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TR ADE SHOW EDITION

FRLA Hall of Fame Winners

MARIJUANA IN THE WORKPLACE

It’s Not Going Away

Florida ProStart Students Shine at Nationals SPECIAL SECTION

FOOD AND FOOD SAFETY

FALL 2019 | FRLA.ORG


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Visit uhctogether.com/frla to learn more. PLANS ARE NOT AVAILABLE TO MEMBER EMPLOYERS IN ALL STATES. Some restrictions and exclusions apply. Discounts are available only to members of the National Restaurant Association and its state restaurant association partners; and may vary by location and group size. The Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust is not available in all states. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company of Illinois, Inc. or their affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Florida, Inc. 19-19439-FL 4/19 Š2019 United HealthCare Services, Inc.

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contents FA L L 2 0 19 | F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

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4 8 10 12 13 16

Leadership Reports Letters from the CEO and Chairman

20 38 40 41 42 43 44 46 47

Risk Strategies Hope for the Best; Prepare for the Worst

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Awards FRLA's 2019 Hall of Fame Recipients Chefs That Sizzle Brian Knepper, Savour Tallahassee Heartland Is Email Marketing Part of Your Recipe for Success? Fiberbuilt Beckner Speaks to FRLA's Valuable Relationships for Business Path to Power Joseph Kadow, Retiring Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer of Bloomin’ Brands Minimum Wage FRLA's Stance and Frequently Asked Questions Google My Business Grow Your Hospitality Business with Google My Business Listings Trade Show 2019 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show and Healthy Food Expo Florida Business Matters Fraudulent Claims Can Hurt Your Business and the Industry Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation September is Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month Giving Back CORE is There to Support Your Restaurant Team Members in Need Hospitality Happenings Catch Up On The Latest Events Top Trends National Restaurant Association's Top Trends in Restaurant and Culinary Concepts Movers And Shakers Great People Doing Great Things Step Up for Students FRLA Members Endorse and Invest in Step Up For Students Educational Foundation Florida ProStart Teams Win at Nationals

SPECIAL FEATURES 14

Marijuana in the Workplace Medical Marijuana, CBD Oil and What Employers Should Know

19

Marketing + Operations Summit Recap FRLA's Signature Marketing Event

25

FRLA’s Special Food and Food Safety Section Food Trends and Food Safety Information

48

A La Carte Industry Information You Need To Know

53 FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Letter from the CEO The year is flying by, and it’s hard to believe it’s already time for the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show! This incredible event is the largest industry expo in the Southeast, and there is something for everyone — whether you are looking for cool new culinary techniques or education for your marketing team. While you’re there, be sure to join us for the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Gala Sunday evening as we celebrate our 2019 Hall of Fame inductees and other shining stars. Be sure to make plans to attend the Central Florida Chapter’s Show Party the night before the Show at BB King’s. Read more about the Show on Page 41. September is Food Safety Month, but this is a year-round issue. Our subsidiary, RCS Training, has team members located around

the state ready to help ensure that your staff has the current certifications and necessary knowledge to keep themselves and your guests safe while protecting your business. RCS Training is celebrating 35 years in business in 2019! FRLA is continuing to focus on two critical issues facing Florida’s hospitality industry: VISIT FLORIDA and the proposed $15 minimum wage. We are actively working to educate our peers and government leaders about the impact of these topics, and I hope to see you at one of our forums soon! Warm wishes,

Carol B. Dover Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Letter from the Chairman of the Board

Dear Members, I hope the summer has treated you well! The potential for a significant increase in the minimum wage has been top of mind lately, and the unintended consequences of a $15 minimum wage are significant. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently reported that a $15 minimum wage would eliminate an estimated 3.7 million jobs. The impact 4

FA L L 2019

would fall hardest on the least-skilled workers. Job losses from a $15 state or local minimum wage are already being seen across the country — a spike in restaurant closures in San Francisco and roughly 6,000 restaurant jobs eliminated in New York City. The tip credit remains a critical aspect of both federal minimum wage legislation and Florida’s proposed state ballot initiative. The potential for an 85% increase to the required cash wage for tipped employees has the full attention of restaurateurs. With every historical minimum wage increase, all wages rise. The potential for impact across the entire pay scale should not be ignored. I’m sure you can agree that the potential negative impact for our industry and our employees is staggering. We must lead the charge to educate our fellow industry members and citizens that this is much more than just a pay increase. Since we last met, FRLA, led by our President and CEO Carol Dover, has initiated several significant actions for the good of the cause: » Formation of a task force dedicated to marshalling our industry’s resources and education efforts

» Spearheading a meeting of a broad business coalition for the purpose of coordinating strategy, resources and messaging » Scheduling minimum wage forums around the state for the purpose of encouraging industry-wide education and engagement on this issue » Providing education to our membership from state and federal level experts on political engagement and outreach The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is the only organization that has been publicly recognized as taking a firm position against this massive wage increase. Recognition is not enough. It is the action we take that will make the difference … and we are making a difference. I am very excited about the upcoming Trade Show and Board Meeting in September, and I look forward to seeing you there! Sincerely,

Alan Palmieri

Alan Palmieri 2019 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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VICE PRESIDENT

EVP AND GENERAL COUNSEL

VICE PRESIDENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND BRAND DEVELOPMENT

Red Lobster Seafood Co.

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Jim Shirley

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The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island 2019–20 NEW RESTAURANT DIRECTOR

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Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

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FA L L 2019

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Interested in advertising? Contact Susie McKinley at editor@frla.org Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published quarterly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

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AWARDS

Hall of Fame David Burke

Nick Vojnovic 2019 Restaurateur of the Year

2019 Hotelier of the Year David Burke was Executive Vice President and Chief Sales and Marketing Officer for The Breakers Palm Beach. He spent 27 years at The Breakers Palm Beach and more than 40 years in the industry. He led a 75-member division managing sales, marketing, e-commerce, public relations, conference services, event sales, advertising and promotion. David was a valued member of the FRLA Board of Directors since 2014 and most recently served as Chair of the 2018 Government Relations Committee. He was President of the Palm Beach Chapter of FRLA. Originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Burke arrived at The Breakers Palm Beach in 1991 after 10 years with Hyatt Hotels and Resorts. His career began immediately after graduating from Florida International University with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Hospitality Management, when he took his first job at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. After two years, he joined Hyatt and worked for the chain at a variety of locations, including Maui, San Francisco, Lake Tahoe and the Caribbean. He later engaged in a second tour in Hawaii during which he oversaw marketing for five of the company’s resorts, totaling more than 5,000 rooms.

You can say Nick Vojnovic has the restaurant business in his blood. Nick’s Grandfather, Costa, was a well-known restaurateur in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in the 1940s. Vojnovic started working at age 12 as a dishwasher in Pittsburgh and has devoted his career to the industry, his community and various charities. Vojnovic is the President and Majority Partner of Little Greek Franchise Development, LLC. Vojnovic bought a location in Tampa in 2015 and has since rebranded the company to Little Greek Fresh Grill. Little Greek is a fast-growing, high-quality Greek restaurant chain based in Tampa. When Vojnovic first became President, there were four locations; there are now 40 with four more coming soon. They are located in Florida, Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. Prior to Little Greek, Vojnovic was President of Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Family Sports Pubs for 12 years, growing from 30 units to 260 units in 23 states. Earlier in his career, he was HR Director at Famous Dave’s of America and the Director of Recruiting and Training for a Chili’s Grill and Bar franchisee. Vojnovic was FRLA’s Chairman of the Board and President of the Hillsborough Chapter. In addition he served on the Technomic Advisory Board and the National Restaurant Association’s Fast Casual Board. Currently he sits on the Executive Advisory Board for the USF College of Business. He has won many industry awards and has been featured in the Wall Street Journal. He is a regular on Fox Business. Vojnovic is involved in several charities. He graduated from Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration and received his MBA from USF. Vojnovic serves as a board member of five start-up restaurant companies.

Pinnacle Hospitality Systems 2019 Supplier of the Year Donald Potter is President and CEO of Pinnacle Hospitality Systems, based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Don has more than 35 years of experience providing computerbased business solutions to the hospitality industry. Pinnacle has offices located throughout Florida and in Alabama, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Pinnacle is known for its excellent customer service, business consulting and accounting resources. Pinnacle's success can be attributed to its ability to provide clients with tailored business solutions that help maximize profitability by increasing productivity, controlling expenses and 8

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managing loss prevention. Most Pinnacle employees have a hospitality background and understand the demands placed upon their clients and their operations. FRLA Senior Vice President of Membership and Corporate Sponsorship, Dan Murphy noted, “Pinnacle is a valuable partner and has been an important sponsor of FRLA for as long as I can remember. We appreciate their support and the excellent service and benefits that they provide to members. Congratulations to Don and Pinnacle Hospitality Sytstems on this well deserved award.”

In addition to its outstanding offerings to customers, Pinnacle has a unique culture that includes its 27 fundamentals. Their fundamentals guide their team through every step of their business processes, and each team member knows what is expected of them and what to expect from other team members. Don’s experiences led him to write a book that he hopes will help newcomers to the hospitality industry navigate their way through some of the common pitfalls and provide seasoned restaurateurs with valuable takeaways that will improve the profitability of their restaurants. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Chefs That Sizzle

Brian Knepper SAVOUR TALLAHASSEE

While many children don’t know what they want to be when they grow up, Brian Knepper’s desire to become a chef was evident at a very early age. Knepper noted, “I was catering parties before I could drive. My mom and dad had to chauffeur me to various jobs.” Chef Brian’s passion for food has led him to some unlikely and interesting places — the best restaurants, hole in the wall markets, the fields and docks of local purveyors and even to forests and swamps filled with wild game. “To me, it is all about the food of the South, especially Florida and utilizing the wonderful seafood and produce we have here. I love meeting the local farmers and fisherman, having conversations with them about food and asking them to grow things for me or hand selecting their catch,” says Chef Brian. “I use the freshest and finest local ingredients to create what I call Red Hills Cuisine, named after the region where Tallahassee is located.” Chef Brian began his professional career at the world-renowned Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. “At Commander’s, I learned the importance of staying ahead of the curve, a lesson I put to good use today,” he said. “It is great seeing a special you created ending up on the cover of a trade magazine a few months later.” A veteran of the food service industry for more than two decades, Chef Brian also worked with Cypress Restaurant, Table 23, Black Fig and The Governors Club, all located in Tallahassee. Yearning to get back into the hustle of a restaurant, Chef Brian teamed up with veteran restaurateur Drew McLeod to bring award-winning Savour Restaurant to downtown Tallahassee. Chef Brian holds both a Culinary Arts degree and a Bachelor’s of Arts in Food Service Management from Johnson & Wales University, in Providence, Rhode Island. Describe your role as a chef at Savour Tallahassee.

I get to oversee a great group of folks and create some awesome food. I have the opportunity to teach and share experiences with my team as well as the entire restaurant staff. What inspires your menus?

Seasonality and fresh local availability. I also like to do a modern spin on old classics, like the Escargot Pot Pie for example.

Please describe some of your most popular menu items. The two that immediately

come to mind are the Gulf Coast Bouillabaisse and the Roasted ‘Never Ever’ Chicken. The

Hot Chef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 10

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Bouillabaisse has only local seafood — shrimp from Port St. Joe, clams from Cedar Key and grouper from the Gulf of Mexico. The chicken entree is a great product raised in Georgia, free of pesticides, hormones, antibiotics and fed a vegetarian diet. Those buzzwords resonate with our guests, but really what it comes down to is a classic cooking technique that you don’t see much anymore in today’s kitchens. Do you create your menu items to pair with any special beverages?

Not specifically. Our bartenders, general manager and waitstaff are well versed in making paired suggestions from our wine and cocktail menus. What is your “sizzle” — your signature items, unique food presentations, or new ideas that you are using? I feel that it’s

important to be a trendsetter. I have always said food is food. It’s our job as chefs to take an idea or food item and play with it to make it new, improved and our own. Come to Savour and see what makes you sizzle!

What do you attribute your success as a chef to?

Being surrounded by great people and being able to listen to them and patrons alike. Also, my parents and my wife, Christine, are an important source for instilling a great work ethic and supporting my passion.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about your chef in a quarterly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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HEARTLAND

Is Email Marketing Part of Your Recipe for Success?

I

t takes more than great food to get customers into your restaurant. It also takes a healthy serving of email marketing. Email marketing is the most effective way to incentivize your best customers to spend more money with you, win back diners who haven’t been to your business in a while and attract people that have never visited. For example, 44 percent of people check their email for a deal from a company they know, whereas only 4 percent will go to Facebook. It may come as a surprise that social media is not the preferred way most consumers shop for promotions and deals. Research compiled by Campaign Monitor reveals that 72 percent of people would rather receive brand content through email, while just 17 percent look to social media platforms. With that in mind, here’s some tips on how to leverage email marketing to keep your restaurant busy year-round. Collect email addresses To connect with potential diners, you’ll first need to collect their email information. Embed an email signup form on your website. Sweeten the deal by offering customers that opt-in a free appetizer or desert that they can use the first time they eat with you. Additionally, you can do a drawing for a free meal and ask people to enter by leaving their business card. 12  FA L L

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Also ask for email information when people order online and make reservations. And when they book a table, ask if it’s a special occasion so you can send birthday and anniversary emails later. Also print your email signup URL on all receipts. Make your words count Below are some topics to include in emails: »» Highlight new and seasonal menu items, specials and themed menu nights »» Tell the story of how your restaurant got started »» Introduce subscribers to the restaurant owners, chefs and staff members »» Give tips on food preparation »» Show off interviews, reviews and positive coverage »» Celebrate your customers »» Provide discounts, deals and coupons »» Ask customers for reviews and to send in ideas for new menu items Another idea is embedding a video that shows how you create a recipe in your kitchen. On this surface, this may seem like you’re giving away secrets, but most people don’t visit your restaurant because they are incapable of cooking for themselves. They come for the food, convenience, atmosphere and quality service. Recipes get people thinking about your restaurant, and eating there.

Emails should always point people to your website and information about your location, operating hours, how to order online and make reservations, as well as details about private dining, catering, gift cards or your loyalty program. In addition, don’t forget to create an irresistible subject line that compels people to open your emails, otherwise it will be dead in the water. Timing is Everything Develop a predictable email cadence without being spammy. Today, 87 percent of customers prefer to receive restaurant email marketing messages at least monthly — and 63 percent want them weekly. For a happy medium, send 3-4 emails per month. The time and day you send email marketing matters, too. Research finds that late mornings on Tuesdays and Thursdays are the best time to send emails. The worst day and time is Sunday afternoon. Pay attention to email marketing analytics to see which emails work best and when you’re getting the most opens and clicks, then use this information to tweak your approach. About Heartland Heartland provides entrepreneurs with software-driven technology to manage and grow their business. The company serves more than 400,000 merchants nationwide, delivering trusted solutions for payment, payroll and human resources, point of sale, customer engagement and lending. Heartland is a leading industry advocate of transparency, merchant rights and security. Heartland is a Global Payments Company (NYSE: GPN). Learn more at heartland.us. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


F I B E R B U I LT

Fiberbuilt

By JORDAN BECKNER, PRESIDENT OF SALES, FIBERBUILT UMBRELLAS & CUSHIONS

A

s a longtime member of FRLA and previously the Florida Lodging Association, FiberBuilt Umbrellas & Cushions has strongly believed in the power of networking and the importance of being an active member of the organization. FiberBuilt’s umbrellas grace the pool decks and outdoor dining areas of hotels and restaurants around the country, but a particular focus has always been on working with properties throughout Florida “providing the comfort of shade across the Sunshine State,” as they say. The Fort Lauderdale-based manufacturer has had a special relationship with properties in the northernmost city on Florida’s Atlantic coast — Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island. President of Sales Jordan Beckner first met Jack Healan, then-CEO of Amelia Island Plantation, nearly 15 years ago at

an FRLA event. And FiberBuilt remained the umbrella supplier to that property until Omni Hotels purchased it. Last year, they renewed the relationship with Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort and are once again providing shade products to the property. In 2012, Jim McManemon, General Manager of the Ritz Carlton Amelia Island (and past chairman of FRLA), began working with FiberBuilt on their needs for both umbrellas and cushions. That led to the ongoing association with Olivia Hoblit who has been purchasing umbrellas, cushions and casual furniture for Seaside Amelia Inn, as well as the continuing support and participation FiberBuilt has built with the Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation. You never know where active engagement with FRLA will lead. But attending local

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chapter or corporate events, joining a committee, etc., provides the opportunity to meet interesting, knowledgeable, industryleading colleagues and that will always be beneficial to your company, allows you to develop and broaden your contacts, and provides you with a voice within the hospitality industry.

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MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Medical Marijuana in the Workplace: What’s Next? By SALLY R. CULLEY, SCULLEY@RUMBERGER.COM and CHASE E. HATTAWAY, CHATTAWAY@RUMBERGER.COM

I

Where are we now? Only qualified patients are entitled to use medical marijuana, which requires certification by a physician of a debilitating medical condition: cancer, epilepsy, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, PTSD, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, other medical conditions “of the same kind or class as or comparable” to the ones specifically identified, a terminal condition, and chronic nonmalignant pain. Florida’s law specifically provides that no employment accommodations are required for any on-site medical marijuana use. Thus, an employee can use medical marijuana on-site only if permitted by the employer. Further, in order to qualify for a 5% discount on worker’s compensation premiums, employers are required to comply with the Drug Free Workplace Act, which demands a zero tolerance of illegal drug use (including marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law). According to a June 21, 2019, report from Florida’s Office of Medical Marijuana Use, there have been 311,443 total patients in Florida who have been issued a medical marijuana card (more than double the number of total patients from the year before). This roughly translates to about 1 in every 68 people in Florida having been issued a medical marijuana card. Where are we going? Based on trends in other states and changing attitudes towards marijuana usage generally, it would not be surprising if, over time, Florida’s medical marijuana laws expand and 14  FA L L

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evolve. Here are a few things we may see in the employment context: »» Workers compensation. As noted above, many employers implement a drug-free workplace policy to receive a discount on their worker’s compensation insurance. Florida’s medical marijuana law does not affect an employer’s ability to “establish, continue, or enforce” such a policy. Consequently, employers who enforce a drug-free workplace policy may lawfully prohibit employees taking medical marijuana from work. Additionally, medical marijuana is not reimbursable under workers compensation claims at this time. Moving forward, however, workers compensation may change as medical marijuana becomes more accepted. Some carriers have shown a willingness to reimburse for medical marijuana, and courts in some other states have required it. »» Accommodations for medical marijuana. Marijuana (including medical marijuana) remains a schedule 1 narcotic and thus illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act. Additionally, Florida’s medical marijuana law does not require employers to accommodate employees’ use of medical marijuana. Early court decisions in states other than Florida have sided with employers on this issue, but there are some more recent cases that are more employee-friendly. Indeed, there are some states that have written employee protections into their marijuana legalization statutes. »» Less drug testing. Many employers in Florida have stopped testing job applicants for evidence of marijuana usage. This is because they have had trouble recruiting and hiring quality

employees when they are forced to reject a significant slice of the population who uses medical or recreational marijuana. Although we can expect employers to continue broad drug testing for employees who perform high-risk or safety-conscious jobs, the movement is to eliminate testing for marijuana usage for other, low-risk occupations. »» Recreational usage of marijuana. To date there are 11 states, plus the District of Columbia that have adopted laws legalizing marijuana for recreational use. A Pew Research Center survey from 2018 found that 62% of Americans believe that marijuana should be legalized — this is double what it was in 2000. Thus, the trend certainly is for legalization of marijuana for all uses — medical and recreational. It is not a stretch to believe that Florida will eventually follow this trend. Tips for Employers: Employers should give real thought to their businesses, the type of work the employees do and the risks of employee use of medical marijuana, and then they can determine whether to limit or prohibit medical marijuana in their drug-free workplace policies. The discount on worker’s compensation premiums is a powerful incentive for a zero-tolerance policy, but it may be worth giving up that discount in order to attract a larger number of qualified employees. Talking with an employment attorney about these issues can be a worthwhile investment, as an attorney can help to draft a policy that is specific to the employer’s needs and ensure that the policy complies with any changes in federal or state laws pertaining to medical marijuana. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY THE CANNABIZ AGENCY / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

n 2016, Florida voters soundly passed Amendment 2, Florida’s medical marijuana law, with over 71% of the vote. Since then, two bills have been passed implementing the law, there was one highprofile lawsuit targeting the legislature’s initial ban on smoking medical marijuana, and the Office of Medical Marijuana Use was created as part of Florida’s Department of Health.


CBD OIL

Cannabidiol (CBD) Oil — Untested, Unregulated By SUSIE MCKINLEY, EDITOR OF THE FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY TINNAKORN JORRUANG / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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annabidiol is one of 400 chemical compounds found in hemp and marijuana that is the newest remedy in alleviating pain, anxiety and a host of other ailments. It has also been associated in providing relief from seizures, but the compound does not offer a hallucinogenic high. CBD oil typically contains less than .03% of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the agent causing the “high.” Currently, CBD can’t be sold legally in the state of Florida, but it is being sold throughout the state at drug stores, big box stores and gas stations, and the oil is being added to ready-to-eat foods, such as ice cream and more. It is no longer included on the federal listing of illegal drugs, but it will remain illegal in Florida until rules are drafted by lawmakers and approved by the Federal government. To understand why it is legal on the federal level but not in the state of Florida, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Hemp/CBD in Florida website, freshfromflorida.com/Cannabis/ Hemp-CBD-in-Florida, notes, “The 2018 federal Farm Bill allows states to create FRL A .org

a hemp regulatory program that meets certain regulatory criteria. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) is currently reviewing the Farm Bill requirements and working quickly to submit the required regulatory plan to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for review. FDACS is also working with the Florida Legislature to ensure that hemp and CBD (cannabidiol) products produced from hemp under an approved regulatory plan will comply with all Florida statutes and ensure consumer protection.” Additionally, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website states, “Right now, the CBD products being sold in Florida are unregulated, untested and without standards on what consumers are putting into their bodies. There have been reports of falsely advertised products containing harmful additives and little or no CBD. Neither consumers nor FDACS can ensure these products are completely safe for human or animal consumption. Once state hemp legislation becomes law, FDACS will begin testing CBD products for consumer safety.”

Things to watch out for are: How is the CBD oil extracted? If CBD oil is added to food, is it contaminating the food since the manufacturing process may be unsafe? CBD is not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the state of Florida, so who knows what really is in that CBD oil bought from your local gas station? How much CBD is actually added to oils? How does CBD oil use impact my workers compensation coverage? It may not cover an incident for someone injured on the job that is using CBD oil. With so many questions, it is best to steer clear of this compound until more is known and/or legislated here in Florida. For now the bottom line for restaurant and lodging operators: Don’t sell, use in food or give away CBD oil in your establishment. References: ConsumerHealthDigest.com TampaBay.com Blog.EmployerSolutions.com FreshFromFlorida.com KnowTheFactsmmj.com F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Joseph Kadow

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fter a highly successful career as Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer of Bloomin’ Brands, the parent company of Outback Steakhouse, Flemings Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar, Bonefish Grill, and Carrabba’s Italian Kitchen, Joseph Kadow has decided to step away from daily operations at Bloomin’ Brands. He will continue to serve on boards and work with organizations that are of interest to him. Mr. Kadow was an original member of the Bloomin’ Brands executive leadership team and worked with the organization for 25 years. While in this role, he also served as Chairman of the National Restaurant Association in 2016. Kadow is a graduate of the University of Scranton receiving a B.S. in Accounting. Kadow then attended the Dickinson School of Law of Penn State University and received his Juris Doctor and was admitted to both the Pennsylvania and Florida Bars. FR&L Magazine Editor, Susie McKinley, had a chance to catch up with Mr. Kadow to reflect on his career in the hospitality industry.

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? In October 1983, I moved from Philadelphia to Sarasota

to join a law firm there. That same month Gene Knippers, Chris Sullivan and Bob Basham came to the firm, as Gene was friends with senior partner John Meshad. Gene, Chris and Bob were the first area developers for Chili’s, and John gave the legal work to me. That started my relationship with Chris and Bob, and when they founded Outback Steakhouse in 1987, they came to me for the legal work. In 1994, I joined the Company as Vice President and General Counsel.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? As an attorney, find

creative ways to make deals work. It is easy to be a “deal killer” as an attorney. As a businessperson, the importance of choosing your partners and always maintaining integrity and fairness with partners. In my experience, it is better to be in a bad deal with good people than to be in a good deal with bad people. 16

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What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? The people I have been fortunate enough to

associate with.

What did you enjoy most about being Chairman of the National Restaurant Association? The opportunity to speak to state restaurant associations across the country and to advocate for our industry and the importance of the opportunities it provides. Most importantly, opportunities for the two-thirds of the American workforce who do not have the advantage of a college degree at a time when their traditional paths to the middle class are shrinking.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? I would just

like them to know how proud I am to be part of the hospitality industry. I love this industry for many reasons, including how much the industry gives back to its communities, but primarily because I have seen it provide wonderful careers for so many people with rapid advancement based on talent and merit, regardless of traditional credentials. And to remind them of the importance of being involved in their state association and local chapters to represent and advocate for our industry. Mr. Kadow, thank you for your leadership. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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WORKERS’ COMPENSATION SPECIALISTS Zenith specializes in helping a broad spectrum of restaurants and hotels with their workers’ compensation needs via the following: Safety & Health Services • Zenith’s expertise on workplace safety allows you to remain focused on your business. • We partner with you to create a culture of safety at work that sends the right message to your employees to decrease the risk of injuries and illnesses. Claims Management • Our in-house nurses, doctors, claims experts, attorneys, and investigators collaborate to achieve the best outcomes for your business.

Zenith is the endorsed workers’ compensation carrier of the FRLA.

Fighting Fraud • We’re an industry leader in investigating and exposing potential fraudulent workers’ compensation activity. Policyholder Resources • We offer a vast array of online resources, support, and tools that are available 24/7. Access your policy, submit and view your claims, use Zenith Solution Center®, make a payment, report payroll, and more!

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THANK YOU SUMMIT SPONSORS!


2019 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT RECAP

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RLA's Marketing + Operations Summit convened in Tampa at the beautiful Waterside Marriott. This event, which was open to non-members and members, featured awesome speakers known for their contributions within the industry and elsewhere. From the former CMO of Chick-fil-A and a Chaos Strategist to an Olympic Gold Medalist and a New York Times Bestseller List author and business leadership coach, there were 64-plus speakers giving their take on what is happening in the industry today with regards to marketing and operations. The event included a reception and dinner at Jackson’s Bistro, Bar & Sushi that served as an excellent opportunity for networking. In addition, the Summit offered a Sponsor Marketplace that allowed attendees to get to know the people and products behind the sponsorships.

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1. Keynote speakers included former Chick-Fil-A CMO Steve Robinson, business leadership coach and New York Times best-selling author Don Yaeger, 1998 Olympic gold medalist Nikki Stone, and Results Through Strategy’s Fred LeFranc. 2. With the biggest crowd ever, this year’s MOS offered educational, motivational and networking opportunities. 3. Thanks to all who sponsored and attended the MOS this year — a great time was had by all! 4. The Advancing Women Leaders: Candid Conversation on Women in the Workplace break out session was relevant and well attended. 5. Former Chick-Fil-A CMO Steven Robinson took questions from the audience after his dynamic presentation. 6. The panel discussion of medical marijuana in the workplace was led by several experts in the field and touched on important aspects of this new issue.

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R I S K S T R AT E G I E S

Hope for the Best; Prepare for the Worst

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ypically, we don’t think about insurance coverage until disaster strikes. Buyers, sellers, managers or developers can minimize losses and face any storm with some common-sense tactics and basic property and policy preparation. Most common building claims stem from weather; water and wind damage top the list. In high-wind zones like Florida, roof and outdoor damage from wind-downed trees is typical. Engaging in some strategic landscape management can reduce these risks. Often, unfortunate flukes or overlooked things like dishwasher leaks, drain clogs and broken washing machines can all cause water damage. Neglected larger problems like mold, uncovered by standard property insurance, could manifest. And then there’s fire. From 2012–16, cooking equipment caused over 170,000 building fires and $1.1 billion in property damage. Those numbers skyrocket with

By ROBERT GRADY

causes outside the kitchen — space heaters, smoking and curling irons. Damage from so-called catastrophic events — such as hurricanes and floods — fall outside standard storm coverage; requiring additional sublimits to protect your property and assets. No matter the risk, some basics can reduce risk and ensure coverage on claims: » Evaluate storage. Before installing or storing critical systems in the lowest floor of a building, evaluate the risk. The lowest floor will usually flood and catch fire first. Placing these critical assets on higher floors can reduce future losses. » Prepare communications. A communication procedure and response plan lets tenants immediately alert you to problems. Have service providers on speed-dial to speed repairs.

» Don’t rush. Filing claims too soon can cost you. Ensure a maximum refund by working with engineers on your claims team before notifying your carrier of a loss, so the cause and full extent of the damages are determined, substantiated and properly disclosed. To understand your risk and prep your investments for the worst, get in touch today: Robert Grady, Risk Strategies rgrady@risk-strategies.com Insurance Council Member Robert Grady is a Vice President of Risk Strategies and is a member of FRLA's Insurance Council.

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TJ

ohn Tolbert the chairman of Revelation Consultancy, a olbert is theischairman of Revelation Consultancy, a leading leading real estate advisory group servicing Fortune 500 real estate advisory group servicing Fortune 500 clients, clients, and andthe active President Managing Director of Boca Raton the active President andand Managing Director of Boca Raton Resort & Club. The club is a 350-acre propertyof with a variety of Resort & Club, a 350-acre property with a variety accommodation accommodation including Cloister, built inMizner 1926 byand styles including the styles, Cloister, built inthe 1926 by Addison Addison Mizner, which reflectsMoorish Spanish-Mediterranean, Moorish reflects Spanish-Mediterranean, and Gothic influences and Gothic influences with hidden gardens, barrel tile roofs, intricate with hidden gardens, barrel tile roofs, intricate mosaics, fountains mosaics, fountains and beamed ceilings of ornate pecky cypress. and beamed ceilings of ornate pecky cypress. He serves on several He serves on several boards, including theTourist Palm Beach County boards, including the Palm Beach County Development TouristCultural Development Council, Cultural PalmRaton Beach Council, Council of Palm BeachCouncil County,ofBoca County,Society, Boca Raton Historical American Hotel &Boca Lodging Historical American HotelSociety, & Lodging Association, Association, Boca Raton Bowl, Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce Raton Bowl, Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce, and more. more. He serves as advisor boards of FAU Business Heand serves as advisor to the boards to of the FAU Business School, LynnSchool, Lynn University andHospitality NSU Hospitality Programs. University, and NSU Programs. Tolbert Tolbert has beenhas been Hilton Worldwide’s “Luxury Leader Year,”Greater GreaterBoca Boca Raton Hilton Worldwide’s “Luxury Leader of of thethe Year,” Chamber of Commerce’s “Business Leader of theofYear” and co-chair Raton Chamber of Commerce’s “Business Leader the Year” and of numerous non-profit and charitable organizations. co-chair of numerous non-profit and charitable organizations. The Boca Resort & Spa is well represented on the The Boca Resort & Spa is well represented channel, and you personally appear in the some of on the channel, and you personally appear the content on The Palm Beaches TV. Can you talk in the some of the content on The Palm about your experience? Our property is rooted in deep Beaches TV. Can you talk about your history, originally founded by architect Addison Mizner. The experience? Our property is rooted in deep history, property opened in 1926 as an “inn” with 100 rooms. With so originally founded by architect Addison Mizner. The much history to tell, The Palm Beaches TV has made our stories property opened in 1926 as an “inn” with 100 rooms. come to life. As a guest on the series, On the Town in The Palm With so much history to tell, The Palm Beaches TV has Beaches, I was pleased to participate as it presented us with an made our stories come to life. As a guest on the series, On opportunity to showcase our incredible property while sharing What impressed you most about the channel? The What impressed you most about the channel? The the Town in The Palm Beaches, I was pleased to participate unique stories and experiences. This series continues to air on channel does anan excellent jobjob of of showcasing thethe diverse amount channel does excellent showcasing diverse amount as it presented us with an opportunity to showcase our South Florida PBS and on The Palm Beaches TV which has of of assets wewe have in in The Palm Beaches forfor visitors to to enjoy. assets have The Palm Beaches visitors enjoy. incredible property while sharing unique stories and given us great exposure. Plus, the channel is available to watch While wewe have some of of thethe best beaches, wewe also have some of of While have some best beaches, also have some experiences. This series continues to air on South Florida on ROKU, online and on the mobile app, so there are many thethe finest cultural venues, sporting events, international dining finest cultural venues, sporting events, international dining PBS and on The Palm Beaches TV, which has given us ways to reach the guest or potential visitor. options, and some awesome outdoor adventures. This channel options, and some awesome outdoor adventures. This channel great exposure. Plus, the channel is available to watch on represents allall this and more and really ignites a guest to to gogo outout HowROKU, do youonline thinkand television plays a role in are a many represents this and more and really ignites a guest on the mobile app, so there and explore thethe area or or come back forfor another trip! traveler’s for their next destination or and explore area come back another trip! ways to decision reach the guest or potential visitor. meeting? I think what one sees on television can greatly How does The Pam Beaches TVTV benefit the Boca Raton How does The Pam Beaches benefit the Boca How do you think television plays a role in a influence how one chooses to spend their free time. At the are in We the are business visitor of acquisition Resort Spa? We in theof business visitor Raton&Resort & Spa? traveler’s decision for their next destination resort, we subscribe to the theory that good curated content and retention and and retention, we use a multitude of amarking tools acquisition and we use multitude of to marking or meeting? I think what one sees on television can can have a lasting impact. The fact that we now have entire dotools this in mostineffective attractive Since way. a large to the do this the mostand effective and way. attractive Since a greatly influence how one chooses to spend their free channel dedicated to The Palm Beaches using high quality part of our is in group duesales to our and large partbusiness of our business is insales group duemeeting to our meeting time. At the resort, we subscribe to the theory that family programming is a huge tool to inspire more travel to event Palm TV is aTV unique platform to and space, event The space, TheBeaches Palm Beaches is a unique platform good curated content can have a lasting impact. The our destination. What we hope to see is raised awareness of the entice and solidify a group sales sales meeting. It’s a It’s channel that to entice and solidify a group meeting. a channel fact that we now have entire channel dedicated to The channel in our target markets. This is an incredible resource provides a very clear of whatofour destination feels feels that provides a verypicture clear picture what our destination Palm Beaches using high quality family programming for planning a vacation and people need to know about it! like and what you cancan expect and experience when you come like and what you expect and experience when you come is a huge tool to inspire more travel to our destination. here. InIn addition, thethe channel compliments thethe service to to ourour here. addition, channel compliments service What we hope to see is raised awareness of the channel concierges’ teams since what a guest seessees on on thethe channel cancan be concierges’ teams, since what a guest channel in our target markets. This is an incredible resource for supported and carried out byout our be supported and carried byconcierges. our concierges. planning a vacation, and people need to know about it!

What led toto your decision toto have The Palm Beaches What led your decision have The Palm TVBeaches channelTV available every room at theroom Bocaat channelin available in every The & Palm Beaches TV isBeaches overseen byis Raton Resort & Spa? The Palm TV the Boca Raton Resort Spa? The Palm Beach Tourist Development Council and one overseen by TheCounty Palm Beach County Tourist Development Council of and the newest initiatives attract more visitors tovisitors the area. one of the newest to initiatives to attract more to With the area. thisWith kindthis of oversight, we felt confident that The Palm kind of oversight, we felt confident that TheBeaches Palm Beaches TVTV would bebe a great would a greataddition additiontotoour ourin-room in-roomprogramming. programming.It’s It’s the thekind kindofofhigh-quality high-quality entertainment that only with entertainment that notnot only fitsfits with thethe resort resort image, andisthe channelofisthe reflective of the entire area. image but also reflective entire area.

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food food AND

SAFETY

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ood sustains life, and food must be served safely to preserve the quality of food and keep consumers healthy after eating it. This issue of FR&L Magazine offers some information about both: food and food safety. Learn about starting a delivery platform to reach your customers from Results Through Strategy’s Fred LeFranc. Find out from Jim Collins about new approaches in food prep and delivery, such as ghost kitchens or virtual restaurants. Learn more from FAU professors Stella Quintero and James Ward about sustainable food in Florida and how it can be used to create a smaller environmental footprint — plus how it can also be part of the overall marketing strategy for your operation. The hepatitis A outbreak in Florida is no joke with nearly 2,000 people ill from this liver-damaging illness. We’ve focused several articles in this issue on this topic to educate the reader. Crisis management, hepatitis A awareness, immunizations and a tear-out sheet for the back-of-the-house will provide that needed information. We’ve touched on edibles, the National Food Safety Standards for state programs and more. We hope you find this September is Food Safety Month issue informative. Remember, the best thing you can do to prevent foodborne illness is washing your hands at every juncture during the day.

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food

FOOD DELIVERY

The Fastest Way to Get a Delivery Program Up and Running By FRED LeFRANC

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» FOOTPRINT. Is there enough front-of-the-house space to

accommodate both delivery drivers arriving with large sacks and dining-room guests waiting to be seated? If not, can the space be expanded to accommodate guests — and at what cost? Or will you have to devise rules for when and where drivers arrive and hang out while waiting for orders?

» SEAMLESSNESS. The issue of seamlessly integrating third-

party delivery technology into a restaurants’ point-of-sale system is improving. But that doesn’t mean your delivery service of choice will make it happen for you. Yet it shouldn’t be a deal breaker if the delivery service hands you their tablet. But be aware that technology (via third-party integrators) does exist to flow orders directly into your POS. Companies that supply it include Ordermark, Omnivore, Chowly and ItsaCheckmate.

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» VISIBILITY. Images of your food will appear on a third-party’s

website. Make sure the photos you supply not only make your dishes look inviting but also fairly represent what is supposed to arrive at the customer’s door. Also, a good idea is to first “test drive” menu items yourself by putting them in a car and driving around to determine which hold up best after, say, an hour’s drivetime.

» DATA. Today’s big issue: who owns sales and customer-behavior

data— you, the operator or the delivery service? For now, delivery services claim it because, in their mind, they “own” the customer. But here’s the twist: If the delivery driver arrives late with cold food, guess who gets blamed? You do. And without customer details, how do you reach out and solve the problem? What’s worse? Ordering off of a third-party platform bypasses a restaurant’s loyalty program, depriving guests of a possible deal and operators of customer data.

» FEES & PRICING. There’s no such thing as “free delivery” — at

least not for you, the operator. Third-party service fees may run as high as 30% of individual menu items, depending on an operator’s ability to negotiate a fair percentage. The bigger you are in terms of sales or number of units, the better your chances of negotiating a lower fee. One way to make up for high fees is to raise menu prices on delivered items. Yet check first with your third-party delivery firm. Some are known to frown on it. Former restaurant CEO Fred LeFranc is the Founder/Chaos Strategist at Results Thru Strategy, the Charlotte, N.C.-based consulting firm he co-founded in 2009. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY KONDOR83 / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (KITCHEN)

oday’s restaurant operators can now use several channels to reach their guests, including: » brick-and-mortar seating » catering » takeout » drive-thru » delivery Digital ordering apps and online delivery platforms have grown the delivery channel exponentially. Among them, online delivery — particularly, via third-party providers — is garnering the most attention because it holds the biggest promise of boosting sales. Last year, the research firm NPD reported a 20% increase in delivery sales and 10% gain in delivery foodservice visits, many them prompted via digital ordering. A Technomic restaurant operator report showed delivery generated incremental sales for 60% of those surveyed. By all accounts, the delivery runway remains long. This year, for example, a Wells Fargo survey of nearly 500 consumers who ordered restaurant delivery at least once during the surveyed month found that respondents ordered delivery fewer than five times a month. The survey also noted 28% ordered delivery just once in the past month. This channel is immature and has a long way to go to become economically viable on a long-term basis. The marketplace is evolving and will change until it normalizes. So if you’re among operators ready to leap on the bandwagon yet smart enough to grasp the pros and cons of delivery, consider these five issues before signing a contract with a third-party delivery service. Or, more likely, services.


food

GHOST KITCHENS

Virtual Kitchens — What? “Ghost kitchens.” “Virtual restaurants.”

Whatever moniker you assign, these newstyle “restaurants” are rapidly making a name for themselves in the restaurant industry. The model, similar to a food hall without seating, is being adopted across the country. Why? Because consumers are increasingly choosing not to cook at home. With that, they are often looking to the convenience of restaurant delivery. William Blair projects third-party ordering platforms will source over $43 billion of delivery orders in the United States by 2022, up from its 2018 estimate of $13 billion. The virtual kitchen model allows restaurants to prepare food in restaurant kitchens without dining rooms, decreasing costs and providing fresh food fast to their new consumer audience. Virtual kitchens come in different shapes and sizes. At Kitchen United, we house 10-12 different restaurant brands under one roof, all with their own dedicated kitchen space. We manage everything but the cooking and delivery. This allows established and emerging restaurant chains to expand their market reach without an expensive new, standalone 28  FA L L

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build and off-load congestion often caused by an influx of delivery orders. Kitchen United also provides members with key data insights to help them adjust and improve staffing, menu items and more to position them for success. Other models cater to chefs looking for an incubator setting, and some create a number of different concepts in one location but own and manage everything — from the branding to the cooking. If you’re looking to start a restaurant and you think this would be a great way to do it because it is less expensive than owning a dining room, you may want to reconsider. The challenge is, without the sidewalk exposure, the restaurant has to come up with other ways to connect with consumers. Unless your concept is prepared to make a significant investment in marketing, this virtual kitchen model isn’t the easiest or fastest way to establish and grow a business. Restaurants successful in this space are those who already

have a strong market presence but simply need a solution for the growing demand of off-premise dining. Additionally, virtual kitchen concepts singularly focused on delivery are missing important market segments, and the limited revenue makes success much more difficult. Delivery represents about one quarter of the overall off-premise market. In order to be viable, restaurants must also include consumer pick-up and catering in their product offering. If you’re considering a ghost or virtual kitchen concept model for your restaurant, the benefits are numerous. You can alleviate the headaches often caused by a delivery influx, gain market reach and take your share of the off-premise boom with minimal investment. Just be sure to have a plan in place to maximize your opportunity. Jim Collins is the CEO of Kitchen United F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY KONDOR83 / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (KITCHEN)

By JIM COLLINS, CEO OF KITCHEN UNITED


FA U

SUSTAINABLE FOOD:

Good Food and Good Business By JAMES WARD AND STELLA QUINTERO

PHOTO BY LIGHTFIELDSTUDIOS / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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onsumers are becoming increasingly aware of products and their effects on our environment. The perception of food and “eating out” have evolved from knowing about the celebrity chef to knowing about the celebrity farmer, and it seems like we hear every week about a new idea to be sustainable. When talking about sustainability, there are numerous components and processes of a restaurant operation that can be addressed and converted to be “sustainable.” However, the most visible to the consumer and perhaps the easiest change to implement is sustainable food. Although there is not a legal definition of sustainable food, the general term refers to food that is healthy for consumers and produced in a humane, ecologically kind, socially responsible and economically fair way. Thus, sustainability encompasses more than just reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The most popular approach to bring sustainable food to a restaurant is to “buy local” and work with local producers of agricultural products as well as local brewers. Beer popularity remains strong, especially FRL A .org

when it is a “local brew.” In Florida, where we are very fortunate to have domestic and international visitors, adding the local elements to a menu elevates the experience and enhances the overall value. How do we go from theory to practice? If you want to explore the sustainable foods avenue, the simplest way to get started is to rely on your food service distributor to do thorough research on sustainable foods and educate you about them. There are more sustainable food producers in Florida than you might think. A great example of how Florida has grown sustainable food production is beef. According to Fresh from Florida, in 2009, “Florida was home to five of the top 10 largest cow/calf operations in the U.S.” Today, organizations such as Florida Cattle Ranchers work on keeping the cattle born and raised in Florida, with sustainable practices to produce better quality beef and protect the natural resources and ecosystems. Nevertheless, sustainable food does not necessarily have to come from within the state, but we do have plenty of options in Florida and the production of sustainable food in Florida is growing rapidly.

food

Once you decide to adopt a sustainable food focus at your restaurant, the following steps can help you make the most of it: 1. Make sure that you can deliver on the brand promise of sustainable food options. 2. Know the story, so you can share the story: Learn about the farmers and producers, where they are located, their commitment to sustainability and quality. 3. Train the staff so they can share the story with your customers. Sustainable foods can be a new way to re-brand your menu and can serve as a marketing tool as well. With that in mind, this creates an opportunity to educate customers on what the changes mean and the benefits that it has not only to them, but also to the environment. This process continues to evolve and the pricing is becoming more competitive. The key to success is to educate the consumer as much as possible. Customers are seeing the benefits of sustainability in their everyday lives, and they are interested in incorporating this social consciousness into everything they do.

Stella Quintero is an Instructor in the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program at Florida Atlantic University. James Ward is Visiting Professor, Florida Atlantic University. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Hepatitis A Immunization Program FRLA is partnered with BioIQ, a healthcare engagement, testing and immunization company, to offer employees a simple, easyto-use program to receive important Hepatitis A vaccinations. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most effective way to prevent Hepatitis A is through an immunization. BioIQ provides access to over 5,000 Walmart pharmacies, which enables franchisee staff to receive their vaccinations at a convenient time and location.

Hepatitis A by the Numbers

Quick service restaurants are at major risk with:¹

27 days Average number of days an employee is out due to illness

Plus, the undetermined costs of: • Damage to brand reputation • Loss of community trust • Loss of revenue before and after incident • Immunizing restaurant guests during incident window • Loss of staff

$1,817 to $3,837 Average medical cost per Hepatitis A case

1. https://www.marlerblog.com/lawyer-oped/a-public-health-failure-since-2016-more-than15000-cases-8500-hospitalizations-and-140-deaths-have-resulted-from-the-hepatitis-avirus-it-is-past-time-to-offer-vaccinations-to-food-ser/

Up to $800,000 The amount a store may have to pay following an outbreak

Since Hepatitis A outbreaks were first identified in 2016, there have been:¹ +15,000 cases

+140 deaths

+8,500 hospitalizations

20 out of 50 States affected

BioIQ Immunization Program Experience

BioIQ partners with the employer

Employee receives their immunization card

BioIQ engages in comprehensive & strategic communication via text and email to the employee

Vaccinating employees is nearly 100% effective in preventing Hepatitis A outbreaks

0%

Employee receives vaccination at a retail pharmacy location

Reporting on who has completed which vaccinations

Protect your brand, revenue, staff and guests

©2019 BioIQ. All rights reserved. BioIQ and BioIQ logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of BioIQ, Inc. All other trademarks referenced are trademarks of their respective owners.

To enroll in the FRLA-sponsored immunization program please call Dan Daley at 949-282-2525 or email ddaley@bioiq.com. Dan Daley, Vice President of Business Development | 949-282-2525 | ddaley@bioiq 30

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NEW DIRECTOR

food SAFETY

Steven von Bodungen Appointed Director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants

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teven von Bodungen has been appointed as the Director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants for the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). Appointed in July 2019, Steven oversees the Division’s programs for food service and lodging inspections, elevator safety, licensing and compliance. The Division licenses over 158,000 businesses and individuals throughout the State of Florida. Steven began working with the Division of Hotels and Restaurants in Tampa as a food and lodging inspector in 1997. He served in multiple assignments around the state that have included field supervision in Pinellas County, plans examination in Panama City Beach, district management in Jacksonville and program leadership in Tallahassee. Steven earned his Hospitality Administration bachelor’s degree from the Florida State University College of Business while gaining experience in the restaurant industry. Congratulations, Director!

Simple Technology and Tools We offer an array of e-business tools—from online ordering and payment to inventory and recipe management—developed to make running your operation easier. Which means you can spend less time managing your orders, and get back to what’s important to you.

Interested in advertising in Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine?

COOL

Contact Susie McKinley Editor at Editor@frla.org or 850.508.1139 Connect with us at gfs.com

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H E PAT I T I S A

Hepatitis A in Florida

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personal contact with someone with the virus, such as a household member or sexual partner. In Florida, the outbreak related hepatitis A cases that have been investigated thus far have not indicated any known transmission of hepatitis A to restaurant patrons from a food worker. As of June 27, 2019, there have been 1,679 confirmed hepatitis A cases reported and food workers only make up 4.4% of the total cases. If a food handler worked while infectious, it may be necessary for the health department to contact and vaccinate patrons of the food establishment to make sure they do not get hepatitis A. Thoroughly washing hands with soap and water after using the bathroom, changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food plays an important role in preventing the spread of hepatitis A. The Florida Department of Health recommends food service facilities follow their regulatory agencies recommendation for sanitation and follow manufacturing recommendations when cleaning equipment. If food employees become ill with symptoms of vomiting or diarrhea, they should notify their manager and be excluded from work following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code. The Florida Department of Health is working to prevent hepatitis A through vaccination in accordance with the guidelines set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. We encourage Florida residents to speak with their health care providers to determine if hepatitis A vaccination is an option for disease prevention. We also advise persons to contact their county health departments for additional vaccination information.

Hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for the following people:

» All children at age 1 year » Travelers to countries where hepatitis A is common

» People who are experiencing homelessness

» Family and caregivers of adoptees from countries where hepatitis A is common

» Men who have sexual encounters with other men

» Users of recreational drugs, whether injected or not

» People with any liver disease, especially chronic or long-term liver disease, including hepatitis B or hepatitis C infections

» People with blood clotting-factor disorders

» People with direct contact with others who have hepatitis A

» Any person wishing to obtain immunity (protection) F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY THARAKORN / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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epatitis A is contagious liver disease transmitted either through personto-person contact or consumption of contaminated food or water. Most adults with hepatitis A have symptoms including fatigue, poor appetite, stomach pain, nausea and jaundice. Hepatitis A does not result in a chronic infection, but usually resolves within two months or less. Trends of hepatitis A have decreased since universal vaccination of children was recommended in 2006. Foodborne outbreaks are uncommon, but three large multi-state outbreaks linked to imported foods were reported in 2012– 13 and 2015–16. Between 2016–18, California had an outbreak of hepatitis A transmitted personto-person. The disease was spread primarily among persons experiencing homelessness and those using drugs in unsanitary environments. Similar outbreaks have since occurred across the United States. In Florida, more than 2,200 outbreak related cases were reported between January 2018 and June 2019. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person. Contamination of food (this can include frozen and undercooked food) by the hepatitis A virus can happen at any point: growing, harvesting, processing, handling and even after cooking. Contamination of food or water is more likely to occur in countries where hepatitis A is common and in areas where there are poor sanitary conditions or poor personal hygiene. In the United States, the most common risk factor for getting hepatitis A is having close,


Protect yourself. Hepatitis A is on the rise in our area.

Get vaccinated.

Wash your hands.

Hepatitis A virus is in the poop of people who have the virus. • If a person with the virus doesn’t wash his or her hands after going to the bathroom, poop can transfer to objects, food, drinks or drugs. • When these things are shared, other people can unknowingly swallow the virus. • If a person who has the virus comes in close contact with others—like during sex—the virus can spread.

Stop the spread of hepatitis A: • Wash your hands with soap and water after you use the bathroom, and before you eat and drink. • Don’t share personal items, food, drinks or drugs. • Contact your county health department for a free or low-cost vaccine, or call the hepatitis A information line, Mon.–Fri., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., toll free: 1-844-CALL-DOH (844-225-5364). Email: HepA@flhealth.gov. Hepatitis A can lead to serious liver problems, even death. Florida Department of Health 04-11-19: A  ll photography is for illustrative purposes only and all persons depicted are models. [Getty Images]


food SAFETY

EDIBLES

Edibles in Florida “Edibles are defined by Florida law as

to children; be manufactured in the shape of humans, cartoons or animals; be manufactured in a form that bears any reasonable resemblance to products available for consumption as commercially available candy; or contain any color additives. Within 12 months after licensure, a medical marijuana treatment center must demonstrate to the department that all of its processing facilities have passed a Food Safety Good Manufacturing Practices, such as Global Food Safety Initiative or equivalent, and an inspection by a nationally accredited certifying body. Edibles are not legal in Florida for consumption by the general public. If edibles are being produced in your establishment, and it is not a medical marijuana treatment center, you are breaking Florida law. There are many reasons for this, most notably that marijuana is still a prohibited substance on the federal level, and is only legal in Florida if dispensed

by a licensed medical marijuana treatment center. Also, levels of THC must be carefully controlled so as not to be potentially unsafe to the consumer. For information about the overeating of edibles in states that allow consumption of these items, read Maureen Dowd’s article in the New York Times, “Don’t Harsh Our Mellow, Dude.” It offers both a somewhat humorous take on this issue as well as a cautionary explanation. Susie McKinley is the editor of FR&L Magazine.

PHOTO BY CREATIVE-FAMILY / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS (EDIBLES)

commercially produced food items made with marijuana oil, but no other form of marijuana, that are produced and dispensed by a medical marijuana treatment center,” according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Edibles come in many forms and are especially popular as baked goods. Production of edibles at these treatment centers eventually will be regulated by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) like any food manufacturer and will meet food safety and construction standards in accordance with Chapter 500 of the Florida Statutes. Currently, FDACS is not licensing medical marijuana facilities for the production of these goods. It is important to note that by law, edibles have established limits of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Also, edibles may not be attractive

By SUSIE MCKINLEY

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CRISIS MANAGEMENT

food SAFETY

INTERNAL PREPARATION

There are some simple steps to getting through a crisis, start with internal preparation. » Establish a plan. » Develop your key contact lists; including government officials, suppliers, leadership team, news media, industry associates and clients. » Identify someone in management and designate a spokesperson to staff and to the media. DURING A CRISIS

» First, you must immediately close ranks and assess the threat level. » Only the spokesperson should be talking to the media. » Hold regular briefings both with staff and the media, this will stop the escalation of rumors. ESTABLISH A MESSAGING PLAN

» Stick to key message points, keep a concise and firm focus on 2-3 talking points. » Always be truthful and transparent. » Use your own media sources and internal platforms to push your message.

Crisis Management The Case of Hepatitis A

PHOTO BY WEDNINTH / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By JODI CROSS, FRLA REGIONAL DIRECTOR

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hen do you know you are facing a crisis or just having a bad day? A crisis poses a significant threat to your business, a bad day usually improves tomorrow. The hospitality and food service industry has experienced its fair share of crises, from natural disasters to mass shootings and foodborne illness events — now we have an outbreak of hepatitis A. Recently, one South Florida restaurant became the unfortunate poster child for the hepatitis A outbreak. It is worth noting there were no traceable cases associated with the patient or the establishment. Was this a case of media frenzy or the miscalculation of one operator who may not have been prepared for all the attention? To be prepared for any crisis, you need to have a crisis management plan ready to go. FRL A .org

HOW A CRISIS GETS WORSE

» The wheels come off when companies are slow to respond. It’s the biggest mistake companies continue to make when it comes to crisis communications. » The second gaffe is “No Comment” or not being transparent. KEY TAKEAWAYS

» Restaurant operators know it is a hard industry with small profit margins, and a hit like this can break you. » Being prepared and having a plan to handle a crisis before it happens can make all the difference. » Transparency and a timely response can take the crisis down to a manageable state. » Using your own platforms to get your message across to key stakeholders helps provide a balanced point of view. » Isolation tends to occur during a crisis, pulling together all your resources can make all the difference. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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DBPR

The Federal National Program Standards are a Framework for Active Managerial Control

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he Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published their first national food code in 1993, which represented the best practices for food storage, handling and preparation for retail food establishments. State and local jurisdictions that adopted the food code were faced with the challenge of developing a system of implementation. Several years later, the FDA began work on what would become the Voluntary National Retail Food Regulatory Program Standards (Program Standards), a framework that highlights the components of an effective and responsive food safety program. The Retail Program Standards were founded on two basic principles: 1) to promote active managerial control of risk 36  FA L L

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factors in food establishments; and 2) to provide a framework for food regulatory agencies to promote the concept of active managerial control. Active managerial control prompts food managers and workers knowledgeable on food safety issues to take an active role in identifying and controlling practices and procedures that increase the risk of foodborne illness. Florida’s Division of Hotels and Restaurants enrolled in the Retail Program Standards in 2001 and since then has achieved six of the nine Program Standards, including Standards 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 9. Most recently, the Division attained Program Standard 4 Uniform Inspection Program, which was verified through an independent FDA-approved auditor. This Program

Standard ensures inspector consistency and accuracy in performing their inspections statewide. Benefits of this Standard include the assurance that operators across Florida are being regulated with fairness and equality. As the Division strives to enhance and improve its regulatory program, the Program Standards serve as a guidepost, focusing attention on achievement of foundational principles. These Program Standards, coupled with communication and responsiveness to the foodservice industry, guide the agency assisting the industry in providing a safe and sanitary dining experience for Florida’s citizens and guests. Michelle Haynes is the Chief of Elevator Safety at DBPR. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY DUSANPETKOVIC / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By MICHELLE HAYNES


NEW FOOD CODE

food SAFETY

NEW FOOD CODE Coming Soon to Florida!

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BPR will soon adopt the 2017 U.S. Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code. This Food Code edition touches on some new topics that have not been present or fully explained in past versions of the Food Code. FRLA will advise the industry about the adoption of the 2017 Food Code when more is known about the schedule. The 2017 Food Code has numerous minor, glitch and organizing changes, but the major differences in 2017 and 2009 (the current edition) are: » Revised requirement for the Person in Charge (PIC) to be a Certified Food Protection Manager (CFPM) (Section 2-102.12) » Added a new section that addresses the use of bandages, finger cots or finger stalls (Section 2-401.13)

» Harmonized cooking time/temperature parameters for intact and non-intact meat and poultry in accordance with guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDAFSIS) (Section 3-401.11) » Updated procedures for retail food establishment operations to continue during an extended water or electrical outage if a written emergency operation plan has been pre-approved by the Regulatory Authority, immediate corrective action taken and the Regulatory Authority has been notified upon implementation of the plan (Section 8-404.11) The Model Food Code is a collaboration between regulatory officials, academia and the industry, and it contains recommendations for the prevention of foodborne illness in retail and foodservice operations.

How Do You Use the Food Code?

PHOTO BY BRIANAJACKSON (LAPTOP) AND ANTONIO_DIAZ (CHEFS) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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he U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently released an online Food Code Training Module to assist Food Code stakeholders, including government and industry, in understanding how to use it. The module is called “Decoding the Food Code: Information to assist the user.” Check it out here: collaboration.fda.gov/decodingthefoodcode.

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MINIMUM WAGE

Minimum Wage Alert!

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here is a push to increase minimum wage to $15 an hour on several fronts. The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association opposes such a drastic increase as it would be devastating to the hospitality industry, which is critical in the Sunshine State. Stay tuned to FRLA.org/minimum-wage for the latest updates regarding the fight.

Frequently Asked Questions Florida’s hospitality industry is strong. Will $15/hour really force all businesses to close? All businesses? Certainly not. But in order to keep doors open, business owners will be forced to make changes to accommodate a 77% increase in labor costs. These changes include: » Reducing the number of employees » Reducing the number of hours employees work » Increasing automation in place of employees » Increasing costs for customers

» Replacing tipped employees with hourly employees » Eliminating entry-level positions Tipped employees in Florida only make $5.44/hour. No one can survive off that. Most tipped employees earn far more than the minimum wage of $8.46/hour, and many make more than $15/hour. If a mandatory $15/hour minimum wage is passed, businesses will move away from a tipped employee and towards automation or hourly employees. See photos for how automation would look.

Orlando Metro Area: (407) 464-0000 Fort Lauderdale/Miami Metro Area: (954) 493-9268

See us at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show in Booth Number 1609

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PHOTOS BY CAROL B. DOVER

Why does FRLA oppose a $15/hour minimum wage? Don’t you think employees should be well-paid? FRLA knows that our state’s hospitality workers are literally the face of the tourism industry, and they are the ones who create memorable experiences that keep visitors coming back for generations. We believe they deserve fair and competitive wages. However, a 77% increase in labor cost is not sustainable for any business, and we want to protect hospitality jobs. In order to address such dramatic cost increases, businesses will cut employee hours and increase automation.


GOOGLE MY BUSINESS

Grow Your Hospitality Business with Google My Business Listings By ANGELA VAUGHN, CHIA, CHDM, MARKETING & OPERATION MANAGER, MILES PARTNERSHIP

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oogle has shifted. With Google owning 90% of the search space — generating over 2 trillion searches per year or 5.6 billion per day — they are the leader in search. Google’s power of search used to bode well for your business’ organic website traffic when their primary role was to send traffic outbound to websites. That is no longer the case as Google has quietly evolved since 2014. Google has shifted, keeping more searchers in their online ecosystem. Now, 40% of all searches will not result in an outbound click. Organic traffic is staying longer within Google’s ecosystem of products before it can ever reach your website. Back in the golden years of organic search, a user would enter terms into Google’s search bar, and Google would deliver a primarily organic search engine results page. Now, above the virtual fold and before organic results, Google delivers Ads, Hotels, Local Pack, Quick Answers, images, business listing panels and sometimes a brand panel. That is a lot of information for an individual searcher to process and then determine where to look and where to click for the most accurate and relevant information. Thus, organic search as we marketers once knew it — our bread and butter — has become something very different in today’s digital world. Let’s introduce you to Google My Business (GMB); it is a free tool for businesses and organizations to manage their online presence across Google. It is the central place where information feeds throughout Google’s online ecosystem. A GMB Listing profile encompasses what was once known as Google Places for Business, Google Listings, and Google+ Business Pages. GMB has evolved over the years to what you see today, and we anticipate Google to continue investing resources into refining and growing the influence of GMB in search results. Last year, there were 5 billion searches for restaurants and 3 billion searches for hotels. Your GMB Listing profile helps your business show up when it matters most — those micro moments when people search where to stay, what to eat and how to experience a destination. As a business owner, take the first critical steps in owning your brand’s presence with GMB. Claim your listings! It is a simple step to take towards owning and managing your presence. Once someone else claims it on your behalf, it can be a challenge to regain control. Your GMB Listing is an important digital asset to your brand that can drive revenue when managed correctly. Looking for more information on Google My Business? Join us at FRLA’s Marketing + Operations Summit, the sixth annual premier Florida hospitality event held Aug. 13–14, 2019 at the Tampa Marriott Water Street. Miles Partnership will be presenting more in-depth Google My Business case studies and sharing tips to positively impact your listings. 40  FA L L

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FOOD TRENDS

One Badge. Two Shows.

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housands of restaurant and foodservice industry professionals will gather at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando on Sunday, Sept. 15 and Monday, Sept. 16, for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show, the only comprehensive industry event devoted to the Southeast U.S. restaurant, foodservice and hospitality market. Attendees will also have access to Healthy Food Expo Florida, bringing together the leading purveyors of healthy, natural, and organic products. Both events are sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and produced and managed by Clarion UX, the global leader in trade show management. The 2019 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show will provide access to the hottest menu trends, a renowned education program, special events including the Rapid Fire Challenge: Meatless Monday Edition, Hip Sip Florida: Battle of the Modern Bartender Rum Edition, the Torch and Beacon Awards, The American Culinary Federation’s Central Florida Chapter Culinary Arts Competition, culinary demonstrations. There will also be an exhibit hall featuring 400-plus vendors from food and beverage products, equipment, services, distributors and technology, with several specialty pavilions including Coffee Fest Marketplace, Food Trends Experience, Beer Wine and Spirits and others.

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Healthy Food Expo Florida will bring together restaurant, foodservice and retail operators’ food and beverage options for healthy menu and shelf items, nutritional information, preparation techniques and access to the latest healthy products from organic, vegan, gluten-free and allergysafe to hormone-free, non-GMO, plant-based, low-sodium, low-fat, and more. The Healthy Food Expo offers education sessions focused on trending healthy ingredients, plant-based seafood, food allergies, lifestyle diet and nutrition, sourcing local food, healthy beverages, prebiotics, spice sourcing, and more. The event will take place at The Orange County Convention Center in Orlando on Sunday, Sept. 15 from 10 a.m.–6 p.m. and Monday, Sept. 16 from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. with conference sessions beginning at 9 a.m. both days. For more information and to register, visit flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

FRAUD:

It’s What’s for Dinner

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f your restaurant has experienced fraudulent claims, you are not the only ones at the table. Claims range from slips and falls; foreign objects in food causing injuries to mouth, teeth and body; and allergens, illness and stolen property accidentally left behind, just to name a few. Some indicators that smell of fraud: »» Someone speaking on behalf of someone else — they will give an excuse as to why you must to speak with them in lieu of the actual person “injured.” »» They will have a story — health issue, cancer treatment, mental capacity, death in family, moving. »» They want to send in the treatment notes and billings direct. This allows them to alter prior to sending; change of treatment date, name, restaurant. »» If treatment notes do not list a specific named restaurant. Could be an indication that they are using for multiple concepts. 42  FA L L

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»» Their address is a post office box. Ask for a street address. »» They receive and/or fax from a UPS or FedEx store. »» Slip and fall in the restroom. They know there will not be any surveillance cameras in this area. »» They are in a hurry to settle the claim. Calling numerous times. Willing to take a lesser amount to settle quickly. »» They have similar types of claims — same injury, same tooth/teeth damaged. Before you bite off more than you can chew, check the resources available: »» Index through Insurance Service Office (ISO) on all payments, including gift cards and anything you feel is questionable. Your insurance company and/or TPA are most likely doing this already, but you may want to check with them. If you are self-insured and/ or handling claims in house, you need to be a member to participate. »» Report suspected fraud to National

Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) — you must become a member to participate. »» Google address. It could be a place of business, psychic, vacant lot. »» Utilize Social Media sites — Facebook them. You may find names of others you have paid in their friends list. Truthfinders, etc. »» Hire Social Media Investigators. They can search social media for you, along with court records, bankruptcies and much more. »» Utilize medical and/or dental canvasing to see what other medical facilities they have sought treatment at in the area. We will never be able to eliminate all the scams. You will probably pay some fraudulent claims. What we can do to reduce the fraud, is to alert each other by using the tools we have available. Lisa A. Blevins is the General Liability Claims Manager for Texas Roadhouse. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY STEVANOVICIGOR / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By LISA A. BLEVINS


AWARENESS

September is Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month

Aneurysm Risk Factors

SEPTEMBER is Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month, and a small but growing nonprofit in Fernandina Beach is on a mission to raise awareness about the signs, symptoms and latest treatment options for brain aneurysms. The Trinity Love Hoblit Foundation, based in Fernandina Beach, was founded in 2015 by Olivia and Phil Hoblit in honor of their daughter, Trinity, who suffered from primordial dwarfism, passed away in 2015 at the age of 14 due to a ruptured brain aneurysm.

Donate During Awareness Month To educate the public about the signs and symptoms of brain aneurysms and to develop advanced treatment options, funding is needed. To learn more about brain aneurysms and to donate, visit TrinityHoblit.org; a portion of all gifts will be matched by the Baptist Health Foundation. If you would like to talk with someone about the Foundation, contact President Olivia Hoblit at olivia@trinitylovehoblitfoundation. org or Jordan Beckner, South Florida Fundraising coordinator, at jordan@fiberbuiltumbrellas.com.

• Smoking • Over age of 50 • Alcohol or drug abuse, particularly cocaine use • High blood pressure • Hardened or narrowed arteries • Head injury • An infection in the blood vessel • Female

Sudden Symptoms • Loss of consciousness • Confusion • Seizure • Nausea and vomiting • Stiff neck • Sensitivity to light • Numbness or weakness • Blurred or double vision A ruptured brain aneurysm is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. Do not ignore the symptoms!

THANK YOU SUMMER BOARD MEETING SPONSORS PLATINUM

SILVER

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REGISTRATION

WELCOME RECEPTION

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GIVING BACK

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inda and her 4-year-old son Garrett joined the CORE family in July of 2019. Linda is a server/manager and is currently on medical leave as she navigates Stage 3 Triple Negative Breast Cancer as well as Thyroid Cancer. Due to some complications and other circumstances, Linda underwent a double mastectomy and is still in treatment for both diagnoses. As Linda shared with us, “This has been a long, hard and exhausting journey, but it has been a very humbling experience.” CORE supported their family by paying their bills, assisting with groceries and providing Garrett with pullups, clothing and shoes. “I will forever remember that day I was sitting at the laundromat with my son wondering how I was going to pay my bills and keep a roof over my son’s head. That day changed our lives. I was given a grace that could never be measured. I was on the edge of losing my home that I had worked so hard to maintain after struggling so hard to beat this cancer and then came CORE. CORE saved us from going over the edge and losing it all. CORE gave us hope, and they gave us a light at the end of the tunnel. CORE saved us from losing our home. It means everything to me to be a part of the CORE family,” Linda said. For more info about CORE, please visit COREgives.org.

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Save The Date SEPTEMBER 15, 2019 HYATT REGENCY ORLANDO

6:00 PM Welcome Reception R 7:00 PM Installation and Awards Dinner Cocktail C ockta ockt a il Attire A ttir ttire e Ticket Price: $150

Sponsorships Available, please contact Ashley Gholston at agholston@frla.org or 850-224-2250 ext. 258

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Eat. Drink. Give.

Serving those who serve you since 2004. Help us make a difference in the industry. Learn more at COREgives.org/donate CORE grants support to children of food and beverage service employees navigating life-altering circumstances.


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

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1. Attendees at the Broward Chapter’s Excellence in Education Gala had a blast. 2. The Broward Chapter of FRLA gave $24,000 toward Broward County Student Scholarships. 3. The Collier Chapter May Reception featured the VISIT FLORIDA CEO as speaker. (L to R) Jack Wert, Stephanie Eakin, Dana Young, Marco Perry, Lois Croft. 4. Lee Chapter’s 2nd Annual Golf Invitational raised $25,000 to help support the local ProStart/Culinary High Schools chapter. Congrats to FRLA member restaurant team from Connors Steak and Seafood, who won the tournament. 5. The FRLA Miami Chapter presented a total of 15 scholarships to hospitality and culinary students in Miami Dade High Schools. 6. Jordan Beckner and Jessica Beckner Rosenfeld enjoyed the FRLA Education Gala photo by Emily Weatherspoon. 7. Members of the Space Coast Chapter Board toured the Palm Bay Magnet High School ProStart program. Following the tour of the culinary instructional area Board members were treated to a scrumptious luncheon served and prepared by the students. 8. The RCS Training team recently participated in a community service project at the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. They unpacked and bagged sweet potatoes for food bank distribution — 2,713 pounds of sweet potatoes. 46

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A LA CARTE

TOP TRENDS Culinary Concepts

Restaurant Concepts

1. Cannabis/CBD-infused food

1. Chef-driven fast casual concepts

2. Zero-waste cooking (elevated cuisine using food scraps) 3. Hyper-local (e.g. restaurant gardens,

2. Pop-up temporary restaurants 3. Commissaries (e.g. shared commercial kitchen space)

housemade items) 4. Veggie-centric/

4. Small-plate menus/ restaurant concepts

vegetable-forward cuisine 5. Food halls 5. Natural ingredients/ clean menus

Source: National Restaurant Association, What’s Hot in 2019 Culinary Forecast

PHOTOS BY DASH_MED (CARROTS), EVGENIIAND (ZOODLES), CREATIVE-FAMILY (COOKIES), ALEXSALCEDO (SMALL PLATE) AND GRESEI (BURGER) / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

HUMAN TRAFFICKING FRLA’s course will help you and your staff: • Recognize the signs of human trafficking • Learn best practices to protect victims and businesses • Promote anti-trafficking awareness

Order online at StopHumanTraffickingFL.com | Call today 888-524-2118 FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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A LA CARTE

Sweeney Retires from NRA Dawn Sweeney, President and CEO of the National Restaurant Association, is retiring effective Dec. 31, 2019. After 12 years with the Association, she plans to leave the traditional employment track and wants to “make a difference” in other “business and humanitarian” circles. Association Chair Joe Essa and Foundation Chair Geoff Hill are heading a search committee along with Spencer Stuart. The plan is to have a new CEO identified and announced by Dec. 31. Sweeney noted, “It is vital to me that the Association and Foundation have a smooth and seamless transition to allow for our continued growth and success.”

AG Launches Price Gouging App Price gougers, beware! It is now easier for the public to report price gouging through a new app that was recently released by Attorney General Ashley Moody’s office. It is called “NO SCAM” and is available on the Apple and Android app stores. Grossly increasing prices over the average price for a commodity during the 30 days before the declaration of a state of emergency is against the law. This applies to essential commodities, dwelling units or self-storage units. Essential commodities include gas, ice, food and lumber.

Luebkemann Named to State Food Safety Council FRLA Senior Vice President for Education and Training Geoff Luebkemann was recently named to the Florida Food Safety and Food Defense Advisory Council by Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Nikki Fried. The Council serves as a unique forum dedicated to the safety and security of Florida’s food supply. Thank you, Geoff, for representing FRLA in this capacity.

Palm Beach Hospitality Students Receive $25,000 in Scholarships The Palm Beach Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association recently presented more than $25,000 in scholarships to local high school students for the fourth year in a row. The money was raised at the FRLA Education and Agriculture Together Showcase (E.A.T.S.) in January. Along with the FRLA Scholarship winners, one student received an additional $4,000 for the Brian Fink Memorial Scholarship, a private organization that supports local culinary students.

FRLA congratulates the following scholarship recipients: Brian Fink Memorial Scholarship Winner — $6500 ($2,500 FRLA & $4,000 BFMS)

Hospitality and Tourism Scholarship Recipients Jose Addly,

Freednie Meliscar,

Forest Hill High School, Attending Palm Beach State College

PB Gardens High School, Attending University of Central Florida

Culinary Scholarship Recipients:

Jose Medina, Forest Hill High Scholl, Attending Palm Beach State College

Yosimara Perez,

Abigail Gafter,

Palm Beach Gardens High School, Attending Palm Beach State College

Olympic Heights Community High School, Attending Florida Atlantic University

Dawyshawn Poe, Inlet Grove High School, Attending Palm Beach State College

Denasia Mann, Palm Beach Gardens High School, Attending Bethune-Cookman University

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Zachary Becerra, Forest Hill High School, Attending Palm Beach State College

Continuation Scholarship Jaime Cooney, UCF, Second Year Support

Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort honored as a Marriott Eastern Region Hotel of the Year The Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort recently was named a Marriott Eastern Region Hotel of the Year — the first time the resort has received the distinction. “We are so proud to be recognized for the dedication, creativity and passion of our team,” said Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort General Manager Fred Sawyers. “We genuinely love this resort and being able to share it with our guests.” The resort was awarded the accolade in the Full-Service Distinctive Premium category. The resort joined Marriott International Inc. following the company’s merger with Starwood in 2016. Marriott International encompasses a portfolio of more than 7,000 properties under 30 leading brands spanning 131 countries and territories. The recognition follows a $150 million transformation of virtually the entire resort, including guest rooms, lobby areas and meeting space. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


IS YOUR

RESTAURANT

AT RISK?

The National Fire Prevention Agency reports that each year there are over 10,000 calls made to 911 requesting help in extinguishing commercial kitchen fires. When fire reaches the roof like this it is usually from a poorly maintained ducting system. USE A PROFESSIONAL COMPANY WITH CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS THAT KNOW THE FIRE CODE AND CLEAN TO IT. We clean over 10,000 commercial hood exhaust systems a year. We have never had to defend ourselves against a kitchen fire.

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• • • •

Proud member of FRLA (Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association) Proud members of the Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce Work very close with the state of Florida’s Hospitality Insurance Industry as well as the state of Florida’s Fire Inspectors and are available to provide educational awareness seminars We offer many other related services such as equipment cleaning and reconditioning, kitchen air balancing, stainless steel hood filter exchange service and stainless wall installation, exhaust fan repairs and maintenance and oil absorbent products for roof protection Guaranteed service with competitive pricing

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FATFREEINC.COM


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Ann Farran

Ashley Connell

Ashley Gholston

Keri Burns

Morgan Forsythe

Susan Aronson

FRLA Brings On New Team Members

F

RLA has recently hired several new team members in our Tallahassee headquarters and regional offices. Morgan Forsythe has been hired as Information Technology Director. Ashley Gholston is FRLA’s new Director of Industry Relations and Events. Keri Burns steps into the role of Central Florida Regional Director, and Ashley Connell has been hired as the Director of Membership Marketing. Ann Farran is replacing longtime FRLA employee Susan Aronson, who is retiring and moving to Texas, in the Membership Department “We are thrilled to welcome these new team members to the FRLA family,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the FRLA. “Although they have very different skill sets, each is an expert in his or her respective area, and I have no doubt that they will bring incredible value to both our staff and our members. We are really going to miss Susan Aronson. She has been with us for so long and has been dedicated to the

Association and the Industry. We wish her well in her retirement.” Forsythe graduated from Florida State University with a degree in Information Studies and is a Microsoft Systems Administrator. Most recently, he spent six years with Aegis Business Technologies as a Technical Services Consultant providing IT support, maintenance and planning services for private businesses and government agencies. Gholston studied hospitality, business and events at both the University of Central Florida and Florida State University. Since her return to Tallahassee after opening and managing restaurants for Darden, Gholston has specialized in events and fostering relationships between industry stakeholders. Keri Burns has extensive experience in business development, events and exhibitions. She graduated from Southern New Hampshire University with a MBA in Human Resources Management and Services and also holds a M.A. in Family Therapy/

Counseling and a B.S. in Public Relations and Marketing and B.S. from Liberty University. Before joining the FRLA team Ashley served as the Media Buyer and Planner at VISIT FLORIDA, where she strived to promote tourism to Florida through numerous advertising campaigns domestically and internationally. Previously, Ashley was a team member of iHeart Media and Clear Channel for over five years, where she created effective marketing campaigns for various clients. Ashley graduated from Florida State University with a Bachelor’s of Science in Marketing and Management, with a minor in Communications. Ann Farran is a graduate of Florida State University. Most recently, she served as Industry Relations Coordinator in Marketing and Membership for VISIT FLORIDA, overseeing partner enrollment and developing relationships to existing partners. She assisted with the partner billing process and maintained data capture along with customer service.

Bob Dearden FRLA’s First COO

PHOTO COURTESY OF SARASOTA MAGAZINE

Congratulations to Bob Dearden on his appointment to FRLA’s Chief Operating Officer. The COO position is newly created and will be an asset to the operation of the Association. Bob has served as CFO since 2002 and has been active in all aspects of FRLA’s management since that time. Bob also represented the Industry from 2008-2016 as a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta’s Travel and Tourism Advisory Council. When not working, Bob enjoys playing golf and is a selfproclaimed “foodie.”

Ricci Named as Distinguished Professor

Anne Rollings Anne Rollings of Gecko’s Hospitality was recently nominated as a 2019 “Woman of Influence” in Sarasota Magazine by Zenith Insurance Company. Congratulations, Anne!

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Peter Ricci, Ed.D., Director of the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program at Florida Atlantic University, has been awarded the 2019 Stewart Distinguished Professor in the College of Business. Each year, FAU recognizes an outstanding FAU business professor based on five criteria: (1) extraordinary dedication to teaching; (2) impact on and involvement with students; (3) scholarly approach to teaching and learning; (4) contribution to education in the institution, community and/or profession; and (5) support from colleagues, current and former students. Congratulations, Dr. Ricci! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

MBA in HOSPITALITY and TOURISM MANAGEMENT

GOING BEYOND THE BUSINESS OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM PROGRAM INFORMATION One of the only MBAs with a concentration in hospitality and tourism management Ranked among the TOP 25 in the U.S. among Hospitality graduate programs One of the highest values and lowest costs in the country (approximately $18,000) Extensive employment opportunities Courses led by both hospitality industry leaders and top academics

The FAU College of Business is proud to be an accredited member of AACSB (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) International, the premier accreditation agency for Schools of Business worldwide.

www.fau.edu/mbahospitality


STEP UP FOR STUDENTS

FRLA Members Endorse and Invest in Step Up For Students

S

ince 2001, corporations and competitors from various industries have found an uncommon but very meaningful cause uniting them: supporting education for Florida’s underprivileged schoolchildren. Through the Florida Tax Credit (FTC) Scholarship Program, corporations can fund K-through-12 scholarships for lower-income children in Florida in partnership with Step Up For Students, a state-approved Scholarship Funding Organization. Participating companies with Florida corporate tax or alcoholic beverage excise tax receive a dollar-for-dollar tax credit for their contributions. Qualifying families use the scholarships to enroll their children in a participating private school or help pay for transportation to an out-of-district public school that best meets their children’s learning needs. The success of the scholarship program cannot be denied. Since 2008, annual studies conducted by an independent research team 52  FA L L

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show participating students, who are among the state’s most economically disadvantaged children, are making solid academic gains. The Urban Institute, a Washington D.C. think tank, studied the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program and found students on scholarship for four or more years were up to 99 percent more likely to attend a four-year college than their peers in public school and up to 45 percent more likely to earn bachelor’s degrees. These positive outcomes would not be possible without the support of Florida’s corporate community, which has pledged more than $3.9 billion since 2001, funding more than 784,000 scholarships. Our partners in the hospitality and alcohol beverage industry have been a major force contributing nearly $2.3 billion, funding more than 396,800 of the total amount of scholarships awarded. “Communities thrive when we all do our part and work together. Breakthru Beverage is

↑ Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits announced a $150 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Southern Glazer’s Vice President of Tax, Cheryl Rawson, Step Up For Students Founder & Chairman, John Kirtley, Southern Glazer’s Director of Charitable Giving, Terry Jove, and Step Up For Students President, Doug Tuthill. They are joined by Kingdom Academy students benefiting from the scholarship. Since 2010, Southern Glazer’s has generously funded 101,508 scholarships through contributions totaling $615 million.

proud to support Step Up For Students and give Florida students an opportunity to reach their highest potential,” said Eric Pfeil, Executive Vice President of Breakthru Beverage Florida. If your company has a corporate income tax or alcoholic beverage excise tax liability in Florida, we hope you’ll join the Step Up For Students family of corporate donors. When companies invest in Step Up, they make a lasting impact in the lives of our scholars and inspire a brighter future through personalized education. Participation is easy. If you’d like to help change the path of a lower-income child’s life today, please call Step Up at 1-866-344-9553 or visit FLTaxCredit.org. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


E D U C AT I O N A L F O U N D AT I O N

2 1

Florida ProStart Teams Win at Nationals!

I

n late spring, Florida ProStart teams competed in the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation’s (NRAEF) 18th annual National ProStart Invitational in Washington, D.C. This three-day event saw high school culinary students compete in both culinary arts and restaurant management competitions against students from across the United States. In the Culinary Competition, Leto High School from Tampa placed fifth. In the Restaurant Management Competition, East Ridge High School from Clermont placed second. “The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) is so proud of our Florida teams competing and placing in the National ProStart Competition,” said Laura Rumer, the Director of FRLAEF. “Throughout the school year, these students train and practice their respective crafts weekly. Getting the chance to compete and show off their skills on a national level is huge for them. All of the Florida teams were outstanding, and their work here is indicative of the bright future ahead for our state’s restaurant industry.” Congratulations! For more information about Florida ProStart or FRLA’s Educational Foundation, contact Director Laura Rumer at LRumer@frla.org.

UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

FRL A .org

3

4 1. The Culinary team from Leto High School from Tampa with their fifth place medals. Left to right: Sterling Frazier, Lia Thompson, Kerelyn Driver, Instructor Debra Hladky, Victoria Clawon, Anthony Nunez. 2. The Management team from East Ridge High School in Clermont with their second place medals. Left to right: Instructor Ken Pitts, Cole Hilton, Faith Macaulay, Evangeline Marshall, Amanda De Turo, Tyler Dobereiner, Instructor Chris Dwyer. 3. The Management team preparing to compete. 4. The Culinary team preparing to compete.

GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

53


REGIONAL DIRECTOR & CHAPTER MAP

GULF ISLAND COAST LEE COLLIER

ROZETA MAHBOUBI

954.270.5814 | rmahboubi@frla.org

FLORIDA INNS Statewide Chapter

KERI BURNS

407.256.7660 | kburns@frla.org

FR LA. ORG/ M E MBE RS HI P 54  FA L L

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CITY

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

LOCATION

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

12

10

13

11

Hampton Inn

BOCA RATON

26

24

21

12

Hilton Garden Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

9

7

14

9

The Shores Resort & Spa

FORT LAUDERDALE

4

2

13

4

Hyatt Place

FORT MYERS

5

3

7

5

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

12

10

14

3

UF Research & Education Center

FORT WALTON

10

8

5

3

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

5

3

7

5

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

-

-

-

-

Islander Resort

JACKSONVILLE

12

10

14

12

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

3

8

5

17

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

-

-

-

-

KISSIMMEE

11

9

12

10

Holiday Inn

LAKELAND

16

14

18

16

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

10

8

5

3

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

24

22

19

19

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

MIAMI SPANISH

10

8

5

10

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

NAPLES

19

15

14

12

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

17

22

19

17

Homewood Suites Ocala Heathbrooke

ORLANDO

10

1

5

3

Embassy Suites

-

-

-

-

Orange Country Convention Center

PANAMA CITY

25

23

20

18

Gulf Coast State College

PENSACOLA

24

22

19

17

Hampton Inn Pensacola Airport

PENSACOLA

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn Pensacola Airport

PORT RICHEY

10

1

5

3

Homewood Suites

SARASOTA

4

2

6

4

EVEN Hotel

ST AUGUSTINE

4

9

6

4

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

9

6

9

6

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

12

10

7

5

Lively Technical Center

TAMPA

9

7

4

2

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore

VENICE

-

-

-

-

Hotel Venezia

WEST PALM BEACH

9

7

12

9

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

ORLANDO - FRLA SHOW

* Dates are tentative

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free (866) 372-SAFE (7233) or visit safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

safestaff.org

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

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Profile for Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2019  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed towards our hotel a...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2019  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed towards our hotel a...