florida is the difficulties hoteliers are experiencing when attempting to evict transient tenants under F.S. 509.

Bed taxes should be used by local Tourist Development Councils to promote their county and attract more visitors, and should not be a funding

The situation evolves wherein the hotel room is let and the “transient tenant” begins to list the hotel suite as their address, acquire their driver’s license

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LABOR ISSUES Florida businesses can choose from many different models, styles, and types of growth, but they are still structured and directed by government regulation. Labor laws are regulations that pertain directly to the relationship between employers and employees.

FRLA supports the clarification of F.S. 509 Eliminating the confusion with chapter 83.

CHANGES TO ALCOHOL RULES AND REGULATIONS Alcoholic drinks are regulated by Florida’s Beverage Law. This law controls the way alcohol is manufactured, distributed, and sold to consumers. This is known as the “three tier system.” Potential alcohol issues which could modify the “three tier system” and that are on the table this year are: cooperative advertising and alcohol separation requirements.

FRLA supports legislation that provides a fair balance between employer and employee.

HOSPITALITY EDUCATION PROGRAM

FRLA supports legislation that reflects the realities of today’s marketplace.

EXPANSION OF GAMBLING Florida lawmakers have been actively negotiating a deal with the Seminole Tribe of Florida to renew a 20-year, multi-million-dollar gaming compact.

Recently, Florida has seen a rise in labor issues at the federal, state, and local levels of government. Some of the issues FRLA continues to monitor are: Miami Beach Minimum Wage, Worker’s Compensation, Employee Benefits, Overtime and Scheduling.

HEP provides important workforce-related training and transition programs through Florida’s public school system to students interested in pursuing careers in the hospitality industry. The money in the Division of Hotels and Restaurants’ Trust Fund is derived from a $10 license surcharge paid exclusively by Florida’s restaurant and lodging establishments for the sole purpose of funding this important program.

Despite several negotiating setbacks, the Seminole Tribe has continued to make monthly payments to the state even after a portion of the compact expired in October 2015.

Approximately 25,000 students and more than 240 high schools participate in HEP. This program helps the hospitality industry grow its future workforce by producing a pool of certified and immediately employable workers with the proper skill set to be an asset to the industry.

FRLA opposes the expansion of gambling and destination casinos.

FRLA encourages continued support of the Hospitality Education Program. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


L E G I S L AT I V E U P D AT E

FRLA’s Governmental Affairs Team Richard Turner, Meghan Sumner and Jason Reynolds RICHARD E. TURNER, ESQ. FRLA General Counsel and Vice President of Government Relations

Richard Turner joined the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association as General Counsel and Vice President of Government Relations in September of 2002. Richard has been a member of the Florida Bar for over 30 years and enjoyed a varied career including 17 years in state government prior to joining the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. Working for state government, Richard was Senior Attorney for the State Treasurer/ Insurance Commissioner, Deputy Director of Law Enforcement for the State Agriculture Commissioner, and Director of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco (ABT).

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Richard’s primary focus at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is to protect the diverse interests of Florida’s restaurateurs and public lodging establishments by lobbying the legislature against unfair regulation, taxation and government intrusion.

MEGHAN SUMNER Meghan Sumner is a Tallahassee native with a strong background in general office management and administration. She has a vast experience in areas such as event/meeting coordination, marketing, human resources and accounting. Meghan has worked as a legislative analyst in FRLA’s Government Relations department since November of 2015. She and her husband, Chris have three children and welcomed their fourth in the beginning of February!

JASON REYNOLDS FRLA Government Realtions

Jason Reynolds joined the FRLA team in 2005, as the Operations Coordinator for the Education and Training Department. He transitioned to the Government Relations Department in 2011. He is responsible for maintaining and reporting FRLA’s Political Action committees, advocates and advises members on legislation and regulations affecting their interests, and serves on the Department of Agriculture and Horse Park Authority Building Subcommittee. Jason is a proud veteran of the United States Air Force, where he was a member of the Air Expeditionary Force and deployed twice to the Middle Eastern Region. He is an aviation enthusiast, who soloed an airplane before he could legally drive.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Lodging THE

ISSUE

Visitors to Florida have enjoyed Florida’s hotels, motels and resorts since the beginning of Florida tourism. Florida is known for its beautiful lodging establishments, outstanding customer service and for the fabulous amenities offered at so many of them. This edition of Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine features many issues that are of interest to our lodging industry. From FRLA’s lodging partnerships and student readiness for our workforce, to customer service training options, tough issues like human trafficking and everything in between, we hope it brings light to all that the lodging industry does for our guests and industry employees.

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S P E C I A L L O D G I N G S E C T I O N : PA R T N E R S H I P S

Lodging Partnerships FRLA partners with various organizations to bolster hospitality industry efforts in Florida. We are proud of our lodging sector partners, and together we collaborate to bring the best of lodging to guests throughout the state.

THE ASIAN AMERICAN HOTEL OWNERS ASSOCIATION (AAHOA) The Asian American Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA) is a key partner in our lodging sector partnerships. With more than 16,000 members nationwide and representing nearly half of all hotels in the United States, AAHOA is a strong partner with members ranging from the small operator to some of the largest in the state. In addition, AAHOA is the largest hotel owners’ association in the world. “AAHOA highly values its relationship with FRLA and applauds the association for consistently showcasing effective legislative advocacy and an engaged membership,” said AAHOA President and CEO Chip Rogers. “Travel and tourism is the No. 1 job-creating industry in the state of Florida, and we’re proud to support the state’s hospitality-related business owners alongside FRLA.” Carol Dover, President and CEO of FRLA noted, “We are thrilled to partner with AAHOA because its members represent the best and brightest in the business. It is evident the organization is committed to ensuring small business owners are protected against burdensome regulations and that Florida hospitality continues to thrive. This partnership fits perfectly with our mission to protect, educate and promote the state’s hospitality industry.” For information about AAHOA, visit AAHOA.com.

FLORIDA BED AND BREAKFAST INNS ASSOCIATION (FLORIDA INNS) Florida Bed and Breakfast Inns Association (Florida Inns) is another one of these partners. The mission of the Florida Inns is marketing, advocacy and education for the hospitality industry. This association is committed to fostering a knowledgeable, caring and conscientious community of professional innkeepers, networking throughout Florida to help member inns achieve their marketing goals and deliver the highest level of professionalism and experience. Florida Inn’s Executive Director Pattie Detwiler noted that, “The Florida Inns focus on education, advocacy and marketing for independent bed and breakfast, boutique and independent hotel inns. The partnership with FRLA postures Florida Inns to better serve our members in the advocacy arena and the education that FRLA provides goes hand in hand with our mission statement. “This collaboration brings together two nonprofit organizations aimed at developing unique guest experiences at the same time safeguarding the needs of the public and attracting guests to Florida. With support from FRLA, we boost our efforts across the state to reach industry leaders and help the hospitality industry thrive.” All independent properties are welcome to join Florida Inns at Florida-Inns.com.

SUPERIOR SMALL LODGING

Superior Small Lodging is another lodging association that FRLA has partnered with for advocacy and education. These are privately owned hotels, inns, bed and breakfasts, cottages, condos and vacation rentals that typically are small business operations throughout Florida. There are 150 members of this association giving a “voice” to the small property owner. For more information about Superior Small Lodging go to SuperiorSmallLodging.com. Together, FRLA, AAHOA, the Florida Inns and the Superior Small Lodging associations work to represent all aspects of Florida’s lodging industry. Want to know more? Contact Dan Murphy, Vice President of Membership at 850.224.2250 extension 226. w w w.FRL A .org

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S P E C I A L L O D G I N G S E C T I O N : E D U C AT I O N

Our Future in Lodging The Hospitality and Tourism Management Program

T

he Hospitality Tourism & Management Program (HTMP) is a two-year, high school curriculum developed by the American Hotel & Lodging Association Educational Institute (EI). HTMP introduces high school juniors and seniors to careers in the lodging industry. The Hospitality and Tourism Management Program teaches them basic skills and knowledge they need for success in the industry. This is accomplished through on-the-job training and experience, coupled with a dynamic and comprehensive curriculum. When a student has earned his/her Year 1 Certificate of Completion and Year II Certificate of Completion, the student is eligible for the Certified Hospitality & Tourism Management Professional designation. This certificate is nationally recognized and allows the student to earn college credit for the HTMP class and scholarships, as well as provides opportunities for employment. There are almost 2,000 students enrolled in 30 HTMP programs across the state.

HTMP JOB READINESS HTMP students come to an employer ready to make an immediate impact. They are trained in industry-specific and transferable skills that bring value to the employer. The program and curriculum teach, among other topics: • Guest Service

• Leadership and Management

• Rooms Division

• Housekeeping

• Marketing and Sales

• Food and Beverage Service

Florida law requires mandatory foodhandler training. FRLA’s online training is easy, self-guided, and this interactive online training program will teach you the basics of safe food handling and preventing foodborne illness.

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Official DBPR Contracted Provider

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


S P E C I A L L O D G I N G S E C T I O N : E D U C AT I O N

Educating Future Hotel Leaders – The Need to Know Everything What a challenge is upon us!

By Dr. Peter Ricci, CHA, CHIA, CHSE, CRME

A

s a former “fixer” for both franchisors and third-party management companies, my career was based on repairing hotels that were not performing to excellent standards. My career had a geographical move 15 times within a 10-year period, and I created a “fresh start” at each hotel. When anyone would ask what skills or competencies were needed for my role, I often said and continue to say: everything. But, how does one teach everything? In my current role as administrator of one of the country’s top 30 hospitality programs, we face this question on a regular basis. It comes up during faculty retreats, with industry executives, in ad hoc discussions with brand presidents and so on and so forth. This conversation with academic administrators, faculty members and industry executives has occurred with those located across the globe. This everything seems to shake out vaguely to be: • Excellent business skills/quantitative/P&L • The “soft skills” of empathy, compassion, guest service excellence to leadership and emotional intelligence (EI) • Liberal arts education to assist with conversations and discussions across all levels of society • Outstanding ability to communicate both orally and in writing — the ability to persuade, lead and be effective while communicating As you’ve just read above, that really means everything! It appears that the current trend found in academia to attempt to meet the majority of these competencies is to move most curricula to a business school model or similar. This includes broad coursework from guest service to finance, accounting to F&B and revenue management to marketing. Yet, one cannot take away the need for a broad-based liberal arts education as well. My roots in sociology often assist in survey design, global communications and so on. One cannot help but come back to a seeming need for everything! What an incredible challenge to anyone preparing future leaders! Further, this is equally overwhelming for hospitality students. And,

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don’t forget their respective faculty mentors and leaders who are usually experts in one or two narrow areas. No one can exceed at everything. Even expert general managers are usually “expert” at only one or two areas themselves. But, the expectations of owners and asset managers are for excellence in performance on all metrics. Hospitality educators are faced constantly with this ever-changing and ever-evolving platform of this everything concept. Does your school become expert at leadership skills? Sustainability? Finance? Hotel operations? Or, do you try to blend/mix/integrate/comingle? This article is written as another part in the ongoing conversation, a starting platform within the FRLA magazine for more discussion among those currently working in hotels. Input from practicing general managers, department heads, staff members and recruiters would be most appreciated as we continue this discussion. The article is actually titled “Part 1” on purpose — with the strong hopes that feedback and opinions will come in from across Florida. As a reader of this article, what do YOU consider the top three skills or competencies we should train for among future hotel leaders? I’ll leave you with this. When I did my doctoral dissertation in 2005, the premise were expectations for hospitality graduates versus non-graduates. In every case, expectations were higher for graduates as common sense would assume. No differences for women and men, new GMs/longterm GMs, full service/select service, brand/non-brand. Everyone expected MORE and they expected everything. The biggest take away, though, was that no one wanted to pay extra for these higher expectations … but, that’s another article in itself. Looking forward to your feedback! Dr. Peter Ricci, CHA, CHIA, CHSE, CHRM, CRME is the director of Florida Atlantic University’s hospitality & tourism management program. You may reach him at peter.ricci@fau.edu.

www.business.fau.edu/hospitality

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SPECIAL LODGING SECTION: HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Division of Hotels and Restaurants www.MyFloridaLicense.com/dbpr/hr

HUMAN TRAFFICKING INFORMATION SHEET Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery that makes billions of dollars in profit by exploiting people for forced labor or commercial sex. Nationwide, it is estimated that 27 million people are enslaved, with 70% of the victims being female. Florida ranks third in the human trafficking market. There are two forms of human trafficking: labor and sex. In labor trafficking, the tourism and hospitality industries allow traffickers to pose as temporary staffing companies that provide labor to public lodging establishments to fill positions such as landscapers, day laborers and housekeepers. In sex trafficking, operations are set up in public lodgings via online advertising — without the lodging operator’s knowledge. Victims are made to live in the lodging and provide commercial sex services for money to customers in their room or the customer’s room. In many cases, the human trafficking victims are lured from foreign countries with the promise of a legitimate job — but then find themselves ensnared by physical abuse or threats. Public lodgings, by their very nature, provide excellent cover to human trafficking operations. Because of this, it is extremely important that hotel and motel staff members are educated on the signs of such activity so it can be reported in the proper manner. By identifying and reporting human trafficking, illegal operations can be thwarted and many lives saved.

Ways to Identify a Victim of Human Trafficking • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Signs of physical abuse or malnourishment Person seems coached or controlled Victim rarely left alone Suspicious tattoos or branding on victim Living conditions unsuitable Victim demeaned or treated aggressively Accompanied by older male Avoids interaction with others “Do not Disturb” sign used constantly Receives lots of visitors Pays for room with cash Dresses inappropriately or provocatively Few personal belongings Refuses cleaning services Room smells of bodily fluids and musk Lots of cash in room Alcohol and/or drugs in room Room monitored outside or in hallway

DBPR Form HR 5022-104

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How to Report Human Trafficking If you suspect human trafficking:

• •

• • • • • •

NEVER Confront the suspected trafficker Attempt to help the victim ALWAYS Contact local law enforcement Alert property management or director of security Contact the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (1.888.373.7888) Contact the Polaris BeFree Textline – Text “BeFree” (233733) Call the Florida Abuse Hotline (1.800.96. ABUSE) (1.800.962.2873) for child victimization Call 911 for an emergency situation

www.MyFloridaLicense.com/dbpr/hr

Revised 2016 March 22

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SPECIAL LODGING SECTION: TRAINING

Do You Want Hotel Staff or Customer Service Ambassadors?

A

ccording to OneReach.com, “While over 80% of companies boast that they provide ‘superior’ customer service, only 8% of customers actually agree with them.” How does your hotel rate, and how much does your staff impact customer opinion? Successful hotels begin and end with staff who create exceptional guest experiences — customer service ambassadors. Staff become ambassadors as a result of engaged leadership that understands the value of continuous learning and improvement through coaching and development. In his book, “The Carolina Way,” former University of North Carolina basketball coach, Dean Smith, outlines necessary steps for a team to have a winning season. One of the main components is well-planned, purposeful practice. For each basketball practice, Coach Smith distributed a written plan that included an emphasis for the day that players memorized. New skills and plays were drilled repeatedly until players could complete the drills flawlessly. In the middle of the night, Coach Smith would wake a player and present a game scenario. If the player could not instantly respond with the practiced action, all players were wakened to attend midnight practice until they could repeat the scenario response perfectly. In other words, practice did NOT make perfect. Perfect practice made perfect. Coach Smith’s co-author, professor Gerald Bell, follows up the practice explanation associating it to a business setting. “Businesses don’t spend nearly enough time practicing, training or rehearsing. Most business just go to work and then ‘play the game.’ Practice, through on-thejob and classroom training, is where great companies are built. The best companies still believe in practice. They train and develop their people so their people can improve the business. The best leaders insist on practice time — training and development, coaching, mentoring and performance improvement of their people and themselves. It’s not an option.” Most hotels require orientation training for policies and procedures or to obtain required state certifications. Beyond this, little time is devoted to professional development designed to educate and empower staff to understand themselves, work well with their teammates and perfectly practice their role as customer service ambassador. Ambassador training and practice should be customized to fit the hotel mission and personally impact each staff member. FRLA/RCS High Performance Training customizes professional development workshops and facilitates workshops as described by Coach Smith with a written plan, w w w.FRL A .org

mantra and repeated practice. When employees learn and grow according to what works well for them while simultaneously recognizing the benefit to the hotel and guests, they become invested and live their title of customer service ambassador with an attitude of gratitude. They realize their professional and personal presentation not only enhance the hotel, but in turn enhance them, their position and their ability to advance. Participants leave training excited to practice their ambassador skills and experience positive feedback from their supervisor, colleagues and hotel guests. The best measure of success is to hear a guest compliment the ambassador and to return to the hotel for another stay.

 few of the customizable High Performance Trainings A offered by RCS: • • • • •

Communicate with Confidence Critical Customer Service Fight, Flight or Flow — Conflict Management Initiative Begins with “I” Professionalism and Business Etiquette: Keys to Intentional Success • Teambuilding 1.0 — Understand Personality Differences Using True Colors • Teambuilding 2.0 — Use Interpersonal Skills to Build Relationships

What people say about RCS High Performance Training: “RCS was a pleasure to work with during the entire process from planning to scheduling to the training itself. They created and customized a program for us based on the book ‘Our Iceberg is Melting – Change Management.’ They knocked it out of the ballpark! Staff enjoyed the activities and learning; it was clear the trainer was prepared for us. This whole program cost less than some of the webinars our staff participate in. What an awesome value.” - Pam Avery, former GM Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore For information on RCS High Performance Training, contact Christy Crump at 850.528.7099 or ccrump@frla.org. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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S P E C I A L L O D G I N G S E C T I O N : S TAT I S T I C S

Public Lodging and Food Service Establishment License Accounts — End of FY 2015-16 DISTRICT PUBLIC LODGING ESTABLISHMENTS

1

Hotels

2 430

Motels

3 261

4 248

5 380

6 205

TOTAL

7 143

167

1,834

264

336

484

583

342

319

326

2,609

5,390

3,860

2,802

2,277

1,495

1,082

866

17,772

216

235

172

89

36

20

144

912

57

24

31

42

63

26

13

256

Single

508

78

246

1,154

145

288

132

2,551

Group

91

73

80

242

42

168

201

897

Collective

99

22

98

135

67

354

179

954

Single

580

310

3,155

5,834

123

513

496

11,011

Group

23

14

22

39

8

18

21

145

126

106

203

330

71

274

273

1,383

Single

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

Group

1

0

0

10

0

1

0

12

Collective

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

3

7,785

5,319

7,542

11,071

2,600

3,206

2,818

40,341

Nontransient Apartments Transient Apartments Bed and Breakfasts Vacation Rentals - Condos

Vacation Rentals - Dwellings

Collective Vacation Rentals – Timeshare Projects

TOTAL SOURCE: DBPR Versa: Regulation Single Licensing System

Average Number of Public Lodging Units per Account — End of FY 2015-16 250

Top 10 Lodging Violations 12K

237.6

Violation Numbers

10,673

26 Garbage and Refuse Disposal 13 Building Repair 25 Premises Maintained 19 Plumbing 12 Balcony, Railing Safety 38 Current License Displayed 24 Vermin Control 39 Housekeeping 2 Fire Hazards 17 Sanitation: Bedding: Bed linens, towels

10K

200

8,837

8,787

8K 150

149.8

6K 100

4,656

4K 3,057

60.2

2,429

50

2K

2017

1,545

1,510

17

02

39

38

12

19

25

0

13

M ot els No nt r Ap an art sie me nt nt s ApTran art sie me nt nt s B Br ed a ea n Va kfa d ca sts tio nR en Co ta Va nd lca os tio nR Dw en ell taling s Tim e Pr shar oje e cts

Ho te ls

2.7

26

6.9

32  S P R I N G

1,738

20.5

17.1

0

2,294

24

55.1

Violation Number

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SPECIAL LODGING SECTION: PRICE GOUGING FOR LODGING REQUIREMENTS

Before You Raise Prices During an Emergency, Consider This! By Cathy H. Tucker, Bureau Chief – Division of Hotels & Restaurants

P

rice gouging refers to when a seller spikes the prices of goods, services or commodities to a level much higher than is considered reasonable or fair and is considered exploitative, potentially to an unethical extent1. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office oversees practices or complaints regarding the practice of price gouging and has been a tireless leader on the issue. The Florida Attorney General has a frequently asked questions page on her website solely devoted to price gouging. Florida Statute 501.160 states that during a state of emergency, it is unlawful to sell, lease, offer to sell, or offer for lease essential commodities, dwelling units or self-storage facilities for an amount that grossly exceeds the average price for that commodity during the 30 days before the declaration of the state of emergency. The Price Gouging Statute covers only essential commodities and requires those selling the commodity to possess an occupational license. Some lodging properties within the state are currently under active investigation and litigation regarding our most recent state of emergency in October 2016 for Hurricane Matthew. Once the Governor declares a state of emergency, the Florida Statute goes into effect. The core objective for investigating and prosecuting price gougers is to prevent businesses and/or individuals from taking advantage of consumers’ misfortunes2. Lodging operators must be cautious when increasing prices and be cognizant of the previous 30 days prior to the declared state of emergency. Operators are provided an opportunity to justify the price increase if evidence can be provided to show increases in its prices or market trends.

w w w.FRL A .org

Advertisements from billboards, advertising booklets, online sites and the internet are also factors to be considered prior to adjusting prices. If a consumer is aware of an advertisement, they can provide information which conflicts with prices charged. In addition, franchisees and general managers are often not responsible for price changes occurring online, and corporate websites often adjust prices internally, updating prices based upon supply and demand. It is important to note that the responsibility for avoiding price gouging rests with the front desk. State Attorney General Investigator Supervisor William Featheringill’s office pursues the actual property, which is where responsibility lies. Once a guest enters into a property and agrees to rent, it is incumbent upon the property owner and staff to ensure that the rental price does not fall into the definition of price gouging. If the room rental is found to be excessive, it is the responsibility of the lodging property to adjust the rate. Failure to do so may put the establishment/operator at risk of being investigated and possibly charged with price gouging. Operators need to understand that price gouging and the definition of “grossly exceeds” falls within the discretion of the investigating assistant attorney general to determine. Given that this happens in a state of emergency, it might be wise to err on the side of caution when raising prices. Promoting goodwill with your guests rewards you, the operator, with customer satisfaction in the short run and brand loyalty in the long run. 1 Wikipedia definition of price gouging 2 Florida Bar Journal, April 2006 Volume 80, No. 4

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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SPECIAL LODGING SECTION: BROWARD CHAPTER

FRLA Broward Chapter Strongly Supports Hospitality Education Local FRLA Chapter Presents $40,000 to Broward County Public Schools to Support Hospitality Education

O

n December 6, the Broward Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) contributed $40,000 to Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) to support the curriculum for the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program (HTMP) at eight Broward County High Schools. Administered by the FRLA Educational Foundation (FRLAEF), the HTMP program helps high school juniors and seniors take their first real steps toward promising hospitality careers through graphic-rich textbooks and workbooks, and incorporates the best of modern technology with a selection of online coursework. Superintendent Robert W. Runcie and Broward County School Board Members recognized the hospitality industry’s contributions at the Broward County School Board Meeting held Tuesday at the Kathleen C. Wright Administration Center. The FRLA Broward Chapter Board of Directors and local high school students currently enrolled in hospitality-related education programs participated in the recognition and check presentation. Students offered testimonials on the positive impacts and benefits of these vocational programs. This year overall, the FRLA Broward Chapter contributed a total of $65,000 in support of local schools and teachers. In 2016, the FRLAEF has awarded more than $700,000 statewide to support Florida’s next generation of restaurateurs, hoteliers and business leaders. Of this, more than $37,000 was contributed toward Broward County Public Schools. In addition to these contributions, several FRLA members have formed partnerships with local schools to add further support and provide mentorship opportunities. In Broward County, seven FRLA members have adopted local schools: • MacArthur High School – The Diplomat Beach Resort • Stranahan High School – Riverside Hotel • Fort Lauderdale High School – Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach • Boyd Anderson High School – Republic Services • Blanche Ely High School – Fort Lauderdale Marriott Pompano Beach Resort & Spa • Stoneman Douglas High School – Duffy’s Sports Grill • Lauderdale Lakes Middle School – Ritz-Carlton Fort Lauderdale   The FRLAEF provides school-to-career training for 30,000 hospitality students representing more than 250 high schools statewide. Designed to increase the quality and employability of graduates, the program uses an industry-derived curriculum through Florida 34  S P R I N G

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ProStart and the HTMP. With a focus on the future of Florida’s hospitality industry, these programs allow students to learn and showcase skills that can be used in foodservice and lodging. To learn more about the FRLA Educational Foundation, visit frla.org/educational-foundation. For membership information, contact Anne Sallee, FRLA Broward Chapter Director at 954.253.0850 or by email at asallee@frla.org. For all media inquiries, contact Erin Power, Press Secretary at epower@frla.org or 850-224-2250 ext. 225.

Broward School Board accepts $40,000 check from local FRLA Chapter.

Broward County students enjoy holding the big $40,000 check. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


WARNING ONE ALCOHOL RELATED VIOLATION CAN LEAD TO YOUR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE BEING SUSPENDED OR REVOKED.

Protect your license with alcohol compliance training!

IMPORTANT! If you serve a minor, you can go to jail for up to 60 days and be fined $500! Remember your training! To protect your liquor license, and be in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, make sure your staff: 1. Checks the ID of anyone who looks younger than 30 2. Ensures the birthday on the ID is on or before today’s date 1996 3. Asks a manager if they have any questions or concerns about an ID’s validity 4. Does not serve an empty seat or multiple drinks to one person 5. Understands they have the right to refuse service if they are not certain the person is at least 21

CONTRACT FRLA’S REGULATORY COMPLIANCE SERVICES TODAY FOR A FREE TRAINING CONSULTATION

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G 35 regcomplianceusa.com • 800-537-9863 • facebook.com/regcomplianceusa

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NEW PRODUCT

How to Start Streamlining Your Alcohol Purchases

T

hese days serving alcohol is a big part of what’s expected by restaurant patrons. Whether it’s coming in for a beer after work or getting together with friends for a nice dinner — the alcohol options behind the bar matter, and people are loyal to their brands. Unfortunately, the hardest part about maintaining your alcohol inventory is purchasing your products. Many restaurateurs don’t realize there are simpler, more streamlined ways to restock inventory, pay invoices and ensure they’re getting the best price for their products.

Understand Alcohol Complexities

The alcohol industry is rife with varying rules and regulations — not only by location, but also by product. With each state setting and abiding by their own rules, the Three Tier System (manufacturers sell to distributors, who sell to retailers) is what governs the sale of alcohol and simultaneously adds complexities to the purchasing process. Depending on your business, you could end up paying alcohol invoices according to a variety of different regulations — especially if you have operations in different states.

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Streamline Purchases

Aside from the burden of ensuring invoices are paid on time and according to the correct alcohol regulations, restaurateurs often have to manually write checks for delivery, maintain escrow accounts, and contend with the concern of consequences if they are a day late on payment. There are several ways to combat these problems, but the most immediate solution is to start automating purchases with electronic payments. When it comes to payment, compliance, reconciliation, insight into purchasing data, and integration into back office and accounting systems, solutions such as Fintech streamline your beverage alcohol business. Electronic payment also alleviates several manual processes that restaurants face

on a weekly and sometimes daily basis, such as inventory control, restaurant accounting and cost analysis.

Stop Leaving Money on the Table

With a business to run there isn’t always time in the day to compare prices to previous costs or to scour bills to see where you could be saving money. In situations like this, it’s ideal to let your vendors do the work for you. Start asking your distributors for their price list and broken case reports and for purchasing insight into where extra fees are piling up and where discounts have been lost.

Visit go.fintech.net/Fintech50 to begin your free 30-day trial for your beer, wine and liquor deliveries.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


A payments company that caters to you.

Sterling offers a unique payments experience that combines the latest technologies with service that’s responsive, efficient and personal. Sterling provides: • Honesty and transparency in pricing • Competitive processing rates • Multiple EMV solutions with tip adjust and out of PCI scope • Partnerships with leading restaurant POS hardware and software companies • Gift cards – starter and custom programs that integrate with any POS system • Individualized, around-the-clock service from our Tampa-based headquarters

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW STERLING’S SOLUTIONS AND SERVICE CAN CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR SUCCESS. Call (800) 591-6098 / Visit sterling.cc/caters w w w.FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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MARKETING TIPS

The Secret Weapon for Restaurants is in Your Pocket By MATT DONOVAN, FOUNDER OF TXTSIGNAL

T

he concept of the “modern” restaurant industry is a fascinating paradox. At its core, it’s the same as it was 100 years ago. Ultimately, restaurants connect people to food that satisfies their need — whether it be for taste, health or convenience. In other ways, we’re seeing a shift toward experimentation. Owners and chefs are trying new styles, new experiences (see the meteoric rise of food trucks) and new ways to grow business. One struggle that’s prevailed from the old to the new is how to keep up with the shifting marketing landscape. TV and radio offer great reach but at a high cost. Social media offers branding and engagement, but that doesn’t always translate into butts in chairs. Enter SMS marketing. SMS, or text message, marketing is promotional communication sent directly to a customer’s phone via text message.

Here are a few ways restaurants can use a simple text message to drive real sales: • Link to a digital coupon. • “Show this text for …” a special or other offer. • Offer a special on a new menu item. • Send alerts when new or popular items are in stock. • Have customers in a certain area sign up for an alert when a new location in their area is opening. • Let customers show a text to receive a gift card with a purchase (repeat customers!). • With broadcast mediums like TV or radio, you get the same message out, but at a much higher cost. And what do any of us do when commercials start on TV? We pick up our phones.

So how is text marketing different? Users actually sign up to receive SMS messages. You’ve seen them before: “Text BREWSKI to 43506 for the newest beers on tap!” It offers something valuable to the customer, something they actually want to receive. With that in mind, consider how SMS makes marketing your restaurant simpler and more successful. YOU BUILD YOUR AUDIENCE. Your audience is based on permission. Imagine talking to a room full of customers who know and love you and offering something they can’t wait to get their hands on. YOU OWN YOUR MESSAGE. Text messages go out through an online platform exactly as you send them. No middlemen; you broadcast directly. TIMING IS EVERYTHING. Text messages can be sent immediately or scheduled ahead of time, exactly when you want a message in the pockets of your customers. It’s important to note that the provider you use matters. In the restaurant industry, you understand the importance of regulatory compliance. SMS marketing is the same way. Look for vendors with an established reputation with regulators (txtsignal is one of only a handful of platforms to earn the Common Short Code Administration’s Top Provider status). The modern restaurant is successful because of more than the food. It creates a great atmosphere, even when the customer isn’t in the restaurant. You can put your experience right into the device that every customer carries with them in their pocket. Matt Donovan is the founder of txtsignal and is a FRLA Marketing Council Member.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Join hospitality’s powerful players for the

Innovation Begins Here

August 2-3, 2017

The Summit is THE event of the year where Florida’s most influential hospitality professionals gather. In addition to riveting educational sessions and unrivaled networking, come experience the newly redesigned Fort Lauderdale resort, situated along a quarter-mile beach, where you can enjoy jet skiing and snorkeling or pamper yourself at the full-service spa and relax by the lagoon pool. Enjoy exclusive attendee discounted hotel room rates as low as $166/night, discounted parking rates and 10% off all restaurant outlets (food only on standard menus) and spa treatments!

We can’t hold this event without the support and participation of our supplier partners. Thank you Zenith Insurance, Coca-Cola, Infinite Energy, Heartland, American Express, Dade Paper, United Healthcare, Hershey’s, Florida Atlantic University, Island Oasis, Snagajob, Sparxoo, Royal Cup Coffee & Tea, PrimeNet Direct Marketing Solutions, Fiberbuilt Umbrellas & Cushions, Bunzl/Reliable Redistribution Resource, Caspers Service Company/Cox Electric, TUUCI, Ecolab, Terminix Commercial, Besnard & Associates Insurance, Alsco and Thompson, Sizemore, Gonzalez & Hearing, P.A. Registration opens Wednesday, March 1 (www.frla.org/event/summit). For event or sponsorship F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G 39 information, contact Marjorie Stone, Director of Corporate Events 850-524-1747 or mstone@frla.org.

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T O U R I S M M AT T E R S

New 2016 Tourism Numbers: Breaking Records Again!

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overnor Rick Scott recently announced that Florida set another record in tourism by welcoming the highest amount of visitors in the state’s history with 112.8 million visitors in 2016. This is the sixth consecutive record year for visitation to Florida, exceeding the previous high of 106.6 million in 2015 by 5.9 percent. Tourism jobs also hit a record high in 2016 of 1.4 million jobs, exceeding the previous record in 2015. Governor Scott said, “I have seen firsthand how tourism impacts our state. Since I have been in office, we have made important investments in VISIT FLORIDA and broken record after record of visitors, added more than a million new residents and seen Florida’s private sector create more than 1.25 million new jobs. Unfortunately, even with these incredible successes, politicians in the Florida House are trying to eliminate VISIT FLORIDA. I don’t understand how anyone can look at Florida’s

booming tourism industry, and the more than 1.4 million jobs it supports, and vote to kill it. The legislation the Florida House is pushing puts more than 1.4 million jobs at risk and we cannot let that happen. We have to fight to continue investing in our tourism industry so we can keep breaking records and adding even more jobs. “Over the past week, I have traveled the state meeting with small business owners, economic development leaders, tourism leaders, community members and hardworking Floridians who all had a clear message – Florida’s economy needs tourism. Last year, Florida was challenged like never before as we faced the Zika virus, two hurricanes and the terror attack at Pulse Nightclub. In the face of adversity, we continued in our mission to promote our great state and thanks to the hard work of VISIT FLORIDA, we continue to see record visitors to Florida. “In 2015, every 85 tourists supported one job. Today, VISIT FLORIDA data shows that

every 76 tourists support one job – proof that tourism continues to be a major and growing influence on job creation in Florida and that we must continue to invest in this vital part of our growing economy.” Ken Lawson, President and CEO of VISIT FLORIDA, said, “Six years of record-setting visitation would not be possible without a strong global marketing strategy focused on maximizing the economic impact of Florida tourism. To have achieved another tourism record in 2016 given all the challenges this state faced last year is an incredible testament to the cooperative relationship VISIT FLORIDA has with our more than 12,000 industry business partners around the state. Today’s announcement proves that sustained collective tourism marketing works and we have Governor Scott and our supporters in the Florida Legislature to thank for their unparalleled leadership over the past six years that has helped position our industry for this unprecedented success.”

What Restaurants Need to Know About Website Accessibility Claims

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he new battleground for plaintiffs filing Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) accessibility cases involves claims of barriers, not in physical space, but in cyber space. The plaintiffs’ bar has become more aggressive in filing claims asserting that public webpages that are not accessible to disabled users violate Title III of the ADA. Restaurants that have websites are prime targets for these lawsuits, second only to retailers. Florida now tips the scales with the most court filings, as Andres Gomez and Juan Carlos Gil, who allege they are legally blind, quietly have been filing ADA website accessibility actions in the Southern District of Florida against namebrand retailers, manufacturers and restaurant chains for several years. Defendants have handled these claims in a legal vacuum because the body responsible for enforcing the ADA, the U.S. Department of

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Justice (DOJ), has delayed its proposed amended regulations to the law, which would provide some guidance on the issue. This has left an increasingly litigated issue open for the courts to interpret how Title III of the ADA applies to business websites, leading to inconsistent legal decisions. Despite the lack of guidance, DOJ continues to intervene in private lawsuits, urging courts not to dismiss the cases. Given the trajectory of this issue, businesses should immediately become familiar with the risk of ADA website accessibility claims, and the ways in which they can be impacted by such claims. When feasible, an ounce of prevention in this area can offer a great value down the line when serial ADA filers come calling. Businesses should consult legal counsel who can explain potential strategies, including retaining a digital accessibility expert and voluntarily adopting the standards of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

(WCAG) version 2.0, which the federal government recently adopted as the guidelines for its websites. The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association is working on this issue with attorneys Nicole Sieb Smith and Jacey Kaps, from FRLA member firm Rumberger Kirk & Caldwell. Please contact the association or the firm for a copy of the webinars the firm has conducted on this subject. Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, P.A. provides litigation and counseling services in a wide range of civil practice areas including product liability, commercial litigation, construction, real estate, intellectual property litigation, securities litigation, bankruptcy, labor and employment law, insurance coverage, professional liability, and administrative law. Offices are located in Orlando, Tampa, Miami, Tallahassee, and Birmingham. For more information, please visit rumberger.com.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


ENGAGE

FRLA Engage Program Update – January Engage Locations Jacksonville, Tampa, Orlando, Miami, Broward County, Tallahassee and the Palm Beaches

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Engage program is continuing to grow. The initiative has spread from Central Florida to Tampa, Miami, Broward County, Tallahassee, Jacksonville and the Palm Beaches. Our continued focus is to build relationships with our local leaders and help change the nature of the conversation to show that our industry can be great partners across many platforms. Additionally, we have expanded outside of local elected officials and have started to meet with city offices such as permitting and health departments in Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, Tallahassee and Broward to build relationships and better understand the process in each city and how we can work better with these offices in the future. We are continuing to set up similar meetings throughout all of our markets.

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Engage Miami will be sitting down with the City of Miami, Miami Dade County and Miami Beach permitting divisions in the first quarter of the year, and Engage Jacksonville will be sitting down with Council members in Jacksonville/Duval County during the first two months of 2017 as well. We will also be launching the Engage Palm Beach initiative in February starting off with a public affairs meeting. As a National Reputation Initiative in December, the FRLA Engage program highlighted

FRLA Gives Back. This is an initiative the National Restaurant Association promoted across the country. Across all of our Engage markets we chose specific organizations and nonprofits to help during the holiday season. From veterans, to assisting the homeless, to giving gifts to children in need, the hospitality industry came together and helped by raising funds, donating toys and volunteering. We are excited to continue growing our Engage program in 2017!

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A LA CARTE

TOP TRENDS!

TOP 20 FOOD TRENDS

1 New cuts of meat 2 Street food-inspired dishes

8 Authentic ethnic cuisine

15 Housemade/

3 Healthful kids’ meals

9 Heirloom fruits and vegetables

16 Whole grain items in kids’ meals

10 African flavors

17 Protein-rich

4 Housemade charcuterie 5 Sustainable seafood 6 Ethnic-inspired breakfast items 7 Housemade condiments

11 Ethnic spices 12 Housemade sausage 13 Housemade pickles

14 Ancient grains

artisan ice cream

grains/seeds

18 Artisan cheeses 19 Savory desserts 20 Gourmet items in kids’ meals

SOURCE: National Restaurant Association — Restaurant.org/FoodTrends

NIGHTCLUB & BAR SHOW Attend the Nightclub & Bar Show, the premier event in the bar and nightlife industry, 3/27–3/29 in Las Vegas! Save $10 off any pass with promo code FRLA10. All passes include Keynotes, Expo Floor, F&B Innovation Center and Welcome Kickoff Party! Register at ncbshow.com.

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A LA CARTE

ICONIC MAI-KAI RESTAURANT CELEBRATED 60 YEARS IN BUSINESS IN 2016 The Mai-Kai has been a tiki-culture legend for 60 years, and in late 2016, to celebrate this milestone, the restaurant went all out for patrons visiting the Mai-Kai from all over the country. Besides serving the classic food and drinks The Mai-Kai is known for, the Polynesian Islander Review, choreographed by owner, Mireille Thornton, put on the authentic South Seas stage show and three “lost cocktails” from

the original menu were served to guests. Named to the National Register of Historic Places two years ago, The Mai-Kai is the last remaining example of the classic mid-20th century Polynesian supper club. Indeed, the restaurant’s many fans consider it the Tiki mecca. Since the venerable Critiki website began compiling its user ratings into an annual list two years ago, The Mai-Kai has been honored as the No. 1 tiki bar two years straight.

D-TOUR, A GLOBAL TOURISM SUMMIT AT WALT DISNEY WORLD RESORT April 26–27, 2017 Addressing the transformation and disruption of the global tourism industry, and how to lead in this new tourism environment, will top the timely agenda at the University of Florida Global Tourism Summit April 26–27, 2017 at the BoardWalk Inn at Walt Disney World. Topics to be addressed include: • Where are profitable travelers? • How will data transform the industry? • How to manage a crisis • What does the future look like? The Summit is open to the tourism and hospitality industry as well as to businesses that rely on tourism. Registration includes a spectacular opening event at Epcot, breakfast, lunch, a full day of speakers, a VIP reception and Gala Dinner. Everything is included and yes Mickey Mouse, too. Registration is $895, and there is a block of hotel rooms at the BoardWalk Inn for $249 per night. Go to UFTourismSummit.com for details and to sign up. w w w.FRL A .org

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A LA CARTE

SOUTHERN GLAZER’S A game changer for the wine and spirits industry In 2016, Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits completed the combination of Southern Wine & Spirits and Glazer’s — forming North America's largest wine and spirits distributor, and the preeminent data insights company for alcoholic beverages. The company has 22,000 employees, and is now in 44 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia, the Caribbean and Canada. With 47 distribution centers encompassing 12.5 million square feet of warehouse space, the company makes more than 6 million deliveries every year to more than 180,000 customers. Leveraging its new structures, resources and best practices from both legacy organizations, Southern Glazer’s is positioned to serve its customers and suppliers in a more tailored and impactful way than ever before. In addition, the organization and its employees give millions of dollars and volunteer thousands of hours for charities that focus on responsible consumption, education, health and welfare, disaster relief, cultural development, social services and environmental sustainability. In particular, it hosts the world-renowned South Beach and New York Wine and Food Festivals, which have raised a combined $32 million for hospitality

education and fighting hunger since their inception. Southern Glazer’s also has the most educated workforce in the wine and spirits industry, with more certified wine experts than any other North American wine and spirits distributor. Its employees have successfully completed more than 3,500 wine, sake and spirits education programs, from introductory to master-level achievements. In fact, there are only 147 Master Sommeliers® in North America, and 14 of them work for Southern Glazer’s. The Company also employs 15 Master Mixologists across North America, responsible for educating bartenders, beverage buyers and corporate clients about the latest trends in cocktail culture. Michelin star chefs, national restaurant chains, international hotels and top spirits brands rely on Southern Glazer’s expert Mixologists to help them develop world-class beverage programs that raise the bar for today’s demanding consumers. For more information about Southern Glazer’s visit southernglazers.com. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @sgwinespirits and on Facebook at facebook.com/SouthernGlazers.

FLORIDA SCORECARD Want to know more about this great state? The Florida Chamber of Commerce has compiled The Florida Scorecard. It is a compilation of metrics about Florida ranging from talent supply and education to infrastructure and growth leadership to business climate and competitiveness and the quality of life. It is definitely worth the few minutes it takes to check it out. Visit thefloridascorecard.org.

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A LA CARTE

SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING FOR THE LODGING INDUSTRY

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement recently announced a new “If you See Something, Say Something™” online tool kit for businesses and citizens. The tool kit contains a variety of educational videos and flyers from general awareness to industry specific information for more than a dozen businesses including hotels and transportation. The link to the tool kit is fdle.state.fl.us/cms/FFC/S4/SAR-Home.aspx. The business specific section contains a video and other materials for hotels and motels that can be used for employee training and a flyer containing specific tips for identifying suspicious behavior at hotels or motels.

300.19 BILLION LITERS

Product Volume Water Use: 151.1B Liters

Manufacturing Water Use: 149.09B Liters

TOP 100 INDEPENDENTS The Top 100 Independents* ranking is out and Florida has eight independent restaurants named in this compilation. Joe’s Stone Crab, Miami Beach is ranked No. 2 with sales at $36,837,000 with 350,000 meals served. Prime 112 of Miami Beach, Fulton Crab House of Orlando, The Rustic Inn of Fort Lauderdale, Wolfgang Puck Grand Café of Orlando, The Boathouse Orlando, Makoto of Bal Harbour and Carpaccio of Bal Harbour were also in the Top 100. *SOURCE: Restaurant Business

337.7 BILLION LITERS

Product Volume Water Use: 151.1B Liters

Treated Wastewater Returned: 145.8B Liters

COCA-COLA, FIRST FORTUNE 500 COMPANY TO BECOME WATER NEUTRAL We started our water replenishment program in 2005 and have been working with communities, governments and respected third parties to commission and support projects that address local water needs from safe water access to watershed protection and water for productive use. In 2015, the company replenished 191.9 billion liters of water through 248 community water projects in 71 countries.

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pelican grand resort By SUSIE MCKINLEY WITH HEIDI DENNIS, GENERAL MANAGER, PELICAN GRAND RESORT

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ocated in Fort Lauderdale, the Pelican Grand Resort is a jewel on the Atlantic Ocean. The Resort is described as having “…old-style elegance and service reminiscent of historic Florida resorts….” With a spa, lazy river, a zero-entry pool and a beachfront, this beautiful property is filled with amenities and something for everyone. WHAT MAKES YOUR HOTEL UNIQUE?

The Pelican Grand is one of very few resorts in Fort Lauderdale that is directly on the beach and not across the street from the beach. In addition, no one has a team that is not only passionate about ensuring our guests have an incredible stay, but they are genuine about it. CAN YOU TELL READERS ABOUT YOUR SIGNATURE AMENITIES?

We have a seafood-centric concept in our Ocean 2000 restaurant. Our new Chef Derek Rosen is taking local, Caribbean and other incredible flavors to new heights. Our new menu will be launched in early March. We also have a genuine Emporium that is a combination coffee, gift and ice cream shop. Many ice cream flavors, lattes and other coffee treats are offered. PELICAN GRAND RESORT HAS WON MANY AWARDS AND ACCOLADES OVER THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS FROM CONDÉ NAST, U.S. NEWS AND TRIPADVISOR TO THE KNOT, AND OPEN TABLE AND MORE. WHAT CAN BE ATTRIBUTED TO RECEIVING THIS KIND OF RECOGNITION?

It always has to do with the team. They are the ones that make a difference in any business, and they really stand out at the Pelican. When your people genuinely care and are passionate about what they do, you get recognized.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY PELICAN GRAND RESORT

Our spa is one of only two in the United States that offers the Maria Aukerberg 100% organic line of products from Sweden. We also have many amenities that most hotels might offer, but the difference is our team. They truly make a difference in anyone’s stay.

PLEASE EXPLAIN TO READERS ABOUT THE RESTAURANT CONCEPTS AND ICE CREAM PARLOR AT PELICAN GRAND.

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SECRETS OF SUCCESS

WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU EMPHASIZE WITH STAFF ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMERS?

We emphasize that happy guests are a direct reflection on us. We have to start within our own house, treat each other with the utmost respect, have fun at what we do and assist each other no matter what department you work in, knowing that teamwork is the key! When you have that recipe, the guests feel the energy and know it is real.

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WHAT CRITICAL OR PRIORITY AREAS DO YOU EMPHASIZE IN TRAINING YOUR STAFF, AND HOW DO YOU MANAGE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER?

Our most important area we emphasize is keeping our internal associates happy to be a part of our resort and the satisfaction of our guests. If our team is happy, our guests are happy. WHAT ARE PELICAN GRAND RESORT’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS?

There is a definite balance of keeping employees and guests happy. Being fair and consistent is no secret and not always easy; we definitely do our best to attain that, and it shows in our associate and guest surveys.

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REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

BAY

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION

DIXIE

DANNETTE LYNCH

HILLSBOROUGH, LAKE, PINELLAS, POLK, SPACE COAST, SPACE COAST, VOLUSIA

DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

727.642.3404

dannette@frla.org

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

CLAY

LAFAYETTE

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

LEVY MARION

727.953.6803

VOLUSIA

CITRUS, FIRST COAST, MARION, NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

LAKE

CITRUS SUMTER

904.880.6964

cbergamo@frla.org

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO ORANGE

JODI CROSS 561.410.0035

PALM BEACH & TREASURE COAST

PASCO

jcross@frla.org

POLK

PINELLAS

LOIS CROFT 239.339.7692

INDIAN RIVER

MANATEE

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

SAINT LUCIE DESOTO

BAY, FORGOTTEN COAST, NORTHWEST FLORIDA

MARTIN CHARLOTTE

MONROE

lhernandez@frla.org

HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

rgreen@frla.org

LYNNE HERNANDEZ 305.710.3962

BREVARD

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

lcroft@frla.org

RAY GREEN 850.545.5901

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

561.744.7669

LEE

GLADES

HENDRY

PALM BEACH

888.612.7115 BROWARD

NICK LOWE 850.661.4256

MARCO ISLAND

nlowe@frla.org

COREY MOBLEY 850.375.8373

ESCAROSA

CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

BROWARD

asallee@frla.org

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MONROE

cmobley@frla.org

ROSIE RICCARDI 407.304.8773

COLLIER

TALLAHASSEE

844.253.0850

CENTRAL FLORIDA

mstone@frla.org F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FRLA CARES

Support CORE

(Children of Restaurant Employees) provides support to children of food and beverage employees navigating life-altering circumstances. Since 2004, CORE has raised over $2 million and provided support to over 200 families across the industry and the country! With families supported in 27 states, CORE grants up to $10,000 per family to help food and beverage employees navigate a medical diagnosis or death of a parent, spouse or child; loss of housing due to fire or natural disaster; and other unexpected situations. By helping these families cover expenses for childcare, hospital bills, rent and utilities, groceries and clothing and much more, CORE fulfills our vision to be a community of support for all food and beverage families in need by ensuring they feel cared for and valued. Early in 2016, Will Orellana took a morning bike ride, something he did every day as a life-long cycler. As he rode that morning, he was hit by an SUV and critically injured. Will had less than a 4% chance to survive the accident and went into a month-long coma. At the time of the accident, Will’s partner Tara Banks — who worked at The Sarsaparilla

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Club in Miami Beach — was eight months pregnant with their first child. Will and Tara’s daughter Vayla was born while Will was still in a coma. After Vayla’s birth, Tara spent the next four months in the hospital with her newborn by her side as Will woke from the coma unable to talk or walk. He needed to relearn the simplest of tasks, while also navigating life as a new parent, and Tara dedicated herself to both Will and Vayla through this challenging time. CORE supported the Orellana-Banks family by purchasing toys and clothes for Vayla and paying for two months of rent for the family. Will still has a long road to recovery ahead of him, but between support from CORE, a “Strong Will” Benefit at the Sarsaparilla Club, and so many dedicated friends and family members, the Orellana-Banks family is settling into their new life! Do you know a family who could qualify for CORE support? Are you interested in becoming a COREporate sponsor or individual donor, or would like to learn more about CORE? Visit our website at COREgives.org or contact Executive Director Lauren LaViola at Lauren@COREgives.org or 404-655-4690. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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FRLA CARES

FoodFinder Helping food insecurity in Florida and Georgia

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oodFinder uses the technology that food-insecure families use every day to connect them with their next meal: FoodFinder is an award-winning geo-locating website foodfinderga.org and an award-winning smartphone app (search FoodFinder Fighting Hunger) available on both the App Store and Google Play. FoodFinder was developed to be a private geo-locating website and app for finding places that provide food to the hungry. Tapping a pin displays the address, hours and contact information for each food resource site. Tapping the address gives walking, driving or taking public transportation directions to the food. Tapping the phone number dials the resource. FoodFinder was developed by high-school student Jack Griffin in 2013. The vision was to help the hungry in his community gain access to food in a private and intuitive method. Most families who have meager resources make sacrifices to maintain a smartphone

“FoodFinder is so grateful for the support of the FRLA and your members … we truly believe that our partnership can help r educe food insecurity acr oss the state!” — JACK GRIFFIN, high school student who developed FoodFinder for family members in order to provide this lifeline between parents and kids. Using a smartphone, this app can direct anyone of any age to a nearby hot meal. Founder Jack Griffin noted, “Foodfinder is all about getting a food-insecure kid or their family all of the information about where to find the food they need quickly, at no cost, and — most important — completely privately.” FoodFinder’s goal is to provide private food resource information to users within five miles of the user’s location. FoodFinder

is in the process of partnering with schools, social work settings and emergency services to spread the word. FoodFinder and FRLA are partnering to bring this technology to Florida. We are currently working on our plan to incorporate food prepared in Florida at FRLA member restaurants into FoodFinder’s database of available resources. We are going to roll out this plan in the next couple of months. Let’s do our part to help the food-insecure in Florida. We have the resources; let’s make the time.

Florida and Geor gia unfortunately ar e both in the top 10 most food insecur e states in America … we hope that FoodFinder can help the people in Florida who ar en’t sur e of wher e their next meal will come fr om.

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FRLA CARES

FRLA Gives Back

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RLA members across the state give back to their communities all year long. From food and clothing drives to fundraising supporting specific events and causes, we are proud to be affiliated with such good neighbors. FRLA wants to feature these members on a regular basis in many ways including something special in every edition of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine. Tijuana Flats completed their 10th year of fundraising to support The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) to help find a cure. This year’s “Treasure the Chest” campaign raised over $115,000, bringing the grand total to over $1 million in donations raised to support BCRF. “Our goal was to exceed $1 million in donations to BCRF. Our team members continue to blow me away with their passion, hard work and dedication to this cause. It is a true testament to our culture and core values that our employees live each and every day,” said Larry Ryback, CEO of Tijuana Flats. Tijuana Flats restaurants turned pink for three weeks to raise money to knock out breast cancer. Guests were offered the option to purchase a limited edition pink cup or make their taco pink for $1 with all donations benefiting to BCRF. Additionally, proceeds from the sales of all Tijuana Flats “Smack” brand hot sauces as well as Just In Queso’s official sauce, “Jason’s Mom’s Sauce,” were donated to the cause. In total, 27,468 cups were sold, 56,435 orders of tacos were made pink and 6,038 bottles of hot sauce were purchased during the campaign. Cash donations exceeding $38,000 were also collected throughout the duration of the campaign and were added to the total contributions.

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In conjunction with the fundraiser, employees rallied behind the cause by decorating their respective stores, dressing up in pink and encouraging guests to honor survivors and those battling breast cancer by writing their names on the doors/ windows of the restaurant.

Through this partnership, Tijuana Flats funded a full year of research for Dr. Joyce Slingerland of the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. Dr. Slingerland's project focused on the cellular origins of breast cancer and potential links between lifestyle factors (like obesity) and breast cancer.

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OUR FUTURE

Opportunity Jobs Academy

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he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is celebrating an ongoing partnership with the Opportunity Jobs Academy (OJA), an initiative aimed at showing impressionable high school students pathways to job success. Through a unique, real-world curriculum that features practical workplace skills training alongside hands-on mentoring, OJA prepares young people for immediate employment in the restaurant and retail sectors and gives them the ability to climb the ladder of achievement in any profession. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association has partnered with OJA to facilitate a restaurant industry mentor for almost 100 students who have participated. Orlando area mentors come from FRLA members such as

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Red Lobster, Smokey Bones, Popeye’s, Tijuana Flats, Marriott, Tibby’s, Marlow’s Tavern, Sweet Tomatoes, Wendy’s, Renaissance and Kobe’s Steak House. OJA is unique because it brings opportunities like jobs, practical education and mentoring directly to the young men and women who need it most. By combining an existing community service program with FRLA mentors, the program fills a needed void in both youth outreach and workforce development. Students graduate from the program with a formal certification of their readiness to successfully enter the workforce and an aptitude they can demonstrate to future employers. The Orlando OJA launched in the summer of 2015 and recently concluded its fourth class at Edgewater High School.

A graduation ceremony took place at Taproom at Dubsdread, an FRLA member, and was attended by Orlando City Commissioner Tony Ortiz and Orange County School Board Member Nancy Robbinson. Commissioner Ortiz and School Board Member Robbinson have been active program advocates throughout the semester. Ortiz gave a presentation to the class in November 2016, and the Orange County School Board formally recognized the program’s success in December 2016. The two have pledged to continue promoting OJA’s mission as the program seeks to expand into more Orlando area high schools. The FRLA is proud to continue supporting this nonprofit and pursuing avenues to give back to the communities in which we operate.

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E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

CITY

LOCATION

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

7

4

9

6

Ramada Inn

BOCA RATON

21

18

23

20

Hilton Garden Inn

BRANDON

28

11

9

13

Embassy Suites

DAYTONA BEACH

30

20

25

29

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

FORT LAUDERDALE

9

13

11

8

Embassy Suites

FORT MYERS

7

4

2

6

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

7

4

3

6

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

2

6

4

1

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

20

10

8

12

Hilton Garden Inn

GAINESVILLE

20

17

22

26

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

17

21

19

16

Islander Resort

JACKSONVILLE

10

7

12

9

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

15

19

17

14

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

7

6

4

8

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

1

4

16

6

Seralago Hotel & Suites Maingate East

LAKELAND

9

12

10

14

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

2

6

11

1

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

9

20

18

15

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

16

20

16

20

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

NAPLES

7

4

9

6

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

6

17

9

19

Homewood Suites by Hilton Ocala at Heath Brook

ORLANDO ENGLISH

21

4

25

6

Rosen Inn International

ORLANDO ENGLISH FRLA SHOW

2

6

4

1

Orange Country Convention Center

ORLANDO SPANISH

21

18

23

20

Rosen Inn International

ORANGE PARK

10

5

19

16

Hilton Garden Inn

PANAMA CITY

1

12

17

14

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall

PENSACOLA

28

25

22

27

Hilton Garden Inn Airport

PORT RICHEY

16

13

18

15

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

13

10

8

12

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST. AUGUSTINE

21

11

9

13

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Holiday Inn Express

ST. PETERSBURG

8

19

17

21

TALLAHASSEE

-

-

-

-

TAMPA - ENGLISH

-

24

2

12

Hilton Garden Inn

TAMPA - SPANISH

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

12

10

7

5

Ramada

WEST PALM BEACH

26

24

21

19

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

safestaff.org w w w.FRL A .org

Hilton Garden Inn Central

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date, or 10 Business Days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

53


MARCH 14 Florida Tourism Day Donald L. Tucker Civic Center Tallahassee

Summer Board Meeting Fort Myers

Fall Board Meeting Orange County Convention Center Orlando

2017

SEPTEMBER 11 Hospitality Stars of the Industry Celebration Hyatt Regency Orlando

CORPORATE EVENTS WWW.FRLA.ORG/EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 9 NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic ChampionsGate Golf Club Orlando

Marketing + Operations Summit Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa Fort Lauderdale

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Orange County Convention Center Orlando


P R O S TA R T

ProStart Regional Workshops T

he FRLA Educational Foundation recently hosted over 800 ProStart students at Regional Workshops. The seven ProStart Regional Workshops provided an opportunity for students to learn from post-secondary instructors while enhancing the students’ skills and increasing their enthusiasm for the industry. Johnson & Wales University (JWU) hosted three Regional Workshops, one at Eastside High School in Gainesville and another on their campus in North Miami. JWU also partnered with the FRLAEF and the Multicultural Foodservice & Hospitality Alliance (MFHA) to host two events showcasing the career opportunities in the foodservice and lodging industries. These events were held in Orlando and on JWU’s campus. Keiser University hosted three Regional Workshops, one on each Keiser campus with a culinary program. The Regional Workshop locations were Sarasota, Melbourne and Tallahassee.

UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

w w w.FRL A .org

GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

55


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Movers & Shakers Governor Scott Appoints Interim DBPR Secretary

Jenny Cerna Fontainebleau Miami Beach announces the appointment of Jenny Cerna as Director of Leisure Sales at the iconic Miami Beach resort. In this role, Cerna leads the development of the domestic and international marketplace while overseeing the coordination of successful execution of all leisure sales programs. Cerna joins Fontainebleau Miami Beach with more than 10 years of hospitality experience, most recently as Regional Director of Sales at Acqualina Resort & Spa on the Beach in Sunny Isles, Florida. Showcasing her expertise in the industry, Cerna has appeared on three international travel and luxury lifestyle TV shows, including “Mis Hoteles Favoritos” from AMC networks, and two Argentinian-based series, “Agenda” by Elsa Seveso and “Cecilia Z” by Cecilia Zuberbhuler. Born and raised in Honduras, Cerna began her hospitality career at the Intercontinental Hotel where she worked at the front desk, as a concierge and in the event sales department before moving to Miami in 2004. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in marketing at Catholic University of Honduras.

make it harder for job creators to succeed in Florida. She has extensive legislative experience and relationships, and I am confident she will be a great leader at DBPR.” Matilde Miller has served as Chief of Staff since 2014 and began her career at DPBR as a Legislative Specialist in 2000. She also served as a Legislative Coordinator, Deputy Legislative Affairs Director and Director of Legislative Affairs before becoming Chief of Staff. She previously worked in the Florida House of Representatives and as a high school English and Spanish teacher. She received her Associate of Arts degree from Brevard Community College and is currently attending Florida State University. 

M AT I L D E M I L L E R

Matilde Miller was recently appointed as the interim Secretary of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DPBR). She has been at DBPR for more than 16 years and has held numerous positions including Legislative Affairs Director, and most recently, Chief of Staff. As Secretary, she will oversee the licensing and regulation of businesses and professionals throughout Florida. She began serving as interim secretary on January 11, 2017. Governor Scott said, “Matilde has spent many years at DBPR serving in numerous leadership positions and understands how important it is to help businesses open and create jobs in our state. Like Secretary Lawson, she will focus on reducing burdensome regulations and fees that

Joe Lupo Joe Lupo has been named President of Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa. As president, Lupo will be responsible for all operations and management of Tampa Bay’s largest entertainment complex, which includes one of the largest casinos in the nation, as ranked by the number of gaming positions. In his new role, Lupo follows longtime Seminole Hard Rock Tampa President John Fontana, who has been named President of Seminole Hard Rock Support Services, a new company set up to increase the coordination and consolidation of certain staff functions at Seminole Gaming and Hard Rock International. Lupo comes to Seminole Hard Rock Tampa after three decades with Boyd Gaming, where most recently he served as Senior Vice President of Operations overseeing gaming, marketing and entertainment at Atlantic City’s Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, long recognized as the most successful casino in the region.

Marjorie Stone is the New FRLA Regional Director for Central Florida Marjorie Stone graduated Magnum Cum Laude with a Psychology and Theatre double major from Florida State University. She then moved to Los Angeles and worked with an event planning and production company where she gained valuable experience as an event professional. She returned to FSU and earned a graduate degree in Event Management. After graduating, she joined Rowland Publishing as their Administrator of Sales and 56  S P R I N G

2017

Events. She joined FRLA in 2013 as the Corporate Events Coordinator and was promoted to the Director of Corporate Events. In this role, she utilized her passion for the planning and execution of events and her organizational skills to manage relationships with supplier partners and raise sponsorship monies. Marjorie is ready for her new role as Central Florida Director where she looks forward to taking the chapter to the next level! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Shelly Weir in New Leadership Role at AHLEF The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Foundation (AHLEF) announced the appointment of Shelley Weir as Senior Vice President of Career Development. In this role, she will oversee the strategic vision of workforce development. She will support the AHLA and Foundation agenda through career development to help strengthen the lodging industry workforce and will lead efforts to engage with community, nonprofit and governmental organizations where

strategies to upskill American workers in the lodging industry align, including grants and contract management programs, such as the Department of Labor’s Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship (HSRA) initiative, which supports the growth of apprenticeship programs in the hospitality sector. Shelly is a founding member of both the AH&LA Women in Lodging and Under 30 Gateway chapters in Florida and is a member of the International Society of Hotel Association

Executives (ISHAE). Weir holds a bachelor’s degree in international affairs from Florida State University, and is currently pursuing her MBA from Auburn University. She resides in Orlando, Florida, with her husband and their two sons. In addition, Shelly was an employee in the Membership Department of FRLA several years ago. Congratulations Shelly!

In Passing Thom Stork

THE FLORIDA AQUARIUM

Florida’s tourism industry recently lost an iconic leader who devoted decades of his professional career to attracting visitors to the Sunshine State. After a long struggle with cancer, Thom Stork passed away. Thom leaves behind a legacy, serving as the president of The Florida Aquarium for 14 years and spending 27 years as a marketing executive with the Busch Entertainment Corporation. He was a brilliant marketer and enthusiastic leader, successfully increasing attendance, revenues and awareness throughout his professional career. Dedicated to his community, Thom actively participated on several local and state boards, including VISIT FLORIDA, and recognized the importance of being involved with numerous associations. All those who were fortunate to work closely with Thom knew of his passion to make Florida the No. 1 destination for visitors. Stork was an extraordinary individual whose substantial contributions to the industry will be valued for years to come. His death is truly a significant loss to Florida’s tourism community. Thom’s kindness will be profoundly missed and his achievements warmly remembered. Our hearts go out to his family, friends and colleagues.

w w w.FRL A .org

Robert A. “Bob” Riedel Influential hospitality industry leader, Robert A. “Bob” Riedel, CHA, age 93, passed away recently in Tallahassee, Florida. Bob, a long-time resident of Tallahassee, was born in Malone, New York, and was a graduate of Florida Southern College in Lakeland, Florida, where he received his honorary Doctorate in Business in 2001. Bob’s first management position was with the Bradenton’s Manavista Hotel in 1947. He went on to operate properties in North Carolina and Tennessee, and for 20 years Bob was the owner and president of Management Resources, Inc. which operated properties in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Connecticut and New York. As an industry insider, he held the double distinction of being the second Florida hotelier to serve as American Hotel & Motel Association President and the only one of prior Florida Hotel & Motel Association presidents to serve in the same capacity for the Florida Restaurant Association in 1957 and 1958. In addition, he also served as Past President of the Florida Educational Institute and the Tallahassee Lodging and Restaurant Association. Later in life, Riedel was a Professor at the FSU Dedman School of Hospitality. He was a member of the Downtown Rotary Club. Survivors include his wife of 36 years, Anna Johnson Riedel; five children, Bert Riedel, Michelle Bryant (Gary), Stephanie Wolfe, Jay Wolfe (Kim), Teri Wolfe; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

57


FLORIDA TOURISM Creating jobs and driving Florida’s economy.

F L O R I D A’ S S H A R E O F T H E

106.6

ECONOMIC Every

76

M M M K K

Canada UK Brazil Argentina Colombia

impact

visitors to the state

supports

1

tourism job

$87.4B

2011

international visitors to the US come to Florida

85.7 % up

9.8%

of Florida's visitors are domestic travelers 9 1 . 3 M 2015

8 3 . 2 M 2014

O F T R AV E L & T O U R I S M *

11.3

$

$91.5B

2012

2013

Visitors spent

108.8

$

In 2015 billion in state and local tax revenue was generated

$98.5B

190

countries

in

billion

300

1.4 million

a re co rd

1 5

Visitors spent an average of $ million per day in 2015

Visitor spending supported

jobs in Florida in 2015

from

million

visitors come to Florida on any given day = more people than live in 13 different US states + District of Columbia

million

MARKET

In 2015 F l o ri d a we l c o me d out of state and international v i si tor s

3.8 1.7 1.5 722 565

1.9

global

$104.7

2015 B 2014

FIVE STRAIGHT YEARS OF RECORD TOURISM SPENDING


REACHING OUR

1

target

AUDIENCE

1 million

25.9 million

More than

pieces of content generated with

Over

million

views on YouTube with 22.5 million minutes watched for 2015

#LoveFL

followers on Facebook, Twitter,YouTube, Instagram and Google+ Accounts

35

$

Partners invested over million in VISIT FLORIDA co-op programs Generating 14.5 billion consumer impressions through dedicated advertising in domestic and international markets

1.5 billion

consumer impressions were generated from 300+ promotional programs

SUCCESS THROUGH

1

$

Through promotions, over

100 million

$

in media value generated

collective

3.20 in tax revenue is generated* $94.3M 2011/12

The Florida tourism industry invests $2 in marketing programs per $1 the state of Florida invests

I M PA C T

138.5 million

$

2:1

46.4% of visitors were significantly influenced by VISIT FLORIDA marketing efforts in 2015

$

12 k

Over industry businesses partnering with VISIT FLORIDA

For every the state invests in VISIT FLORIDA,

= The equivalent of one person watching VISIT FLORIDA’s YouTube channel for 42.8 years straight

$57.1M 2010/11

$108.6M 2012/13

2014/15

$120.1M 2013/14

Private investment in VISIT FLORIDA’s total budget shows growth

*Office of Economic and Demographic Research

We’re on our way to becoming the No. 1 travel destination in the world. Visit SunshineMatters.org, the official blog for Florida Tourism.


s r o t i s i V e r o M t A c D I a r R t t O A L F T I S I V p i a h s h r e n wit t r a P g n i t e k r Ma

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Spring 2017  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Spring 2017  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...