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F L O R I DA R E S TAU RFLORIDA A N T & L O DFUNDED GING SHOW EDITION VISIT

FOOD SAFETY Special Section

PATH TO POWER

MARYANN FERENC FALL 2017 | FRLA.ORG

CHEFS THAT SIZZLE Brian Doyle, Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Council Oak Steaks & Seafood SECRETS OF SUCCESS Victoria & Albert's


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contents FA L L 2 0 17 | F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4  Leadership Report Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 8  UHC Announcement Diverse Health Care Needs of the Hospitality Industry 10  Path to Power Maryann Ferunc, 2017 VISIT FLORIDA Chair and 14  CEO/Proprietor, Mise en Place, Inc.

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Chefs that Sizzle Brian Doyle, Chef at Council Oak Steaks & Seafood 16  FRLA New Members First Half of 2017 18  Young Operators Carlos Gazitua, President and CEO of Sergio’s Restaurants 20 

and creator of Sergio’s Cuban

Awards FRLA’s 2017 Hall of Fame Recipients 24  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 26  28 DELL Learn more about DELL's products FRLA’s Corporate Calendar 41  42 Marketing Tips Make the Most of Your Beverage Menu 43 Business Matters Big Revenue Draws Sales Tax Issues Business Matters Workers’ Compensation 45  Engage Update 48  Movers and Shakers 50  ProStart Teachers Go Back to College During Summer Break 54  Support CORE 56 

26

SPECIAL FEATURES 12

VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

22

Marketing + Operations Summit Recap

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FRLA’s Special Food Safety Section

Attract and Engage Visitors

FRLA's Signature Marketing Event

September is Food Safety Month

Secrets of Success 46 

Victoria & Albert’s

A La Carte 52 

Industry Information You Need to Know

Price Gouging 53 

The ABCs of Price Gouging

Correction: Please note in the Summer 2017 issue of FR&L Magazine, the “Path to Power” article on Bob Johnston, CEO of The Melting Pot, included one Q&A response which was not submitted by Mr. Johnston. The printed response to the question, “How has participation in the FRLA positively affected your business?”, was not his own; this was a production error. We apologize for the oversight and to Bob Johnston.

54 FRL A .org

ON THE COVER: FRLA member and VISIT FLORIDA Chair Maryann Ferenc is a strong leader. Ms. Ferenc is our Path to Power feature this edition.

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Recognizing Our Industry’s Finest It’s that time of year when the best in the business converge in Orlando for our 2017 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. We’re fortunate to provide this invaluable member benefit with our wonderful partners at Urban Expositions and Clarion Events. This inspiring event surpasses expectations and attracts the industry’s finest who develop the hottest menu trends and embody the heart and soul of the hospitality industry. The event on September 11 at the Hyatt Regency Orlando, is THE Florida hospitality gathering of the year. On this evening, we’ll recognize the outstanding accomplishments of exemplary hospitality employees and celebrate their exceptional service in the industry. I’m thrilled to honor our remarkable 2017 Hall of Fame award winners on page 24. This evening also marks 16 years since the U.S. suffered from the 9/11 terrorist attacks. We must never forget the courage and unity of our nation that day and will commemorate those who perished during this event with a special recognition. It’s no secret our industry produces amazing professionals and dynamic leaders. Industry

veteran Maryann Ferenc, CEO/Proprietor of Mise en Place, Inc. and 2017–18 Chair of VISIT FLORIDA provides her insights for success on page 14. For the first time ever, we’re featuring the full video interview that is just a click away from the digital version of our magazine at FRLA.org. This edition of FR&L Magazine also features the latest developments in food safety. We take pride in ensuring our members are ahead of the curve when it comes to new regulations and providing the necessary resources and tools to keep your business open and thriving. Check out pages 29–39 for an in-depth look at current issues in training and education. I also encourage you to read the new opportunity from our friends at UnitedHealthcare that offers small businesses invaluable healthcare solutions on page 10. If you missed our Marketing + Operations Summit, we’ve provided highlights from this year’s amazing speakers and innovative educational sessions on page 22. This event featured 45 speakers and attracted more than 400 attendees.

This year truly has been remarkable! The Sunshine State welcomed 113 million visitors, the highest number of visitors in the state’s history. On behalf of FRLA, we are sincerely grateful for the 1.4 million dedicated employees who have been essential to the record-breaking successes of Florida’s tourism industry. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Great Employees Serve Our Guests Every Day At the risk of employing a cliché, we can’t operate our lodging and restaurant operations without our team members. The millions of dollars we invest in brick and mortar are worthless if not for the people who bring our businesses to life every day. Of course, the people we employ don’t magically show up on our doorstep ready for primetime. More than one third of Americans found their first job in the hospitality industry, and they often are in need of coaching and training on some of the most basic traits associated with being a good employee, much less an excellent one. For the good of our businesses, it is incumbent upon us to fine-tune our training skills. The more quickly you can coach up an employee for success, the greater and more immediate positive impact they will have on your business. We all want superstar employees who embrace hospitality and strive for flawless execution in their day-to-day responsibilities. But employees like this don’t come about by accident. It takes a culture of training for continuous improvement, combined with systems and programs supporting that culture. One of the benefits of membership in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association is the access that you have to great training systems, along with the opportunity to network

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with peers from which you can draw great ideas and inspiration. The Marketing + Operations Summit is just one great example of the rich networking and continuing education opportunities offered by FRLA. But there are countless other opportunities, many of which are available through the networking that takes place within each of the FRLA chapters. When an employee enters our industry, there is one area of training that isn’t a nice-tohave, it’s a must-have, and that is food safety. Having an uncompromising approach to food safety isn’t just critical for your business; it is critical for the well-being of our industry. This is an area of the business that we are all in together, for if the public loses confidence in the industry’s ability to provide safe, reliable food service experiences, we may all suffer. FRLA has displayed unequalled excellence in its development of food safety training programs. It is the cornerstone of the Association and a source of pride for all of us. This year’s trade show is almost upon us. And as we prepare for the event, we have one other source of pride to celebrate: the great employees who serve our guests every day. One of the most magical evenings for our industry is our gala, when we recognize some of the most valuable employees and management professionals in the

industry. While a common ingredient among the very best is their work ethic and desire to do a great job, let’s never forget that if we don’t provide great training and coaching, the odds of any of our employees reaching center stage is drastically reduced. Let’s all commit, for the good of our businesses and the good of our employees, to be the best employers we can be. And that begins with a culture of training and continuous improvement.

Don Fox 2017 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY.

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Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Check frla.org/great-florida-events for more information about our upcoming events! Don't miss any of our Great Florida Events coming up later this fall! Hundreds of folks attended Cocoa Beach Uncorked, which was the first Uncorked held on the Space Coast.

Friday Night Sound Waves is a weekly musical event on Fort Lauderdale Beach.

Cocoa Beach Uncorked was a lot of fun!

FRLA’s Great Florida Events program sponsored Friday Night Sound Waves for several weeks during the spring and summer. 8  FA L L

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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U N I T E D H E A LT H C A R E

Addressing the Diverse Health Care Needs of the Hospitality Industry UnitedHealthcare offers exclusive health care pricing and solutions for NRA/FRLA members through the hospitality associations alliance program

I

n a year of new opportunities, the National Restaurant Association (NRA) and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) continue to work with UnitedHealthcare in a strategic alliance to help address the diverse health care needs of the hospitality industry. Through the hospitality associations alliance program, UnitedHealthcare offers NRA/FRLA members exclusive health care pricing and solutions that include: • Up to a 5 percent discount on medical rates for fully insured groups with 51 or more eligible employees. • Annual invoice credit of up to 5 percent on administrative fees for new ASO medical products for self-funded groups with 100 or more eligible employees. • Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision, life, disability, accident and critical illness) for fully insured groups — in addition to all other discounts including bundling benefits programs. HEALTH CARE REFORM GUIDANCE AND SOLUTIONS Amid the ever-changing health care regulatory environment, UnitedHealthcare helps provide NRA/FRLA members with the latest health reform facts, guidance and solutions to navigate potential changes and opportunities. One of its main goals is to offer easier access to cost-effective health care coverage and related products and services to members, while helping them comply with state and federal regulations.

NEW NRA ASSOCIATION PLAN OPTION FOR SMALL EMPLOYERS — COMING SOON! A new NRA Health Benefits Association Plan will be available soon to quote as an option for NRA/FRLA hospitality member groups. The NRA Association Plan is a new health benefits solution insured and serviced by UnitedHealthcare and focused on small employers with 2-99 eligible employees. This solution can offer NRA/FRLA members some of the same advantages of large employers regarding more health plan designs for product and potential pricing flexibility. The NRA Association Plan is just one more way for hospitality businesses to access UnitedHealthcare’s solutions for NRA/FRLA members. UNITEDHEALTHCARE NAMED 2017 FRLA SUPPLIER OF THE YEAR The FRLA recently named UnitedHealthcare the 2017 FRLA Supplier of the Year. This prestigious honor was awarded to UnitedHealthcare because of its wide range of innovative products and services that address the diverse health care coverage needs of the hospitality industry and FRLA members. UnitedHealthcare features an expansive network of more than 1 million physicians and care professionals, and 6,000 hospitals and other care facilities nationwide; various online tools and resources; and a range of wellness programs designed to help improve employee health, productivity and retention.

To help illustrate the advantages of choosing UnitedHealthcare, Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer of Firehouse of America, LLC (Firehouse Subs), says:

“Our relationship with UnitedHealthcare pre-dates the turbulent challenges of the Affordable Care Act. They helped us navigate those waters with great success. And while uncertainty abounds in the current political and legislative environment, one thing is certain: We can rely on UnitedHealthcare to deliver solutions that will fit the ever-changing marketplace.” Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business. Visit uhctogether.com/frla. For more information, contact your broker or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

Some restrictions and exclusions apply. Discounts are available only to members of the National Restaurant Association and its state restaurant association partners and may vary by location and group size. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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VISIT FLORIDA

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ISIT FLORIDA, the state’s Official Tourism Marketing Corporation, exists to promote travel to and within Florida and to establish the Sunshine State as the number one travel destination in the world. The partnership between VISIT FLORIDA and core tourism businesses throughout the state — hotels, restaurants, attractions, and visitor services — is critical to reaching our goal of attracting over 120 million visitors. To effectively equip businesses with the tools needed to market their brands, attract more visitors, and boost revenue, VISIT FLORIDA offers a unique Partnership Program. THE MISSION OF THE PARTNERSHIP IS SIMPLE: First, VISIT FLORIDA maintains and grows a membership base and network of core Florida tourism businesses, and provides to these Partners the tools and programs to bring visitors to their businesses and destinations. Second, Partners provide continuous feedback to VISIT FLORIDA, serve on Committees and help shape the organization’s plans each year. The most comprehensive program, a VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partnership, provides hotels and restaurants with 10 easy-to-activate core benefits.

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THOSE BENEFITS FOR PARTNERS ARE:

1. A business listing in the Official Florida Vacation Guide. A new guide is printed each year with updated listing information and resources to help and inspire visitors to plan trips to Florida. More than 500,000 guides are requested and distributed annually. 2. An Enhanced Web Listing on VISITFLORIDA.com. A listing on the website, with more than 12 million visits in 2016, brings better exposure to any Florida business. Post a video, multiple photos, showcase special deals and events, and more. 3. Participate in VISIT FLORIDA’s Online Hospitality Training Program for front-line employees. Learn how you can have an impact and lasting impression on our visitors. This free program consists of two modules that provide the tools needed to create memorable moments for guests. 4. Download sales contacts for meetings planners, travel agents and tour operators who attend VISIT FLORIDA’s domestic events. 5. Participate in lobby booth displays in the Official Florida Welcome Centers and receive discounts on brochure distribution.

7. Ability to promote Partner-to-Partner specials and discounts on VISIT FLORIDA’s industry-facing website, VISITFLORIDA.org. 8. Post on VISIT FLORIDA’s consumer-facing social media pages. Partners can submit content to be posted on social media to advertise their hotel or restaurant, promote an event or share a deal. 9. Access free webinars. Need information on topics such as social media and marketing best practices? Let us show you! 10. Download pictures from VISIT FLORIDA’s image library for marketing purposes. Use the VISIT FLORIDA Partner logo to show your affiliation. In addition to these core benefits, Partners also receive access to special marketing programs and discounts for VISIT FLORIDA co-op offerings, which can be viewed on the Online Marketing Planner at VISITFLORIDA.org/planner. To learn more about VISIT FLORIDA Partnership, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/Join or call our Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872. We look forward to working with you!

6. Access VISIT FLORIDA research. Includes visitor profiles, trends and international data. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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PAT H T O P O W E R

2017 VISIT FLORIDA Chair

Maryann Ferenc

CEO/PROPRIETOR, MISE EN PLACE, INC.

Maryann Ferenc has worked in the restaurant industry her whole life, beginning her career in her parents’ Detroit restaurant as a bus girl. From there and with a few stops in between, Maryann established Mise en Place in 1986, along with co-proprietor Chef Marty Blitz.

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? I grew up a restaurant brat; my parents were in the

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? The key to success in our case is

industry. I tried to get out of it, (laughing) but when I met Chef (Marty Blitz) and we ended up in Tampa, what we saw there was really an exciting opportunity for fine dining, and I realized it was part of the Master Plan.

that the partners, Chef and I, both really like what we do. He looks forward to cooking every day, and I look forward to the service aspect of our business. We are both willing to work hard. We show up for more than just the job, because we love this business.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? My Mom taught me

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? Since the beginning, we have always tried to find

that the customer is always right and is always the focus. My Dad taught me that in this business, every nickel, dime and penny counts.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? My mentors were my parents. Although they are not here any longer, they gave me my foundation and demonstrated to me what it takes to be successful. And spiritual leaders in my life have kept me on track.

those things between the community and our business that we both cared about. And we focused in on that concentric circle and put our time and energy there, and it has paid off. We believe this has something to do with sustaining our business.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? It is really important to use the broad experience and immense talent that exists statewide in Florida as a foundation to build a future that might look different than our past. To see the full interview, visit FRLA's YouTube Channel.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Sunday, September 10, 2017 5:30 – 7:30 PM ★ Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar, Pointe Orlando ★Admission: $35.00* ★$150 for 5 tickets/$310 for 10 tickets * https://www.frla.org/event/opening-night-party/ *Includes hors d’oeuvres and two (2) drink tickets available for our beer and wine supplier partner selections. Cash bar available. Sponsorships available: contact Marjorie Stone 850-524-1747 What better way to end the day at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show (September 10-12) than at Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar! Join the Central Florida Chapter as we transport you to Old Havana, complete with exotic tropical foliage and vintage décor – in an open-air ambiance. Enjoy Two-Time James Beard Award-Winning Chef Guillermo Pernot’s menu, entertainment by Latin musicians and an energy-packed party while you network with show exhibitors and attendees, some of the top names in the hospitality industry.

Hosted by:

Sponsored by:

Proceeds benefit the FRLA Educational Foundation which provides culinary & hospitality training programs, equipment and scholarships to Florida high school students.

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Chefs That Sizzle

Brian Doyle CHEF, COUNCIL OAK STEAKS & SEAFOOD Brian Doyle brings nearly 20 years of upscale dining experience to his role as chef of Council Oak Steaks & Seafood, the award-winning signature steakhouse at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida. Prior to joining the Seminole Hard Rock team, Doyle served as chef de cuisine at Smith & Wollensky in Miami Beach, where he supervised day-to-day operations and managed three kitchens, including a staff of more than 50 employees. Doyle has also served as chef for Wolfgang Puck Catering, servicing Boston’s Museum of Science and Institute of Contemporary Arts, as well as for several upscale northeastern restaurants, including Smith & Wollensky Atlantic Wharf, Locke Ober Cafe, Vintage Lounge and Central Kitchen. Doyle holds an associate’s degree in culinary arts from the New England Culinary Institute. Describe the Council Oak Steaks & Seafood concept.

Council Oak Steaks & Seafood is the resort’s award-winning signature steakhouse offering guests a sophisticated fine-dining experience. The menu at Council Oak features USDA prime dry-aged meats, fresh seafood and an award-winning wine list. What is the Council Oak? A special generation of Seminole

leaders — children of that last generation to hide in the swamps — began to meet regularly beneath a huge oak tree on the Hollywood Reservation. The restaurant’s name pays homage to this historic tree that still stands today. It can be seen near the corner of U.S. 441 and Stirling Road on the Hollywood Reservation.

What inspires your menus? Seasonality, sustainability and

local product all play a large part whenever we change our menus. It’s very important to us to provide our guests with the highest-quality product available. For our summer menu, we created a lionfish dish served with melted fennel and citrus. Not only is it a light whitefish that is perfect for summer, lionfish are an invasive species that endanger our reefs with no natural predator. We are able to do our part to save our corals, while serving a delicious fish option that guests might not find outside of Florida.

Do you create menu items to complement local produce, meats and seafood? Showcasing Florida’s local product is a big

part of our menu. Our yellowtail snapper is locally caught, as is our lionfish. We also work with some of the best local farms in South

Hot Chef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 16  FA L L

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Florida — for example, Swank Farms in Loxahatchee, Florida. Whenever possible, we definitely try to play up Florida’s natural flora and fauna when creating menu items and specials. Please describe some of your most popular menu items. The Smoked Wagyu Beef Tartare is one of our most pop-

ular appetizers that also has a very unique presentation. We use a blend of Japanese and American wagyu, mixed with shallots and capers, topped with a quail egg. Then we finish it with a quick smoke that really brings out an elevated, unique level of flavor. An integral part of Council Oak’s menu are the dry-aged meats. Some of our most popular cuts are the bone-in ribeye, bone-in New York strip and the porterhouse — all of which are dry-aged 28 days. What is your “sizzle” cuisine you consider to be your “specialty,” unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using? One of our steakhouse signatures is

our dry-aging program. We butcher our meats in-house and dry-age all of our beef cuts for 28 days. The dry-aging process intensifies the flavor of the meat, bringing a natural nutty flavor and giving our steaks a far more complex taste. All the steaks are cut in-house by our butchers and broiled to the perfect temperature. The broiler is also key to our menu. In addition to broiling our meat, we also use it for our fish.

What do you attribute your success as a chef to? Being surrounded by really talented people. The Council Oak and Seminole Hard Rock team — from management to front-of-house, back-of-house and everything in between — is amazing. Everyone puts in a lot of hard work and dedication, and without them, we wouldn’t be where we are today.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bimonthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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FRLA New Members ••HRB Universal LLC, Birmingham, AL ••Merchants Foodservice, Clanton, AL ••In Cloud Counsel, San Francisco, CA ••Nonprofit Gift Card, Evergreen, CO ••Venu Magazine, Fairfield, CT ••Zaza Altamonte Springs, Altamonte Springs, FL ••Apalachicola Main Street, Apalachicola, FL ••The Enterprise Team, Auburndale, FL ••Enovation Brands / Enoitalia Spa, Aventura, FL ••Pubbelly Sushi Market, Aventura, FL ••The Ritz-Carlton Bal Harbour, Bal Harbour, FL ••Bolay Restaurants, Boca Raton, FL ••CJS Global, Boca Raton, FL ••Hotel Spec International, Boca Raton, FL ••Marriott Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL ••Pinnacle Advertising & Marketing Group, Boca Raton, FL ••Renaissance Boca Raton Hotel, Boca Raton, FL ••The Payroll Professionals Inc, Boca Raton, FL ••DeRomo’s Gourmet Market & Restaurant, Bonita Springs, FL ••Interstate Restoration, Boynton Beach, FL ••Spring Brothers Irish Pub, Boynton Beach, FL ••Tibby’s New Orleans Kitchen, Brandon, FL ••American Heritage Financial, Cantonment, FL ••Badgers Business Solutions, Cape Coral, FL ••Page One Graphics Inc, Cape Coral, FL ••Point 57, Cape Coral, FL ••Rusty’s Raw Bar & Grill, Cape Coral, FL ••Applebee’s, Casselberry, FL ••Culver’s of Casselberry, Casselberry, FL ••83 West, Cedar Key, FL ••Garrison Brothers, Chipley, FL ••Amazon Restaurants, Clearwater, FL ••Clear Sky Restaurants & Catering, Clearwater, FL ••Clearwater Gas System, Clearwater, FL ••Domino’s Pizza, Clearwater, FL ••Monin Gourmet Flavorings, Clearwater, FL ••Stratford University, Clearwater, FL ••Blinkers Beachside Steakhouse, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Clearwater Beach Marriott Suites on Sand Key, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Docks, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Kokomo’s Bar & Grill, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Ocean Hai, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Proforma N & M Communications, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Watercolour Grillhouse, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Wyndham Grand Clearwater Beach, Clearwater Beach, FL ••Applebee’s, Clermont, FL ••Holiday Inn Express Clermont, Clermont, FL ••Roland Martin Marina & Resort, Clewiston, FL ••Holiday Inn Express Cocoa, Cocoa, FL ••Golden Krust Caribbean Restaurant & Grill, Coconut Creek, FL ••Junior Achievement of South Florida, Coconut Creek, FL ••Timber Creek Distillery, Crestview, FL ••Putnam Lodge & Spa, Cross City, FL ••Port Hotel & Marina, Crystal River, FL ••Boost Creative Marketing, Dania, FL ••Sushi Sake, Davie, FL ••Applebee’s, Daytona Beach, FL ••Florida Atlantic University, Deerfield Beach, FL ••Hutch Pro Global, Deerfield Beach, FL ••Death or Glory, Delray Beach, FL ••Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Delray Beach, FL ••Hospitality Risk Consultants, Delray Beach, FL ••Johnson & Wales University, Delray Beach, FL ••654Limo, Destin, FL ••Infrico USA Corp, Doral, FL ••Farlows on the Water, Englewood, FL

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••Islander Properties Inc, Englewood, FL ••Key Agency Inc, Englewood, FL ••Lock ‘n Key Restaurant & Pub, Englewood, FL ••Olive Garden, Estero, FL ••Rusty’s Raw Bar & Grill, Estero, FL ••Applebee’s, Eustis, FL ••Bayne’s Barbeque, Flagler Beach, FL ••Turtle Shack Cafe, Flagler Beach, FL ••Fleming Island High School, Fleming Island, FL ••A Head for Profits, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Alliance Supply, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Biscayne Roofing & Waterproofing Systems, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Broward Workshop, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Cake Digital LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Ehrlich Pest Control, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Helen’s Tropical-Exotics Inc, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Jackson’s Prime, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Lloyd Staffing, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••National Chef Supply Warehouse, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Riverwalk Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••The Dalmar, Fort Lauderdale, FL ••Cape Cod Fish Co, Fort Myers, FL ••Charley’s Cabana Bar, Fort Myers, FL ••Courtside Steakhouse, Fort Myers, FL ••Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL ••Global Restaurant Superstore, Fort Myers, FL ••HEM Sweets Enterprise LLC, Fort Myers, FL ••LongHorn Steakhouse, Fort Myers, FL ••Olive Garden, Fort Myers, FL ••Rusty’s Raw Bar & Grill, Fort Myers, FL ••Sanibel Harbour Marriott Resort & Spa, Fort Myers, FL ••Sanibel Harbour Princess, Fort Myers, FL ••School District of Lee County, Fort Myers, FL ••Tarpon House, Fort Myers, FL ••The Standard Restaurant, Fort Myers, FL ••Clemenza’s At Uptown, Fort Walton Beach, FL ••Concept Companies, Gainesville, FL ••University of Florida IFAS, Gainesville, FL ••Cafe Nola, Gulf Breeze, FL ••La Brisa Restaurant, Gulf Breeze, FL ••Reliable Management Services Group LLC, Hallandale Beach, FL ••Angelo’s Pizzeria, Hernando, FL ••Sushi Sake, Hialeah, FL ••Froze N Nitro Creamery, Hollywood, FL ••Natures Best Inc, Hollywood, FL ••Hurricane Hanks, Holmes Beach, FL ••Sushi Sake, Homestead, FL ••My Deli Button, Hudson, FL ••Angelo’s Pizzeria, Inverness, FL ••Mandarin Pub, Jacksonville, FL ••Armor Pest Control, Jacksonville, FL ••Baymont Inn & Suites, Jacksonville, FL ••Bottlenose Brewing, Jacksonville, FL ••Bounce A Roo, Jacksonville, FL ••Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC, Jacksonville, FL ••H&R Block, Jacksonville, FL ••Hoodz of Greater Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL ••Southeastern Paper Group, Jacksonville, FL ••Your Pie, Jacksonville, FL ••Cold Stone Creamery/Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, Jacksonville Beach, FL ••Gusto - A Taste of Rome, Jacksonville Beach, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Jensen Beach, FL ••Rewards Network, Jensen Beach, FL ••Holiday Inn Express, Juno Beach, FL ••East Coast Electric Screening, Jupiter, FL ••The Parisian, Jupiter, FL ••Parrot Key Resort, Key West, FL ••Sloppy Joe’s Bar, Key West, FL

••Applebee’s, Kissimmee, FL ••Blue Grove Baking Co, Kissimmee, FL ••Napleton Automotive, Kissimmee, FL ••Log Cabin BBQ, Labelle, FL ••The Boathouse, Lake Buena Vista, FL ••Applebee’s, Lake Mary, FL ••Zaza Lake Mary, Lake Mary, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Lake Worth, FL ••Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth, FL ••The Food Lady, Lake Worth, FL ••Staybridge Suites Lakeland, Lakeland, FL ••Towne Park, Lantana, FL ••Whistle Stop Tavern, Lantana, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Lauderdale by the Sea, FL ••The Evander Lee, Leesburg, FL ••D J Shephard Restoration Inc, Madeira Beach, FL ••Daiquiri Shak Raw Bar & Grille, Madeira Beach, FL ••Applebee’s, Maitland, FL ••Risk Advisors of America, Maitland, FL ••Firehouse Subs, Margate, FL ••Applebee’s, Melbourne, FL ••Candlewood Suites, Melbourne, FL ••Launch Federal Credit Union, Merritt Island, FL ••Amazon Restaurants, Miami, FL ••Atlantic Coast Restaurant & Mechanical Services, Miami, FL ••BBQ Rib Shack, Miami, FL ••Chargello LLC, Miami, FL ••Coyo Taco, Miami, FL ••Cozen O’Connor, Miami, FL ••Dav El, Miami, FL ••Expedia Inc, Miami, FL ••FPL Energy Services, Miami, FL ••Gourmeat, Miami, FL ••GrayRobinson PA, Miami, FL ••Il Pastaio & La Pasta Boutique LLC, Miami, FL ••J A Uniforms, Miami, FL ••Jackson Lewis PC, Miami, FL ••L’Epicerie At Cafe, Miami, FL ••Marfil Bistro, Miami, FL ••Matrix 2 Advertising, Miami, FL ••Mojito Grill, Miami, FL ••National Planning Corporation, Miami, FL ••PizzaRev, Miami, FL ••Pollo Tropical Corporate, Miami, FL ••Pubbelly Sushi Brickell City Centre, Miami, FL ••Pubbelly Sushi Dadeland, Miami, FL ••Pubbelly Sushi Miami Beach, Miami, FL ••Riomaggiore LLC, Miami, FL ••Shula Burger, Miami, FL ••Sushi Sake, Miami, FL ••Tornio Best Meat, Miami, FL ••Tuyo At Miami Dade College, Miami, FL ••Videndi Human Capital Management, Miami, FL ••Water Restoration Group, Miami, FL ••Wynwood Diner, Miami, FL ••Gelato Go, Miami Beach, FL ••Grillfish Restaurant, Miami Beach, FL ••Hyatt Centric South Beach, Miami Beach, FL ••Loews Miami Beach Hotel, Miami Beach, FL ••Metropolitan by COMO, Miami Beach, FL ••Pubbelly Hospitality Group, Miami Beach, FL ••Pubbelly Noodle Bar, Miami Beach, FL ••Residence Inn South Beach, Miami Beach, FL ••Shelborne South Beach, Miami Beach, FL ••The Confidante Miami Beach, Miami Beach, FL ••Brown & Brown of Florida Inc, Miami Lakes, FL ••Big Oak Barbecue, Middleburg, FL ••Oops Alley, Milton, FL ••Jack’s Barbeque, Minneola, FL ••Baytowne Provisions, Miramar Beach, FL ••Emeril’s Coastal Italian, Miramar Beach, FL

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First Half of 2017 ••Mama Clemenza’s European Breakfast, Miramar Beach, FL ••Mellow Mushroom, Mount Dora, FL ••Baleen, Naples, FL ••Blue Zones Project - Southwest Florida, Naples, FL ••Kareem’s Lebanese Kitchen, Naples, FL ••LaPlaya Beach & Golf Resort, Naples, FL ••Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLLP, Naples, FL ••The District School Board of Collier County, Naples, FL ••Two Guys Kitchen and Catering, Naples, FL ••Valiant Solutions, Naples, FL ••Hampton Inn & Suites, Navarre, FL ••TC’s Front Porch, Navarre, FL ••Where Y’at Seafood, Navarre, FL ••Firehouse Subs, New Port Richey, FL ••New Port Richey Main Street Inc, New Port Richey, FL ••Sushi Sake, North Miami, FL ••Oceanside Beach Service Inc, North Palm Beach, FL ••Insurance Worldwide / American Funding, Oakland Park, FL ••Applebee’s, Ocala, FL ••McLauchlin & Company, Ocala, FL ••Applebee’s, Orange City, FL ••A&B Cakes and Catering, Orlando, FL ••Aloft Orlando Downtown, Orlando, FL ••Amazon Restaurants, Orlando, FL ••Applebee’s, Orlando, FL ••Caribbean Sunshine Bakery, Orlando, FL ••Cataloochee Holdings LLC, Orlando, FL ••Chef’s Commissary, Orlando, FL ••CHOICE HR, Orlando, FL ••Circo Orlando, Orlando, FL ••City of Orlando, Orlando, FL ••Coldwell Banker Commercial NRT, Orlando, FL ••Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurant, Orlando, FL ••Crayola Experience, Orlando, FL ••Duffy’s Sports Grill Mall At Millenia, Orlando, FL ••Excellence Training LLC, Orlando, FL ••Floridian Hotel & Suites, Orlando, FL ••ForeWith Strategic Growth Consultants, Orlando, FL ••Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers, Orlando, FL ••Fusion Bistro Sushi & Sake Bar, Orlando, FL ••Geeked Pros Inc, Orlando, FL ••Gemaire Distributors, Orlando, FL ••Holland & Knight LLP, Orlando, FL ••La Chiquita Tortilla Mfr, Orlando, FL ••Landform of Central Florida Inc, Orlando, FL ••Millenia 106, Orlando, FL ••Orlando Senior Health Network, Orlando, FL ••Performance Food Group (Performance Foodservice), Orlando, FL ••Phoenicia Development LLC, Orlando, FL ••Pollos Pio Pio Inc, Orlando, FL ••Spinout Guest Laundries, Orlando, FL ••Sugar Canes Rum Bar & Lounge, Orlando, FL ••SuperShuttle International, Orlando, FL ••Your Pie, Orlando, FL ••Zaza Waterford Lakes, Orlando, FL ••Applebee’s, Ormond Beach, FL ••Ormond Beach Main Street, Ormond Beach, FL ••1000 Degrees Pizza, Oviedo, FL ••Mi Balconcito Latin Grill, Palm Bay, FL ••Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce, Palm Beach, FL ••Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurant, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Devonshire At PGA National, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Lighthouse Realty Services Inc, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••PGA Arts Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Twin Trees Pizza, Palm Beach Gardens, FL ••Marriott’s Ocean Pointe, Palm Beach Shores, FL

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••Brass Taps, Palm Coast, FL ••EconoLodge, Palm Coast, FL ••Hilton Garden Inn, Palm Coast, FL ••Coldwell Banker Commercial NRT, Palm Harbor, FL ••Hilton Brand Management, Panacea, FL ••Grand Marlin of Panama City Beach, Panama City, FL ••Los Antojitos Mexican Restaurant, Panama City, FL ••Reinhart Foodservice Valdosta, Panama City, FL ••Sue’s, Panama City, FL ••Easy Parking Systems Inc, Parkland, FL ••Patrice & Associates, Parrish, FL ••Golden Krust Caribbean Restaurant & Grill, Pembroke Pines, FL ••Another Broken Egg Cafe, Pensacola, FL ••Avalon HR LLC, Pensacola, FL ••BJ’s Brewhouse, Pensacola, FL ••Buffalo Rock Pepsi, Pensacola, FL ••Cordova Lanes, Pensacola, FL ••Global Grill, Pensacola, FL ••HeroMan Services Plant Company, Pensacola, FL ••Holiday Inn - University, Pensacola, FL ••Republic National Distributing Company, Pensacola, FL ••Skopelos At New World, Pensacola, FL ••South Palafox Group LLC, Pensacola, FL ••Supreme Paper Supplies Inc, Pensacola, FL ••Tadlock Roofing, Pensacola, FL ••Twin Peaks of Pensacola, Pensacola, FL ••VIP Pensacola / Destin, Pensacola, FL ••United Water Restoration Group, Pompano Beach, FL ••Utopia Juice Bar Inc, Pompano Beach, FL ••Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL ••LongHorn Steakhouse, Port Charlotte, FL ••Applebee’s, Port Orange, FL ••The Brick Wall Sports Bar & Grille, Port Saint Joe, FL ••88 Keys Florida, Punta Gorda, FL ••Perch 360, Punta Gorda, FL ••Scotty’s BrewHouse, Punta Gorda, FL ••Wyvern Hotel, Punta Gorda, FL ••Marriott Oceana Palms, Riviera Beach, FL ••Wild Olives Market and Cafe, Rosemary Beach, FL ••Pets Living The Dream.com, Safety Harbor, FL ••Coneheads, Saint Augustine, FL ••Blue Parrot Ocean Front Cafe, Saint George Island, FL ••Honc Industries, Saint James City, FL ••Applebee’s, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Five Bucks Drinkery, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Gaunce Law, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Hyatt Place St Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Kimpton Hotel Zamora, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Orange Blossom Catering, Saint Petersburg, FL ••Nicklaus of Florida Inc, Saint Petersburg Beach, FL ••The Florida Hotel, Sanford, FL ••Brick’s Smoked Meats, Sarasota, FL ••Duffy’s Management, Sarasota, FL ••El Toro Bravo, Sarasota, FL ••Holiday Inn Sarasota Airport, Sarasota, FL ••Mattison’s Restaurants & Catering, Sarasota, FL ••Progressive Employer Mgmt Co, Sarasota, FL ••Quality Inn & Suites Sarasota, Sarasota, FL ••Tableseide Group, Sarasota, FL ••The Founders Club, Sarasota, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Sebastian, FL ••Miller’s Ale House Seminole, Seminole, FL ••Applebee’s, Spring Hill, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Stuart, FL ••NuCO2, Stuart, FL ••Stuart Main Street, Stuart, FL ••Anheuser Busch, Tallahassee, FL ••Cecil’s Texas Style BBQ, Tallahassee, FL ••Centrale Italian Parlour, Tallahassee, FL

••Decent Pizza, Tallahassee, FL ••Dipped, Tallahassee, FL ••Enterprise Risk Management by Carol, Tallahassee, FL ••Ernie Sims Big Hits Foundation, Tallahassee, FL ••Fire Betty’s, Tallahassee, FL ••Frenchtown Heritage Market, Tallahassee, FL ••Growler Country, Tallahassee, FL ••Hungry Howies, Tallahassee, FL ••McDonald’s, Tallahassee, FL ••McGowan’s Hops & Grapes, Tallahassee, FL ••Pavilion At The Centre of Tallahassee, Tallahassee, FL ••Red Hills Broadcasting LLC, Tallahassee, FL ••Reinhart Foodservice Valdosta, Tallahassee, FL ••Seminole Golf Course and Club, Tallahassee, FL ••Tallahassee Downtown Improvement Authority, Tallahassee, FL ••Westscott Construction, Tallahassee, FL ••Applebee’s, Tampa, FL ••Bay Harbor Hotel, Tampa, FL ••Besnard & Associates Insurance, Tampa, FL ••Coldwell Banker Commercial NRT, Tampa, FL ••Fintech, Tampa, FL ••Fire & Life Safety America, Tampa, FL ••Johnson Jackson LLC, Tampa, FL ••La Tropicana, Tampa, FL ••Luigi’s Kitchen, Tampa, FL ••McCall Service, Tampa, FL ••Mr. Gio’s Cafe, Tampa, FL ••Nolto Junction, Tampa, FL ••Revenue Management Solutions, Tampa, FL ••The Oneida Group, Tampa, FL ••Trenam Law, Tampa, FL ••United Water Restoration Group, Tampa, FL ••UnitedHealthcare, Tampa, FL ••World of Beer Fowler, Tampa, FL ••Fish Camp Lake Eustis, Tavares, FL ••Maxine’s Inc, Tequesta, FL ••Applebee’s, The Villages, FL ••ACR Solutions LLC, Titusville, FL ••Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill, Vero Beach, FL ••Accurate Franchising Inc, West Palm Beach, FL ••Baron Sign Manufacturing, West Palm Beach, FL ••Bolay Restaurants, West Palm Beach, FL ••Courtyard By Marriott West Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, FL ••Embassy Suites West Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, FL ••I3-PBS LLC, West Palm Beach, FL ••IdeaBar, West Palm Beach, FL ••Itty Bitty Bin, West Palm Beach, FL ••Klinefelter Holdings LLC, West Palm Beach, FL ••Martinique II Le Club, West Palm Beach, FL ••Network Technology Partners, West Palm Beach, FL ••Pipeline Poke Co., West Palm Beach, FL ••Residence Inn West Palm Beach Downtown, West Palm Beach, FL ••TooJay’s, West Palm Beach, FL ••Mitrani Rynor Adamsky & Toland PA, Weston, FL ••Caribbean Sunshine Bakery, Winter Garden, FL ••Miller’s Ale House Winter Garden, Winter Garden, FL ••Brownieria, Winter Park, FL ••Copier Warrior, Winter Park, FL ••HOODZ of Orlando, Winter Springs, FL ••FPL Food LLC, Augusta, GA ••MIRoots Inc, Dallas, GA ••Cowboy Gaming LLC, Duluth, GA ••Reinhart Foodservice Valdosta, Valdosta, GA ••Amalgamated Insurance Underwriters, Monsey, NY ••Universal Environmental Consulting, Westbury, NY ••Hain Pure Protein Corporation, New Oxford, PA ••Parking Management Company, Nashville, TN ••Job Creators Network, Addison, TX ••Dell, Round Rock, TX

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H O S P I TA L I T Y L E A D E R S U N D E R 4 0

Young Operators Carlos Gazitua PRESIDENT AND CEO OF SERGIO’S RESTAURANTS AND CREATOR OF SERGIO’S CUBAN Young operators are the key to the future of Florida’s hospitality industry. This is the first of a series featuring hospitality leaders under 40. FR&L Magazine is proud to recognize these young operators. Read about the success of Carlos Gazitua, the first candidate for this new feature.

C

arlos Gazitua is President and CEO of Sergio’s Restaurants and creator of Sergio’s Cuban in South Florida. With six restaurants and three fast casual locations, Sergio’s has over 650 employees. The robust growth of Sergio’s in South Florida marks him as a Hispanic minority leader in the hospitality industry. Gazitua’s entrepreneurship has led him to great success. In 2012 he created the La Flaca™ brand, which promotes healthy cooking alternatives for Cuban food. La Flaca™ menu has transformed the way people eat Latin and Cuban cuisine in South Florida. Sergio’s earned an award from the Florida Department of Health this March as the first certified restaurant to take part in the Healthy Happens Here Initiative in Miami-Dade County. Gazitua is also the President for the FRLA Miami-Dade Chapter and a recipient of Doral Chamber Council Hispanic Business Award. He also was honored for leading the 2016 Small Business of the Year Award by the Doral Business Council and recently was appointed spokesman for the Bring Small Business Back program for Job Creators Network. As CEO of Sergio’s, Gazitua has shared his small business insight as a featured guest on FOX Business’ “After the Bell,” NPR, WLRN and the “Mike Gallagher Show.” His opinion articles have been featured in the Miami Herald, Miami Today and 305 Magazine. Gazitua’s passion for Cuban food started early on, and he has been featured on Telemundo Noticias and performed multiple food presentations on NBC Miami’s “6 in the Mix.” Most recently, Sergio’s was featured on the Cooking Channel’s “Cheap Eats” with Ali Khan and “Emeril’s Florida” with famed chef Emeril Lagasse. Gazitua plans to expand his fast casual restaurants throughout the state of Florida in the next five to 10 years. Carlos earned his undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and his MBA and law degree from Stetson College of Law. He resides in Miami with his wife, Liana Gazitua, and their two young boys.

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Favorite social media outlet:

Instagram, because a photo tells a thousand words. Favorite type of restaurant:

I enjoy restaurants that serve authentic fresh comfort food. What podcast are you listening to?

Dave Ramsey because Financial Peace is just as important as Business Success. Describe the culture of your business in 20 words or less:

We set the standard in our community by providing Genuine “Wow” Hospitality while serving flavorful, honest Cuban & Latin Comfort Food Where are you going on your next vacation:

Sanibel Island Favorite App:

Waze Cause you believe in?

Any cause that furthers the education and entrepreneurship of our next generation. If you are planning a dinner, who would you invite to represent Florida’s hospitality industry?

We have so many wonderful leaders in the Florida Hospitality Industry that it becomes hard to select a few individuals. However, if I could travel back in time I would want to invite Walt Disney and Henry Flagler who were visionaries and titans for our State that helped pave the way for the Hospitality industry. How did you get into the hospitality industry?

I was raised breathing and living in the industry as a young boy. It is become part of me.

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2017 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT RECAP

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The Keynote was Erin Moran, Chief Culture Officer, Union Square Hospitality Group.

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1. Align Strategies closed the Summit with a live podcast of “The Working Lunch.” 2. There was plenty of time for networking during the Marketing + Operations Summit. 3. Kathleen Wood moderated a panel entitled “Biggest Bang for Your Buck Working with Small Marketing Budgets,” and her panelists were Ron Dinella, CFO Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza, and Joe Natale, VP of Food and Beverage, Menin Hospitality. 4. The Marketing + Operations Summitt opened with a welcome from FRLA President CEO Carol Dover and event emcee, Heiko Dobrikow. A junkanoo band helped to liven the crowd! 5. The mini trade show held during the summit was beneficial to both attendees who wanted to learn more and to the sponsors who participated.

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RLA presented its annual Marketing + Operations Summit in early August at the Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa. The twoday event was designed to spotlight hospitality industry leaders who have instituted best practices in their own companies and introduced innovative business trends to increase sales and customer satisfaction. Featured presenters were from Union Square Hospitality Group, Technomic, Bloomin’ Brands, Coca-Cola, Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza, Bolay, Menin Hospitality, Duffy’s Sports Grill, Firehouse Subs, Marriott, Miller’s Ale House, Snagajob, Tijuana Flats, World of Beer, Wyndham and many others shared marketing and operations tips and techniques. With several presentations to choose from, a cocktail hour, networking opportunities, a live podcast and more, the 400plus attendees experienced a beneficial and fun event. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SUPPORT THE NRA AND FRLA PACS

2017 GOLF CHAIRS • Robin Sorensen, Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs • Lino Maldonado, Vice President of Operations, Gulf Region Wyndham Vacation Rentals • Jason Emmett, • Sheldon Suga, Lodging Director, Hawks Cay BrionPrice.Co

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2017 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE: ADAM COREY, Tallahassee Hospitality Group, LLC HARRY PRICE, Coca-Cola North America JOHN HORNE, Ana Maria Oyster Bar MONIQUE YEAGER, Tijuana Flats JASON FIALKOFF, VGM Client Rewards MIKE VINIK, BJ's Restaurants JAN GAUTAM, IHRMC and AAHOA DAVE REID, World of Beer DON DONLEY, Tommy Bahama Restaurant JONATHAN RAZ, Hilton CHARLY ROBINSON, F and D Kitchen FRANK ZUMBO, Marriott MATT HALME, Instant STEVE KEUP, Florida Region Hersha Hospitality CHRIS FRAWLEY, Miller's Ale House Restaurants JASON DOWNEY, Southeastern Laundry Equipment Sales, Inc.

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SPONSORSHIPS/TEAMS AVAILABLE, PLEASE CONTACT SDAVIS@FRLA.ORG 850.224.2250 EXT. 258

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H A L L O F FA M E AWA R D S

Congratulations to FRLA’s 2017

HALL OF FAME RECIPIENTS! RESTAURATEUR ANDREW REISS To call Andy Reiss anything but a Tallahassee legend would be an understatement. Elected officials, students and Tallahassee residents alike recognize Andy not only as a creator of delicious food, but also as an engaged and considerate employer. In 1972, Tallahassee and surrounding Leon County had just over 100,000 residents. Two of those were Florida State University graduates Andy Reiss and his new wife, Maxin. At a time that most restaurants were moving away from the capital in downtown Tallahassee, Reiss seized an opportunity. Believing the time was right for Tallahassee’s first New York-style delicatessen, he opened The Deli in November 1972. Through the subsequent 45 years, Reiss’ restaurant concepts included Andrew’s 2nd Act, Maxin’s, Tutto Bene, Andrew’s Upstairs, Andrew’s Catering, Trio, Andrew’s Capital Grill and Bar, and Andrew’s 228. Reiss’ restaurants

have been recognized by major Florida magazines for excellence in food for 27 consecutive years. Reiss has been an advocate for the restaurant industry and for Downtown Tallahassee through all these years. He was Tallahassee’s first FRLA Chairman of the Board in 2013 and 2015. Appointed by four different Governors, he served 24 years on the DBPR Hotel and Restaurant Advisory Council. Reiss helped create and served as Chairman of the Tallahassee Convention and Visitors Bureau, currently known as Visit Tallahassee. He spent 35 years on the Downtown Improvement Authority and served also on the Downtown Redevelopment Commission. Andrew and his wife, Maxin, have been married for 47 years and now live in Seagrove, Florida, where they enjoy beach time with their two daughters, Aly and Dana, and two grandchildren.

HOTELIER DON SEATON The late Don Seaton was a hotelier by profession. He and his wife, Nan, owned, developed, built and operated four hotels in Clearwater Beach, one in Crystal River and two in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. Seaton was not only a successful businessman, but was also involved in his community and devoted to Florida’s tourism industry. Don Seaton was also father to Wendy Damsker, a member of the FRLA Board of Directors. Seaton was a true leader. His Florida contributions included: • Two terms as President of the Greater Clearwater Innkeepers Association; • Three terms as Vice Chairman of the Pinellas County Tourist Development Council; • Terms as Secretary, Treasurer, Board of Directors and Chairman of the Florida Hotel & Motel Association; • Director and Chairman of the Board of Best Western International; • Florida Hotel & Motel Association’s Hotelier of the Year, • Clearwater Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Lifetime Achievement Award (Mr. Clearwater); • President and two-time Paul Harris Fellow of the Clearwater Beach Rotary Club.

SPECIAL HONOREE RANDY SPICER Randy Spicer was truly a friend to the industry. Spicer worked 23 years for Prudential Insurance Company, then was hired by Arkansas Blue Cross Blue Shield in Little Rock where he spent the next 10 years as President and CEO of their subsidiary, First Pyramid Life. Randy and his wife, Diane, then resided in Southlake, Texas, while he wasworking for United Healthcare (UHC). When he passed away on March 20 of this year, he was working for the National Restaurant Association (NRA) as Vice President of Health Insurance Services.

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After multiple years of hard work, Randy had very recently completed a major project creating a joint venture between the NRA and UHC, with the goal to provide affordable health insurance for restaurant employees. Randy’s friend, Don Fox, the current FRLA Chairman and President/CEO of Firehouse Subs, stated: “Randy was an incredible gentleman; one of the nicest, most genuine people I have ever known … he was an incredible family man, and his self-deprecating humor was as endearing as it was funny. He will be missed by everyone he touched.”

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H A L L O F FA M E AWA R D S

SUPPLIER UNITEDHEALTHCARE UnitedHealthcare, represented by Kimberlee Vandervoorn, is a strong supporter of the hospitality industry. It offers exclusive health care pricing and solutions for every size FRLA member business, including a soon-to-beavailable NRA Association Plan option for fully insured small business groups. Since 2009, UnitedHealthcare has worked with the National Restaurant Association and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association in a strategic alliance to help provide easier access to cost-effective health care coverage and related products and services for the hospitality industry. UnitedHealthcare features an expansive network of more than 1 million physicians and care professionals, and 6,000 hospitals and other care facilities nationwide; various online tools and resources; and a range of wellness programs designed to help improve employee health, productivity and retention. UnitedHealthcare is dedicated to helping people nationwide live healthier lives by simplifying the health care experience, meeting consumer health and wellness needs, and

sustaining trusted relationships with care providers. It offers the full spectrum of health benefit programs and is one of the businesses of UnitedHealth Group, a diversified Fortune 50 health and well-being company. UnitedHealth Group has two philanthropic foundations – UnitedHealthcare Children's Foundation and United Health Foundation. UnitedHealthcare Children's Foundation gives families somewhere to turn when they need medical assistance. Contributions come from UnitedHealth Group employees and the generosity of others. United Health Foundation is passionate about improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of medical care, expanding access to health care services, nurturing a 21st-century health workforce and enhancing community well-being. Each year, it provides contributions and support to more than 2,200 organizations through its partnerships locally, nationally and internationally. In addition, UnitedHealth Group’s employee giving! program promotes volunteering and giving back to support the communities where employees work and live. Every day, employees generously

give of their time and money to charitable causes they care about. UnitedHealthcare demonstrates its commitment to the present and future of the hospitality industry through supporting the FRLA Educational Foundation by funding scholarships, sponsoring fundraising events and donating time. Kimberlee Vandervoorn, Vice President of Distribution Services at UnitedHealth Group, has developed and led UnitedHealthcare’s strategic alliance program with the NRA, FRLA and all of the state restaurant association partners since its inception in 2009. For more than 15 years, Kimberlee has worked with businesses and industries to develop health benefits and wellness solutions that meet their unique needs and help them navigate the complex health care system. She also serves on the FRLA Educational Foundation Board, Insurance Council, Marketing Council and Allied Member Council.

THE FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND THE

INDIVIDUAL TICKET: $150 GROUP OF EIGHT: $1,100

STARTING AT 6:00 PM • Cocktail Reception • Installation & Awards Dinner • Awards Party Celebration

HYATT REGENCY ORLANDO 9801 International Drive Orlando, FL, 32819

WWW.FRLA.ORG/EVENT/HOSPITALITY-CELEBRATION

FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in

hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry

and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would

like to share something significant that’s

happening in your area, feel free to submit your

The Central Florida Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is in full swing this year with monthly networking events and opportunities to raise money for educational and political outreach.

Visit Tampa Bay awarded the Gonzmart Family Ambassador of the Year Award to FRLA member and Board member of the Pinellas Chapter Troy Manthey.

story to editor@frla.org.

Dannette Lynch received the Silver Spoon Sponsor Award from Clearwater Beach Restaurant Week on behalf of the Great Florida Events Program.

Tampa Bay Beaches Chamber of Commerce partnered with FRLA Pinellas Chapter in presenting the Nicklaus family the Tourism Award for 2017. 26  FA L L

2017

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

Sandie and Jerry Foland of Baron Sign Manufacturing with Susan Nefzger of The Parisian Restaurant and Carlo Baine of Interstate Restoration at the Palm Beach Chapter mixer.

Motivational speaker, Jim Knight, shared an evening with the Monroe Chapter in Key West.

Dave Reid, COO, World of Beer, shared his expertise on engaging millennials with the Suncoast Chapter of FRLA. FRL A .org

Richard Turner presented a Government Relations update at the AAHOA Florida Regional Conference.

Attendees at the Central Florida PAC Fundraiser had the opportunity to learn more about FRLA’s Engage Program from Align Strategies. If you aren’t engaged with this program, you are missing out on an opportunity to get to know your local public officials. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

27


LEADERSHIP REPORT

A Unique Offer Just for Members FRLA members can now take advantage of exclusive offers and learn more about Dell products

C

ustomers are at the core of everything Dell does. Dell is focused on delivering affordable technology solutions that enable restaurant and hotel owners to make smarter business decisions that impact their bottom line. FRLA members enjoy savings of up to 40% on the everyday price on their purchase of select Dell systems and Dell branded electronics and accessories. Visit Dell.com/ FRLA for more information. Visit us at Booth #2100 at the FR&L Show!

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2017

Save up to 40% on OptiPlex, Latitude, Precision, Workstations and PowerEdge Servers. Inel® Core™ m7 processor Intel Inside®. Extraordinary Performace Outside.

Latitude 12 7000 Series 2-in-1

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


food SAFETY

PHOTO BY KONDOR83 / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

D

id you know that September is Food Safety Month? FRLA celebrates Food Safety Month with our annual Food Safety Edition of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine. In this edition, we compile food safety-related information that you can use to sharpen your skills and those of your employees’, learn about current food safety trends, and find out more about what is going on in the world of food safety. We hope you find this edition informative and interesting.


food SAFETY

SEAFOOD

SOME TIPS TO MAKE SURE YOU WILL NOT BE FOUND IN A “BAIT AND SWITCH” SITUATION: • Understand why mislabeling occurs

By LISA WEDDING, SECRETARY, BETTER SEAFOOD BOARD

T

he many species of seafood available today make fish and shellfish an exciting addition to your menu. But variety can also cause confusion if you use the wrong name for the species. Selling one type of fish by the name of another is known as seafood mislabeling, species substitution, “bait and switch,” or just plain and simple “fraud.” The fraud is not always intentional. It can be as simple as a misunderstanding or a lack of information on the part of a distributor, retailer or restaurant — who themselves may have purchased a misrepresented product. Regardless of the reason for mislabeling, customers don’t make the distinction — they expect to get what is advertised. With such a wide range of seafood species available, where can you find the answers to correctly naming seafood species? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains an extensive list of acceptable market names for seafood sold in the U.S. Using the names from “The Seafood List” will support your commitment to “truth in menu” requirements. For more information on how to prevent seafood fraud, visit betterseafoodboard.com and download a free document — Industry Guidance of Best Practices for Addressing Seafood Fraud — or contact the Better Seafood Board at bsb@nfi.org with questions. 30  FA L L

2017

ɝAvoid ɝ creating a new fish name or renaming the fish to make it sound more appealing. • Become educated with FDA’s resources for labeling seafood ɝWatch ɝ FDA’s Learning Module videos on seafood labeling (search fda.gov for “seafood labeling”). ɝConfirm ɝ seafood names with FDA’s Seafood List (search fda.gov for “seafood list”). • Be a smart buyer ɝBe ɝ clear in purchase specifications — use scientific names if necessary to avoid misunderstandings. ɝMatch ɝ container labels to both invoices and purchase orders and to your menu. ɝɝBuy from reputable suppliers such as members of the Better Seafood Board. • Trust your “gut” (if the price is too good to be true, it probably is) ɝInvestigate ɝ low price offers to make sure you aren’t being cheated with lower cost species, short weight product or excess added water. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY LITTLENY / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

SEAFOOD FRAUD

ɝA ɝ fish species will be substituted in order to get a better price or to meet consumer demand for a particular species.


T H I R D - PA R T Y D E L I V E RY S E R V I C E S

food SAFETY

THE COST OF CONVENIENCE Understanding the Third-Party Food Delivery Dilemma By SUZANNE SINGER SSINGER@RUMBERGER.COM AND DAMIEN ORATO DORATO@RUMBERGER.COM

U

berEats. Postmates. Seamless. Grubhub. Eat 24. These are just a few of the names leading the market in the fast growing field of third-party food delivery services (TPDS). TPDS generally result in increased revenues by generating additional business for casual dining restaurants and other industries that do not offer delivery. The introduction of TPDS in a restaurant’s business model is especially enticing because some restaurant sales are in decline. The convenience factor a TPDS brings to the table is something that the restaurant industry cannot overlook. In the midst of this tech renaissance where maximizing convenience is king, there are important liability considerations associated with those third-party delivery persons bridging the gap between the restaurant and consumer. Emerging issues in this new landscape include the potential for increased litigation involving matters such as food borne illnesses, auto accidents and possible intentional or criminal acts by delivery personnel. The question then becomes: How can restaurants minimize the potential for liability exposure while using TDPS? A recent interview with a Grubhub corporate employee confirmed that Grubhub, as is the case with most of these TPDS in the industry, maintains written partnership agreements with all of the restaurants for which it provides services. However, according to a recent Technomic, Inc. study, “On Demand Delivery: Disrupting the Future of Foodservice,” 76 percent of customers hold the restaurant partially responsible for errors, even if restaurants have formal agreements with third-party delivery companies, and even though the consumer never interfaces with the restaurant itself during a TPDS transaction.

To mitigate risk, restaurants who utilize TPDS should include not only basic operational content in these agreements — like menu pricing — but also adequate liability limitation language. In formulating such a “partnership,” restaurants should consider the following provisions in any written agreement: • Require TPDS and its drivers to actively disclaim any agency relationship with the restaurant;

Written agreements aside, another emerging concern involves TPDS like Postmates, which is well-known in the industry to

Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell provides litigation and counseling services in a wide range of civil practice areas including product liability, commercial litigation, construction, real estate, intellectual property litigation, securities litigation, labor and employment law, bankruptcy, insurance coverage, professional liability and administrative law. Offices are located in Orlando, Tampa, Miami, Tallahassee and Birmingham, Alabama. For more information, please visit rumberger.com.

1 Technomic Inc. is a research and consulting firm servicing the food and foodservice industry. technoic.com/Pressroom/Releases/dynRelease_Detail. php?rUID=432

3 The business model of Postmates another popular third party delivery service, involves them not asking permission from the restaurants in which they are delivering food. eater.com/2015/7/31/9074491/post mates-delivery-problems

4 Agency theories may subject the restaurant to liability. For example, liability may arise if a restaurant creates the appearance of an agency relationship, or by its actions or words holds the agent (TPDS) out as possessing authority to act.

2

See above.

FRL A .org

• Include strong indemnification terms which provide for a full shift of responsibility to the TPDS for any claims arising from a consumer’s use of the TPDS services; • Require TPDS to carry insurance coverage which names the restaurant(s) as an additional insured; • Require proof of insurance by the TPDS and for any driver the TPDS utilizes, including the requirement of clear vehicle ownership by the TPDS driver or TPDS service; • Require compliance with industry standards for safe food handling, including temperature maintenance and procedures to follow in case a customer is unavailable to take the delivery of an order at the time specified; • Partner with a TPDS that uses tracking technology so that the “chain of custody” can be firmly established to aid in the defense of food borne illness cases.

deliver from restaurants without permission. Some restaurants may already be engaging with such TPDS without their knowledge. Even with this type of “passive permission” on the part of the restaurant, there is still a risk of a non-verbal partnership creating liability exposure. For this reason, restaurants should safeguard against unsanctioned delivery services in order to inform the public that TPDS operates independently from the restaurant. Methods for accomplishing this include: • Specify the TPDS that restaurant has agreements with and issue disclaimers on the restaurant website regarding unauthorized TPDS; • Include disclaimer language in take-out or delivery menus; • Include disclaimer language in any online or paper advertisement for the restaurant. As technology evolves and becomes more innovative, we can expect a spike in personal injury or consumer protection lawsuits involving these types of third-party delivery services. It is important to take precautionary measures to reduce the risk of liability associated with these TPDS.

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food SAFETY

CROWDSOURCING AND SOCIAL MEDIA

SOCIAL MEDIA SURVEILLANCE The Next Frontier for Food Safety

M

ost people have had an experience with food poisoning, and in most cases, those experiences are mercifully shortlived. However, the price of foodborne illness is high: Approximately 3,000 people are killed and 128,000 are hospitalized each year due to foodborne illness in the United States alone, according to the CDC, and the economic annual cost reaches to the billions of dollars. Most of the estimated 48 million annual cases of food poisoning go unreported. Due either to mild illness, limited knowledge of reporting protocol or lack of a laboratory confirmation of the disease, underreporting of these cases makes it difficult to protect the public and the global economy from emerging or ongoing outbreaks. Many well-known national restaurant brands have experienced high-profile cases of foodborne illness. While food safety standards have evolved to further protect the consumer, little has been done to create a more robust consumer based reporting and surveillance system. Social media and crowdsourced reporting sites may offer the solution to the perennial issue of underreporting, with the added bonus of early detection, which would allow faster reaction time for businesses and public health departments. Traditional methods of reporting (i.e., phone, email, forms on health department websites, fax, etc.) are now being supplemented with reports submitted through social media and business review sites. Platforms like Twitter and Yelp, with their constantly active and informed audiences, have been put to use by public health departments seeking to track foodborne illness outbreaks. Crowdsourcing, or participatory surveillance, has also been used for public health monitoring of

32  FA L L

2017

infectious diseases, and systems use mobile apps and the internet to collect data on specific symptoms. A crowdsourcing platform specifically for foodborne illness would be of benefit in supplementing existing foodborne illness surveillance methods. Just such a platform exists on Iwasposioned.com, which curates crowdsourced data to identify clusters that might signify foodborne illness outbreaks. When a potential outbreak is identified, Iwaspoisoned. com alerts the local public health department and also offers alert services to industry. Iwaspoisoned.com has an impressive track record: In 2015, Iwaspoisoned.com was first to identify a cluster of reports at a Simi Valley fast casual restaurant, detecting what was later confirmed as a norovirus outbreak. With thousands of reports submitted each month, Iwaspoisoned. com has tapped into the potential for crowdsourced, curated social media to augment existing food safety systems. With 87% of Americans already online, social media and crowdsourced surveillance have the greatest chance both to bridge the gap of underreported illness and to facilitate the early detection of outbreaks, leading to a stronger, safer food supply chain, better business for restaurants and healthier consumers confident in their food.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY GPOINTSTUDIO / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By PATRICK QUADE, FOUNDER, IWASPOISONED.COM


TRAINING

food SAFETY

LET RCS HELP YOU FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) Provides Mandatory Food Handler Training

F

lorida law requires that all food handlers (employees whose job involves the occasional or routine handling of food or beverage or the contact surfaces involved in the production, storage, or service of food or beverage products) be provided training utilizing a state approved basic food safety curriculum. Training must be conducted by a certified food manager and records must be maintained. The FRLA SafeStaff® Foodhandler Training Program is the contracted program of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) and contains the required food safety principles: FRLA offers food handler online or onsite training by FRLA’s RCS Training team. During onsite training, one of our professional training staff comes to your establishment and provides live training for you. In addition, the trainers assist you in assuring you have the necessary documentation to avoid problems during an inspection. To schedule your SafeStaff® food handler training, call (800) 5379863 or visit RCSTraining.com.

FRL A .org

G N I N R A W C

OLI ALCOH YOUR AD TO REVOKED. LE N A ION C ENDED OR IOLAT P TED V G SUS L RELA E BEIN LCOHO GE LICENS A E N A O BEVER

Protect your license with alcohol compliance training! IMPORTANT! If you serve a minor, you can go to jail for up to 60 days and be fined $500! Remember your training! To protect your liquor license, and be in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, make sure your staff: 1. Checks the ID of anyone who looks younger than 30 2. Ensures the birthday on the ID is on or before today’s date 1996 3. Asks a manager if they have any questions or concerns about an ID’s validity 4. Does not serve an empty seat or multiple drinks to one person 5. Understands they have the right to refuse service if they are not certain the person is at least 21

CONTACT FRLA’S RCS TRAINING TODAY FOR A FREE TRAINING CONSULTATION

rcstraining.com • 800-537-9863 • facebook.com/FRLARCSTraining

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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food SAFETY

DBPR – LISTERIA

LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

F

all is just around the corner, and it’s a great season to spend with friends and family, at home and out in restaurants or your favorite sports bar. But among all the excitement there might be one guest that might sneak in without an invitation and put a big damper on all the festivities — Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes is the foodborne bacteria that forced Blue Bell Creameries in 2015 to remove its entire product from the market and shut down its manufacturing plants until they had being thoroughly disinfected. It is unique among foodborne pathogens in that it continues to grow inside the refrigerator and even in the freezer. Listeria is commonly found in soil, water,and animals such as poultry and cattle. Produce can become contaminated when irrigated with contaminated water or when manure is used as a fertilizer. Foods at high risk of Listeria contamination include sprouts, deli meats, smoked seafood, hot dogs, soft cheeses, unpasteurized milk and dairy products made with unpasteurized milk. Listeriosis is the name of the disease caused by the consumption of foods tainted with the bacteria. Listeriosis symptoms include muscle 34  FA L L

2017

aches, nausea and diarrhea. In more serious cases, individuals may also experience headaches, neck stiffness, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions. Pregnant women, those with compromised immune systems, infants and the elderly are the groups most at risk. You should seek immediate medical treatment if you belong to one of these groups and begin to show some of these symptoms. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1,600 people contract listeriosis each year leading to approximately 260 deaths. Preventing cross contamination, cooking, washing and date marking are the main tools for controlling Listeria. Preventing cross contamination starts with food storage. Different types of raw animal products should be stored separately from each other and from ready-to-eat foods such as vegetables and food already cooked. Cleaning and sanitizing cutting boards, counters, utensils and even the inside of the refrigerator can eliminate the bacteria and reduce the chances of cross contamination. Fully cooking the food will destroy Listeria and other foodborne pathogens. It is important for cooks to be careful and avoid cross contaminating cooked food with raw

product; something that could very easily happen when removing and adding food to the grill. All fruits and vegetables should be washed before cutting, combining as an ingredient or eating raw. Remember that Listeria is commonly found in soil and consuming unwashed produce is extremely risky. Hands are the number one vehicle for cross-contamination and it is important to wash them before starting to work with food and at any other time when they become contaminated. Lastly, leftovers should be date marked before storing in the refrigerator. Since Listeria continues to grow even in cold temperatures, leftover food not consumed within 7 days should be discarded. Listeria monocytogenes should not be taken lightly. Following good sanitation practices will allow everyone to continue to enjoy the season without having unexpected guests spoil all the fun. Carlos Lezcano is the Statewide Training Manager, Division of Hotels and Restaurants; Sabrina Groover is the Training & Research Consultant, Division of Hotels and Restaurants; and Jose Quinones, Training and Research Consultant, Division of Hotels and Restaurants. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY KRISMEDVEDEVA / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

By CARLOS LEZCANO, SABRINA GROOVER AND JOSE QUINONES


T H E C U LT U R E O F F O O D S A F E T Y

food SAFETY

THE CULTURE OF FOOD SAFETY READIES FOR THE INSPECTOR By GEOFF LUEBKEMANN

M

any operators, even those that truly integrate food safety and sanitation into their daily operations, can view inspections as intrusive and disruptive at least, or terrifying at worst. This needn’t be the case, and if approached with perspective and preparation, can burnish your brand and bolster your bottom line. More and more frequently, social media are communicating inspection results, making this an excellent opportunity to shine. In addition to the reputational benefits, establishing a “culture of food safety” keeps money in your pocket and reduces costs. Operators that allocate training time and management attention to best operating practices — without regard to when the inspector may next appear — can drive lower food costs through better inventory awareness, peak performing equipment, and highly aware and engaged team mates. While DBPR inspects most types of food service twice a year, operators must be ready every day. Inspections are only a “snapshot” of that point in time, but the information will characterize you forever as a public record and on the internet. Inspection records are typically the first thing reporters and trial lawyers ask for, and they are accessible to everyone. A good inspection with few violations demonstrates to your patrons, the media and the entire internet that you do things right. Here are some tips to get you there: BEFORE THE INSPECTION: • Inspectors are extensively trained in laws and rules, food safety procedures, and receive mandatory continuing education — they are true subject matter experts. • Inspection observations are recorded electronically, making it easier than ever to track business performance. • Inspections are unannounced, and Florida law allows inspectors access at virtually any time — be sure that all staff know that inspector may not be denied entry. • Look for and verify a government ID or credential — scams abound.

FRL A .org

DURING THE INSPECTION: • The inspector will ask for the “Person In Charge” (PIC) prior to starting. This should be the highest ranking individual on-site, that is in control of and responsible for food activity • Don’t get stuck on terminology — the PIC may be an owner, manager, supervisor, lead worker, shift leader, key employee, etc. • It is a very good idea for the PIC to shadow the entire inspection; have a notepad, flashlight, and thermometer, take notes, write down inspector comments and suggestions — and any needed corrections • Be courteous and attentive, ask lots of questions, take lots of notes and ensure your understanding! AFTER THE INSPECTION: • REVIEW. Sit with inspector, review any violations, ask clarifying questions, understand needed corrections and deadlines. • SIGN. Be sure all employees know who is authorized to sign and where inspection reports go. Lost reports cause problems; better yet, establish an email for top managers to receive the report. • COMMUNICATE. Immediately share results with top managers to line up corrective action plans and needed resources. • PLAN. Within 24 hours, set up action steps and deadlines to address violations and recommendations. • EXECUTE. Monitor deadlines, be ready for next inspection. Know what to do if you are on a “24-hour callback.” Failure to correct these can result in a closure! Many of the tips included here are related to establishing a “culture of food safety” through “Active Managerial Control.” If you’d like help enjoying great inspection results and reaching the next level of food safety and sanitation, contact the experts at RCS Training to discuss customized training and consultation today. Geoff Luebkemann is the Vice President of Education and Training for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association.

FOUNDED IN 1984, RCS Training is a subsidiary of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA), and is Florida’s leader in providing risk management and regulatory compliance training programs to the state’s hospitality industry. Utilizing the SafeStaff® educational training materials and harnessing the resources of FRLA industry experts and former regulators, RCS Training is the largest and most respected firm of its kind in Florida. RCS Training also offers professional development training, which is a unique, proven approach to staff education that improves performance and increases efficiency and effectiveness. Customized to fit any industry, RCS High Performance Training is conducted from a “manage up” perspective. RCS Training guides trainees through a process to set attainable goals, identify steps to reach those goals, recognize behaviors that hinder progress, and overcome fears that cause failure. High Performance Training is available throughout the United States and Canada. For more details or to schedule training, contact Christy Crump, Director of Operations at ccrump@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

35


food SAFETY

DBPR – COOLING

PROPER COOLING OF FOOD A key factor in preventing foodborne illness

By JOSE QUINONES AND CARLOS LEZCANO

36  FA L L

2017

either the 70°F or the 41°F marks should be discarded. Heat treated TCS foods are not the only ones that need to be cooled properly. There is also ambient cooling, which refers to the cooling of foods when no heat is applied. It occurs when TCS food is prepared from ingredients at room temperature or when TCS food has been removed from cold holding for preparation. During ambient cooling food must be cooled to 41°F within a maximum of 4 hours. Monitoring the process is critical to achieve proper cooling and instituting a time/temperature written log can be an immensely helpful tool. The log emphasizes the importance of proper cooling, forces employees to timely monitor the process, and allows management to assess if the methods are working or need to be adjusted. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants has created several temperature monitoring charts. These charts can be found online at myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/hr/forms/sign_ and_charts.html#temp_monitoring.

To achieve proper cooling, adequate methods should be used such as:

Jose Quinones is the Training & Research Consultant, Division of Hotels and Restaurants and Carlos Lezcano is the Statewide Training Manager, Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

• Arranging the food containers in the refrigerated units to provide maximum heat transfer. Stacked containers will not permit cold air to reach all sides of the containers.

• D  ivide into small portions. The rate of cooling will increase if the volume of food in an individual container is smaller. • U  se shallow containers to provide a larger heat transfer surface. • Do not cover the containers to increase heat transfer from the surface of the food and allow heat to escape. • Stirring the food will prevent the formation of a dense film on the surface of the food that creates a barrier trapping the heat inside. • Using metal containers — foods cool faster in thin-walled, metal containers as opposed to thick-walled glass or plastic materials that act as insulators. • Using ice baths or adding ice as an ingredient. • Using rapid cooling equipment such as blast chillers or flash freezers.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY SNVV / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

M

ost food service employees recognize the importance of cooking potentially hazardous or time/temperature control for safety (TCS) food to eliminate harmful bacteria. Unfortunately, the importance of properly cooling the food is not as easily understood. The belief that the reheating process will eliminate any potential hazards is a myth that is difficult to dispel. In reality, not all bacteria may be eliminated during the cooking process, the food may be re-contaminated after cooking, and some bacteria might create spores or toxins that cannot be eliminated even when the food is reheated properly. The temperature danger zone is where microorganisms grow most rapidly, and it ranges from 135°F to 41°F. Cooling food safely requires removing heat from the food quickly to make the window of opportunity for microbial growth as small as possible. The Food Code dictates that heat treated TCS food must be cooled from 135°F to 70°F within the first two hours and from 135°F to 41°F or less within a total of 6 hours. The first two hours of the cooling process are the most critical. Food in danger of not reaching 70°F within the two hours should be reheated to 165°F and the process started anew. Food that fails to reach


E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

CITY

LOCATION

SEPT

OCT

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DEC

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

26

24

21

12

Ramada Inn

BOCA RATON

27

11

8

13

Hilton Garden Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

20

18

15

20

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

FORT LAUDERDALE

26

24

28

19

Crowne Plaza

FORT MYERS

7

27

2

12

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

21

19

9

14

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

5

3

14

5

Wyndham Garden Best Western Gateway Grand

GAINESVILLE

7

5

2

12

ISLAMORADA

18

16

20

-

JACKSONVILLE

19

25

8

13

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

21

17

14

5

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

5

3

7

6

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

8

12

8

LAKELAND

18

23

13

11

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

7

11

15

13

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

21

26

21

19

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

MIAMI SPANISH

19

10

7

5

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

NAPLES

14

5

16

14

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

21

19

16

19

Hilton

ORANGE PARK

6

13

17

14

Hilton Garden Inn

ORLANDO

1

2

1

5

Embassy Suites

PANAMA CITY

5

10

14

12

Gulf Coast State College

PENSACOLA

19

17

21

19

Hyatt Place Airport

PORT RICHEY

19

10

7

12

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

7

5

2

7

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

Islander Resort

Holiday Inn

ST AUGUSTINE

7

19

16

7

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

26

17

8

5

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

28

19

2

21

Hiltong Garden Inn Central

TAMPA

18

9

13

11

Hilton Garden Inn

WEST PALM BEACH

11

9

13

11

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

TALLAHASSEE

12

10

14

11

Hilton Garden Inn Central

-

24

2

12

Hilton Garden Inn

TAMPA - ENGLISH TAMPA - SPANISH

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

12

10

7

5

Ramada

WEST PALM BEACH

26

24

21

19

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

* Dates are tentative

food SAFETY

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

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food SAFETY

A N I M A L S I N R E S TA U R A N T S

A LEGAL ANALYSIS OF SERVICE ANIMALS IN RESTAURANTS By MARC A. MARRA

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e have all witnessed a person dining in a restaurant while a dog sits at their feet. This article explores issues concerning when a service animal is legally allowed in a restaurant, and seeks to provide an introduction as to the circumstances under Florida law whereby a restaurant owner may ask the dog (and its owner) to leave the premises. Restaurants are private enterprises. As such, a restaurant operator has a right to refuse accommodation to anyone, so long as the refusal is not based on discriminatory factors, including disability. In fact, a restaurant must make reasonable modifications in its policies, practices and procedures in order to accommodate individuals with disabilities. Violations of such requirements can expose the restaurant to legal consequences. Florida Statute §413.08 defines a “service animal” as one that is trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability. The statue limits the term “service animal” to a dog or miniature horse. But, you might be wondering, “Doesn’t a dog or miniature horse in a restaurant pose a health risk?” Actually, the answer is no. The Florida Department of Health Administrative Code related to food hygiene states that no live birds or animals (except for crusta-

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cea, shellfish and fish in aquariums) shall be allowed in a food service establishment, except as provided under Florida Statute §413.08 referenced above. So then, what does a restaurant owner need to know as it relates to service animals in their establishment? It is imperative that an owner recognize that the business cannot inquire as to the nature or extent of the person’s disability, or ask for proof that the animal is a service animal. However, the business can inquire if the animal is required because of a disability and what tasks the animal has been trained to perform. While service animals are allowed in all areas that customers can normally occupy, such as dining areas, the service animal must remain under the control of its handler. The business also has no obligation to supervise the

service animal nor provide it with food or care. Moreover, a restaurant may exclude or remove a service animal from the premises if it is not housebroken, and the business has no obligation to assist with cleanup in the event of an “accident.” In such a circumstance, however, the business must provide the disabled individual with the option of continuing access to the business without the service animal on the premises. Finally, the Florida Department of Health and the federal Food and Drug Administration both require restaurant employees to immediately clean their hands and exposed portions of their arms after handling a service animalbefore they can engage in food preparation or work with kitchen equipment. It is vital for Florida restaurant owners to ensure that they are protecting the health and safety of their patrons, while also recognizing the legal rights of disabled individuals who require the assistance of a service animal. By keeping their attorney’s contact information close, Florida restauranteurs can successfully navigate any challenge they may face in running their business. With the right legal counsel and the implementation of reasonable restaurant policies, there is no reason why restaurants and patrons with service animals cannot coexist and thrive. Marc A. Marra is a real estate and business attorney in the Fort Lauderdale office of Kelley Kronenberg, a full-service business law firm. Mr. Marra represents Businesses and Condominium and Homeowner’s Associations throughout South Florida in areas including vendor negotiations and day-today management. He may be reached at (954) 370-9970 or mmarra@kklaw.com.

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C F P U P D AT E

food SAFETY

UPDATE ON CFP ACTIVITIES RELATED TO RETAIL FOOD SAFETY By DR. DAVID MCSWANE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONFERENCE FOR FOOD PROTECTION

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he Conference for Food Protection (CFP) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving retail food safety in the United States. It brings together representatives of the food industry, government, academia and consumer organizations to identify retail food safety problems and make recommendations to solve them. Though CFP has no formal regulatory authority, it provides significant input into model retail food laws and regulations including the FDA Food Code. In May of 2016, CFP submitted 26 recommendations to FDA for changes in the 2013 Food Code. FDA conceptually agreed with 16 of these recommendations and they should appear in the 2017 Food Code and/or its Annexes. FDA partially concurred with the remaining 10 recommendations, and with some modification, they may appear in a future edition of the Food Code. Here are a few of the changes we expect to see in the 2017 Food Code. 1. Equipment and utensils can be dried with single-use, disposable towels after they are cleaned and sanitized using a high temperature dish machine. 2. A permit holder may continue operations during an extended interruption of water or electrical service provided: 1) the facility has a specific written emergency operating plan that has been approved by the regulatory authority, 2) a certified food protection manager takes immediate corrective action to eliminate, prevent or control risk/hazard in accordance with the approved plan, and 3) the permit holder informs the regulatory authority that the risk/hazard has occurred and that the emergency operating plan has been implemented. 3. The Person in Charge isn’t required to be a certified food protection manager if the regulatory authority deems the establishment poses minimal risk of causing or contributing to foodborne illness either at certain times of operation or based on the nature of food preparation. 4. A bandage, finger cot or stall located FRL A .org

on the wrist, hand or finger of a food employee working with exposed food must be covered with a single-use glove. 5. Reduced oxygen packaging (ROP) fish packaged at retail food establishments must be accompanied by a label indicating ROP fish is to be kept frozen until further use and removed from packaging before thawing, and food establishments must remove ROP fish from packaging before thawing. 6. Make the Food Code consistent with USDA Food Safety Inspection Service requirements by: 1) providing a new definition for Intact Meat, 2) clarifying which criteria apply to intact meat (cook to 145°F for 15 sec internal temperature), 3) revising the minimum cooking temperature that applies to mechanically tenderized and injected meats, from 155°F for 15 seconds to 155°F for 17 seconds, and 4) revising the minimum cooking temperature that applies to poultry from 165°F for 15 seconds to 165°F instantaneous. Seven Council Committees were created or recreated as a result of recommendations approved at CFP’s 2016 Biennial Meeting. COUNCIL I The Unattended Food Establishment Committee was recreated to develop recommendations on how the Food Code addresses unattended food establishments. The committee will review and update CFP’s “Guidance Document for Unattended Food Establishments” which states can use when approving a waiver or variance for entities that do not meet the Demonstration of Knowledge and Person in Charge provisions in the Food Code. The Clean in Place Committee was formed to: 1) review current literature, including applicable ANSI sanitation standards, for clean in place processes for equipment with inaccessible food contact surfaces and ascertain their compatibility with Food Code definitions and recommendations; and 2) conduct a survey to determine the current prevalence and processes used to evaluate CIP Equipment during inspections.

COUNCIL II The Employee Food Safety Training and Demonstration of Knowledge (DoK) committees were recreated to complete tasks started in 2014–16. The Employee Food Safety Training Committee will identify what a food employee should know about food safety (prioritized by risk) and develop a guidance document to include recommendations for appropriate operator, regulator, and/or third-party food safety training program(s). The Demonstration of Knowledge (DoK) Committee will identify the pros, cons and criteria for assessing alternative methods for the Person in Charge to Demonstrate Knowledge as required by the Food Code. COUNCIL III A Produce Wash Committee will review the science and public health impact associated with water treatment options to minimize cross-contamination when using a water bath for washing, rinsing, crisping, processing, and/ or other treatments of Raw Agricultural Commodities (RACs) and ready-to-eat (RTE) fruits and vegetables in food establishment. A Special Process Controls Committee will review the specialized processes, including curing and reduced oxygen packaging (ROP), to determine when and if food safety hazards could be controlled by a plan less than a full HACCP plan. A Mail-Order Food Safety Committee was created to develop a guidance document for food establishments that transport perishable food items directly to a consumer. The guidance document will include best practices related to proper packaging; temperature control during shipping, receiving and storage; return of compromised and abused products; and other food safety related topics. All Council Committees will be expected to report their findings and recommendations at the CFP’s 2018 Biennial Meeting to be held in Richmond, Virginia, from April 16–20, 2018. You’re encouraged to attend this meeting and participate in the vetting of new issues that are submitted for consideration. Feel free to visit the CFP web site at foodprotect.org for more information about CFP and the 2018 Biennial Meeting. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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It all began when a French cattleman bought a farm in Georgia… Fast forward to today. FPL Food is the Southeast’s one-of-a-kind source for sustainable, local beef. Family-owned and operated, we pair French provincial farming traditions with a dedication to providing quality beef. We proudly offer chefs a consistent supply of options, including vertically integrated beef. Great beef starts with a great story. This is ours.

southeastbeef.com

© 2017 FPL Food, LLC


S B A L O A N G R O U P PA R T N E R S H I P

SBA Loan Group and FRLA Announce Partnership

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he SBA Loan Group and FRLA recently announced a partnership to assist our industry by providing packaged small business loans. With 35 years of experience in assisting and obtaining SBA-backed loans, the SBA Loan Group can help FRLA members grow their businesses. SBA-backed loans with reasonable annual interest rates can help with acquisitions, expansion, remodeling, equipment purchase, working capital and more. If purchasing real estate, the loans can offer up to 90% financing. For more information about the SBA Loan Group, visit Jarret Prussin in the FRLA Booth, Booth 1701, at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show in Orlando, September 10 – 12, 2017 at the Orange County Convention Center. You can also reach him at (786) 686-5050 or visitsbaloangroup.com for more information.

2017 CORPORATE EVENTS CALENDAR

MARK YOUR CALENDARS AND GET PLUGGED IN

SAVE THE NEW DATE! NRA/FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC

FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW

OCTOBER 12

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

TH

ChampionsGate Golf Course Orlando, Florida

SEPTEMBER 10 TH–12 TH

FALL BOARD MEETING FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW’S OPENING NIGHT PREMIERE PARTY

SEPTEMBER 10 TH–11 TH

The FRLA hosts a full slate of industry events throughout the state. Visit www.frla.org and click on the orange button, “FIND A CHAPTER,” to get plugged in with your local FRLA Representative. For a full listing of FRLA corporate and regional events, visit www.frla.org/events.

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

SEPTEMBER 10 TH Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar Orlando, Florida Hosted by:

HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY SEPTEMBER 11 TH Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, Florida

VISITSPONSORSHIPS US IN THE FRLA AVAILABLE! CONTACT SALLY DAVIS AT 850.224.2250 EXT. 258 BOOTH 1701 AT THE SHOW! FRL A .org

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MARKETING TIPS

Make the Most of Your Beverage Menu By KIM O’MALLEY KURTH

“I’ll have one of those.”

How many times have your customers simply pointed to an image on a drink menu and ordered it? That’s the power of suggestive selling! A customer survey done by Next Level Marketing found that “fewer than 30% typically know what they’re going to drink before arriving at a restaurant. And 90% look at beverage menus before ordering.”* Make your drink menu work for you! Turn an order for a house margarita into a top shelf “Spiced Watermelon Margarita,” or a soda order into a “Sammie’s Strawberry Smoothie,” by engaging the customer with dynamic photography, catchy names and the right price. At Island Oasis, when it comes to drink photography, we believe in bold, vibrant and realistic. We carefully plan our photo shoots to ensure that we show how our products can be used in a wide range of applications so you can easily add the image to your menu and customize the name and price.

WHAT MAKES A DRINK MENU GREAT? • PRESENTATION IS KEY: Customers order with their eyes from the drink menu and then share what they see. A perfectly presented drink will make its way onto social media. Customers that snap and share can also tag your location and invite more friends to join them, increasing traffic and orders! • MAKE IT UNIQUE: Give your drink a custom name that means something to you and your customer. You can tie it into the type of food you serve, local points of interest, sports teams or even some of your favorite employees. • PRICING: Premium hand-crafted drinks can command a higher price point while happy hour drinks are intended to be value priced. Price it right and sell, sell, sell! A great drink menu with these three components will excite your customers and help increase your sales. A few simple changes can lead to big returns. Cheers. Kim O’Malley Kurth works with Kerry Foodservice as the Senior Brand Manager for Island Oasis. *Jack Robertiello, July 15, 2012

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Big Revenue Draws Sales Tax Issues For Restaurants and Hotel Industries

PHOTO BY STEVANOVICIGOR / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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lorida’s economy driver is tourism, in which the hotel, restaurant and related industries are a huge and constant source of revenue for the state. As the majority of this revenue is derived from state and local taxes, such as sales and hotel occupancy taxes, it should come as no surprise that these industries remain among the most heavily targeted industries for audits by the Florida Department of Revenue. Our law firm, focusing primarily on state and local tax representation, has seen the following recurring issues related to those industries. RESTAURANTS The Florida Department of Revenue (DOR) knows the quantity of alcohol and tobacco purchased by a restaurant. Armed with this information and a fancy estimation model, restaurants are continually audited by the DOR for sales tax by the hundreds. Other highly audited issues include gratuities, bakery items and tax exempt food items paired

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with taxable ones. Our firm regularly represents restaurants, bars and other related business against the Florida DOR during an audit, protest and litigation. Restaurants are also heavily targeted by the DOR for criminal investigation. Most sales tax-related arrests are in the restaurant or related industries. Many are unaware, but collecting just over $300 in sales tax without remitting it to the states is a third-degree felony. It can also be a second-degree felony for failing to remit $20,000 of collected sales tax and a first degree felony for over $100,000. If you or your business is under criminal investigation by the DOR, our firm can help. HOTELS This past year, in Sarasota Surf & Racquet Club Condominium Association, Inc. v. Sarasota County, Florida and Florida Department of Revenue, our firm claimed a victory for Florida’s hotel reservation industry against the county Tourist Development Tax and

Florida Sales Tax. Sarasota County attempted to impose the local Tourist Development Tax on the Sarasota Surf & Racquet Club based on reservation and cleaning fees charged to guests during the reservation process. Our firm fought for Florida taxpayers to ensure they are only charged local county tax on the cost of the room. The Law Offices of Moffa, Sutton, & Donnini, P.A. is a well-established, Florida-based state tax law firm serving clients throughout Florida since 1991. We have helped thousands of clients overcome tax burdens and problems in almost every Florida industry. Our firm’s primary practice area is Florida tax controversy, which means that we defend taxpayers against the Florida Department of Revenue, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, and any other state agency, from the initial audit notice through litigation. We also handle collection matters, revocation hearings and criminal investigations. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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“Our relationship with UnitedHealthcare pre-dates the turbulent challenges of the Affordable Care Act. They helped us navigate those waters with great success. And while uncertainty abounds in the current political and legislative environment, one thing is certain: We can rely on UnitedHealthcare to deliver solutions that will fit the ever-changing marketplace.” Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer Firehouse of America, LLC (dba Firehouse Subs) “We have had a positive relationship with UnitedHealthcare for over a decade. Offering health care coverage through the UnitedHealthcare vast network grants our employees great access to quality care. Claims are paid quickly and accurately, and additional services help our employees get engaged, manage their health, and control costs. UnitedHealthcare has been a great partner for TradeWinds Island Resorts.” Keith Overton, CHA, President TradeWinds Island Resorts

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U NIT

2017

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FRLA Supplier of the Year

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Why choose UnitedHealthcare?

ALTH CA R E

AM

In their own words:

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“As a growing independent family of restaurants in the highly competitive hospitality industry, we rely heavily on our partnership with UnitedHealthcare for their expertise and guidance in the protection and benefit coverage areas in which they are the experts. With a dedicated staff to respond to our inquiries and guide us on complex matters facing our business, UnitedHealthcare works closely with our insurance broker to provide us with a professional suite of services and the personal attention we have come to rely on. Our partnership with UnitedHealthcare comprises an invaluable component of our strategic and operational plans, and delivers the peace of mind that comes with knowing we have the coverage and resources we need so that we can devote our time to managing our business.” Michael Quillen, President Gecko’s Hospitality Group “As a small business, we rely on our vendor partners to help educate us in their areas of expertise – with the heart of a teacher. UnitedHealthcare does just that when it comes to health care coverage solutions for our restaurant employees and their families. With a dedicated team to serve the unique needs of the hospitality industry, UnitedHealthcare provides guidance and value every step of the way. UnitedHealthcare is a true partner.” Carlos Gazitua, President and Chief Executive Officer Sergio’s Restaurants

Find out why UnitedHealthcare is right for you. Contact your broker, the FRLA or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at (301) 865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

Insurance coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. D30115 9/17 ©2017 United HealthCare Services, Inc.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Want to Lower Your Workers’ Compensation Costs?

Try a Returnto-Work Program A → By ANDY TATUM, SAFETY & HEALTH MANAGER, ZENITH INSURANCE COMPANY ll employers want to lower their workers’ compensation premiums. One way to do that is with a return-to-work program. Nearly 30% of people who are injured on the job miss work. In 2015, more than a million lost-time workplace injury and illness cases resulted in over 8.5 million days of lost productivity nationwide. These injured employees missed an average of eight days of work.1 If an injured employee misses more than three months of work, the odds of ever returning drops by 50%.2

RETAIN EMPLOYEES AND REDUCE COSTS Studies show that 80-90% of people injured on the job would rather return to work than collect disability.3 Establishing a return-to-work program puts a business in a better position to harness that motivation, control claims costs and retain valuable employees. An effective return-to-work program also impacts workers’ compensation premiums. For Florida businesses with an experience modification (ex mod), having fewer claims and less claims costs compared with their industry average can earn them an ex mod score of less than 1.00 and a lower annual premium. When a business provides return-to-work transitional duty, employees receive regular wages, and a claim’s cost is reduced 70% before being included in the ex mod calculation. However, once lost wages are paid, 100% of the claim’s cost, up to a maximum, is included in the ex mod calculation. Because claims impact the ex mod for three years, reducing claims costs can lead to years of significant premium savings. At Zenith, we have found that effective return-to-work programs can reduce policyholder ex mods 4% annually, saving policyholders $4,000 for every $100,000 in annual workers’ compensation premium. Another way return-to-work programs minimize costs is by reducing litigation. It helps to offer injured employees assurance that their jobs are safe and that they’re valued employees. Further, statistics show that simply calling an injured employee within a week of their injury reduces the chance of a lawsuit by 50%.2 Make a return-to-work program part of your company’s workers’ compensation safety and claims management practices and help reduce claims costs and the overall costs of your insurance. REFERENCES: 1 News Release Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2016, November 10). 2 O'Halloran, B. (2011). The Dollars and Sense of Workers’ Compensation. Florida Underwriter. 3 Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010).

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AN EFFECTIVE RETURN-TOWORK PROGRAM INCLUDES: • A policy describing your company’s practices • Injury reporting procedures • Written transitional duty task lists • Sample employee transitional duty offer letter • Notifying and coordinating transitional duty with the treating physician and insurance carrier’s claims specialist • Calling the injured employee after the incident to follow up on care and offering transitional duty • Procedures for what to do when an employee fails to show or perform transitional duty tasks • Procedures to follow up on transitional duty tasks as restrictions change • Training for managers and employees

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SECRETS OF SUCCESS

victoria & albert’s By SUSIE MCKINLEY WITHCHEF SCOTT HUNNEL, EXECUTIVE CHEF AND CHEF AIMEE RIVERA, CHEF DE CUISINE Victoria & Albert’s is the only AAA 5-Diamond Restaurant in Central Florida and the ultimate in fine dining at Walt Disney World Resort. Diners are treated to an elegant dinner featuring Modern American cuisine with products sourced from around the globe and an award-winning wine list. The experience evokes another era when dining was an elegant ritual. PLEASE DESCRIBE THE EXPERIENCE OF DINING AT VICTORIA & ALBERT’S. With three

different experiences — the Dining Room, Queen Victoria’s Room and the Chef ’s Table in the kitchen — the dining room offers two options: a seven-course Chef ’s Tasting Menu or the Chef ’s Degustation Menu, a series of 10 small courses. The smaller Queen Victoria’s Room offers a 10-course menu paired with exclusive wines from the restaurant’s impressive cellar, and the Chef ’s Table offers seating for up to eight guests in the kitchen with a personalized menu.

PLEASE DESCRIBE YOUR SIGNATURE DISHES. With a wealth

of purveyors, there are no “signature” dishes, as the menu changes often

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with whatever is freshest at the market. Florida seafood often is on the menu, as well as tastes from around the globe, such as truffles from Italy, beef from Japan and octopus from Spain. Our talented chefs are just as excited about creating vegetarian and vegan dishes. PLEASE SHARE WITH FR&L READERS ABOUT THE NUMEROUS AWARDS VICTORIA & ALBERT’S HAS GARNERED OVER THE YEARS. For the 17th year in a row,

Victoria & Albert’s was awarded the coveted AAA Five Diamonds for 2017. There are just 47 AAA Five Diamond restaurants in the United States, with three in Florida — and Victoria & Albert’s is the only AAA Five Diamond restaurant in Central Florida.

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Victoria & Albert’s also was voted the No. 2 restaurant in the United States in TripAdvisor’s 2016 Travelers’ Choice awards. No. 2 out of 10, it is the only Florida restaurant on the illustrious list. It also is the recipient of Forbe’s Travel Guide Four-Star rating. In 2013, Zagat, the quintessential dining guide, released their list of “America’s Most Iconic Restaurants,” compiled by their editors — restaurants “that embody the essence of their city,” writes Zagat. Victoria & Albert’s is on the exclusive list (the only other Florida restaurant on the list is Joe’s Stone Crab in Miami). WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING VICTORIA AND ALBERT’S EMPHASIZES WITH STAFF ABOUT GUESTS? Our guests are sophisticated

and well-traveled and very knowledgeable about cuisine. We engage with them in a personal way during their dining experience, but also maintain the highest standards of five-diamond dining. We ask our guests for personal preferences, and cater to diners with specific dining restrictions and allergies. WHAT CRITICAL OR PRIORITY AREAS DO YOU EMPHASIZE IN TRAINING YOUR STAFF?

• Flavor is most important: It could be the most beautiful plate in the world, but it has to taste good. • Respect for the product: understanding the uniqueness of the products we bring in and that our kitchen staff gets to work with every day. Turbot can cost up to $900 for a single fish, for instance, and we purchase authentic Wagyu beef. • Teamwork: teamwork is extremely important in the environment of a small, quiet kitchen. Techniques and skills are more specialized than in an average kitchen, so the team has to work together to get top results. • Pride: doing it right not only when others are watching you, but at all times — because you care. • Attention to detail: very important at Victoria & Albert’s, and crucial to achieve the desired end product.

HOW DO YOU MANAGE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER?

We showcase upper mobility at Victoria & Albert’s. There have been numerous promotions from our award-winning kitchen, both in and out of The Walt Disney Company. Our team sees the results and knows that working here is an investment in the future. We strive to make every cast member feel that they are part of something BIG, and that their contribution is important to the operation. Constant cross training keeps the staff motivated and, at the same time, able to cover any areas in need. It’s a win-win! WHAT ARE VICTORIA & ALBERT’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS? A well-trained and respected staff, both

in the kitchen and in the front of the house; attention to detail from the first phone call to make a reservation; sourcing the finest ingredients from around the globe; a solid wine list and well-trained sommeliers; personal attention throughout the dining experience.

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ENGAGE

FRLA Engage Program Update

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association's Engage Initiative has spread from Central Florida to Tampa, Miami, Broward County, Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Southwest Florida, the Panhandle and the Palm Beaches. While some markets are in the early stages of setting up elected official introductory meetings and public affairs briefings with Align Public Strategies, many of our markets that have been established over the last year are extremely engaged at the local level. One major success to highlight during the spring was the VISIT FLORIDA rallies that took place all over the state with Governor Scott during the 2017 Legislative session to save VISIT FLORIDA funding. In all of our Engage markets, members attended roundtable discussions with the Governor and

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other local elected officials to discuss the importance of tourism marketing for the state of Florida. Due the to success and support of the hospitality industry, VISIT FLORIDA was able to receive full funding for this upcoming year. In each market, we have also made substantial steps at the local level, continuing to build relationships and get more involved. In Broward, Miami, Orlando and Jacksonville we have been present at multiple City/County council meetings and have had representatives present to speak on behalf of the hospitality industry on issues ranging from homelessness, short-term vacation rentals, food trucks, alcohol sale hours and more. During the months of July through September, we scheduled meetings with mayors and local elected officials in Tampa,

Palm Beach, Orlando and Tallahassee and will be scheduling more in other markets to make sure we are staying engaged in important discussions relevant to each local community. We will be highlighting Hispanic Heritage Month in September and FRLA Gives Back during the November–December months as we have in previous years. Because of the Engage program, we have noticed that not only do our local community leaders have a better understanding of what FRLA represents, but also call on our local members to help provide solutions. We are excited to continue growing our Engage program in the second half of 2017!

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Movers & Shakers Davis Named as FRLA’s Corporate Events Director Sally Davis has been named as FRLA’s new Corporate Events Director. Sally will be responsible for handling corporate events, sponsorships and other assigned membership duties. Sally, formerly the Executive Operations Representative with VISIT FLORIDA, was responsible for coordinating board meetings, CEO speaking engagements and special projects. She also comes with a strong background in graphic design and marketing campaigns. Welcome to the FRLA, Sally!

Greg Cook and Oliver Key Greg Cook, seven-year veteran of FRLA’s Board of Directors, has recently been promoted to the Area General Manager for Ritz-Carlton. In this role he will work closely with the Ritz-Carlton properties in Fort Lauderdale, Amelia Island and the W Fort Lauderdale. Oliver Key, of the FRLA Dade Chapter, has been promoted. He is the current General Manager at the St. Regis Bal Harbour and will oversee the W Hotels in Miami and Washington, D.C. Congratulations!

Jimmy Patronis Jimmy Patronis, Partner of Capt. Anderson’s Restaurant & Waterfront Market was appointed by Governor Rick Scott to serve as Florida’s Chief Financial Officer. Patronis was selected to replace Jeff Atwater who resigned before the end of his term to become Vice President at Florida Atlantic University. Jimmy Patronis assists in the management of the family-owned Capt. Anderson’s Restaurant & Waterfront Market in Panama City. FRLA is proud to recognize the Patronis family’s restaurant as an active and dedicated member of the Association for 47 years! 
The future is bright and our leadership team looks forward to working with our new CFO. Congratulations Jimmy! 50  FA L L

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Maxham Appointed to VISIT FLORIDA Industry Relations Committee Eileen Maxham, of RCS Training, has been appointed to the Industry Relations Committee for VISIT FLORIDA. Eileen brings intimate knowledge of Florida hospitality, with perspectives from many years in food and beverage operations, and currently as a veteran member of the RCS team. The Industry Relations Committee serves as the primary source of industry feedback and counsel on strategic matters related to industry communication and engagement, Partner development and participation, and customer relationship management. Eileen is an excellent addition to the Committee, and FRLA congratulates her on this service opportunity!

Around the World in 80 Stays Julian and Kim MacQueen will be the first to travel around the world in a HondaJet. Julian CEO and founder of Innisfree Hotels is also a pilot and has been a traveler all of his life. This will be the first time that a HondaJet has made this kind of journey. The MacQueens will visit Colombia, Ireland, Portugal, Turkey, Vietnam, New Delhi, Thailand, Australia, Japan and Russia among other places. Enjoy!

New FRLA Northeast Florida Chapter Director Appointed Nicole Chapman has recently been appointed as FRLA's Northeast Florida Chapter Director. Nicole comes from Visit Jacksonville where she was most recently the Senior Convention Services Manager. With Visit Jacksonville, Nicole also served in several other capacities working with events and partnerships. Nicole also has worked with the North Florida Hotel & Lodging Association as Administrator. She is a graduate of the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Recreation. Welcome, Nicole!

Dover Elected Chair of Florida Agricultural Center and Horse Park The Florida Agricultural Center & Horse Park (FHP) Board of Directors recently approved FRLA President/CEO, Carol B. Dover, to serve as its Chair. Dover, who has served on the FHP Board of Directors since its inception, fills the vacant Chair position for the remainder of the current term ending December 31, 2017. The Florida Agriculture Center and Horse Park is a 500-acre, multipurpose facility located in Ocala-Marion County that provides a world-class setting for equestrian events throughout the year. FHP provides the state and community with a facility to host outside, equestrian and non-equestrian events, giving preference to, and promoting education of, equine and agriculture related events. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


VISIT US IN THE FRLA BOOTH 1701 AT THE SHOW!


A LA CARTE

TOP TRENDS! PROTEIN 1. New cuts of meat 2. Sustainable seafood 3. House-made sausage 4. Free-range pork/poultry 5. Heritage-breed meats

Ocean Properties Opens Two New Resorts Ocean Properties opened two new resorts in the Sunshine State this summer: the Zota Beach Resort in Longboat Key that opened at the end of June and Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa in Jensen Beach was slated to open Labor Day weekend. We can’t wait to check them out! Congratulations!

RESTAURANT CONCEPTS 1. Chef-driven fast casual concepts 2. Food waste reduction 3. Meal kits 4. Pop-up/temporary restaurants 5. Food trucks

TRENDS HEATING UP Poke House-made charcuterie Street food-inspired dishes Food halls Ramen Breakfast burritos/tacos House-made condiments Lumberjack breakfast/fry-up

SOURCE: National Restaurant Association — Restaurant.org/FoodTrends 52  FA L L

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ZOTA BEACH RESORT

DBPR Plan Review Fee — Repealed!

Good news for licensees! The $150 plan review fee payable to the Division of Hotels and Restaurants was eliminated effective May 16, 2017! A plan review is still part of the process, and the need for the approved plan review has not changed, but now there is no associated cost. That’s money in our pocket! Thank you!

Kobe Steakhouse Wins Multiple 2017 Best Foodie Awards! FRLA Executive Committee member, Chau Nguyen's restaurant, Kobe Steakhouse won four of the Orlando Sentinel's 2017 Best Foodie Awards in Best Japanese, Best Steakhouse, Best Sushi, and Best Dinner Show in Central Florida. Kobe Steakhouse has several restaurants located throughout Central Florida in the Orlando and Tampa areas. Congratulations! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


PRICE GOUGING

The

ABCs of Price Gouging A

WHAT IS PRICE GOUGING?

Under Florida law, price gouging means that during a state of emergency, it is unlawful to sell, lease, offer to sell, or offer for lease essential commodities for an amount that grossly exceeds the average price for that commodity during the 30 days before the declaration of the state of emergency, unless the seller can justify the price by showing increases in its costs or market trends. WHAT ITEMS ARE COVERED BY THE PRICE GOUGING STATUTE? Under Florida Statute 501.160,

B

PHOTO BY JACOBLUND / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

essential commodities, such as dwelling units, including hotel rooms, self-storage units, food, ice, gas, generators and lumber are the items covered by the price gouging statute. But the price gouging statute also covers any good or service, material, merchandise, supplies and equipment.

C

WHAT IS A DECLARATION OF A STATE OF EMERGENCY? A

state of emergency is an executive order by the governor of Florida that responds to fires, floods, hurricanes, and other natural disasters or potential disasters.

D

HOW DO I KEEP TRACK OF STATES OF EMERGENCY? It’s

not easy to keep track of when the governor FRL A .org

By EDWARD J. PAGE, SHAREHOLDER, CARLTON FIELDS, P.A.

signs a state of emergency, but it is possible with a little work. Most states of emergencies are published in many newspapers. And it’s possible to verify states of emergencies in Florida by visiting www.myflorida.com and searching for state of emergency in the searchable window provided. So far in 2017, Governor Scott has declared one state of emergency in 2017 for wildfires in executive order 17-120. His last executive order in 2016 was 16-230, which dealt with Hurricane Matthew.

E

IS PRICE GOUGING A CIVIL OR CRIMINAL MATTER? Florida

law makes price gouging a civil matter, not a criminal matter. But civil matters have civil monetary penalties. These penalties are stiff for price gougers under Florida law; for example, violators of the price gouging statute are subject to civil penalties of $1,000 per violation and up to a total of $25,000 for multiple violations committed in a single 24-hour time period. HOW ARE PRICE GOUGING CIVIL CASES BROUGHT AND CONCLUDED? The Florida Attorney

F

General’s Office (AGO) investigates allegations of price gouging and issues investigative subpoenas to determine if price gouging has occurred. The AGO compares

the reported price of the commodity or service during the declared state of emergency to the average price charged over the 30-day period before the state of emergency. If there is a “gross disparity” in the prices, it’s considered price gouging. AG price gouging investigations are resolved in various manners including civil penalties, assurances of voluntary compliance, civil complaints and closure if the price gouging complaint is unfounded. HOW DO I AVOID BEING SCRUTINIZED FOR PRICE GOUGING BY THE AGO? Hotels, gas

G

stations and other vendors employ a number of techniques to avoid being scrutinized for price gouging during states of emergencies. First, they watch for and monitor states of emergencies even when the hurricane season is not active. Second, they closely monitor their pricing during states of emergencies to ensure their prices do not escalate too much from the prices they charged for the same item during the thirty days before the state of emergency. Third, they compare the prices they are charging during states of emergency to the prices they charged for the same item in the same time period the year before as a guide to ensure they are compliant with Florida’s price gouging statute. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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P R O S TA R T

ProStart Teachers Go Back to College During Summer Break FRLA Educational Foundation Hosts 21st Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute at Johnson & Wales University

I

n Tallahassee, 94 Florida ProStart instructors went back to college to become students again for one week during their summer vacation. The teachers participated in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation’s (FRLAEF) 21st Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute June 18–23, 2017. This event was once again held at Johnson & Wales University’s (JWU) North Miami Campus. Participating instructors are involved in teaching FRLAEF’s two-year ProStart School-to-Career curriculum which is designed to prepare high school students for careers in the foodservice industry. ProStart instructors participated in the weeklong event to fine-tune their culinary skills so they are better prepared to teach their students. While the teachers were able to have a little fun, there was no skipping class! They spent countless hours hitting the books and studying hard. The teachers were divided into four groups based on their past attendance at the event. First year attendees learned the basics of cooking methods, stocks and sauces as well as knife skills. Second year

UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

54  FA L L

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ProStart instructors covered topics such as nutrition, breakfast foods, meat, poultry and seafood. There was no slacking off as third year participants learned about salads and garnishing, desserts and baked goods along with global cuisines. The fourth-year attendees finished off their experience with athletic performance and nutrition, farm-to-table understanding basics of gardening and food as well as nutrition and recipe analysis. All participants then participated in a capstone market basket and critique followed by a national exam for the Certified Secondary Foodservice Educator (CSFE) certification. The instructors will take the information learned during the weeklong training back to the classroom and share it with their students. This event would not be possible without the support of the FRLAEF’s partners. The FRLAEF would like to thank Global Sponsor Johnson & Wales University along with Universal Sponsors FRLA Tallahassee Chapter, Keiser University, and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF).

GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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FRLA GIVES BACK

Support

W

hen you work in the food and beverage service industry, a life-altering circumstance like a medical diagnosis, a car accident or a house fire can quickly become unmanageable financially and emotionally. Luckily, for those employees caring for children, CORE can provide support. CORE is a national 501(c)(3) organization that supports children of food and beverage service employees navigating life-altering circumstances. Since 2004, CORE has provided support to over 200 families across the country and the industry and raised over $2.5 million. When a food and beverage service family struggles to stay afloat during a medical diagnosis or family death, accident, or loss of home from fire or natural disaster, CORE helps them stay on top of house payments, bills, and medical or equipment costs. CORE can purchase clothing and toys, or send food and other necessities. When a child passes away, CORE can pay for a funeral or memorial, or help plan a family retreat to grieve. CORE knows that the core of the food and beverage service industry is the food and beverage service employees and the families they work to support, and the core of these families is the children. The Martin-Phillips family became a part of CORE in May 2017, after Skylar Martin was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as a 15-year-old freshman from Wilmington, North Carolina. Skylar’s mom Jennifer Phillips works at Indochine Restaurant in Wilmington. Skylar was diagnosed with ALL the day before Thanksgiving 2016, and is currently in treatment at North Carolina Cancer Hospital in Chapel Hill while 56  FA L L

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he waits to start his CAR-T immunotherapy trial at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Once CHOP is ready and prepared for Skylar, he will return for the transfusion. If all goes well, the treatment will be outpatient, but the family will have to remain in Philadelphia for six weeks for weekly clinic visits and observation. After this is all said and done, not only will Skylar be in remission, he will be cured! CORE supported the Martin-Phillips by paying for two months of their mortgage and helping pay for some bills and utilities while Skylar is in treatment. Before his diagnosis, Skylar played on his high school’s varsity football team and was looking forward to the upcoming season. Although his football career is on hold for now, Skylar hasn’t lost his positivity, and during treatment at the Chapel Hill Clinic he’s called the Mayor because of his bright spirit and great personality. A huge Carolina Panthers football fan, CORE arranged a special treat for Skylar — on June 9, Skylar was one of the kickball team captains for the Cam Newton Foundation’s Kicking It With Cam! Celebrity Kickball Tournament! At the tournament, Skylar got to meet Cam and other Carolina Panthers players and spend an amazing day with the team and his mom. Interested in helping CORE support a family like the Martin-Phillips? There’s a way for everyone to support CORE and give back to our own! You can refer a food and beverage service family for support at COREgives.org, become a COREporate Member or Ambassador, or host your own promotion or event to benefit CORE. For more information, visit us at COREgives.org or call (404) 655-4690. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FRL A .org

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MEMBERSHIP REGIONS & STAFF HOLMES

ESCAMBIA

JACKSON

SANTA ROSA

OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

BAY

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION

DIXIE

DANNETTE LYNCH DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

HILLSBOROUGH, LAKE, PINELLAS, POLK, SPACE COAST, SUNCOAST, VOLUSIA

dannette@frla.org

727.642.3404

CORKEY BERGAMO NICOLE CHAPMAN

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

LEVY MARION

727.953.6803

VOLUSIA LAKE

CITRUS SUMTER

904.880.6964

561.410.0035

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO ORANGE

NORTHEAST FLORIDA

PASCO

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH POLK

PINELLAS

JODI CROSS

PUTNAM FLAGLER

nchapman@frla.org

904.5742259

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

CITRUS, MARION, NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

cbergamo@frla.org

904.993.6287

CLAY

LAFAYETTE

INDIAN RIVER

PALM BEACH & TREASURE COAST MANATEE

jcross@frla.org

239.339.7692

561.744.7669

SAINT LUCIE

MARTIN CHARLOTTE

2017

MONROE

nlowe@frla.org ESCAROSA

cmobley@frla.org CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

MARJORIE STONE 58  FA L L

COLLIER

MARCO ISLAND

ROSIE RICCARDI

850.524.1747

PALM BEACH

BROWARD

888.612.7115

BAY, FORGOTTEN COAST, NORTHWEST FLORIDA, TALLAHASSEE

COREY MOBLEY

407.304.8773

HENDRY

MONROE

lhernandez@frla.org

NICK LOWE

850.375.8373

GLADES

lcroft@frla.org

LYNNE HERNANDEZ

850.661.4256

HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

LEE

305.710.3962

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

DESOTO

LOIS CROFT

BREVARD

CENTRAL FLORIDA

mstone@frla.org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2017  
Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Fall 2017  

The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hote...

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