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TRADE SHOW EDITION

HELP WANTED Looking To Hire Talent Is Our Greatest Challenge

FALL 2018 | FRLA.ORG

SEPTEMBER IS FOOD SAFETY MONTH MARY ROGERS, FONTAINEBLEAU GM, PATH TO POWER


Serving your restaurant with amazing business solutions.

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Contact us today to learn more Bobby Higdon robert.higdon@heartland.us 888-798-3133 x11577 © 2018 Heartland Payment Systems, LLC


contents FA L L 2 0 18 | F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4  Leadership Reports 12  FRLA New Members First Half of 2017 14  Path to Power Mary Rogers, Fontainebleau Miami Beach 16  Awards FRLA’s 2018 Hall of Fame Recipients 18 Summer Board Meeting Casa Marina Key West, A Waldorf Astoria Resort 19  Florida Natural Gas Association How Natural Gas Can Help Optimize Any

29

Foodservice Operation

20 Human Trafficking What Business Owners Need to Know 22  Synergi Partners Helps Resturants and Hotels Find Federal Hurricane Relief Tax Credits

Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 24  The Lease Coach Three Reasons Why You Won’t Be Able 36 

to Sell Your Restaurant

40

The Forgotton Dollar LocalSeniorDiscounts.com 37  Supplier Personalized Service from Alsco Plus Local Community Support 38   39 RCS Training Foodhandler and Food Manager Training Business Matters How to Prepare For a Revenue Audit 48  Drive-By Lawsuits How to Prevent Them 49  Florida Wine Magnolia Blossom 50  A La Carte Industry Information You Need to Know 51   52 Movers and Shakers Marketing Tips IHOb 53  57 Support CORE ProStart Teachers Go Back to College During Summer Break 58 

SPECIAL FEATURES 10

VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

"Bleisure": An Opportunity to Increase Overnight Visits and Incremental Spending

26

Marketing + Operations Summit Recap

FRLA's Signature Marketing Event

29  FRLA's Special Workforce Section Meeting the Challenges of Today's Workforce

40

FRLA’s Special Food Safety Section

September is Food Safety Month

Secrets of Success 54 

Cuba Libré

50 FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Florida’s Hospitality Workforce is the Star of Our Industry Florida’s $111.7 billion hospitality industry is made up of 1.4 million hard-working, passionate individuals who ensure the state’s visitors have incredible experiences. From landscape crews at independently owned bed and breakfasts to CEOs of national chains headquartered in the Sunshine State, hospitality workers are the backbone of the industry. In this issue of FR&L Magazine, we’ll celebrate the success of some of our stars on pages 2935 and offer insight into programs and services designed to benefit individuals and the hospitality industry as a whole. One of the ways we honor our best and brightest is the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Celebration on Thursday, Sept. 6, held in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show in Orlando. The Show features hundreds of suppliers showcasing their newest products to more than 8,000 attendees. In addition to expos, the Show includes competitions and opportunities for education. Be sure to join us as we toast this year’s Hall of Fame inductees. FRLA and our members lead the nation on issues surrounding the hospitality industry,

confronting challenges head-on and implementing proactive solutions. For this reason, FRLA has developed a workforce training program specifically designed to address human trafficking in our state. FRLA partnered with trafficking experts to create a course that teaches staff how to recognize the signs of human trafficking and what to do if they believe it is occurring. It is imperative that the hospitality industry raise awareness of this horrific crime to save lives and make it clear — Florida is no place for traffickers. Read more about what you need to know about human trafficking on page 20. Another one of the challenges hotels and restaurants face is keeping up with the labor demands of an ever-growing visitor population. Attracting and retaining the skilled staff that visitors expect and deserve is critical. In this edition of FR&L Magazine, we highlight issues vital to the health of our hospitality workforce. We interviewed two experts who are leading the way via the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship on pages 30-33. Don’t forget that September is Food Safety Month. This year, FR&L Magazine’s

Food Safety feature includes information on topics ranging from food fraud to temporary event food safety. Turn to pages 39-45 to check it out. We are on track for another banner year in 2018, and we have our incredible workforce to thank. I look forward to continuing to celebrate the stars of our industry — the incredible men and women who welcome visitors with a warm smile and a passion for service. Sincerely,

Carol B. Dover

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Education Paves the Way for the Hospitality Industry

With my favorite season, Fall, upon us, I trust everyone had an enjoyable summer full of business growth and vacation relaxation. The new season means school has resumed, and that is a good reason to participate in continued learning opportunities. There is no better place to do so than at the 4  FA L L

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Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. The Show is full of business partners, innovation and inspiration to recharge your business. The Show will also have plenty of resources to refine your food safety — a serious business requiring a proactive approach to train and educate your staff and establish food safety procedures. There are numerous business partners available at the trade show, each equipped with the ability to support your business needs. I encourage you to utilize the ServSafe® and SafeStaff® resources. As always, the incredible FRLA team is there to support you, so don't go it alone. Speaking of going it alone, finding talented staff is one of the top objectives for all operators, and everyone seems to be competing for the same limited manpower. This is another reason to engage your state legislators to explore workforce solutions and continued hospitality education programs. Save

the date: Florida Tourism Day in Tallahassee is planned for March 13, 2019. I encourage everyone to participate. It is a great pleasure to participate in recognizing the legacy leaders inducted into the FRLA Hall of Fame who paved the way for so many tourism professionals, and it is also a pleasure to honor our hospitality stars at the front lines of our industry — our future leaders. After all, our profession allows us to touch so many, and thus it’s incumbent upon us to leave a lasting legacy of hospitality. Sincerely,

Kevin Speidel Kevin Speidel 2018 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Attract More Visitors with a VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partnership Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.


2018 CHAIRMAN

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Grand Vacations, Orlando VICE CHAIRMAN

Alan Palmieri

Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando 2018 SECRETARY 2017–18 LODGING DIRECTOR

Sheldon Suga

Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key 2018–19 RESTAURANT DIRECTOR

Jim Shirley

Great Southern Café, Santa Rosa Beach 2018–19 LODGING DIRECTOR

Olivia Hoblit

Seaside Amelia Inn, Amelia Island

Or visit us at: www.WorksiteEmployee.com

2018 LODGING DIRECTOR

Cathie Koch

Bloomin’ Brands Inc., Tampa IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN

Don Fox

Firehouse of America, LLC, Jacksonville MANAGING EDITOR

Looking for a turn-key solution for

GREASE TRAP INSTALLATION maintenance and compliance?

Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

Rowland Publishing, Inc.

1932 MICCOSUKEE ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 Phone: 850-878-0554 Fax: 850-807-5037

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published quarterly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY.

(239) 283-5454 | (888) 772-4662 | HONC.COM 6  FA L L

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Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FRLA InsuRAnce councIL FRLA scoured the state, vetted the players and found the group that is best in class to handle FRLA member insurance needs. We encourage you to let them provide an expert opinion on your insurance needs. Our insurance council consists of several hand-selected agencies with over 200 years of individual brokerage experience and over $100,000,000 in premiums in the hospitality industry.

Our Trusted Agency Advisors Acentria

PC

Property and Casualty insurance

H Health insurance provider

James F. Tullis & Associates PC

Besnard & Associates PC

H

Rob Barnes

Kevin Dover

Jacksonville, Florida 904-874-9341

813-287-1721

PC

Robert Brown

Caton Hosey Insurance John Hosey

Sarasota, Florida 941-552-4114

H

Jimmy Tullis, Jr.

Tampa, Florida

Destin, Florida 850-502-4690

Atlas Insurance

PC

PC

H

Leading Edge Benefit Advisors

H

Kerri Sisson

Port Orange, Florida 386-767-3161

Fort Myers, Florida

Heartland Payroll & Payment Solutions

The Enterprise Team at Sihle Insurance Group H

941-922-7998

Palm Beach, Florida 585-622-2993

Altamonte Springs, Florida 407-900-8484

Barnes Insurance & Financial Services H

Erwin Insurance

Pensacola, Florida 850-473-1500

Jacksonville, Florida 904-256-5123

Atlas Insurance Jennifer Dibert

H

Sarasota, Florida

Dennis Barnes

Benefit Advisors, Inc. H Joey Janssen

Jacksonville, Florida 904-332-9084

Besnard & Associates PC

Adam Besnard Tampa, Florida 813-287-1790

239-433-1184

Randy Pumputis

PC

Brett McMillian

Miami, Florida 305-431-2417

Hylant Group

Restaurant Programs of America PC

H

HR Benefits Services Mario Roiz

Terry Singleton

Tony Davenport

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 561-262-4240

PC

H

Hub International Insurance Services, Inc. William H. Shea Clearwater, Florida 727-244-6923

H

Joe Mowery

Lake Mary, Florida 407-215-2225

Strategic Benefits Group, LLC Acentria Insurance H J. Scott Fenstermaker, RHU Tallahassee, Florida 850 556-4500

Our Company Partners

UnitedHealthcare

Kimberlee Vandervoorn

301-524-9962

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Zenith Insurance Todd Cicero 941-906-5581

Zenith Insurance Angela Borthwick 941-906-5437


SAVE THE DATE OCTOBER 18, 2018

C HA MPIONSGATE GOLF CLUB

I N PA R T N E R S H I P W I T H T H E F R L A C E N T R A L F L O R I D A C H A P T E R

2018 GOLF CHAIRS ROBIN SORENSEN

RALPH SCATENA

Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs

General Manager, Orlando World Center Marriott

Chief Operating Office, World of Beer

Founder, Another Broken Egg

DAVE REID

RON GREEN 

2018 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE JASON EMMETT

CHRIS FRAWLEY

Duffy’s Sports Grill

Miller’s Ale House Restaurants

Tommy Bahama Restaurant

Gulf Region Wyndham Vacation Rentals

DON DONLEY

SHELDON SUGA

LINO MALDONADO

CATHY SABOFF Outback Steakhouse

JEFF JABOT

Salt Life Food Shack

JOHN HORNE

Hawks Cay Resort

GREG OHLEMACHER

Ana Maria Oyster Bar

Southeastern Laundry Equipment Sales, Inc.

MORIAH MURPHY 

Oasis Outsourcing

JASON DOWNEY LEIGH DOYLE

Ellie Lou’s Brews & BBQ

JASON FIALKOFF VGM Client Rewards

JAN GAUTAM

IHRMC and AAHOA

DAVE HADELMAN

La Cima Restaurant LLC/Twin Peaks Restaurants

HARRY PRICE

Coca-Cola North America

Ecolab

UnitedHealth Group

STEVE KEUP

Florida Region Hersha Hospitality

CRAIG LEICESTER

Aloft Orlando Downtown

DAWN MOLITERNO 

Wyndham Vacation Rentals

DANEEN TYSON MIKE VINIK 

BJ’s Restaurants

TOBY SULLIVAN

Caspers Service Company

FRANK ZUMBO

Marriott Miami Airport

ADAM COREY

ALAN PALMIERI

Tallahassee Hospitality Group, LLC

JONATHAN RAZ

The Oneida Group

Marlow’s Tavern

Waldorf Astoria Orlando & Hilton Bonnet Creek

TIM JARRETT 

POLITICAL RECEPTION O C T. 1 7, 2 0 1 8 6:30 P.M. – 8 P.M. CHAMPIONSGATE GOLF CLUB, ORLANDO

BRION PRIC E PHOTOGRAPHY

RSVP: CONTACT SALLY DAVIS AT SDAVIS@FRLA.ORG OR JOE JOINER AT JJOINER@RESTAURANT.ORG

S D A V I S @ F R L A . O R G F O R S P O N S O R S H I P S , T E A M S & M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N


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VISIT FLORIDA

E

asy traveling, invigorating sunshine and an abundant array of activities make Florida the perfect state to hold a trade show, convention or business meeting. In 2017, Florida welcomed a record 116.5 million out-of-state visitors with more than 12.8 million of them traveling to the Sunshine State to attend business events, such as trade shows, meetings or conferences. According to the latest economic data in 2016, business travelers spend $17.3 billion, representing 15.5 percent of all visitor spending in the state. With travel combining business and leisure on the rise, Florida has been presented with an opportunity to increase overnight visits and incremental spending. This increase in “bleisure” travel is attributed to millennials who see the affordability and efficiency of tacking on to existing business trips. The millennial bleisure traveler spends four-to-six times more than the average traveler and is 65 percent more likely to add at least one day of leisure onto their business trip. This fiscal year, to capitalize on the trend, VISIT FLORIDA will launch a bleisure marketing campaign targeting domestic and international business travelers. An important component of this campaign will be Florida’s meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions (MICE) market. VISIT FLORIDA understands the meetings industry is big business in the Sunshine State, and it knows properly marketing to this segment will be crucial. In addition to the bleisure campaign, VISIT FLORIDA has created a host of programs to help VISIT FLORIDA marketing partners reach this vital market. Florida Encounter, VISIT FLORIDA’s signature event for the meetings, 10  FA L L

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conventions and incentive travel industry, will take place Nov. 28-30 in Bonita Springs. The three-day trade show will bring together meeting professionals and top Florida hotels and resorts, attractions and event suppliers to showcase Florida as the premier meetings destination. This year, based on feedback from a diverse group of industry Partners, VISIT FLORIDA is refreshing the event. New this year, Cvent’s audience will be leveraged and new standards will be used to attract and vet meeting professionals. In addition to the traditional one-on-one appointments, this year’s event will feature more opportunities to network outside the trade show floor. To facilitate these opportunities, the floor will be redesigned to feature a small meetings village, designated networking lounge and professional photo station. CEUs will also be offered for meeting professionals in attendance. To learn more and register, go to FloridaEncounter.com. Through VISIT FLORIDA’s partnerships with key meetings industry organizations, such as Meeting Professionals International, Professional Convention Management Association, IMEX America and Connect, VISIT FLORIDA is able to offer partners participation and sponsorship opportunities at meetings industry shows and marketplaces across the country. These options include stand sharing, meal sponsorships, in-room gifts, registration bag inserts, e-marketing to planners and speaking opportunities. To learn more about these opportunities, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/planner. For those planning or hosting an event in the Sunshine State, VISIT FLORIDA developed Cover Your Event insurance. This free program provides coverage that will

reimburse a meeting in the unlikely event of a cancellation due to a named hurricane. The premium on this insurance is at no cost to the organization planning the meeting and helps ensure meetings professionals can take advantage of Florida’s venues any time of year. To learn more, go to FloridaMeetings.com. To assist local governments and nonprofit corporations/organizations as they attract national minority conferences and conventions to the state, VISIT FLORIDA administers the Minority Convention Grant program. Funds from this reimbursement grant program can be used for marketing purposes, such as advertising, direct mail, brochure production, sales videos, presentations and other related projects. Applications for FY19/20 Grant Program will open December 2018. For more information, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/resources/grants/ minority-convention-grant-program. To take full advantage of VISIT FLORIDA’s meetings professionals programs and engage visitors through VISIT FLORIDA’s multiple marketing channels, join as a Marketing Partner at VISITFLORIDA.org/join. If your property has designated meeting space, VISIT FLORIDA encourages you to submit a listing to be placed on FloridaMeetings.com, a resource for planners looking to book their next meeting in Florida. For more information, call the VISIT FLORIDA industry hotline at 877-435-2872 or email partner@ VISITFLORIDA.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY ANYABERKUT / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

"Bleisure": An Opportunity to Increase Overnight Visits and Incremental Spending


FRLA New Members ••#00 Saloon, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••12A Buoy, Fort Pierce, FL ••23 Restaurant Services, Tampa, FL ••2nd Street Bistro, Fort Pierce, FL ••305 Transportation, Miami, FL ••4 Corners Tavern, Davenport, FL ••4KIDS of South Florida, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••A1A Airport & Limousine Service, Boca Raton, FL ••Absolute Patio Furniture Restoration, Pompano Beach, FL ••Academy Bus LLC, West Palm Beach, FL ••Accounts Receivables Inc, West Palm Beach, FL ••Agape International Education Services LLC, Melbourne, FL ••Akerman LLP, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Allphase Construction of South Florida, Deerfield Beach, FL ••Amcal Management Corp, Lake Park, FL ••American Restaurant Service LLC, Tarpon Springs, FL ••AmericasCuisine, Summerville, SC ••AmeriGas, Saint Augustine, FL ••Andy's Flour Power, Panama City, FL ••Angela Mann Photography, Clearwater, FL ••APB Security, Deerfield Beach, FL ••Aragon Cafe, Pensacola, FL ••Armor Screen Corp, West Palm Beach, FL ••Artfood, Miami, FL ••Atlantic Beer & Oyster, Winter Park, FL ••Bagel Bakery, Gainesville, FL ••Bahama Breeze, Kissimmee, FL ••Bahama Bucks, North Palm Beach, FL ••Bar Louie Tavern & Grill, Addison, TX ••Baron Sign Manufacturing, West Palm Beach, FL ••Bayshore Marketing Group, Saint Petersburg, FL ••BB King's Blues Club Orlando, Orlando, FL ••Beale Street Blues Company, Orlando, FL ••Best Western Palm Beach Lakes, West Palm Beach, FL ••Beyond, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Bistro Accounting, Miami Beach, FL ••Blend Lounge Palafox, Pensacola, FL ••Blue Sky Communication, Boynton Beach, FL ••Blue Star Linen, Miami, FL ••Boca Brandon, Riverview, FL ••Bolay Pines, Pembroke Pines, FL ••Bolay West Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, FL ••Booking.com, New York, NY ••Bootleggers, Fort Myers, FL ••Botanica Interior Plant Services, Boca Raton, FL ••Bowland Beacon, Naples, FL ••BowStern Marketing Communications, Tallahassee, FL ••Brambles Tea Room, Naples, FL ••Brazilian Court Hotel, Palm Beach, FL ••Brew Ha Ha, Pensacola, FL ••Brightline, Plantation, FL ••Brightline, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Bronco Wine Company, Tampa, FL ••Broussard's of Navarre Beach, Navarre, FL ••Brown & Brown Insurance - Pinellas, Clearwater, FL ••Brown & Brown of Florida Inc, Tallahassee, FL ••Cardlytics, Jupiter, FL ••Caspers Service Company / Cox Electric, Ocoee, FL ••Catayu Group, Lake Worth, FL ••Celery City Craft, Sanford, FL ••Chamaleon Cleaning Specialist, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Charlotte County Chamber of Commerce, Port Charlotte, FL ••Charter School Associates, Coral Springs, FL ••Chef Rolf's New Florida Kitchen, Sarasota, FL ••Chef's USA, Lake City, FL ••Cheney Brothers Inc, Riviera Beach, FL ••Chotto Matte, Miami Beach, FL

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••Christine Kay & Associates, Boca Raton, FL ••Christmas Decor Company, Tallahassee, FL ••Chunkie Dunkies, West Palm Beach, FL ••Cigar Factory Pensacola, Pensacola, FL ••Ciro's Speakeasy & Supper Club, Tampa, FL ••City of Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Clark Service Group, Lancaster, PA ••Classic Commercial Services of South Florida, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Clay County Board of County Commissioners, Green Cove Springs, FL ••Clevelander Hotel, Miami, FL ••Coast To Coast Linens, West Palm Beach, FL ••Coastal Payment Systems, Pensacola, FL ••Cocina 214, Daytona Beach, FL ••Cocina 214, Winter Park, FL ••Colt Country Cafe & Buffet, Reddick, FL ••Commerical Interior Concepts, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Coral Lanes, Cape Coral, FL ••Country Inn & Suites, Jacksonville, FL ••Courtyard St Petersburg/Clearwater, Clearwater, FL ••Creative World School Wesley Chapel, Wesley Chapel, FL ••Crunchy Tech, Orlando, FL ••Crystal & Company, Miami, FL ••Crystal & Company, West Palm Beach, FL ••Customer Driven Staffing, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Dairy Queen, Orlando, FL ••Damicos, Brooksville, FL ••Dan Marino Foundation, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Days Inn West Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, FL ••DeNunzio Interior Design, Miami, FL ••Department of Corrections, Tallahassee, FL ••D'Lucas, Lakeland, FL ••Dodaddy's Seafood ••Doubletree Orlando Downtown, Orlando, FL ••Doubletree Palm Beach Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••DoubleTree West Palm Beach Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Drainz, Winter Springs, FL ••Economic Incubators Inc, Naples, FL ••Ed Carey Design, Boynton Beach, FL ••Edible Arrangements 897, Cape Canaveral, FL ••Ellihad LLC, North Port, FL ••Els for Autism Foundation, Jupiter, FL ••Embassy Suites Palm Beach Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Empire Roofing, Sunrise, FL ••Energy Management Solutions, Casselberry, FL ••EVOQ, Sarasota, FL ••F&D Cantina, Lake Mary, FL ••F&D Kitchen & Bar, Orlando, FL ••Fairfield Inn & Suites Palm Beach, Palm Beach, FL ••Fairfield Inn Clearwater Beach, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Fat And Skinny's, North Palm Beach, FL ••FBMC Benefits Management, Tallahassee, FL ••Federal Bar Lakeland, Lakeland, FL ••Film Florida, Kissimmee, FL ••Finn Foodservice, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Fire Guy Inc, Hollywood, FL ••Five Star Pizza UNF Town Center, Jacksonville, FL ••Florida Agriculture Center & Horse Park, Ocala, FL ••Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking, Fort Myers, FL ••Florida Food Safety Systems, Redington Shores, FL ••Florida Keys and Key West TDC, Key West, FL ••Florida Public Utilities Company, West Palm Beach, FL ••Foam-iT, Grand Rapids, MI ••Ford's Garage Brandon, Brandon, FL ••Ford's Garage Cape Coral, Cape Coral, FL

••Ford's Garage Estero, Estero, FL ••Ford's Garage Fort Myers, Fort Myers, FL ••Ford's Garage Wesley Chapel, Lutz, FL ••Ford's Garage Westchase, Tampa, FL ••Gateway Payments of Northwest Florida, Crestview, FL ••Gecko Hospitality, Brandon, FL ••Gecko's Restaurant & Lounge, West Palm Beach, FL ••GFA International Inc, Delray Beach, FL ••Gigglewaters, Safety Harbor, FL ••Girl Scouts of Citrus Council, Chuluota, FL ••Global Sourcing International LLC, Orlando, FL ••Golisano Children's Museum of Naples, Naples, FL ••Grand Tour Foundation, Winter Park, FL ••Gulfstream Goodwill, West Palm Beach, FL ••H&R Block, Daytona Beach, FL ••H2O Suites, Key West, FL ••Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Riviera Beach, FL ••Hancock and Whitney Bank, Tallahassee, FL ••Harry Buffalo, Orlando, FL ••Harry Harrell CPA PA, Clermont, FL ••Hawthorn Suites, West Palm Beach, FL ••HeadPinz Cape Coral, Cape Coral, FL ••HeadPinz Naples, Naples, FL ••Hill Audio Visual Inc, West Palm Beach, FL ••Hilton Garden Inn Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Hilton Garden Inn Palm Beach Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Hilton Palm Beach Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Hilton Singer Island Oceanfront, Singer Island, FL ••Hilton Suites Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL ••Hi-Tech Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc, Lake Worth, FL ••Holiday Inn Boca West, Boca Raton, FL ••Holiday Inn Express Cape Coral, Cape Coral, FL ••Holiday Inn Orlando Airport, Orlando, FL ••Holiday Inn Palm Beach Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Hollerbach's Willow Tree Cafe, Sanford, FL ••Home2 Suites, Pensacola, FL ••HopCat, Port Saint Lucie, FL ••Hotwire Communications, Bala Cynwyd, PA ••HRC Recruiting Inc, Boca Raton, FL ••Hyatt Place Delray Beach, Delray Beach, FL ••Hyatt Place Marathon, Marathon, FL ••Hyatt Place West Palm Beach Downtown, West Palm Beach, FL ••Hyatt Windward Pointe, Key West, FL ••Ice Box Portable Storage, Montgomery, AL ••IHOP, Gainesville, FL ••IHOP, Orlando, FL ••IHOP, Palm Coast, FL ••Inn At Boynton Beach, Boynton Beach, FL ••Inside & Out Maintenance, Port Saint Lucie, FL ••Insurance Office of America, Sunrise, FL ••Integrated Building Technologies, Boca Raton, FL ••Irie Diner, Orange Park, FL ••Island Inn Beach Resort, Treasure Island, FL ••Island Wing Company, Orlando, FL ••Itta Bena, Orlando, FL ••J & S Marketing & Advertising, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Jackson Hall, Miami, FL ••Jaco's Bayfront, Pensacola, FL ••Jani-King of Miami Inc, Hollywood, FL ••Johnny Longboats, Riviera Beach, FL ••Junior Achievement of Central Florida, Orlando, FL ••Katz & Associates, Miami Beach, FL ••Kenney Communications Inc, Orlando, FL ••Key HR, Orlando, FL ••Kirk Friedland PA, West Palm Beach, FL

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


First Half of 2018 ••Kirkland Event & Destination Services Inc, Lake Worth, FL ••Knight Electric Company Inc, West Palm Beach, FL ••Kobe Japanese Steak House, Clearwater, FL ••LaFayette's, Orlando, FL ••Latite Roofing, Pompano Beach, FL ••Le Provencal, Miami, FL ••LegalStandard PA, Jacksonville, FL ••Lindburgers Restaurant, West Palm Beach, FL ••Little Chefs In Training, Fort Myers, FL ••Lively Technical Institution, Tallahassee, FL ••Lodging Association of the Florida Keys & Key West, Key West, FL ••LRJ Enterprises Inc, Dunedin, FL ••Main Event Entertainment, Orlando, FL ••Mangos, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Marble Waters Hotel & Suites, Jacksonville, FL ••Marsh & McLennan Agency, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Marsh & McLennan Agency, Tequesta, FL ••Martin County Office of Tourism & Marketing, Stuart, FL ••Mazie's, West Palm Beach, FL ••Meat Eatery and Tap Room, Boca Raton, FL ••MedExpress Urgent Care, Boca Raton, FL ••Meeks Construction, Tallahassee, FL ••Metz Culinary Management, Sarasota, FL ••Mi Apa Latin Cafe, Alachua, FL ••Mi Apa Latin Cafe, Gainesville, FL ••MidiCi The Neapolitan Pizza Company of Gainesville, Gainesville, FL ••Mom & Dad's, Tallahassee, FL ••Morris Visitor Publications & Where GuestBook, North Miami, FL ••Mr Wings, Pensacola, FL ••Mulligan's Beach House Bar & Grill, Riviera Beach, FL ••Naples Botanical Garden, Naples, FL ••Netchex, Covington, LA ••Newgentek, Tampa, FL ••Nozzle Nolen Pest Solutions, West Palm Beach, FL ••NRG Equipment Inc, Richmond Hill, ON ••Oblivion Taproom, Orlando, FL ••Ocean Drive Association, Miami Beach, FL ••On Q Properties, Lake Worth, FL ••One Solution Payments & POS, Cocoa Beach, FL ••OrderCounter POS & SaaS Solutions, Pensacola, FL ••Original American Kitchen, Gainesville, FL ••Orlando North Seminole County, Lake Mary, FL ••Oyster Boss, Eastpoint, FL ••Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL ••Palm Beach International Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Palm Beach Tours & Transportation Inc, West Palm Beach, FL ••Pandion Optimization Alliance, Oviedo, FL ••Pavilion Furniture, Miami, FL ••Payday Human Resources, Panama City, FL ••Payday Human Resources, Pensacola, FL ••Pensacola Sports, Pensacola, FL ••Peoples First Insurance, Panama City, FL ••Persimmon Hollow Brewing Company LLC, Deland, FL ••Pest Logic, Deerfield Beach, FL ••Place of Hope, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Place of Hope, Port Saint Lucie, FL ••PoFolks, Panama City, FL ••Premier Capital Partners, Tulsa, OK ••Premier Security, Stuart, FL ••Prezzo Park Place, Boca Raton, FL

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••Prime Group Insurance Services, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Promotion Marketing of Florida LLC, Palm Harbor, FL ••Protection Advisory Inc, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••QuisineClub, West Palm Beach, FL ••Ramada West Palm Beach Airport, West Palm Beach, FL ••Ray Dog Productions LLC, Tallahassee, FL ••Red Hawk Fire & Security, Palm City, FL ••Resource One Recruiting, Deland, FL ••Restaurant Technologies, Mendota Heights, MN ••Reyes Mezcaleria, Orlando, FL ••RikSha Tacos, Tallahassee, FL ••Royal Inn, West Palm Beach, FL ••Saint Madeleine Catholic Church, High Springs, FL ••Salty Sam's Marina, Fort Myers Beach, FL ••Scenic Hills Golf Course, Pensacola, FL ••Scooter's Fun Foods & Spirits, Hobe Sound, FL ••Sculpture Hospitality Florida Region, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Seasons Dumpling, Jacksonville, FL ••Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, Orlando, FL ••Seito Sushi, Orlando, FL ••Shands Hospital, Tallahassee, FL ••Sheraton Bay Point Resort, Panama City Beach, FL ••Show N Tail The Legend, Panama City, FL ••Shrimp Basket Intermediate Holdings LLC, Pensacola, FL ••Sihle Insurance Group, Deland, FL ••Simplex Grinnell LP, Jupiter, FL ••Skillets Restaurants, Bonita Springs, FL ••Skillets Restaurants, Naples, FL ••Skys The Limit, Boca Raton, FL ••Slick Lips Seafood & Oyster House, Miramar Beach, FL ••Smitty's, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Soho Hospitality Management, Tampa, FL ••Sole on the Ocean, Sunny Isles Beach, FL ••South Florida Luxury Guide, Miami, FL ••Southern Seas Resort, Lauderdale By The Sea, FL ••Southwinds, Key West, FL ••Specialty Insurance Agency, Brick, NJ ••Splitsville, Tampa, FL ••Springhill Suites Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL ••Springhill Suites Gainesville, Gainesville, FL ••Springhill Suites Marriott, Punta Gorda, FL ••St Johns Air, Jacksonville, FL ••Stahl-Meyer Foods Inc, Madison, FL ••Studio 6, West Palm Beach, FL ••Super Source South, Ambrose, GA ••SuperFi, Jacksonville, FL ••Supreme Linen Service, Hialeah, FL ••Sushi Masa Hibachi & Grill, Pensacola, FL ••SVN Hotels, Pensacola, FL ••Sweeney's Weeneys, Key West, FL ••Synergi Partners Inc, Florence, SC ••Talento Restaurant, Hollywood, FL ••Tallahassee Dodge Chrysler Jeep LLC, Tallahassee, FL ••Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Tampa, FL ••Target Print & Mail, Tallahassee, FL ••Teak LLC, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Teasers, Club A, 22 & Co, Key West, FL ••Ted's Montana Grill, Estero, FL ••Ted's Montana Grill Inc, Atlanta, GA ••The Amelia Island Culinary Academy, Fernandina Beach, FL ••The Blend Bistro, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••The Braford Steakhouse, Fort Pierce, FL

••The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, GA

••The GOAT - Greatest of All Time, Fort Walton Beach, FL

••The Greystone Hotel, Miami Beach, FL

••The Grill At Bal Harbour, Miami Beach, FL ••The Grounds Guys, Tallahassee, FL ••The Honor Bar, Palm Beach, FL

••The Lighthouse Grill At Stump Pass, Englewood, FL ••The Links of Sandpiper, Lakeland, FL ••The Melting Pot, Orlando, FL

••The Osprey Tavern, Orlando, FL

••The Situs Companies, Houston, TX ••The Social, Orlando, FL

••The West End Trading Co, Sanford, FL ••The Westin Sarasota, Sarasota, FL

••Theodore Barber & Company Inc, Clearwater, FL ••Three Olives, Seminole, FL

••Tijuana Flats, Melbourne, FL

••Top Hog, Newberry, FL

••Towne Place Suites by Marriott, Boca Raton, FL ••TradeFirst Florida Inc, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••TransValue Inc, Miami, FL ••TriNet, Tampa, FL

••TriNet, Bradenton, FL

••Trolley Stop Ice Cream Shoppe, Milton, FL

••Two Buks, Clearwater, FL

••UF/IFAS Extension St Lucie, Fort Pierce, FL

••Uncommon Friends Foundation, Fort Myers, FL ••Under the Sun, Delray Beach, FL ••Union 27, Boca Raton, FL

••University of West Florida Global Hospitality & Tourism Management, Pensacola, FL

••Urbano Interiors and Sourcing, Miami Beach, FL ••US Foods, Spring Hill, FL

••V Paul's Italian Ristorante, Pensacola, FL

••Valencia College Poinciana Campus, Kissimmee, FL ••Victory Casino Cruises, Cape Canaveral, FL

••Virginia College, Fort Pierce, FL

••VPNE Parking Solutions, Boston, MA ••Waffle House, Pensacola, FL

••Waffle House 2006, Jacksonville, FL

••Waffle House 2063, Orange Park, FL ••Waffle House 2150, Jacksonville, FL

••Waffle House 2256, Jacksonville, FL

••Waterstone Resort & Marina, Boca Raton, FL ••Western Prime Burger, Naples, FL

••Whiskey Joe's Port Richey, Port Richey, FL

••Willie Jewell's Old School Bar-B-Q, Tallahassee, FL ••Windjammers on the Pier, Gulf Breeze, FL ••Wine Bar George, Orlando, FL ••Wine Plum, Dania, FL

••Woodyard Grill, Newberry, FL

••Wop's Hops Brewing Company, Sanford, FL ••WSA Systems, Boca Raton, FL

••Wyndham Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL

••Xiscali Mexican, Pensacola, FL

••Yeoman's Cask & Lion, Tampa, FL

••Zonal Hospitality Systems, Maitland, FL

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Mary Rogers VICE PRESIDENT/GENERAL MANAGER FONTAINEBLEAU MIAMI BEACH

F

RLA President and CEO Carol Dover interviewed Mary Rogers, the new Vice President/General Manager of the iconic Fontainebleau Hotel this summer. To view the interview visit FRLA's YouTube page at http://bit.ly/FRLA-MaryRogers.

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? I worked for five summers in a bed and breakfast

and fell in love with the service industry. I derived great satisfaction from ensuring guests had enjoyable and memorable vacations. I also realized that the hospitality industry would be a great gateway to travel the world while enjoying a very fulfilling career.

an individual business unit and how each unit plays their part in the overall success of the hotel.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? I feel the lesson that has

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? I took advantage of every opportunity for

stood with me through the years is to always treat others the way you would want to be treated. I also feel it is very important to let our team members know that the work they do every day makes a difference, and that they are hugely important to our success.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? I am fortunate to have a number of mentors in this

business. Individually, each played a very important part in my career development. Most recently, I have worked very closely with our president and chief operating officer of Fontainebleau, Mr. Phil Goldfarb. He taught me to look at each operational department as

growth that came my way. In many cases, it involved relocating to another state or even another country by myself, but with every move, I learned something new, my career grew, my network expanded and the opportunities increased. Do not be afraid of the unknown, take chances and grab every opportunity you have to broaden your horizons.

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? Fontainebleau recently launched “Bleau Adopts,” a new

internal pet adoption program that matches our employees with dogs from the Greater Miami Humane Society. The initiative invites a dog to our hotel for a day each week where it gets to meet our team members. So far we have found homes for nearly 20 dogs. This philanthropic effort has had the dual effect of boosting the morale of our employees during their workday while saving the lives of many dogs.

industry is complex, ever-changing and evolving. As such, I encourage our members to stay involved and up to date with all the changes that affect our industry. It is hugely important to be active in an organization such as FRLA, as they advocate on our behalf at the local and state level. Use your resources wisely to ensure your voice is heard and that you partner with the right organizations to fight on your behalf. Be involved, be heard, be seen and don’t stand on the sidelines while others make decisions that affect your business. Thank you, Mary! Congratulations again on your new role. We wish you much success!

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARY ROGERS

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Our


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AT RISK?

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Proud member of FRLA (Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association) Proud members of the Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce Work very close with the state of Florida’s Hospitality Insurance Industry as well as the state of Florida’s Fire Inspectors and are available to provide educational awareness seminars We offer many other related services such as equipment cleaning and reconditioning, kitchen air balancing, stainless steel hood filter exchange service and stainless wall installation, exhaust fan repairs and maintenance and oil absorbent products for roof protection Guaranteed service with competitive pricing

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AWARDS

Hall T of Fame

he FRLA Hall of Fame awards are given to individuals who have attained career distinctions of the highest level and are recognized for distinguished service to their industry, community, charitable organizations and family. The 2018 Hall of Fame Awards are going to be celebrated at the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Celebration on Sept. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. For information about the event visit frla.org/event/hospitality-celebration or contact Sally Davis at sdavis@frla.org or (850) 224-2250.

Paul Avery 2018 Restaurateur of the Year

With a degree in hotel and restaurant management, Paul Avery took the industry like gangbusters. From his employment at Steak & Ale to joining Outback Steakhouse as a managing partner — and from there to Director of Operations, Vice President of Operations and President of the concept, overseeing 887 restaurants and eventually as the Corporate President of Outback — he has never looked back. In addition, Avery served as the COO for OSI Restaurant Partners from 2005-09. Currently, he is the CEO and president of World of Beer Franchising, Inc. In addition to his career, Mr. Avery is actively involved in his community, serving on the Board of Directors at SunTrust Bank Tampa Bay and The Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA). He is also a trustee for Paul Smith’s College in New York. He serves as a Director of Edison Pharmaceuticals Inc. He has also been a part of many organizations, including the Boys and Girls Clubs, Great Outdoors Conservancy, the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce, Take Stock in Children and the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s National Board of Directors.

Bruce Craul

2018 Hotelier of the Year

Bruce Craul received his degree in Hospitality Management from Florida International University after a move from Pennsylvania. His diverse background includes hotel, resort, restaurant, bar, spa and property management roles. Bruce served in key management roles for Holiday Inn, Inc. and Vista Host, Inc. of Houston, Texas, a company with franchise-affiliated hotels located throughout the United States, including Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza, Hampton, Hilton, Ramada and Marriott. Bruce’s extensive experience includes Director of Operations positions at TOPS’L Beach and Racquet Resort, Abbott Resorts, Inc., Destin Resorts, Inc., and President and CEO of The Hospitality Group, Inc. Most recently, he has retired after 16 years as Chief Operating Officer of Legendary Hospitality in Destin, Florida. Bruce was the 2012 Chairman of the Board for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and is now the chairman of the Okaloosa County Tourist Development Council. Bruce has been active in his community, serving as President of the Destin Rotary Club, elder at Grace Lutheran Church and is a lifetime board member of the Emerald Coast Boys and Girls Club, where he was the Chief Volunteer Officer for two consecutive years. Bruce and his wife, Debbie, are the Family Life Leaders at Destiny Worship Center.

Zenith Insurance Company 2018 Supplier of the Year

Zenith Insurance Company, represented by Todd Cicero and Angela Borthwick, is a key partner of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association. The company has strongly supported several corporate events, FRLA board meetings and events in every one of FRLA’s 17 chapters. Zenith is the foremost specialist in workers’ compensation insurance for the Association. The group works closely with members to allow them to be profitable and keep their businesses and employees safe. They are active in their communities with involvement in the following organizations: Pines of Sarasota – Rehabilitation & Senior Care, Easter Seals Sarasota, Visible Men’s Academy, YMCA Foundation, All Faith’s Food Bank, Mothers Helping Mothers & SPARC and Southeastern Guide Dogs. 16  FA L L

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Lifetime Achievement Award/Hall of Fame Award YEAR

RESTAURATEUR

SUPPLIER

YEAR

RESTAURATEUR

HOTELIER

SUPPLIER

1993

Joe Lee, Darden

-

2008

Robert Johnston, The Melting Pot Restaurants, Inc.

1994

-

-

Frank Flautt, Sandcastle Resorts & Hotels

Coca-Cola

1995

Caesar Gonzmart, Columbia Restaurants

-

2009

Jimmy Patronis and Johnny Patronis, Captain Anderson’s Seafood

Harris Rosen, Rosen Hotels & Resorts

Fiberbuilt Umbrellas, Inc.

1996

Fred DeLuca, Subway

-

1997

Dave Thomas, Wendy’s

-

2010

Robin Sorensen, Firehouse Subs

Peter Bos, Legendary Inc.

American Express

1998

James McLamore, Burger King

2011

Bonefish Grill, OSI Inc. (Tim Curci, Co-Founder and John Cooper, President)

1999

Outback Steakhouse: Bob Basham, Tim Gannon and Chris Sullivan

Jack Healan, Amelia Isl. Plantation

CTB Foodservice Consultants

True Foodservice

2000

Millennium Awards - Joe Lee, Caesar Gonzmart, Fred DeLuca, Dave Thomas, James McLamore

Entertainment Publications

2012

The Weiss Family, Joe’s Stone Crab, Miami Beach

Fontainebleau, Miami Beach

A&L Associates

2001

-

National Distributing Company

2013

Bill Shumate, Bella’s Italian Café, Tampa

Gene Prescott, The Biltmore in Coral Gables

Southern Wine & Spirits

2002

Michael Hurst, Fifteenth Street Fisheries

Wachovia Davis/Baldwin

2003

Bob Leonard, IHOP/FMS Management Systems, Inc.

-

2015

Chris Christini

Russ Kimball

Ecolab

2004

Jack & Claire Miller, Ale House Restaurants, Inc.

Heartland Payment Systems

2016

Manny Garcia

Island Oasis

2005

Bern Laxter, Bern’s Steakhouse, Tampa

Julian MacQueen, Innisfree Hotels, Pensacola Beach

Sysco

2017

Andrew Reiss

Don Seaton

2006

Charley Woodsby, Talk of the Town Restaurants

Infinite Energy

UnitedHealthcare Special Honoree: Randy Spicer

2007

Gene Knippers, Beef O’Brady’s

AmeriGas

2018

Paul Avery

Bruce Craul

The Zenith Insurance Company

2014

Presentations in conjuction with Expo

THE SHOW PARTY

Support educational culinary and hospitality programs. Proceeds provide career pathway opportunities for your future employees!

FRL A .org

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B O A R D U P D AT E

Summer Board Meeting

F

RLA’s Summer Board Meeting was held in Key West at the Casa Marina Key West, A Waldorf Astoria Resort. Attendees enjoyed the relaxed and beautiful atmosphere while conducting board business.

1

2. Florida's CFO, Jimmy Patronis, was a featured speaker at the board meeting.

2

3

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1. Representative Holly Raschein (R-Key Largo) spoke to the Board.

4

3. State leaders and the Executive Committee took a few moments to pose for a photo. 4. Casa Marina Key West, A Waldorf Astoria Resort, was a lovely setting for the summer board meeting.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


N AT U R A L G A S

Florida Natural Gas

PHOTO BY ZHUDIFENG / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

I

t can be challenging for professionals in the foodservice industry to predict just how big a rush will be during any given breakfast, lunch or dinner shift. Sometimes you eagerly wait for one to start. Other times, a rush comes out of nowhere. Big rushes bring about a fury that pushes the entire kitchen to the brink. It is on those days especially when chefs and restaurateurs can count on natural gas to dig out of the avalanche of food orders. When chefs and their kitchens are at their busiest — and hottest — they most often rely on natural gas to provide on-demand energy and consistent performance. That’s why Florida chefs have preferred natural gas for decades. In the kitchen, natural gas is unmatched for cooking on a burner, flat-top griddle, grill or fryer. Imagine achieving peak culinary performance while saving money. Natural gas makes it happen. Natural gas fryers are faster, use less oil and save energy. And, the food quality is without compromise. The Florida Natural Gas Association (FNGA) recently commissioned a thirdparty field study of high-efficiency FRL A .org

fryers and documented the energy and cost savings for typical foodservice establishments. The Florida Solar Energy Center, which has served as the state’s energy research institute for more than 35 years, conducted the months-long study and reported the results. Natural gas fryers simply performed better. Learn more about the study during a free online session crafted especially for FRLA members, including: • Daily average costs of an electric fryer compared to a natural gas fryer. • Measured reduction in daily electricity usage. • Dramatic annual economic savings. Scott Ranck, senior conservation and energy specialist and a member of FNGA,

will provide a summary of the documented testing results, describe how a natural gas fryer could benefit your operation, overview the available commercial utility rebate programs for small and large foodservice and lodging facility operators that can reduce costs even further and share valuable conservation tips that can help you start saving right away. Scott is a certified energy rater and member of the Florida Building Commission’s Energy Technical Advisory Committee. He has provided energy surveys, calculations, code compliance guidance and conservation measures for the foodservice industry. Register today to join us on September 26 at 10:00 a.m. and see how natural gas can help optimize any foodservice operation. Contact kerry@floridagas.org.

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HUMAN TRAFFICKING AWARENESS

Human Trafficking What Business Owners Need to Know Seedy motels. Crime-ridden, rundown neighborhoods. Border towns. In the

minds of many, this is where human trafficking occurs. The gut-wrenching reality, however, is that human trafficking can occur anywhere and in many kinds of businesses. Lodging operations, with their amenities and pre-disposition for discretion and guest privacy, are particularly vulnerable. Also contrary to popular belief, this horrific crime is not concentrated in economy-priced, limited-service lodging properties. Human traffickers operate in every category and across every price point of the lodging industry, from the cheapest to the most luxurious. Awareness of human trafficking tends to focus primarily on sexual exploitation, which is undoubtedly huge. But this focus ignores the equally pervasive trafficking in labor. This form amounts to modern-day slavery and can be found among landscape crews, construction crews, maintenance crews, and agricultural workers. In many of these instances, members of a cleaning or landscaping crew pay traffickers for entry to the U.S. with a job waiting. Once the crew arrives, the traffickers confiscate their victim’s identification and travel documents and force them to hand over pay. Sometimes, the traffickers contract directly with businesses for services, then pay the workers little or nothing. Businesses have a responsibility to raise awareness of these crimes, not only to aid victims and help them become survivors,

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but also to protect the business itself from exposure to criminal prosecution and civil lawsuits. To learn more and to protect your business from traffickers, visit FRLA.org/ human-trafficking and get online training for your supervisors and employees. Five Quick Steps to Combat Human Trafficking

1. Display posters in staff and guest areas explaining how to report suspicions of human trafficking by calling law enforcement at 911 or the 24-hour National Human Trafficking Hotline at 888-373-7888. 2. Provide information cards with human trafficking indicators to your employees. 3. Use Blue Campaign anti-trafficking materials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. 4. Avoid purchasing from sources known or believed to use child or forced labor by consulting the U.S. Department of Labor’s list of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor. 5. Train your staff and supervisors using FRLA’s Human Trafficking Awareness online course. For a deeper dive in to what you can do, review these 15 Ways You Can Help Fight Human Trafficking from the U.S. Department of State.

“Having taken this training course, I’m very proud of FRLA’s strong engagement on this critical issue. No business in hospitality is safe from the scourge of traffickers, regardless of category or price point. Raising your staff awareness can literally save lives and ensure Florida continues to enjoy its reputation as the premier destination for family vacationers.” — Kevin Speidel, Chair, 2018 FRLA Board of Directors

“I personally completed the FRLA Human Trafficking Awareness online course and recommend all hospitality businesses consider having their employees do so. This demonstrates our commitment as an industry to ensure our frontline employees are equipped to be part of the solution to this terrible crime while also protecting our individual businesses from victimization by traffickers.” — Danielle

Rosse, President, FRLA Broward Chapter

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


AWARENESS

Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation

Raising Awareness About Brain Aneurysms

O

ne in 50 people in the United States has an unruptured brain aneurysm, and a brain aneurysm ruptures every 18 minutes. When an aneurysm ruptures, blood leaks into the brain causing a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical treatment. It usually causes a sudden, severe headache — often described as the worst headache of your life! Trinity Hoblit, born in 2001 with primordial dwarfism, was diagnosed in 2009 with multiple brain aneurysms. She endured numerous brain surgeries and was scheduled for another surgery when she died in June 2015 of a ruptured aneurysm. Her parents, Phil and Olivia Hoblit of Amelia Island, have honored their daughter’s compassion for others by establishing the Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation to support neuroscience research at Wolfson Children’s Hospital and the Baptist Neurological Institute, both part of Baptist Health in Jacksonville. To educate the public about the signs and symptoms of brain aneurysms and to develop advanced treatment options, funding is needed. To learn more about brain aneurysm, the Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation and to donate, visit TrinityHoblit. org. A portion of all gifts will be matched by the Baptist Health Foundation.

Sexual harassment and workplace discrimination lawsuits are on the rise. Just one of these costly lawsuits can put you out of business. That is why it is so important that you, your managers, and your employees know how to deal with these issues. Our full-service Anti-Harassment Training addresses common types of sexual harassment and/or discrimination and precautionary measures businesses should take in order to prevent a sexual harassment and/or discrimination lawsuit in the workplace.

The RCS Anti-Harassment Training: • • • •

On site, live training Local training manager Employee grievance process paperwork Recordkeeping/documentation

To learn more about the RCS Anti-Harassment Training, go to www.rcstraining.com or call 800.537.9863.

See us at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show in Booth Number 1833

FRL A .org

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F E D E R A L H U R R I C A N E R E L I E F TA X C R E D I T S

Synergi Partners Helps Resturants and Hotels Find Federal Hurricane Relief Tax Credits

How can Synergi help my business? Many businesses in your area were greatly impacted by last year’s hurricanes, and there are disaster relief credits available to employers like you. Many business owners are not even aware of the facts and circumstances that enable your business to qualify for these credits! Let us help you find them. How much credit are we talking about? Here are some highlighted businesses in your area that have benefited by partnering with Synergi Partners and have taken advantage of the Hurricane Disaster Relief Act of 2017: • For a restaurant group in Miami with five locations that were closed for an average of six days, we helped them recover $375,651.32 in tax credits; • For a restaurant group in Tampa with three locations, we helped them recover $232,149.90 in tax credits; • For a group of 12 quick service restaurant (QSR) locations in Florida that were closed for an average of three days, we helped them recover $92,586.40 in tax credits; • For a QSR restaurant group with multiple locations in Florida and Georgia, we helped them recover $423,900.27 in tax credits; • For a staffing agency with three locations in South Florida that was closed for an average of seven days, we helped them recover $98,271.83 in tax credits. How do I know if my business is eligible? Every business located in a disaster area is eligible to receive the hurricane retention tax credit of up to $2,400 for every employee retained after the 22  FA L L

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hurricane, according to The Hurricane Disaster Relief Act of 2017 (H.R. 3823 Section 503). The Hurricane Retention Tax Credit is meant to compensate businesses for the unintended cost associated with a natural disaster. What could an additional $10K, $50K or $100K plus do for you and your business? Let us do a complimentary evaluation of your business to find out! Why Synergi? Here are a few KEY reasons WHY you should partner with Synergi Partners: 1. Synergi Partners is an expert in tax credits. Their tax credit veterans have more than 30 years of experience. 2. No money up front. 3. Complimentary review prior to executing a contract. 4. 100 percent guarantee. We defend our work product. 5. Contingency fee: If we find zero credits there is no fee.

TIM NORWOOD Executive Vice President

Don’t believe it? Here’s a testimonial from a Synergi client: “Synergi provided me with a service and benefit I would otherwise not have utilized. … Synergi did all the calculation legwork and provided it in a completed format. I would encourage any business owner that is wondering about their closure and possible qualifications to call today.” — Ray Soto, Allstate Insurance Synergi Partners’ leadership team is comprised of tax credit veterans with over 30 years experience helping employers obtain federal tax incentives. We focus solely on tax credit and disaster relief, allowing us to offer superior knowledge of tax credit recovery, including state, zone disaster (specifically the Hurricane Disaster Relief Act of 2017) and WOTC opportunities. Our proprietary technical solutions make for a faster, simplified process for our clients, typically resulting in more tax credits than alternative solutions.

SHANNON SCOTT Executive Vice President

KAREN FREEMAN Global Sales Manager

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF SYNERGI PARTNERS

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association has teamed up with Synergi Partners and initiated a free program to assist members in finding available Federal Hurricane Relief Tax Credits. Synergi representatives will be available to discuss this opportunity at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show from Sept. 6-8 and at the FRLA Board Meeting from Sept. 6-7. Vanessa Carmack, Director of Marketing for Synergi, answered some questions about this Program for FR&L Magazine.

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The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Monroe Chapter wishes to extend our deepest gratitude and appreciation to our Sponsors of the 2018 FRLA Keys Fishing Tournament held on June 14, 2018 in Key West, Florida THANK YOU! AMERIGAS • BAKER’S CAY RESORT • BAREFOOT BILLY • BLUE NATIVE • CASA MARINA RESORT • COCA-COLA • DIGIPRO MEDIA • FARO BLANCO RESORT • FIBERBUILT UMBRELLAS • FRLA TEAM • FURY WATER ADVENTURES • HAWKS CAY RESORT & SPA • HEARTLAND • HIGHGATE HOTELS KEY WEST • HYDROTHUNDER • IMPERIAL DADE • INFINITE ENERGY • ISLAND OASIS • ISLANDER RESORT ISLAMORADA • JR UNITED INDUSTRIES • MARGARITAVILLE RESORT & MARINA KEY WEST • MARRIOTT BEACHSIDE RESORT KEY WEST • MEISEL HOLDINGS • MILLER COORS • PERFORMANCE FOOD GROUP • PERRY HOTEL KEY WEST •OCEAN KEY RESORT KEY WEST • PIER HOUSE RESORT • PSAV • REPUBLIC NATIONAL DISTRIBUTING COMPANY • RUMFISH • SIGNAL RESTORATION • SMOKIN TUNA SALOON • SOUTHERN GLAZER WINE AND SPIRITS • SUNCOAST MARKETING • THE REACH RESORT • TROPICAL DELIGHT • JOHN TROVATO • TRADEWINDS RESORT • VISIT FLORIDA • AND THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE FRLA MONROE CHAPTER! SAVE THE DATE! 2019 FRLA KEYS FISHING TOURNAMENT IS JUNE 13, 2019 HAWKS CAY, MARATHON, FL

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H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

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1. Active Shooter training, hosted by the N.E. Chapter. 2. Seventy golfers came out to raise $5,000 for the N.E. Chapter at the Jacksonville Golf and Country Club. 3. The Gulf Island Coast Chapter enjoyed a sunset wine cruise and visited with County Commissioner Bill Truex. 4. Dan Murphy traveled to the National Restaurant Show earlier this year and visited with the Uber Eats team. 5. Tampa Bay Beaches Chamber of Commerce CEO Robin Miller, along with FRLA Director Dannette Lynch, presented Maryann Ferenc the 2018 Tourism Person of the Year Award during the annual luncheon. 6. FRLA staff attended a beautiful memorial for our lost staff member, Elizabeth Sheffield. 7. The fishing tournament at the summer board meeting was a lot of fun for everyone. Look at that haul! 24  FA L L

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2018 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT RECAP

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RLA returned to the Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa for its annual Marketing + Operations Summit in early August, welcoming over 400 attendees to a spectacular, two-day event. This year, FRLA partnered with Results Thru Strategy to bring innovative speakers at the forefront of the rapidly changing hospitality industry to Fort Lauderdale. Industry leaders and allies from across the state came together to learn recruitment and retention strategies, gain insights into new technologies and hone their marketing technique.

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1. Summit attendees networked with fellow power players between educational sessions. 2. The 2018 FRLA Marketing + Operations Summit opens to its largest crowd yet with more than 400 attendees. 3. Eve Turow Paul, thought-leader on youth culture and the food system, sheds light on the millennial generation, their relationships with food and the deeper psychology behind food trends. 4. Dave Reid, COO for World of Beer and past FRLA chairman at the FRLA Marketing + Operations Summit. 5. The “Happier Hour: Alcohol Beverage Innovations Panel” delves into the next round of beverage innovations, featuring Chris Frawley, VP of Operations, Miller's Ale House; Mike Vinik, Area VP, BJ’s Restaurants & Brewhouse; and Jason Emmett, President, Duffy’s Sports Grill.

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THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS TO OUR SPONSORS THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS THANK YOU PLATINUM TO OURPLATINUM SPONSORS PLATINUM TO OUR SPONSORS PLATINUM PLATINUM GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD GOLD SILVER GOLD SILVER

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6. Travel Channel TV personality and hospitality expert Anthony Melchiorri answers audience questions with Cintas’ Lauren Katz. 7. Representatives from Cintas were ready to find solutions and forge relationships in the sponsor gallery. 8. Fellow speakers Gerry Fernandez, President of the Multicultural Foodservice & Hospitality Alliance and Fred LeFranc, Chaos Strategist at Results Thru Strategy, enjoy the Summit’s happy hour. 9. Early risers enjoy yoga at the water’s edge and walking on the beach, courtesy of UnitedHealth Group.

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Inspiration. Creativity. Passion. Your fascination with food. Your creativity. Your love of people. Your talent for

nourishing their bodies and their souls. lmagine3 days in the heart of Orlando - one of

the world's most vibrant cities - where you can focus on all the magic and mystery that

attracted you to food in the first place. Give yourself the gift of learning! From the art of ancient grains to the latest in lighting for lnstagram, from the fine points of fermentation to designing smart kitchens, from veggie-centric dining to the prospect

of delivery by drone. Spark your creative appetite and turn your passion for the industry into a sustainable business.

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September 6-8, 2018 at the Orange County Convention Center.

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FwRlnA RllstAURANT & loDGING AssocIATION

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HOSPITALITY WORKFORCE

PHOTO BY JACOBLUND / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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he challenges presented by sustaining a competent hospitality workforce have been faced by the industry for decades. From recruiting and retaining employees, to developing a workforce skilled in this industry, to overcoming issues such as seasonal demand, there is no shortage of tasks related to expanding the workforce in this growing business sector. The industry has worked to address our workforce with programs such as the National Restaurant Association’s ProStart high school culinary program and the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program high school curriculum sponsored by the American Hotel and Lodging Association. We need more to maintain our growth. Over the next several issues, FR&L will address our hospitality workforce challenges by providing ideas, resources, initiatives and trending information to our readers — Florida’s hospitality employers. We are lucky. The hospitality business in Florida is growing by leaps and bounds. That’s why we need experience and talent in our human resources. We hope that you find this topic of interest, and, as always, should you have any suggestions or ideas, contact Susie McKinley at editor@frla.org.

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HOSPITALITY WORKFORCE

LODGING

Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship for Lodging

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R&L Managing Editor Susie McKinley recently had a chance to talk with Shelly Weir, the Senior Vice President of Career Development for the American Hotel & Lodging Association and its Educational Foundation. During their conversation, they discussed the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship Program for the Lodging Industry. Shelly is an expert in hospitality workforce development. She has held various roles at the American Hotel & Lodging Association and, earlier in her career, worked in the Membership Department at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association. Shelly is a member of the National Network of Business & Industry Associations, National Workforce Needs Coalition, National Advisory Board for DECA and the Business & Industry Advisory Council of the Association for Career Tech Education. She has also represented the lodging industry on a variety of tasks forces with the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education. Most recently, she co-chaired a committee on President Trump’s Apprenticeship Taskforce. Shelly obtained her bachelor’s degree from Florida State University and her MBA from Auburn University. She resides in Orlando, Florida, with her husband and two sons.

So, this is a joint effort between the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF)? Please describe how this works in tandem. We are working together as partners, doing this for the entire industry. One of the unique things about this program is that employees can port industries to another occupation in our field; e.g. an apprentice can start in the restaurant industry and then move to the lodging industry if desired and vice versa.

Shelly, it is great to have a chance to talk with you today about our hospitality workforce and the program you manage on behalf of the AHLA with regards to the (HSRA) program. Can you explain to FR&L readers what the HSRA program is? The HSRA is comprised of two Department of Labor-registered

Is this program sponsored by the federal government? Actually, the federal Department of Labor is the registering agency. AH&LA and the NRAEF sponsor the programs. Apprenticeships appear to be an effective and affordable method to train and establish

OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO BY SHEALAH CRAIGHEAD

training programs that are enabling the lodging and restaurant industries to build up their bench strength of supervisors and managers. The apprenticeship model has been highly successful in the construction and manufacturing industries for many years, and it has many benefits that the hospitality sector can now take advantage of.

Shelly Weir (AHLA) & Dawn Sweeney (NRA) meet with President Donald Trump, Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and Ivanka Trump to discuss recommendations on how to expand the apprenticeship system in the U.S. 30  FA L L

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Aimbridge Hospitality AHLA Apprenticeship Program “Through the recent acquisitions of TMI Hospitality and ONE Lodging Management, Aimbridge Hospitality is now the nation’s largest third-party hotel management company with over 825 hotels and 35,000 employees. We believe that with great growth comes greater opportunities. It was imperative that we establish a consistent and effective training and development solution that could be universal across multiple platforms, could be sustained in a changing environment and would strengthen our internal bench by yielding well-rounded, experienced and motivated future leaders. The AHLA Apprenticeship Program has been the perfect solution for us. At Aimbridge, we don’t want employees to just work with us, we want them to grow with us. This program allows us to recognize the top rising talent in our hotels, invest in their careers and help them grow into first, mid-level or even general manager positions.” — Heather Italiano, Talent Development Manager, Aimbridge Hospitality

career opportunities for the hospitality workforce. Can you speak to this statement? Yes, 91 percent of apprentices in the United States, across multiple industries, stay with their employer upon program completion, and a high number of apprentices are still with that employer five years later. This program is an excellent model for the industry that has been used successfully in our sector for years overseas. We wanted to be involved because it helps the employers with retention and recruitment. It gives the employees a career path. This is not a moneymaker for AHLA. In fact, there is no cost involved unless the employer needs to source the classroom component from AHLEI, and then it is no more than $400 per apprentice. Can you explain how the HSRA benefits both the employer and the employee? The employer benefits from HSRA because it will increase retention rates. Our industry is beating the national average of 91 percent and is reporting 96 percent retention rates at the moment. This is a model that works, and we are eager to bring on new employers. It also provides highly skilled employees who are trained in the exact competencies identified by the industry as being critical for an up-and-coming manager to master. Additionally, the apprenticeship system can also help to enhance any current management development FRL A .org

programs employers have in place because there are some fiscal benefits, such as state and local government funding, as well as the opportunity to bolster current programs with credentialing. Employees benefit from the program because they “earn while they learn,” and there are opportunities to earn industry certifications and college credit at no cost to the apprentice. Who are the apprentices? Eighty percent of the apprentices are incumbent workers; they are employees who have been identified as candidates with high potential for management. The other 20 percent are coming in as new hire employees, typically from the hospitality post-secondary schools. Could you give some examples of companies that the HSRA is working with on this initiative? There are a mix of hotel brands, management companies and independent properties involved, including: Hilton, Hyatt, Wyndham, Aimbridge Hospitality and Interstate Hotels and Resorts. How can someone get involved in the program? Contact Shelly Weir, Senior VicePresident of Career Development AH&LA Educational Foundation for a one-on-one consultation. She can be reached at sweir@ahla.com, or at (202) 289-3187 (office) or (407) 920-1051 (mobile).

Pictured here are lodging manager apprentices who recently graduated and earned the Certified Hospitality Supervisor designation.

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HOSPITALITY WORKFORCE

RESTAURANTS

John Shortt, Director of Program Development, National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation industry and the DOL. Restaurant management apprentices will finish the program with knowledge in both front of the house and back of the house, the fundamentals of restaurant leadership and operations, skills in financial management, marketing and much more. The knowledge, skills and abilities they gain from the program will allow them to pursue a variety of management-level positions across the restaurant, foodservice and hospitality industry. John Shortt

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R&L Managing Editor Susie McKinley spoke recently with John Shortt, the Director of Program Development for the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). In this role, John manages the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship (HSRA) program for the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Prior to working at the NRAEF, Mr. Shortt worked with the Home Builders Institute as the Director of Education, Training and Apprenticeship and as the Director of Post-Secondary C redentialing.

John, it is great to have a chance to talk with you today about our hospitality workforce and the restaurant manager program you manage on behalf of the NRAEF with regards to the Hospitality Sector Registered Apprenticeship (HSRA) program. Can you explain to FR&L readers what the HSRA program is and how it works with restaurateurs? Absolutely, Susie, thank you for the opportunity. NRAEF submitted competency-based standards based on industry feedback to the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Apprenticeship, and they were approved in June 2017. AHLA went through the same process and had their lodging manager standards around the same time. Both the restaurant manager and the lodging manager apprenticeship programs 32  FA L L

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provide restaurant and lodging employees with the opportunity to advance their careers and grant them the skills needed to become hospitality managers. With a multi-year contract, the NRAEF and AHLA developed the DOL-approved programs as part of an overall workforce strategy to develop and retain top talent, increase productivity and encourage career growth. The program is competency-based, not time-based — meaning employees are continuously assessed to ensure they learn all aspects of the industry. While in the program, restaurant management apprentices will receive on-the-job training in a restaurant setting, job-related education and, upon completion, two nationally recognized credentials from the restaurant

Apprenticeships appear to be an effective and affordable method to train and establish career opportunities for the hospitality workforce. Can you explain the steps to implementing the program? Absolutely. To build your hospitality apprenticeship program, you will need to identify the key people and organizational structure to operate the program. We will work closely with your company to design a program that can best showcase hospitality, benefit your workforce, and help you reach your workforce goals. The stepby-step process is as follows: Step 1: Contact the NRAEF (or AHLA for hotel and lodging) to review the restaurant manager competencies and standards, complete documentation to become part of the program and identify apprenticeship locations and supervisors. Step 2: Once you have signed

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final documentation, the National Restaurant Association and AHLA will crosswalk your existing training program and match to the national competencies. Once the crosswalk is complete and the employers’ training program meets a minimum of 80 percent match, you can begin enrolling apprentices. The next steps consist of recruitment and enrollment, on-the-job training, related training instruction, progressive wage increases and quarterly reports. Step 3: At the end of the apprenticeship program, the apprentice will receive two nationally recognized professional certificates: one from the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Apprenticeship and one from the NRAEF. Can you explain how the HSRA benefits both the employer and the employee? The program is a win-win for employers and employees — employers will be able to meet the demand for a competitive workforce, report higher productivity, achieve better retention rates and reduce their turnover costs, which is especially important for the hospitality industry. Currently FRL A .org

our retention rate is 96 percent. For apprentices, they are able to increase their skills quickly, reach higher wages and advance their careers. Employees will be positioned for management roles in a restaurant, which could earn them more than $50,000 per year. Could you give some examples of companies that the NRAEF is working with on this initiative? We are working with employers all over the country to offer apprenticeship to their employees. Firehouse Subs, based in Jacksonville, was an early adopter, and Gecko Hospitality Group in Sarasota recently signed on to the program. We also have other national employers, such as Chili’s, providing the apprenticeship program. How can someone get involved in the program? The first step is reaching out to the NRAEF for restaurant employees and AHLA for hotel and lodging employees. Interested employers can contact me directly with more questions for the restaurant management apprenticeship. I can be reached at jshortt@nraef.org.

“One of the great opportunities our brand was afforded last year was direct involvement in the collaboration between the U.S. Department of Labor and the National Restaurant Association’s Apprenticeship Program. We immediately enrolled candidates and look forward to them climbing the ladder toward their ultimate goal of restaurant general manager. Showing a genuine interest in the development of our staff and having a structured program that backs it up, is of critical importance at a time when hiring and retaining excellent team members is our biggest challenge.” — Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer, Firehouse of America LLC F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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HIRING FOR SHIFT WORK

Snagajob Rebrands as Snag to Better Serve America’s Largest Workforce and Usher in a New Era of Flexible Work

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he largest platform for hourly work, Snagajob, recently launched a rebrand with a new visual identity and name, Snag, to reflect the company’s evolution. Since our launch in 2000, Snagajob has grown beyond jobs. The company acquired PeopleMatter in 2016 and established itself as the first end-to-end platform for hourly work. Key elements include a new look with reimagined logo, refreshed brand identity and updated website and apps. Our purpose remains the same — to bring workers and employers together with the solutions they need to find and share work in their community. With Snag, employers receive an allin-one solution for hiring and managing hourly teams. Employers staff up faster, hire smarter and keep shifts filled. Workers find the right-fit positions, in convenient locations, with the schedule they need to earn more. Almost 60 percent of the American workforce is hourly, and an overwhelming number of these consider themselves underemployed, meaning they aren’t getting enough work, hours or shifts to cover basic living expenses. Snag is committed to connecting people with work that best fits their talents and availability, so they can maximize their potential and live more fulfilling lives. It’s in our DNA. The new brand

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not only captures our vision but also gives us room to continue expanding. We’ve seen exceptional growth over the past year, surpassing: »90 » million registered hourly workers with an additional 1 million workers registering on the platform each month »300,000 » active employer locations hire and manage teams on Snag’s platform, including Marriott, McDonald’s, Del Taco, Buffalo Wild Wings, KFC, Kroger, Macy’s, Kohl’s, Uber, Postmates and UPS — among many others »300,000 » hires powered by the platform each month, with nearly one in four jobs filled the same day Our flexible work platform, Snag Work, has also gained substantial momentum since its launch last year in Richmond, Virginia, representing the first time hourly workers were giv-

en the flexibility of the gig economy. The on-demand platform instantly connects workers with open shifts in restaurants, hotels and retail storefronts. Workers get the hours and flexibility they need while helping businesses eliminate the headache of turnover. On average, Snag Work fills 90 percent of shift requests, and 70 percent of shifts are filled in minutes. Thousands of shifts are worked on the Snag Work platform each month. Employers embracing the new era of flexible work are attracting and retaining the best people, especially in today’s tight labor market where there’s very little slack. People want work with flexible schedules to ensure they get the hours and income they need. Snag Work provides the hourly workforce just that and gives employers a competitive and efficient way to fill shifts with proven and reliable workers. Snag Work launched its second location in April in Washington, D.C., and will be expanding to more cities across the country this year.

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PHOTO BY YACOBCHUK / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By PETER HARRISON, SNAG CEO


EDUCATION

HOSPITALITY WORKFORCE

ProStart and HTMP Programs

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here are 22.7 million people currently working in the nation’s restaurant and hotel industries. That represents 15 percent of working Americans. While that number is high, it’s still growing and shows no signs of stopping. That is the reason the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) became involved in high school education. The FRLAEF works with high school culinary programs using the ProStart curriculum, which was developed by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). ProStart is a nationwide, two-year program for high school students that develops the best and brightest talent into tomorrow's restaurant and foodservice industry leaders. From culinary techniques to management skills, ProStart's industry-driven curriculum provides real-world educational opportunities and builds practical skills and a foundation that will last a lifetime. ProStart students come to an employer ready to make an immediate impact. They are trained in industry-specific and transferable skills that bring value to the employer; 95 percent of

UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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Florida’s ProStart programs are using the ServSafe program to train students on food safety. There are over 31,000 students enrolled in 238 Florida ProStart programs. The FRLAEF also supports the Hospitality & Tourism Management Program (HTMP). HTMP was developed by the American Hotel & Lodging Association Educational Institute (AHLAEI). HTMP introduces high school students to the hospitality and tourism industry on a global scale with a large focus on diversity. It teaches employability skills along with job-specific technical skills for careers in this industry. HTMP was developed with input from hospitality industry experts to ensure the curriculum aligns with the industry’s needs. There are over 2,000 students enrolled in 32 Florida HTMP programs. At the completion of both programs, students have the opportunity to earn certifications, and 81 percent of the students earning the ProStart Certificate of Achievement are still studying/working in the foodservice industry five years after completing the certification.

GLOBAL SPONSORS

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THE LEASE COACH

Three Reasons Why You Won’t Be Able to Sell Your Restaurant By DALE WILLERTON AND JEFF GRANDFIELD, THE LEASE COACH

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elling your restaurant might seem fairly straightforward. However, as we explain in our new book, Negotiating Commercial Leases & Renewals FOR DUMMIES, this is not always the case. As it pertains to the space you lease, here are three reasons why you might not be able to sell as easily as you had hoped: 1. Your Current Rent is Too High (or seen as such): While your restaurant might be popular, your potential buyer could be scared off by what they perceive as high rent. If the buyer lacks business savvy or is not experienced (i.e. this is their first business), even a reasonable rent might scare them. 2. The Landlord Tries to Raise the Rent for the Buyer: You

need landlord consent to assign your lease agreement, but the landlord points out the fine print in the lease that says, “the rent can be raised to fair market value” when you assign the lease.

3. You Don’t Have Enough Lease Term Left: If you have only

a year or two left on your lease term, potential buyers might back off. If financing is required, the buyer’s banker may only grant them a loan for the remainder of the term. Buyers also want security — they are partially paying for your location, so

they want certainty of the term. The landlord may not grant a longer term or will try to leverage big deposits, guarantees and rent increases. Renewal options are often not transferrable to the buyer/lease assignee. For a copy of our free CD, Leasing Do’s & Don’ts for Commercial Tenants, please email your request to JeffGrandfield@TheLeaseCoach.com. Dale Willerton and Jeff Grandfield — The Lease Coach are Commercial Lease Consultants who work exclusively for tenants. Dale and Jeff are professional speakers and co-authors of Negotiating Commercial Leases & Renewals FOR DUMMIES (Wiley, 2013). Got a leasing question? Need help with your new lease or renewal? Call 800-7389202, email DaleWillerton@TheLeaseCoach.com / JeffGrandfield@ TheLeaseCoach.com or visit TheLeaseCoach.com.

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Featuring Research and Resources from:

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MARKETING TO SENIORS

The Forgotten Dollar By LEW WILSON

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en thousand seniors turn age 65 every day in America, and someone turns age 50 every seven seconds. For the first time in history, the senior age group is the largest in terms of size and percent of the population in the United States, and it is growing. This age group grew at a faster rate than the total population between 2000 and 2010, according to a 2011 U.S. Census brief. As of 2015, those aged 50 and older represent 45 percent of the population. Baby Boomers outspend other generations by an estimated $400 billion each year on consumer goods and services, and ages 5564 outspend the average consumer in nearly every category, including food away from home, furnishings, entertainment, personal care and more, according to a U.S. Government Consumer Expenditure Survey. The numbers are staggering. With each day, living expenses begin to eat away at a lifetime of savings. This increasing longevity requires wise money management and budgeting. Saving money wherever and whenever possible is imperative for seniors who hope to maintain their quality of life. In an attempt to help this growing population of seniors economize without having to give up too many of life’s special pleasures, senior living organizations have come together to support a local senior savings program as seen on LocalSeniorDiscounts.com. This specialized marketing program has blossomed with their expansion of statewide partnerships with organizations like FRLA, where current members receive a member-only marketing package. This program allows restaurants to set their offer for valid days and times. For example, your offer may be valid from Monday–Thursday, lunch and dinner only. It’s a great way to fill some empty chairs

during off-peak hours, days or seasons — or all the time. Today's seniors are quite tech-savvy and can save hundreds of dollars with just a click of the mouse. Over 65 percent of households with someone over 65 have a computer and over 58 percent of those households are on the internet regularly. Senior computer skills

not only contribute to longer lives by expanding communications and research options, but they also provide many great opportunities to save money. The Local Senior Discount marketing program is a proven revenue generator. Opened in 2009 by Lew Wilson, the website promotes daily specials and a wide range of exclusive offers, helping seniors to save and businesses to grow, prosper and support local senior organizations. For more information on how to receive your member marketing package, contact Lew Wilson at Member@LocalSeniorDiscounts.com.

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SUPPLIER

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rom the growth of our first customer to all our Florida customers and thousands worldwide, one thing remains the same — we consistently operate, as we always have, with personalized service on a local level. That’s why we now have 10 facilities in Florida, from Pensacola to Jacksonville and down to Miami, committed to bringing you our award-winning One & DoneSM service. Now in its fourth generation of family leadership, Alsco was founded by George A. Steiner in 1889 and, more than a century later, was recognized by the prestigious Hohenstein Institute for inventing the linen and uniform rental industry. From an early innovation of adding bib aprons to the young company’s

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product line as the first towel supplier, Alsco has always looked for innovative ways to enhance its business and improve its products. Today, Alsco continues to lead by advancing new, green technologies using recyclable fabrics and cutting-edge research to save water and energy in our processing plants. Yet our success goes deeper than our roots and involves the spirit of giving as well as giving our best in service. Alsco is committed to a legacy of fair dealing, a passion for excellence and being a world-class neighbor, which is why we are involved in many communities with or near a local Alsco branch. In Florida, our branches have enthusiastically participated in events or raised donations for local charities — such as Gear-Up for Autism, K9s for Warriors, Meals on Wheels and the PACE Center for Girls — to benefit everyone in the community. To encourage branches to reach out to their

communities to find a need and fulfill it, Alsco created the Steiner American Foundation in 1969, later renamed the Steiner Foundation. Alsco branches can apply for and receive a nonprofit gift/grant from the Steiner Foundation to further benefit a charity of their choice along with volunteering and sponsorship of events. Both Alsco and the Steiner Foundation have made substantial contributions to local organizations that support the arts, education, physical fitness and health care within local communities. For over 129 years, we have been committed to providing our customers with the best service and the best products the industry has to offer. We have you covered, giving you peace of mind that the items you need will be there when you need them — whether you need napkins, tablecloths, placemats, or chef wear for a restaurant; scratchless shirts and pants for a repair shop; healthcare garments and uniforms; first aid; facility services and more. Visit Alsco.com or contact your local Alsco branch.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO MACHINEHEADZ (STAFF) AND KONDOR83 (TABLE) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Personalized Service from Alsco Plus Local Community Support


RCS TRAINING

Let RCS Training Help You with All of Your Mandatory Foodhandler and Food Manager Training Needs

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RLA’s RCS Training can help you meet your mandatory foodhandler training and food manager testing needs. Since 1997, Florida law requires that all foodhandlers (employees whose job involves the occasional or routine handling of food or beverage or the contact surfaces involved in the production, storage or service of food or beverage products) be provided a course of study utilizing a state-approved, basic food safety curriculum. The training must be conducted by a certified food manager, and records of the training must be kept on file. Companies trained by RCS can find their training records in the DBPR online database. The FRLA SafeStaff® Foodhandler Training Program is the contracted program of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) and contains the following six mandated key food safety principles:

PHOTO KASTO80 (BURGERS) AND WAVEBREAKMEDIA (WAITER) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

1. Ensuring proper personal hygiene 2. Preventing cross-contamination 3. Controlling time and temperature when handling food 4. Proper cleaning and sanitizing 5. The causes and effects of major foodborne illnesses 6. Ensuring proper vermin control FRLA offers foodhandler training via an online system or via onsite training by FRLA’s RCS Training team. During onsite training, one of our professional training staff comes to your establishment and provides live employee foodhandler training. In addition, the trainers assist you in assuring you have the necessary documentation to avoid problems during an inspection. In 1990, Florida was the first state to require mandatory food manager certification. RCS Training can help you meet this standard with our public food manager certification program. This Program offers a four-hour review, the SafeStaff® Manager Review Guide, and the ServSafe® Food Protection Manager’s Exam. It is scheduled in 30 Florida cities, 31 times per month. This widely recognized certification lasts for five years. To supplement this Program, contact SafeStaff® for additional study materials at (866) 372-7233. To schedule your SafeStaff® foodhandler training or food manager certification program, call (800) 537-9863 or log on to RCSTraining.com.

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food SAFETY

S

PHOTO BY JACOBLUND / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

eptember is National Food Safety Month. This is a great time to generate awareness to prevent food poisoning in your operation. Every year, 48 million people are sickened with foodborne illness, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die from eating contaminated food. That is one in six people who become ill according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Training is critical in the prevention of food poisoning. The state of Florida requires all employees that handle food be trained, and Florida law also requires a certified professional food manager on duty at all times in any restaurant while food is being served or prepared. FRLA offers the gold standard in foodhandler and food manager training. Visit SafeStaff.org for information on our training programs and resources. There are many resources available to assist you in ongoing staff training available from not only the FRLA, but also the CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Florida’s Division of Hotels and Restaurants also provides educational materials on their website. We encourage you to visit those informative websites to gain more knowledge. We hope you find our 2018 Food Safety edition educational and informative.

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TEMPORARY EVENTS

food SAFETY

FLORIDA ADMINISTRATIVE RULES GOVERN TEMPORARY EVENT FOOD SAFETY, LICENSING By LISA LAMBERT AND CARLOS LEZCANO

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emporary events have always been a part of the American culture. Fairs, carnivals, athletic contests, farmers’ markets and local celebrations all have one thing in common — a variety of available foods. Food vendors range from restaurateurs trying to increase revenue and brand exposure, to home cooks hoping to develop businesses around family recipes. Florida Administrative Rules define a temporary event as any event of 30 or fewer consecutive days, advertised and recognized in the community, where food is prepared, served or sold to the general public. The statutes and the rules also specify food safety guidelines and licensure requirements food vendors must follow. Most events take place outdoors, and portable facilities and equipment are permitted. The minimum requirements include: ɝOverhead ɝ protection ɝDustless ɝ flooring ɝPotable ɝ water for cleaning and hand washing ɝApproved ɝ cleaner and sanitizer for foodcontact surfaces ɝA ɝ hand-wash facility with soap and single-use towels

PHOTO BY ALEKSANDR_VOROBEV / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

ɝEquipment ɝ to maintain food hot (135°F or above) or cold (41°F or below) ɝA ɝ food thermometer ɝThe ɝ means to protect food from environmental contamination If warewashing facilities are not available on site, an adequate supply of spare preparation and serving utensils must be present to replace in-use utensils that become soiled or contaminated. All food must be stored and prepared at the temporary event or in a licensed food establishment. Food prepared or stored in private homes is strictly prohibited. FRL A .org

Except for specific statutory exclusions, food vendors must obtain a license prior to operating at temporary events. Event sponsors are required to notify the Division of Hotels and Restaurants at least three days prior to the start of the event. Division staff will issue licenses on the event day after conducting a satisfactory inspection. Fixed and mobile public foodservice establishments with a current license, either from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants or the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, may operate one unit at an event without obtaining a temporary event license. Single event license fees are $91 for one- to three-day events and $105 for four- to 30-day events. A $456 annual license is also available and can be used to participate in multiple events. ɝLicensing ɝ exclusions include: ɝEvents ɝ held on property regulated by the Florida Department of Health, on Native American sovereign land or on church property

ɝEvents ɝ lasting one to three days and sponsored by a nonprofit organization ɝFood ɝ stands operated by a nonprofit organization ɝVendors ɝ offering only ice, popcorn, whole fruits, peanuts in the shell, prepackaged items and beverages without additions or further preparation Food vendors, including those excluded from licensing, must follow all sanitation and safety requirements to protect public health. A temporary event brochure and checklist published by the Division of Hotels and Restaurants is available on DBPR’s website at myfloridalicense.com/DBPR/hotels-restaurants/. Carlos Lezcano is statewide training manager and Lisa Lambert is training and research consultant for the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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food SAFETY

FOOD FRAUD

DIVISION OF HOTELS & RESTAURANTS, DBPR Did you know? »There » were 52,973 food service licenses issued in Florida in 2016-17. »There » were 41,931 lodging licenses issued in Florida in 2016-17. »That » Hotels & Restaurants conducted 111,449 inspections in 2016-17, from routine to complaint inspections.

Top 10 Food Violations 22 ­– Food-contact surfaces clean and sanitized 36 – Floors, walls, ceilings and attached equipment properly constructed and clean; rooms and equipment properly vented 14 – Food-contact and nonfood contact surfaces designed, constructed, maintained, installed, located 23 – Non-food contact surfaces clean 08B – Food protection during preparation, storage and display

FIGHTING FOOD FRAUD By DR. QINCHUN RAO

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ood fraud is a collective term used to encompass the deliberate and intentional substitution, addition, tampering or misrepresentation of food, food ingredients or food packaging, or false or misleading statements made about a product, for economic gain.1 Food fraud not only violates the relevant food regulations but also affects food quality and safety with regard to foodborne illness, such as individual allergies and infection via foodborne pathogens. According to the U.S. Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), it was estimated that the typical organization, including within the food industry, loses 5 percent of its revenue to fraud each year.2 If applied to the 2013 estimated gross world product, this translates to a potential projected global fraud loss of nearly $3.7 trillion.2 Food fraud is a global problem with rising incidence rates. The U.S. Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) estimates that global adulterated food products cost the industry $10 to $15 billion per year, affecting approximately 10 percent of all commercially sold food products.3 In the EU, about 4 percent of the RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) notifications (110 of 2993) was due to adulteration/fraud in 2016.4 The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) has estimated 10 percent of the food on the shelf may be adulterated.5 According to the U.S. National Center for Food Protection and Defense (NCFPD) EMA Incident Database, from 1980 to 2013, a) the leading reported type of fraudulent foods was animal products including fish and seafood (31 percent), meat and meat products (7 percent) and dairy products (6 percent); b) 65 percent of the incidents were due to substitution or dilution; and c) in about 30 percent of the incidents, the involved food products were produced in the U.S.6 It was estimated that at least 5-to-7 percent of the U.S. food supply was affected by food fraud.7 Food fraud is also a serious concern for religious and cultural reasons, as well as for those with individual moral aversions.8 Both Muslims 9, 10 and Jews 11, 12 who follow religious law are forbidden from consuming materials derived from pigs and animal blood. It was reported that most of the 6 to 8 million Muslims in North America observe halal laws, particularly the avoidance of pork; however, the food industry has essentially ignored this consumer group.8 It was reported that the major authenticity concerns in meat products for Muslim consumers include pork substitution and undeclared blood plasma.13 To fight food fraud, the Food Safety and Quality Laboratory at Florida State University is devoted to providing solutions to a number of food fraud issues by developing rapid and user-friendly immunoassays to detect undesirable substances or fraudulently added material in foods. Food safety concerns being addressed by our technology include undeclared meat and fish species, specified risk materials, hidden proteins derived from animal bloods and various allergens from animal source foods. Several unique features for our technology include the ability to detect different undesirable substances in all kinds of foods (raw and processed), qualitative and quantitative analysis, species and tissue selectivity, simple sample preparation, sensitivity, rapid and economic.

31B – Hand-washing supplies and hand-wash sign provided

Dr. Qinchun Rao is an Assistant Professor of Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences at Florida State University. For more information, please contact Dr. Qinchun Rao at (850) 644-8215 or by email at qrao@fsu.edu.

03A – Receiving and holding PH/TCS foods cold

References

21 – Wiping cloths; clean and soiled linens; laundry facilities 29 – Plumbing installed and maintained; mop sink; water filters; backflow prevention 31A – Hand-wash sink(s) installed, accessible, not used for other purposes

SOURCE: Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Annual Report, 2016-17

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1. Spink, J.; Moyer, D. C., Defining the public health threat of food fraud. J. Food Sci. 2011, 76, R157-R163. 2. Association of Certified Fraud Examiners. Report to the nations on occupational fraud and abuse - 2014 global fraud study. http:// www.acfe.com/rttn-summary.aspx (June 19, 2018). 3. GMA. Consumer product fraud: Deterrence and detection. . http://www.gmaonline.org/downloads/research-and-reports/ consumerproductfraud.pdf (June 19, 2018). 4. European Commission. The rapid alert system for food and feed 2016 annual report. https://ec.europa.eu/food/sites/food/files/ safety/docs/rasff_annual_report_2016.pdf (June 19, 2018). 5. Everstine, K.; Kircher, A.; Cunningham, E., The implications of food fraud. Food Quality & Safety June/July, 2013. 6. Food Protection and Defense Institute. Food Adulteration Incidents Registry (FAIR). https://foodprotection.umn.edu/fair (June 19, 2018).

7. Layton, L. FDA pressured to combat rising 'food fraud'. http:// www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/29/ AR2010032903824_pf.html (June 19, 2018). 8. Regenstein, J. M.; Chaudry, M. M.; Regenstein, C. E., The kosher and halal food laws. Compr. Rev. Food Sci. Food Saf. 2003, 2, 111-127. 9. WorldOfIslam. Halal/haraam? http://special.worldofislam.info/ Food/halal_haram.html (June 19, 2018). 10. IFANCA. What is halal? http://www.ifanca.org/Pages/ staticwebpages.aspx?page=whatisHalal (June 19, 2018). 11. Byrne, J. T.; Price, J. H., In sickness and in health: the effects of religion. Health Educ. 1979, 10, 6-10. 12. Kosher Certification. What is kosher? http://www.ok.org/ companies/what-is-kosher/ (June 19, 2018). 13. Nakyinsige, K.; Man, Y. B.; Sazili, A. Q., Halal authenticity issues in meat and meat products. Meat Sci. 2012, 91, 207214.

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E D U C AT I O N

food SAFETY

PARTNERSHIP FOR FOOD SAFETY EDUCATION

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temperatures often get lost in the act of getting a meal or snack to the table. This conference will explore behavior change and the way forward to better engaging everyone in modeling proper food preparation and hand hygiene practices. To make sure you get all the news about the conference, be sure to get your name on our list. For more information, visit cfsec2019.fightbac.org. ABOUT PFSE The Partnership for Food Safety Education (PFSE) is the only nonprofit in the U.S. dedicated to reducing the risk of foodborne illness through consumer food safety education. This critical work is done through a publicprivate partnership with the FDA, USDA and CDC, as well as 24 partner industry and professional associations.

PHOTO BY JACOBLUND / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

hese days it seems as though everyone is thinking more about food and about cooking. At the conference From Consumers to Chefs: Food Safety Education Matters, which will be held March 6-8, 2019, hundreds of public and private sector professionals will be talking about bringing food safety to the forefront of the food discussion. The conference is sponsored by the nonprofit Partnership for Food Safety Education, creator of Fight BAC!ÂŽ The truth about food preparation at home is that people are not consistent when it comes to basic food safety and hand hygiene. Research shows that sometimes the importance of cleaning surfaces between contact with raw meats and vegetables, keeping raw and cooked foods separate or using a thermometer to verify safe cooking

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food SAFETY

TRAINING

FOOD ALLERGEN TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION

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llerTrain is the nation’s No. 1 food allergy training offered today. RCS Training’s certified trainers are available to teach the following versions of AllerTrain at your location:

ALLERTRAIN FOR MANAGERS

• • • • •

90-minute class for managers Includes workbook and test Earn five-year certificate $79 per person Required minimum number for training: five

ALLERTRAIN LITE PHOTO BY MARGOUILLATPHOTOS / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

• • • • •

30-minute class for non-management staff Includes information card and test Earn five-year certificate $29 per person Required minimum number for training: 10

For more information and a free consultation, go to rcstraining.com or call (800) 537-9863.

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LODGING

food SAFETY

PROPER EXTERIOR MAINTENANCE HELPS ENSURE SAFETY OF PUBLIC LODGING ESTABLISHMENTS By CARLOS LEZCANO

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lorida has a lot to offer. Great beaches, the best theme parks in the world, eclectic restaurants serving world-class cuisine, excellent universities, no income taxes and a diverse population are just a few advantages of living in our state. It’s no wonder Florida is a top destination for tourists and those seeking to relocate. The ever-increasing demand for a place to stay is fulfilled, in great part, by public lodging establishments. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants enforces several provisions of the Florida Statutes and Administrative Rules, ensuring the safety of residents and guests. Railings and all building components must be maintained in good repair and sound condition. Establishments with three stories or more must submit a Certificate of Balcony Inspection to the division, stating all balconies, platforms, stairways and railways are safe, secure and free of defects. The certificate must be submitted every three years or upon a change of ownership and must be completed

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by an individual competent in the inspection of multi-story buildings. The Administrative Rules include in the definition of the term “balcony” those portions of a building that are unenclosed except by a railing, guardrail system, balustrade or parapet. Therefore, even buildings that don’t have balconies must still submit a Certificate of Balcony Inspection if they contain any of the unenclosed areas mentioned in the rule. Vermin are also a public health concern. Public lodging establishments must maintain common grounds clean and free of debris, appliances and other household items that could harbor rodents and other pests. Outer openings, including soffits and vents, must be protected to prevent vermin from entering. Dumpsters must be kept closed and must be located on a nonabsorbent surface that is sloped to drain. Garbage must be removed at a frequency preventing waste receptacles from overflowing and becoming an environmental nuisance. Proper lighting is important in preventing accidents and is a critical safety component

when rapidly exiting a building during an emergency. Proper lighting is also a deterrent to criminal activity. Halls, entrances and stairways must be illuminated day and night. Lighting can include natural daylight or artificial illumination. Other exterior maintenance items that must be addressed include leaking roofs, concrete spalling, broken windows and doors, overgrown grass, abandoned equipment and areas where water can accumulate, creating a breeding ground for mosquitoes and other pests. Florida’s reputation as a top destination is richly deserved. Maintaining lodging establishments to avoid tarnishing this sterling reputation takes teamwork. Working together, property owners and regulators can ensure Florida’s tourism industry continues to flourish. Carlos Lezcano is the statewide training manager for the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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HOSPITALITY ASSOCIATIONS ALLIANCE

FEATURING EXCLUSIVE SOLUTIONS FOR MEMBERS OF THE FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION

The Hospitality Associations Alliance, a strategic alliance platform created by the National Restaurant Association and UnitedHealth Group, offers exclusive solutions that benefit Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) members and their employees. The Alliance provides guidance and solutions to help members navigate state and federal compliance areas, and features special offerings from industry-leading organizations such as UnitedHealthcare®, Optum® and DigiPro Media. The Hospitality Associations Alliance program: • Provides access to more affordable health care solutions with members-only pricing. – Exclusive discounts on medical and specialty benefits from UnitedHealthcare. – Exclusive Association Health Plan option for small employers in the hospitality industry (insured and serviced by UnitedHealthcare). • Promotes and supports health and wellness in the hospitality industry. – Free National Restaurant Association Pharmacy Discount Card program for prescription savings (not insurance). – Discounted Health Savings Account (HSA) from Optum. • Helps members mitigate the risk of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) website accessibility lawsuits. – Exclusive discounts on website accessibility solutions from DigiPro Media.

For more information on the Hospitality Associations Alliance program, contact Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com. 46  FA L L

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EXCLUSIVE SOLUTIONS FOR FRLA MEMBERS Solution

Details

Exclusive Health Care Discounts*

• Up to a 5% discount on manual medical rates for fully insured groups with 51 or more eligible employees. • An annual invoice credit of up to 5% on administrative fees for new ASO medical products for self-funded groups with 100 or more eligible employees. • Up to a 5% discount on specialty benefits (dental, vision, life, disability, accident and critical illness) for fully insured groups – in addition to all other discounts including bundling benefits programs.

Contact Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com. Association Health Plan

• Available to small restaurant and lodging member employers with 2-99 eligible employees. • The Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust offers small businesses some of the same product selection and pricing flexibility advantages formerly available only to large employers. • Features a product portfolio with more than 120 health plan designs. • Insured and serviced by UnitedHealthcare.

Visit restauranthealthcare.org. B:3.63”

Free Pharmacy Discount Card T:3.38”

S:3.13”

PHARMACY DISCOUNT CARD 9 74 6 Z XC

PCN

CLAIMCR

UP TO 75% OFF YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS Show this card every time you fill a prescription.

This card is not insurance.

Contact Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

T:2.125”

0 0 5 9 47

GRP

S:1.875”

BIN

B:2.375”

AUTHORIZATION NUMBER

• Helps employees save up to 75% (average savings of about 40%) on all FDA-approved prescription medications. • Accepted at more than 62,000 pharmacies nationwide. • Cards are pre-activated and easy to use; privacy is protected. • Each time a Card is used, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation receives a portion of the proceeds. • There are no costs for ordering or using this Card. • Administered through OptumRx®. This discount card program is not insurance.

NPSN0118 CD NRA.indd Last Saved at 2-1-2018 11:49 AM

Last Edits

Printed At

Stacey Simpson / Barbie Golan

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Discounted Health Savings Account (HSA) • Available to all eligible members with a qualifying high-deductible health plan regardless of insurance carrier. • Provides a tax-advantaged way for employees to pay for qualified medical expenses now and in the future. • The Optum Bank HSA solution offers a 20% discount on the Monthly Maintenance Fee for members and their employees. • Optum leverages holistic integrated health care and financial data to deliver various consumer engagement strategies that help drive savings. • Administered through Optum Bank®, Member FDIC, with nearly 3.5 million Visit restauranthealthcare.org/optumhsa. HSA accounts and $9.4 billion in HSA assets under management.** Job info

BC Name

None

Live Trim Bleed

3.13” x 1.875” 3.38” x 2.125” 3.63” x 2.375”

Folded Size Gutter Panel Sizes

None None None

General Instructions

Fonts & Images

Folder Sign Off Is Required Internally

Fonts National (Bold, Book), Calibri (Bold)

Images NRA_4c_new.jpg (CMYK; 1635 ppi; 18.34%)

Notes

Inks

None

Cyan,

Magenta,

Yellow,

Website Accessibility Solutions

Visit adotpro.net/natrest to protect your website today. For creating a new, web accessible website or to remediate your current website, contact John Guidroz at jguidroz@digipromedia.com.

Black

• Significant member discounts from DigiPro Media, a website services provider specializing in web accessibility related to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). • The ADA is the law of the land, making discrimination against people with disabilities illegal. ADA website accessibility is a recent “hot button” legal issue for hospitality business owners. • DigiPro Media’s immediate solution, Adot Pro, can provide an initial website accessibility plan as the first line of protection for member businesses at a 33% discount off the standard subscription. • DigiPro Media offers members additional web solutions to build a new, fully accessible website at a 25% discount off the monthly DigiPaas Hosting/Platform access.

*Some restrictions and exclusions apply. Discounts are available only to members of the National Restaurant Association and its state restaurant association partners; and may vary by location and group size. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company of Illinois, Inc. or their affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Florida, Inc. **Optum Bank Book of Business, 12/31/17. Health savings accounts (HSAs) are individual accounts offered by Optum Bank®, Member FDIC, and are subject to eligibility and restrictions, including but not limited to restrictions on distributions for qualified medical expenses set forth in section 213(d) of the Internal Revenue Code. State taxes may apply. This communication is not intended as legal, investment or tax advice. Please contact a competent legal, investment, or tax professional for personal advice on eligibility, investing, tax treatment and restrictions. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change. Investments are not FDIC insured, are not guaranteed by Optum Bank®, and may lose value. The National Restaurant Association logo is a registered trademark of the National Restaurant Association. Other designated trademarks and brands are the properties of their respective owners. D30411 6/18 © 2018 Alliance Business Solutions, LLC. All rights reserved.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Are You Ready for a Florida Department of Revenue Audit? By GERALD J DONNINI II, ESQ., LLM

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»» Multiple-Item Packages »» Taxable Take-Out Sales »» Coupons, Discounts and Donated Foods »» Sales to Tax-Exempt Entities »» Improper Tax Collection on Sales of Alcohol »» Alcohol Tastings »» Complimentary Food Provided with Lodging »» Vending Machines »» Amusement Machines »» Taxable Consumables »» Taxable Services »» Taxable Commercial Rental »» Taxable Transient Rental Whether it is misusing an exemption certificate to purchase cleaning supplies for your store, or failing to remit sales tax on taxable gratuities, there are endless ways in which minor errors in tax compliance can result in devastating bills from the Department of Revenue. Worse yet, the Department of Revenue can go back three years in an audit, assessing taxes owed for 36 months. If tax was collected from customers,

but not remitted to the Department, a criminal investigation can ensue. Those in the hotel and restaurant industry are familiar with the concept of quality customer service. But when the Department of Revenue issues an audit notice, do not expect the same treatment you give to your customers. The audit process can be a grueling experience, and the Florida Department of Revenue can be intimidating for taxpayers. Here at Moffa, Sutton, & Donnini, PA, we have decades of experience working with the Florida Department of Revenue to help defend taxpayers in state and local tax audits. Our tax-focused firm is dedicated to helping businesses defend themselves from audits, and we have decades of experience helping restaurants and hotels work through complex audits and assessments. Gerald J. Donnini is a shareholder with Moffa, Sutton & Donnini, P.A. The Law Offices of Moffa, Sutton, & Donnini, P.A. are comprised of attorneys with strong accounting backgrounds, CPA licenses, and a dedicated focus to defend taxpayers against the Florida Department of Revenue. Serving clients since 1991, the firm’s attorneys have over 100 years of collective experience. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY KORRAWIN / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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he Florida Department of Revenue may be preparing to initiate an audit on your business. Are you prepared for it? Florida’s sales tax laws are complex, counterintuitive and often difficult to properly execute. Just how technical are these laws? Well, a pint of ice cream sold in a grocery is taxable, but a half-gallon is likely exempt. This odd rule is just the cherry on top of a large cake of rules for businesses that deal with food, and it’s anything but sweet. The spectrum of issues that can arise in a Florida Department of Revenue audit is broad. Even the most prepared taxpayer can be susceptible to an assessment when there are so many ways the Department can assess and different state and local taxes to assess with. Hotels and restaurants are prime targets because the burden of compliance is substantial and taxpayers, or their employees, are bound to slip up occasionally. Some of the audit issues seen in the hotel and restaurant industries are below: »» Taxable Sales of Food »» Taxable Grocery Sales »» Taxable Bakery Sales »» Taxable Gratuities »» Improperly Exempted Sales


B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Drive-By Lawsuits By SAMANTHA PADGETT

I

n 2016, Florida ranked second in the nation for lawsuits filed under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)1. Known as drive-by lawsuits, many of these ADA claims involve a plaintiff suing a business with which he or she has had little or no contact, alleging the business has failed to comply with the ADA. We receive calls weekly from members who are victims of these drive-by lawsuits. Often, they have no idea their business is not in full compliance with the ADA, and they are happy to make the necessary modifications in order to be accessible to all of their potential customers. The plaintiff only wants attorney fees and a quick settlement. Fearing the expense of extended litigation and fees, most businesses choose to settle quickly, even if they feel the lawsuit is unjust. There is a more recent twist to these ADA lawsuits — ADA website compliance. While the ADA provides no objective standards for business website compliance, there has been alarming and rapid growth in ADA website lawsuits. In these suits, plaintiffs allege they are unable to use e-commerce websites and this constitutes a violation of the ADA. Some Florida courts have been receptive to these arguments, and it has proven to be the latest trend in ADA litigation. You don’t have to wait for an ADA lawsuit to be filed against you. There are important steps you can take now to protect your business:

suit is dropped. This is the best way in which to achieve ADA compliance and increase accessibility for all citizens. The U.S. Senate has not taken up HR 620 or filed a similar bill. Contact Senator Bill Nelson and Senator Marco Rubio and encourage them to sponsor legislation to adopt these much-needed ADA reforms. Without legislation at the federal level to address this issue, there is little that can be done at the state level to stop these abusive lawsuits. Samantha Padgett is the General Counsel for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association.

»» Assess your business and develop a remediation plan. In

2017, FRLA was instrumental in passing legislation that provides business owners with greater resources to help them become ADA compliant. The legislation specifies that professionals licensed in Florida, such as engineers, general contractors, architects and building inspectors, are qualified experts that can help you assess the compliance of your business and develop a remediation plan. The legislation allows businesses to file their remediation plan and demonstrate their good faith efforts to come into compliance. Find an expert near you and work with them to develop a remediation plan.

»» Assess your website. If you conduct business through your

website, you could be vulnerable to an ADA website claim. Assess your website to determine if it can be made more accessible.

PHOTO BY ABDOUDZ / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

»» Contact your U.S. Senator. The U.S. House of Representatives

has taken an important step to combat drive-by lawsuits by passing HR 620, which adopts significant and necessary reforms to the ADA. Under these reforms, a plaintiff would be required to put the business on notice that it is not in compliance. The business would then have a specified period of time in which to cure the deficiencies and come into compliance. If the business demonstrates that the issue has been remediated, the

1 See Minh Vu, Kristina M. Launey, & Susan Ryan, ADA Title III Lawsuits Increase by 37 Percent in 2016, ADA Title III News & Insights https://www.adatitleiii.com/2017/01/ada-title-iii-lawsuits-increase-by37-percent-in-2016/

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WINE

Magnolia Blossom By HEATHER McPHERSON

T

here are more than 2,600 miles between Healdsburg, California, and Tallahassee, Florida, but the roots and passions of both cities run deep. With the Roberts Family Wines’ launch of Magnolia Blossom Wines in 2014, the two cities have a link born of innovation and intuition. The Founders are Pat and Pam Roberts, along with their sons Madison and Austin. Pat, the vintner, is the CEO and president of the Florida Association of Broadcasters and former executive producer of both “Emeril’s Florida” on the Cooking Channel and Food Network and “Bass2Billfish” on NBC Sports. The Roberts family met Emeril Lagasse more than a decade ago in Sandestin. Their son, Madison, a professional angler and boat captain, fished with the famed restaurateur overnight in the Gulf of Mexico, and both families became fast friends. The friendship with the Lagasse family sparked something new: a desire to explore a culinary enterprise they all had in common: wine. One year at Emeril’s annual Carnivale du Vin, a fundraiser for his foundation, the Roberts family bought an auction lot and took a family vacation to Healdsburg in Sonoma County. It proved to be much 50  FA L L

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family venture in Sonoma. While still an avid professional angler, Madison now oversees the marketing and sales of Magnolia Blossom. Pat and Pam are involved in all aspects of the operation, making it a truly family affair. Magnolia debuted in some of the toptier restaurants and markets across Florida, including Fontainebleau Miami Beach, The Breakers Palm Beach, Seagar’s in the Sandestin Hilton, Bud & Ally’s in Seaside, Bern’s Steakhouse in Tampa, Wine Bar George at Disney Springs, Wild Olive in Rosemary Beach, Clusters & Hops in Tallahassee, Chan’s Wine World in Watercolor and Sandestin, the Governor’s Club in Tallahassee, Emeril’s in Orlando and Sandestin, Okeechobee Steakhouse in West Palm Beach and The Ocean Reef Club in Key Largo. Magnolia Blossom is represented in Florida by Opici Family Distributing and is also available direct to consumers. Heather McPherson is the former Food and Restaurant Editor of the Orlando Sentinel.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA BLOSSOM

more than a vacation. It was the catalyst for their next chapter. Their oldest son, Madison, became engaged to his soon-tobe-wife, Amy, and, within two months, younger son Austin made Sonoma County his home. In 2013, Austin was a harvest intern at Kosta Browne, a premier Pinot Noir winery. He has since worked at other prestigious boutique wineries in Russian River. Pat and Pam, who have been married for over 35 years, knew there was no turning back on the wine project. They immersed themselves in wine culture, and their sons insisted that the wine be named in honor of their mother, lovingly known as the “Steel Magnolia.” They decided to focus on Sonoma County for sourcing grapes. After all, the region is surrounded by several of Northern California’s finest regional wine appellations. Through their friendship with several outstanding winemakers, the Roberts became friends with some of the most prestigious vineyard owners, such as the Bacigalupi and Bucher families in the heart of Russian River. Magnolia Blossom is fortunate to work with a small custom crush winery in Sonoma County to produce their three outstanding varietals. With winemaker William Weese on board, Magnolia Blossom Wines was underway. Weese, a native of Sonoma County, brought extensive experience from vineyards in New Zealand, France and Chile. He also worked at The Napa Valley Reserve, Kendall Jackson and the MacPhail Family Winery. Austin has become assistant winemaker, overseeing the

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


A LA CARTE

Frank Ray’s Music Video Filmed in Beautiful Key West Rolling Stone “Artist You Need to Know” Frank Ray filmed the music video for his new single, “Tequila Mockingbird,” on the picturesque streets and beaches of Key West. Frank Ray has spawned top-four and top-10 singles on Texas Country Radio, and he is now making his splash in Nashville with the release of this summer anthem. Catch Frank Ray on tour or stream and download the single now at FrankRayMusic.com.

FRLA and Florida Hospitality Industry Association (FHIA) Announce Strategic Partnership FRLA and the Florida Hospitality Industry Association (FHIA) recently announced a strategic partnership to encourage growth and impact the Florida hospitality and tourism industry. The agreement will promote tourism advocacy and will allow opportunities to grow industry engagement. In addition, it will expand FRLA’s reach to FHIA members and offer many of FRLA’s benefits to these individuals.

Rock On at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino FRLA President/CEO Carol Dover and Senior Vice President of Membership and Corporate Relations Dan Murphy were on hand, alongside Broward County tourism leaders, to celebrate the “topping out” of the new guitar-shaped tower going up at member property, the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. Slated to open in fall of 2019, the hotel expansion will bring nearly 1,000 additional rooms and suites to the property.

TOP TRENDS Produce 1. Uncommon herbs 2. Hybrid fruit/vegetables 3. H  eirloom fruit and vegetables 4. Exotic fruit 5. Superfruit

Protein 1. New cuts of meat 2. Sustainable seafood 3. Heritage-breed meats 4. Plant-based burgers 5. House-made sausage

Sweets 1. Thai-rolled ice cream 2. D  oughnuts with non-traditional filling 3. Artisan/house-made ice crean 4. Savory desserts

Connect Travel Marketplace

5. S  moked dessert ingredients

Increase international visitors to your destination, hotel, resort, restaurant or attraction. Register now for the Connect Travel Marketplace for guaranteed pre-scheduled one-on-one meetings with decision-makers from top international tour operators. ConnectTravel.com

*Source: National Restaurant Association ~ Restaurant.org/FoodTrends

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

FRLA’s New Press Secretary Amanda Handley has recently joined the FRLA family as Press Secretary. Mandy brings expertise in media relations and strategic message development to our association. Amanda’s public relations background includes working with clients ranging from local nonprofits to national associations, and she is an active member of the Florida Public Relations Association. A lifelong Florida resident, she holds a Master’s Degree in English Education from Florida State University. Prior to joining the FRLA team, she was the Public Relations Director at BowStern Marketing Communications, worked in the Florida Senate and taught high school English. Welcome!

FRLA’s New Hire, Guilherme Cunha Guilherme Cunha has been hired as Regional Director for FRLA’s Central Florida Chapter. Cunha brings extensive experience in event management and fundraising as well as a proven track record in tourism development promoting the Sunshine State’s largest industry. “Gui’s lifelong involvement with the hospitality and tourism industry make him a natural fit for FRLA,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the FRLA. “His commitment to success, creativity and incredible track record will bring exceptional value to both the Central Florida FRLA chapter and to the association as a whole.” Cunha grew up in Miami Beach watching both of his parents work in the hospitality industry. What he saw as a child sparked a passion for the industry that has followed him throughout his career. Cunha attended the Academy of Hospitality and Tourism in Miami-Dade County,

where he was part of the first Hospitality and Tourism Management Program team to win back-to-back titles at the FRLA competition. He served as Florida International University’s Assistant Director of Events and Operations and worked at The Diplomat Resort and Spa, managing large-scale projects like the Miami Dolphins’ 50th Anniversary Gala, Monday Night Football with ESPN and the Miss Universe pageant. Most recently, Cunha was the Tourism Manager for Orlando North Seminole County. Under his leadership, the convention and visitor bureau experienced Seminole County’s highest tourist development tax and average daily rate collections in the county’s history.

Maldonado Named New VISIT FLORIDA Chair Former FRLA Chairman Lino Maldonado, Vice President of Operations, Growth and Innovation for Wyndham Vacation Rentals North America, has been named as the Chairman of the Board for 2018-19. During his tenure as Chair of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors, Maldonado intends to build on the momentum VISIT FLORIDA has achieved and focus on efforts that will propel the Sunshine State’s tourism industry to attract even more visitors. Under Maldonado’s direction, VISIT FLORIDA committees have been restructured and work groups have been introduced. This reorganization aims to cultivate further collaboration between VISIT FLORIDA and industry sectors as well as harness collective knowledge to advance tourism in the state.

Luke Thomas

The Palm Beach Chapter looking good at The Breakers Resort! First Row (left to right): Jodi Cross, Jason Emmett, Robin Bayless, David Burke, Stella Quintero, Nick Velardo, Cheri Rutledge and Jorge Pesquera. Second Row (left to right): James Gelfand, Rich Roberto, Bill Horn, Samuel Weiss, Roger Amidon, Glenn Jorgensen, Tony Davenport, Mazen Saleh, Christophe Baraton and Jude Chassagne. 52  FA L L

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Congratulations to Luke Thomas, who has been promoted to RCS Training’s regional training manager for the northern Central Florida area. Luke is a proud graduate of the University of Central Florida. After graduation, Luke worked for Orange County Public Schools as an English teacher. In addition to teaching, Luke has over 20 years of experience in the restaurant and hospitality industry. He joined RCS Training as a contract trainer in 2016, giving him the opportunity to experience how Responsible Vendor and Food Safety training can benefit clients. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


MARKETING TIPS

From IHOP to IHOb! By SUSIE MCKINLEY

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he International House of Pancakes, IHOP, surprised consumers this summer after announcing that they were changing the name of the pancake chain temporarily to IHOb. Rebranding the “p” to a “b” celebrates new burger menu items that the pancake house is now offering. The new menu items are “Ultimate Steakburgers,” available in “seven varieties that will satisfy burger cravings morning, noon and night.” The steakburgers come in “distinctive and classic flavors” that diners will really enjoy, ranging from Big Brunch, Cowboy BBQ and Jalapeno Kick to the Classic (with bacon, mushroom and Swiss) and the Mega Monster with two steakburger patties. Dan Enea, CEO of Sunshine Restaurant Partners, the largest IHOP franchisee, noted that, “It’s looking like this marketing strategy is going to give the company a bump in sales anywhere from 10 percent to 12 percent overall and potentially 25 percent to 30 percent at lunch and dinner.” “Burgers are a quintessential American menu item, so it makes perfect sense that IHOP, one of the most iconic, allAmerican comfort-food brands in the world, would go over the top to create a delicious lineup of quality burgers that hit the spot any time of day,” said Chef Nevielle Panthaky, Head of Culinary at IHOb. “Our new Ultimate Steakburgers are made with all-natural, 100 percent USDA Choice, Black Angus ground beef

that is smashed on the grill to create a sear that locks in the juices and flavor. With seven different burger builds, all steakburgers are custom built and piled high with premium quality ingredients and unique, signature sauces in between a buttered and grilled brioche bun. There’s definitely a juicy steakburger for whatever you might be craving at any time of day. The IHOP culinary team took the creation of these steakburgers as seriously as we take innovation around our pancakes, which means they’re soon to become world famous, too.” “Everyone knows that IHOP makes world-famous pancakes, so we felt like the best way to convince them that we are as serious about our new line of Ultimate Steakburgers as we are about our pancakes, was to change our name to IHOb,” said Brad Haley, Chief Marketing Officer for IHOb restaurants. “We’ve pancaked pancakes for 60 years now, so it’s the perfect time to start burgerin’ burgers, and we’re kicking it off by flipping the ‘p’ in IHOP to a ‘b’ for burgers. And, when you try them, I think you’ll agree with me that IHOb’s new line of Ultimate Steakburgers are so good that I’d put them up against anyone’s … just like our pancakes.” Guests can visit IHOP.com to learn more about the new Ultimate Steakburgers, the IHOb flip, the flagship burger location and find their nearest restaurant. Susie McKinley is the Managing Editor of Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine and is a former Director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

FRL A .org

“Everyone knows that IHOP makes world-famous pancakes, so we felt like the best way to convince them that we are as serious about our new line of Ultimate Steakburgers as we are about our pancakes, was to change our name to IHOb.” — Brad Haley, Chief Marketing Officer for IHOb restaurants F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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SECRETS OF SUCCESS

cuba libre SUSIE MCKINLEY WITH CUBA LIBRE PRINCIPAL AND CO-FOUNDER BARRY GUTIN

Please describe Cuba Libre to FR&L readers. Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar opened

in Philadelphia in 2000, Atlantic City in 2004, Orlando in January 2009 and Washington, D.C., in 2010 to much acclaim, giving guests a passport to Cuba's intriguing flavors and culture. The restaurant’s name, which translates to “a free Cuba,” signifies a hope for the future of the treasured island nation. Two-time James Beard Award-winning Chef-partner Guillermo Pernot’s menus feature tantalizing tastes that are derived from the exotic island's culinary traditions, which include Spanish, African, Creole and Asian influences.

What does a typical dining and drinking experience at Cuba Libre entail? Cuban cuisine offers a mix of robust and soul-satisfying dishes. At Cuba Libre, Chef Pernot highlights traditional cooking techniques with modern dishes based on his recent travels in Cuba. His menu reflects the current innovative culinary happenings in Havana. Meticulously prepared dishes are full of color, aroma and style. Menus reflect various Latin

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regions and combines beef, poultry, pork and seafood with exotic fruits and vegetables, herbs and seasonings. On the beverage side, Cuba Libre offers an expansive rum menu that includes over 95 premium and flavored varieties, along with the restaurant’s own brand of the liquor. Fresh sugarcane juice, called guarapo, pressed in-house, naturally sweetens signature mojitos, and exotic tropical fruit juices infuse the abundant specialty cocktails.

Please describe your signature dishes and drinks. Our Chef-partner Guillermo Pernot’s

menus feature classic and contemporary Cuban cuisine, with a focus on grilled proteins and seafood. One of our classic and most popular dishes, the Churrasco a la Cubano, is composed of a perfectly grilled all-natural Black Angus skirt steak, roasted garlic boniato-potato mash, a lemon-onion demi-glace and served with a watercress salad. Cuba Libre’s uniquely refreshing and popular house specialty, the mojito, is offered in 10 varieties, including grilled pineapple, mango, coconut and more. We sell over 100,000 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


mojitos company-wide every year. The classic mojito is made from an authentic Cuban recipe, combining rum, freshly-squeezed lime juice, fresh mint leaves, a splash of soda and most distinctively, guarapo — raw sugarcane juice pressed on site. You can find mojitos just like this right outside of Havana at Hemingway’s home — Finca La Vigía — at a little stand with an old-fashioned press squeezing sugarcane specifically for the mojitos.

Please share with FR&L readers about the numerous awards Cuba Libre has garnered over the years. Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar

in Pointe Orlando has won numerous awards and accolades since its opening in 2008. Some of these include Best New Restaurant (Orlando Magazine), Best Latin Food (Orlando Style Magazine), Best Cuban Restaurant, Orlando (My City Eats), Open Table Diner’s Choice Awards and TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence.

more. Guests dance to DJs spinning an energetic mix of salsa, merengue, bachata and Latin pop. Nightlife guests can reserve VIP bottle service tables during the late-night hours and mix cocktails of their own design.

What is the most important thing Cuba Libre emphasizes with staff about guests? Cuba Libre emphasizes a 'guest first' philosophy in our restaurants. We train our staff to warmly welcome guests, as if we are hosting them in our own home. The guest's experience and comfort is priority on every visit.

What are Cuba Libre's Secrets of Success? Our unique, experiential concept. One of our most widely used and enduring taglines is, “Be in Havana by dinner time.” Dining at Cuba Libre is more than just a delicious meal crafted by our two-time James Beard award winning Chef-partner Guillermo Pernot. It is an encompassing, full-sensory experience designed to transport our guests to a lively, fun, music-filled courtyard in 1950’s Havana.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CUBA LIBRE

Please tell readers about nightlife at Cuba Libre. On Fridays and Saturdays, after dinner hours

and continuing into the early morning, each Cuba Libre restaurant location transforms into a dance club featuring Latin DJs, professional dancers, percussionists and other entertainers. Cuba Libre’s nightlife scene, with its unparalleled music, atmosphere and VIP service, attracts an upscale crowd to its weekend dance parties that are often themed with dancers in costume, glow sticks, confetti and FRL A .org

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CITY

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

LOCATION

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

12

10

7

5

Hampton Inn

BOCA RATON

26

24

7

3

Hilton Garden Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

17

24

14

12

Hampton Inn Daytona Airport

FORT LAUDERDALE

18

16

13

18

Hyatt Place

FORT MYERS

13

4

1

6

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

20

18

15

13

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

-

-

-

-

Northwest Florida State College

FORT WALTON

11

2

6

4

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

6

4

1

6

Best Western Gateway Grand

JACKSONVILLE

20

11

15

13

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

18

24

13

11

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

-

-

-

-

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

13

11

8

-

Holiday Inn

KISSIMMEE

-

-

-

-

Comfort Suites Maingate East

LAKELAND

17

15

19

17

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

11

9

6

4

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

18

16

15

18

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

MIAMI SPANISH

11

2

6

4

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

NAPLES

20

18

15

13

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

18

16

13

18

Homewood Suites Ocala Heathbrooke

ORLANDO

-

1

6

4

Embassy Suites

ORLANDO - FRLA SHOW

6

-

-

-

Orange Country Convention Center

PANAMA CITY

26

31

28

19

Gulf Coast State College

PENSACOLA

18

23

20

18

Hampton Inn Pensacola Airport

PORT RICHEY

18

2

1

4

Days Inn & Suites

-

4

1

6

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST AUGUSTINE

12

10

7

5

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

20

4

6

6

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

20

18

15

13

Lively Technical Center

TAMPA

17

15

5

10

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore

VENICE

-

-

-

-

10

8

5

10

SARASOTA

WEST PALM BEACH

* Dates are tentative

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Hotel Venezia

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free (866) 372-SAFE (7233) or visit safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

Get ServSafe® Results Immediately ServSafe® offers eCertificates! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results include ServSafe® eCertificates. No need to wait for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

safestaff.org F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


GIVING BACK

Support

E

mployees in the food and beverage service industry are dedicated to taking care of all of us. Yet when tragedy strikes, where can they turn? Nonprofit organization CORE was created for this very purpose — providing support to those food and beverage employees who are navigating life-altering circumstances while supporting children or dependents at home. Brittney Moon found herself facing such a circumstance while working at Coppersmith in South Boston, Mass. Her other job included being mom to 5-year-old son Giuseppe Urrata. Giuseppe was born with gastroschisis — a gastrointestinal birth defect where a baby’s intestines are found outside of the body. The diagnosis led to Giuseppe needing multiple surgeries and hospitalization every few months. As an employee in the food and beverage service industry, Brittney missed work and lost pay every time Giuseppe was hospitalized. Even during short stays, the bills piled up, adding to the stress of having a sick child. CORE was able to support Brittney and Giuseppe by paying off overdue utility bills that had accumulated during his last hospital stay. The family was able to start the summer off fresh — just in time for Giuseppe’s kindergarten graduation. “We are so thankful that we have the opportunity at CORE to help families like Brittney and Giuseppe across the country make it through incredibly difficult times in their lives,” said Lauren LaViola, executive director of CORE. “Giving back to the people that serve us is why CORE was founded 14 years ago. Helping our recipients reach and celebrate important milestones, such as a kindergarten graduation, are what it’s all about!” CORE supports families from all sides of the food and beverage service industry. The types of eligible establishments include: »» Casual dining »» Fine dining

»» Fast casual »» Quick service »» Hotel bar, dining and in-room service »» Concessions »» Cafeteria or dining hall »» Catering Families can apply for support when a parent or child is experiencing a variety of life-altering circumstances, including a medical diagnosis, an injury or accident, the death of an immediate family member, domestic abuse, a natural disaster, fire, loss of home and/or other unexpected housing emergencies. CORE applicants can include caregivers, custodians or guardians who have a child or children under their care, in their custody or dependent upon them for support. Once families are approved, CORE takes care of paying recipients’ expenses directly and is committed to providing for families’ most immediate needs. Aside from internet/ cable and direct cash payments, the types of expenses CORE covers include: »» Rent or mortgage »» Utilities such as electric, gas, water and sewer services »» Funeral expenses, including travel to out-of-town funerals »» Medical bills and supplies »» Therapy sessions and equipment »» Hospital expenses for the family, including travel, hotel stays, food, gas, etc. »» Other child needs, including diapers, formula, etc. »» Childcare To date, CORE has supported more than 400 families in 35 states and raised nearly $4 million to give back to their own in the food and beverage industry. To apply for a grant or refer someone to receive support from CORE, fill out a grant application today at coregives.org/refer-a-child.

“Giving back to the people that serve us is why CORE was founded 14 years ago. Helping our recipients reach and celebrate important milestones, such as a kindergarten graduation, are what it’s all about! — LAUREN LAVIOLA, Executive Director of CORE FRL A .org

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E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N D AT I O N

ProStart Teachers Go Back to College During Summer Break FRLA Educational Foundation Hosts 22nd Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute at Johnson & Wales University

O

ne hundred Florida ProStart instructors went back to college to become students again for one week during their summer vacation. The teachers participated in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation’s (FRLAEF) ProStart Teacher Training Institute in June 2018. This event was once again held at Johnson & Wales University’s (JWU) North Miami campus. Participating instructors are involved in teaching FRLAEF’s twoyear ProStart School-to-Career curriculum, which is designed to prepare high school students for careers in the foodservice industry. ProStart instructors participated in the weeklong event to fine-tune their culinary skills so they are better prepared to teach their students. While the teachers were able to have a little fun, there was no skipping class. They spent countless hours hitting the books and studying hard. The teachers were divided into four groups based on their past attendance at the event. First-year attendees

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learned the basics of cooking methods, stocks and sauces, as well as knife skills. Second-year ProStart instructors covered topics such as nutrition, breakfast foods, meat, poultry and seafood. There was no slacking off as third-year participants learned about salads and garnishing, desserts, baked goods and global cuisines. The fourth-year attendees finished off their experience with a week focusing on baking and pastry. All participants then participated in a capstone market basket and critique followed by a national exam for the Certified Secondary Foodservice Educator (CSFE) certification. The instructors will take the information learned during the program back to the classroom and share it with their students. This event would not be possible without the support of the FRLAEF’s partners. The FRLAEF would like to thank global sponsor Johnson & Wales University, along with universal sponsors FRLA Tallahassee Chapter, Keiser University and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


REGIONAL DIRECTOR & CHAPTER MAP

GULF ISLAND COAST LEE PARADISE COAST

GUI CUNHA

407-613-9350 | gcunha@frla.org

FR LA. O RG/ M E MBE RS HI P


BEWARE OF

HEAVY TAXES OUR SERVICES • Florida sales tax audits, appeals and litigation • Criminal sales tax defense • Corporate sales and transactions support

• IRS services including audit, appeals, collection, tax court litigation • Tobacco tax, wholesale alcohol tax, and other tax issues

Call 888.966.8216 or visit www.MSDTaxLaw.com | www.FloridaSalesTax.com

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Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2018  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2018  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...