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2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

NEW 2017 FRLA CHAIRMAN

Don Fox CEO, Firehouse of America, LLC SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION Soc ial Media, POS, Tips & Lodging HOT MENU TRENDS Locally Sourced Tops the Chef Survey Results Meet Your 2017 Executive Committee

WINTER 2016–17 | WWW.FRLA.ORG


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contents W I N T E R 2 016 W W W.FR L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4 Food for Thought Florida’s Hospitality Industry is Strong From the Chairman’s Desk Proud of Our Industry 4   8 Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 10  Path to Power Don Fox, CEO of Firehouse of America, LLC 11  FRLA’s 2017 Chairman of the Board Meet Don Fox 12  Sustainability Panacea Oyster Co-op Has Big Plans 14  Chefs that Sizzle Lucy Buffet, Founder, LuLu's Sunset Grill 15  Fall Board Meeting 16  Dine Out Bringing Locals Back to Wynwood 18 Gala & Hospitality Awards Stars of the Industry 24  CORE Helping Children of Restaurant Employees 24  Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Product Showcase 25  Better Stewards Brilliant Nights Offers Turtle-Friendly Lighting 33  Engage Statewide Momentum 41  Movers and Shakers | Top Trends What’s Happening With FRLA and The Industry

Prostart Perspective of a Mentor 48  FRLA’s Corporate Calendar 49 

SPECIAL FEATURES

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26

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VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

Putting the Power of Discovery in the User’s Hands

FRLA’s Tech Edition

Discover Technology Trends Economic Development

Rediscovering Your Florida Main Streets

34  Year in Review

2016 Was a Great and Inspiring Year for FRLA

36  Regulation

FDA Changes Tobacco Regulation

Health Care 38 

Business Matters 39 

A La Carte 43 

2017 FRLA Executive Committee 44 

Resilience 47 

Take Advantage of Exclusive Health Care Pricing and Solutions

Take Control of Your Worker’s Compensation, Take Control of Your Bottom Line Industry Information You Need to Know Get to Know Your Leadership Team Post-Matthew Florida Is “Open For Business”

ON THE COVER: 2017 Chairman of the Board, Don Fox – CEO of Firehouse of America, LLC. Photo by Craig O'Neal

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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FROM THE CHAIRMANS DESK

Florida’s Hospitality Industry is Strong

By CAROL B. DOVER

Reflecting on the achievements of the past year, I am inspired by the significant influence the hospitality industry has in our communities. Through the outstanding work of our dedicated hospitality industry employees, the Sunshine State continues to enjoy record-breaking visitors each year who generate billions of dollars in economic activity. FRLA hosted more than 150 events this year ranging from local chapter, corporate and instate tourism marketing events. See our Year In Review (page 34). The resiliency of Florida’s tourism industry was tested this year. I am humbled and overwhelmed by our industry’s ability to band together during critical times. After weathering the hurricanes, we provided lodging and meals for evacuees and utility workers and toured impacted areas (page 47). In the wake of tragedy, more than 1,500 restaurants came together to support Dine Out for Orlando United raising more than $800,000 to benefit victims of the Pulse nightclub tragedy. Working with Florida Governor Rick Scott, we participated in roundtable discussions to address the Zika virus issue and helped coordinate Dine Out for Wynwood (page 16). At the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Installation and Awards Gala, we honored

first responders who risked their lives during the response to the Pulse nightclub tragedy, recognized all who supported Dine Out for Orlando United and celebrated the stars of Florida’s hospitality industry. We inducted the following hospitality icons into our prestigious Hall of Fame: Julian MacQueen as Hotelier of the Year; Manny Garcia III, as Restaurateur of the Year; and Island Oasis, Supplier of the Year (page 18). Looking forward to next year, our 2017 Chairman of the Board shares a vision of continued success for the FRLA. Don Fox, CEO of Firehouse of America, LLC, has been a dynamic leader in the restaurant business for decades, beginning his career as an entry-level employee for an independent Italian restaurant 42 years ago. I encourage you to take a moment to learn more about our next Chairman’s passion for the industry (page 11). We’re grateful for the strong foundation Lino Maldonado has laid during his service as our 2016 Chairman of the Board. Through his leadership, FRLA has navigated through numerous achievements and overcome diverse challenges. I am confident that Don and our talented 2017 Executive Committee will reinforce Lino’s achievements. Learn more about our incoming leadership (page 44).

With the support of more 10,000 members, our team continues to work tirelessly to protect your business through legislative advocacy, education, training and legal compliance as well as promote relationships through local chapters and grassroots efforts. I am excited about the opportunities 2017 will present to the industry and our organization. Our industry will face new challenges, and your active participation will be crucial to carry forward our successes. Thank you for your continued engagement and efforts on behalf of our industry. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Proud of Our Industry

As I reflect on this past year, my mind is filled with thoughts of how truly extraordinary the people of our industry are. Considering that record-breaking tourism numbers weren’t even the biggest headlines we faced as a state, I am deeply moved by the quality and compassion of our industry family. 4  W I N T ER

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We kicked off the year with an incredible turnout at Tourism Day, where passionate ambassadors of our industry — from front line staff to senior leadership of companies and every associate in-between — campaigned through the halls of the Florida State Capitol, raising awareness for legislation that directly impacts the restaurant and lodging industry, and further, the power of this organization. In the first half of 2016 alone, the Florida tourism industry welcomed 57.4 million visitors, simultaneously shattering longstanding records and facing evil adversity unlike anything we have had to before. At the end of the day it was again our people that rose to the occasion as they do day in and day out to create magical experiences for others. A special thanks to Governor Rick Scott and our legislators for not only recognizing the importance our industry has to the state, but for

By LINO MALDONADO

providing us the tools and resources required to grow it. To Will Seccombe for his support of the FRLA and his tireless efforts on our behalf to share our story with the world. And last but not least, our very own Carol Dover and her team at the FRLA. We are truly blessed to have such a great group of focused professionals advocating on our behalf! Lastly, as I look ahead to the coming year, I can tell you that our association will be on FIRE! Primarily due to our incoming Chair, Mr. Don Fox, CEO of Firehouse of America, LLC — one of the fastest growing brands in the country! He is a passionate advocate of our industry and no doubt will lead us into another record-breaking year!

Lino Maldonado 2016 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


CHAIRMAN

Lino Maldonado ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals VICE-CHAIR

Don Fox Firehouse of America, LLC SECRETARY-TREASURER

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Fort Lauderdale DIRECTORS

Chau Nguyen Kobe Japanese Steakhouse

Pam Avery Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore, Tampa

Paul Hineman First Watch Restaurants, Sarasota IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee PRESIDENT/CEO

Carol B. Dover, FMP EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley EMAIL: EDITOR@FRLA.ORG PUBLISHED BY

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MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion d effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


VISIT FLORIDA Puts the Power of Discovery in the User’s Hands Immersive Trip-tuning Technology By Nelson Mongiovi VISIT FLORIDA first launched the Florida Beach Finder online search tool in 2014 as a way to showcase the state’s beaches to visitors from around the globe. Here’s how it works: Visitors can “tunet” their preferences in four ranges of beach personalities. Looking for action-packed, secluded or maybe somewhere in between? The Florida Beach Finder immediately delivers visual choices that best match users’ desires. With every tweak of the tuner, the options change before their eyes. Next, they can “walk” the Florida beaches they love with immersive Street View imagery in Google Maps. In one of the first partnerships of the Street View Trekker Loan Program, VISIT FLORIDA and Google collaborated to train and equip our local teams with their high-tech, 40-pound, backpack-mounted, 360-degree panoramic camera. Over the four months of the project, these teams took nearly 15 million pictures as they trekked Florida’s 825 miles of beaches. The same technology that lets viewers mouse around their city streets and tour monuments now empowers Florida beach lovers to view the sand, sky and shorelines of the beaches they choose to explore — all in 360-degree panorama. To date, the Florida Beach Finder has attracted more than 260 million views on Google and VISITFLORIDA.com. The success of the Florida Beach Finder prompted VISIT FLORIDA to create another finder on the TripTuner platform which launched in May — this time featuring the state’s unique and diverse attractions. Similar to the Beach Finder, the Florida Attractions Finder has four separate settings that can be adjusted depending on the user’s vacation w w w.FRL A .org

preferences: from thrill to chill, popular to hidden gem, high-tech to natural, and days to hours. The interface then matches the user with an attraction, which could be an internationally recognized theme park or an off-the-beaten path experience. Point-of-view videos send users careening and diving on the newest roller coasters, zip-lining over alligators or skimming the Everglades aboard an airboat. Whether visitors are looking for a first-time Florida experience or wishing to repeat their favorite Florida vacation moment, the Florida Attractions Finder puts the power of discovery in the user’s hands. The goal of the Finders is two-fold — to give people an immersive and highly visual sampling of Florida’s diverse offerings and entice them to experience it for themselves by planning the exact vacation they’ve always wanted. To view for yourself, go to VISITFLORIDA.com/beachfinder and Vav. And stay tuned, VISIT FLORIDA hopes to create additional Finders that will showcase Florida’s wide array of dining and lodging options. Nelson Mongiovi is the Director of Marketing Operations at VISIT FLORIDA.

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Photo credit Mike Gilbert CAT Country 107.1.

Check frla.org/great-florida-events for more information about our upcoming events! Don't miss any of our Great Florida Events coming up in 2017.

Island Hopper continued the fun in the sun of summer at their 10-day three-city songwriters' festival.

The 53rd annual Florida Seafood Festival welcomed thousands in Apalachicola.

The Friday Night Block Party and Downtown Getdown brought thousands of fans to downtown Tallahassee.

The Nashville Songwriters played tunes for Labor Day fans on Okaloosa Island.

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The Nashville Songwriters moved from Okaloosa Island to Sandestin in October for a great event.

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Photo by Michael Cork Blast on the Bay in Port St. Joe crushed attendance records.

Paul Montgomery of Charles Atkins and The P&W Trio at the first-ever Florida Jazz and Blues Festival in Tallahassee.

Florida FanFest was a big hit at Church Street Station.

The chefs of Cows 'N Cabs were ready for action in Winter Park.

CORE supports children of food + beverage employees navigating life-altering circumstances/conditions. Learn how you can help at COREgives.org

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Don Fox FIREHOUSE OF AMERICA, LLC, JACKSONVILLE FRLA 2017 CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? Like one third of Americans, my very first job was in the restaurant business. At the age of 16, I was a dishwasher in an independent Italian restaurant in New Jersey. Though my original aspiration was to be a musician, I never left the restaurant business. And nearly 43 years later, I love it more than ever.

effort and a good plan, nothing is out of your reach.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? I quickly discovered that those who work hard

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? At the

and strive to learn can enjoy success and advancement in this industry. If you treat every day as an opportunity to both prove your value to the team and increase your knowledge and proficiency, the opportunities for improving your life are nearly unlimited.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? I have never had a mentor

in the traditional sense. Throughout my life, I have taken care to observe the successes and failures of others (and often, the latter provides the most valuable lessons). At each stage of my career, there have been individuals from whom I have captured more than they would have ever realized. Outside of the restaurant industry, a key figure in my life has been (retired) Brigadier General Albin Irzyk. I came to know him through my book Patton’s Vanguard – The United States Army Fourth Armored Division. I have never personally known another person with his leadership qualities.

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What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? A fundamental belief that with enough work,

most basic level: If you do the right thing, then good things happen. Call it karma. But when you give unselfishly, without an expectation for anything in return ... amazing things can happen.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? The front line

employees are the backbone of our businesses. We invest millions in our hotels and restaurants, but without talented, dedicated people who breathe life into those structures, we are throwing our money down the drain. In the end, our business thrives because of the experiences we provide. And those experiences are a direct result of the commitment and passion that team members have for the company the work for and the brand they represent. During my year as Chairman, if there is one thing above all else that I would hope to accomplish, it would be to inspire operators to value their team members and treat them in a way that sincerely reinforces their value to our industry. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Meet FRLA’s 2017 Chairman of the Board Don M. Fox ,CEO, Firehouse of America, LLC

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on Fox is Chief Executive Officer of Firehouse of America, LLC, in which he leads the strategic growth of Firehouse Subs, one of America’s leading fast casual restaurant brands. He also serves as its chief spokesperson, sits on various boards of influence in the restaurant community, and is a respected speaker, commentator and published author. Don’s restaurant career started 42 years ago as an entry-level employee for an independent Italian restaurant in New Jersey. In 1980, he relocated to Florida with Burger King Corporation, which led to a 23-year career with the national chain. Don served in a variety of positions, from restaurant management and field operations, to R&D and new concept development. He joined Firehouse Subs in 2003 as director of franchise compliance. He was promoted to chief operating officer in 2005 and was named chief executive officer in 2009. Under his leadership, the brand has grown from 65 restaurants to more than 1,010 restaurants in 44 states, Puerto Rico and Canada, and is consistently recognized as one of the best franchises in the country. Don is a mainstay at restaurant industry events and is often involved both behind the scenes and as an expert panelist. He was named Operator of the Year by Nation’s Restaurant News in 2011, joining a long list of restaurant w w w.FRL A .org

luminaries. Most recently, Don was ranked No.1 on FastCasual.com’s 2013 Top 100 Movers & Shakers list and received the prestigious Silver Plate award from the International Food Manufacturers Association (IFMA). Fox gives back to the restaurant community through active participation on various boards of influence, and is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Restaurant Association (NRA). In 2013, NRA awarded Don with its Advocacy Leadership Award. Don is also the 2017 incoming chairman of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association. A published author, his most notable work is Patton’s Vanguard – The United States Army Fourth Armored Division, a history of General Patton’s most famed division. Industry and Community Service: • Board of Directors, National Restaurant Association (NRA) • Chair, NRA Advocacy Strategy Committee • Vice Chair, Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) • Fast Casual Industry Council Steering Committee (NRA) • Advisory council member, Restaurant Leadership Council • Advisory board member, Technomic, Inc. • Advisory board member, Fast Casual Executive Summit • Advisory Board Member, Flagler College • Advisory Board Member, Student Aces F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

Panacea Oyster Co-op Has Big Plans Oyster Ranchers South of Tallahassee Offer Sustainable Alternative

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or generations, people have harvested oysters by digging or tonging them out of oyster beds. As Florida continues to experience diminishing oyster production in an area that once thrived on oyster harvests, a group of Panacea oyster ranchers have joined to create a sustainable legacy for their community and Florida’s world-renowned oyster industry. “Together, we are working with nature to revive our local community and environment,” said Rob Olin, Panacea Oyster Co-op

co-founder. “This is our community, and we want to see it thrive.” The Panacea Oyster Co-op is poised to be the largest oyster ranch in Florida. There are 38 leases covering more than 50 acres that are managed by dedicated ranchers who hand-raise their oysters from spat to the day they are pulled from the water. Ranched oysters live in specially designed cages attached to lines submerged in the water and above the sea floor. This environment allows the bivalves to move with the tide, taking in the “salad bar” of organisms that live in the waters, and in return, clearing the water ways and replenishing natural sources. The result of this ranching process is a crafted, premium oyster that is meatier, firmer and upholds the unique taste qualities of its natural environment. The difference is evident in its taste, as well Chef Art Smith takes time for a photo with Dan Murphy, FRLA, as its appearance. Rob Olin, Panacea Oyster Co-Op, and guests after enjoying oysters and dinner at Table 23 in Tallahassee. The thinner shell 12  W I N T ER

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is not only more aesthetically pleasing, but it also makes shucking easier and lowers shipping costs due to its lighter weight. “The taste and appearance elevates this to a high-end product that is tailored to a fine-dining experience,” said Olin, who is also a lease owner. When at full production, the Panacea Oyster Co-op anticipates it will be producing tens of millions of oysters per year and employing hundreds. “We are working to reinvigorate a community,” said Olin. “This co-op will help support a struggling economy, provide job opportunities and resurrect the Panacea area as the aquaculture community it once was.” The Panacea Oyster Co-op began wholesale operations October 1. To place an order or arrange a visit to the leases, contact Rob Olin at 850-378-1000.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Lucy Buffett FOUNDER, LULU'S SUNSET GRILL Lucy Buffett is the “Crazy Sista” to world-famous and loved singer, songwriter and entrepreneur, Jimmy Buffett. Growing up on the Gulf Coast, she learned to love to cook and entertain. Lucy opened her first restaurant LuLu’s Sunset Grill on Week’s Bay, Alabama, and a few years later moved her operation to Gulf Shores, Alabama. LuLu’s now has two locations, in Gulf Shores and Destin, feeding and entertaining over a million folks a year. Describe your restaurant concept. I like to call LuLu’s a

“high-class” dive. Actually, the first LuLu’s was ALL dive! It showcased Gulf Coast cuisine, specifically the time-honored recipes of my grandmother in an atmosphere reminiscent of the great Bahamian waterfront restaurants that I encountered along my travels in the Caribbean. From the beginning, I wanted a place that was FUN, where folks could escape as if they were on vacation with great food, live music and impeccable Southern hospitality.

What are your most popular menu items? Our top-selling items are the Big Fry Seafood Basket with Fried Shrimp, Crab Claws, Oysters and Fried Flounder (or Grilled Mahi-Mahi) and the Specialty Cheeseburger with our “Pamenna” Cheese, Bacon and Fried Green Tomatoes! For the meat lover, our burgers are some of the best, just above our Mahi-Mahi Tacos. What is your “sizzle”? Without a doubt, my signature dish is sea-

food gumbo, a homage to the Gulf Coast cuisine of my childhood. I learned how to cook it when I was a young adult, inspired by my Buffett grandmother. As I’ve grown up, I’ve embraced all types of cuisines. Personally, I also enjoy lighter fare including stir-fry dishes and light curries used in Asian-style cuisine. As a lover of all things reminiscent of classic Mexican food, LuLu’s menu reflects that with great fish tacos and various renditions of quesadillas and nachos, including blackened shrimp and crabmeat.

Currently, what is your favorite ingredient? What a great

question! There are so many I enjoy, but I would have to go with shrimp for my “go to” when I want to create a new dish. Cilantro is my favorite herb, and nothing can take a bland dish to appetizing like a little ole plain salt and pepper! But creole seasoning may be my most used seasoning.

Describe your efforts to serve all of your guests. Your menu accommodates guests with allergies and gluten intolerance. At the end of each season, we meet with our man-

agers to recap and determine what could be improved upon for the whole concept, not just the menu. It’s important to our success

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that we keep up with trends, technology and restaurant resources. The allergy menu is the result of us wanting to accommodate the gluten-free movement and that has evolved into the extensive allergy menu we have today. It’s hard to execute, but we found a way. It’s gratifying to hear positive feedback from our guests with food issues who struggle to find safe dining experiences. Beyond our allergy menu, I’m a stickler when it comes to giving a customer whatever they need. At LuLu’s, we welcome any substitution or special request and will do whatever we can to make dining with us enjoyable. That is the heart of our philosophy. Your beverage selection is fantastic! What is your best seller? I love to tell folks that the No.1 item with the highest vol-

ume per unit of sales is iced tea! That’s one that they don’t think of, but it is indicative of the family nature of our restaurant. It also speaks volumes to being Southern. After that, long neck bottled beers — Bud Light and Miller Lite — alternate in sales, and my Crazy Sista Honey Ale comes in a big third. Our frozen cocktails are also popular, as are our margaritas. We are now offering mocktails too. How have you become successful in the restaurant business? There are so many ingredients that have gone into this

big ole successful pot of gumbo I call LuLu’s. But if I had to boil it down to one underlying theme and word, it would be RESPECT. I respect the choice my customers have made to come to my establishment, and I want them to have an exceptional experience — as if I’ve invited them into my own home. Equally important, is that I respect my team, and they respect each other. We are equal and in this together. My commitment to them is this: If you will take care of LuLu’s, our customers and each other, then LuLu’s will take care of you.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


BOARD MEETING

2016 Chairman of the Board Lino Maldonado addresses board members.

Rick Thompson of Zenith Insurance addresses the FRLA Government Relations Committee.

Richard Turner, Meghan Horne and Jason Reynolds of the FRLA Government Relations team.

FRLA Government Relations Committee Chair Cathie Koch, Bloomin' Brands.

FRLA Fall Board Meeting

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Left to right: Allied Member Chairs and Executive Committee Liaison Marilyn Arnall, Florida Power & Light; Dan Murphy, FRLA; Angela Borthwick, Zenith Insurance; Pam Avery, Quorum Hotels & Resorts w w w.FRL A .org

he FRLA Fall Board Meeting, in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show, joined together board members, chapter presidents and representatives, past state chairmen, FRLA allied members and at-large directors from large and small national restaurant and hotel chains and top independents. Board meetings are an opportunity for members to gather and discuss hospitality issues and ways to continue to make the association thrive. FRLA Board meetings are held twice a year in the summer and fall. If you haven’t attended a board meeting, make plans to attend our 2017 Summer Board Meeting and bring the family! Find out more about upcoming board meetings and other FRLA events at FRLA.org/events. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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DINE OUT

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#DineOutWynwood I

n an effort to bring locals back to Wynwood following the challenges that Zika presented to Miami’s urban arts neighborhood this past summer, the Wynwood Business Improvement District (BID) and several partners hosted #DineOutWynwood Day on Friday, Sept. 30. The day-long event garnered the participation of more than 25 local Wynwood businesses — including restaurants, bars, breweries and retailers — which offered special incentives and events to customers. The Wynwood BID and its partner-businesses were joined in the marketing effort by Florida Governor Rick Scott, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau, Miami-Dade County and the City of Miami. Together, they ensured that #DineOutWynwood was a success, encouraging locals and visitors alike to come back and rediscover the Wynwood neighborhood that they know and love.

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1: Florida Governor Rick Scott and Donald Goldberg, owner of the Wynwood Diner; 2: Frangipani owner Jennifer Frehling and Florida Governor Rick Scott; 3: Wynwood Kitchen & Bar Chef, Miguel Aguilar and Florida Governor Rick Scott; 4: Governor Rick Scott speaking with patrons enjoying a meal at Wynwood Kitchen & Bar as part of #DineOutWynwood; 5: Governor Rick Scott poses with Wynwood Business Improvement District Executive Director, Tom Curitore and Wynwood Kitchen & Bar staff.

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GALA AWARDS 2016 FLRA Hall of Fame Inductees

Island Oasis was inducted into the FRLA Hall of Fame as the 2016 Supplier of the Year.

Longtime Central Florida industry leader Manny Garcia III of Davgar Restaurants Inc. was inducted into FRLA’s Hall of Fame as the 2016 Restaurateur of the Year.

Geraldo Bayona, Corporate Chef, Columbia Restaurant Ybor City won the Chef of the Year category.

Jim Garris ​of Columbia Restaurant​in Ybor City​​won the Restaurant General​M ​ anager of the year​.

Julian MacQueen of Innisfree Hotels was inducted into FRLA’s Hall of Fame as the 2016 Hotelier of the Year.

The FRLA Hotel General Manager of the Year award was a tie with Eduardo Fernandez, General Manager, Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach and Tom Williamson, General Manager, Hampton Inn Cocoa Beach/Cape Canaveral.

Stacey Landis, Bartender at Applebee’s in Venice, and Miranda Steele, Chef’s Office Coordinator at the Orlando World Center Marriott, tied as winners for the FRLA Restaurant Employee of the Year.

AHLEI 2016 Lamp of Knowledge Award for Outstanding High School Educator was presented to Joanne Goodman, Oak Ridge High School by Chef Emeril Lagasse.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Sofia Slimak received her award as Student of the Year from Chef Emeril Lagasse.

Aaron Barker was recognized for being inducted into the 2016 Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Will Seccombe, VISIT FLORIDA, Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, Florida Governor Rick Scott, President/CEO Carol Dover Carol Dover and 2016 FRLA Chair Lino Maldanado presented $800,000 to the OneOrlando Fund at the Gala.

Stars of the Industry 2016 Hospitality Award Winners and Nominees During the Stars of the Industry Installation and Awards Gala held at the Hyatt Regency Orlando, FRLA announced the nominees and winners of our annual award categories to recognize exceptional service throughout the state: Restaurant General Manager of the Year, Hotel General Manager of the Year, Restaurant Employee of the Year, Hotel Employee of the Year and Chef of the Year. Nominees and winners were chosen by a panel of independent industry judges.

First responders from Central Florida attended the Gala.

RESTAURANT GENERAL MANAGER OF THE YEAR Jim Garris, General Manager, Columbia Restaurant, Ybor City *WINNER Clayton Green, General Manager, Another Broken Egg Cafe, Sandestin Lindsey Smith, Senior Restaurant Manager, Orlando World Center Marriott HOTEL GENERAL MANAGER OF THE YEAR Eduardo Fernandez, General Manager, Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach *WINNER – TIE Tom Williamson, General Manager, Hampton Inn Cocoa Beach/Cape Canaveral *WINNER – TIE Rey Martinez, Resort Manager, Hyatt Coconut Plantation Resort, Bonita Springs RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR Stacey Landis, Bartender, Applebee’s, Venice *WINNER – TIE Miranda Steele, Chef’s Office Coordinator, Orlando World Center Marriott *WINNER – TIE Lenny Jacobs, Kitchen Manager, Another Broken Egg Cafe, Sandestin

Brittany, Ashley and Walt Dover sang with the Tallahassee Boys Choir to pay tribute to the Pulse victims.

HOTEL EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR Santiago Navarro, Assistant Front Office Manager, Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach *WINNER Maria Colon, Executive Assistant, Hard Rock Hotel at Universal Orlando Juan Rivera, Banquet Captain, Jupiter Beach Resort & Spa CHEF OF THE YEAR Geraldo Bayona, Corporate Chef, Columbia Restaurant, Ybor City *WINNER Tuong (Hirano) Ly, District Head Chef, Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Altamonte Springs James Routhier, Executive Banquet Chef, Orlando World Center Marriott FRLA EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION STUDENT OF THE YEAR Sofia Slimak, Mainland High School, Daytona Beach *WINNER Tyler Chaffin, The Academy of Culinary Arts at Belleview High School, Ocala Jose Murillo, Inlet Grove Community High School, Riviera Beach w w w.FRL A .org

FRLA Executive Committee Member Chau Nguyen of Kobe Japanese Steakhouse enjoyed the Gala.

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A payments company that caters to you.

Sterling offers a unique payments experience that combines the latest technologies with service that’s responsive, efficient and personal. Sterling provides: • Honesty and transparency in pricing • Competitive processing rates • Multiple EMV solutions with tip adjust and out of PCI scope • Partnerships with leading restaurant POS hardware and software companies • Gift cards – starter and custom programs that integrate with any POS system • Individualized, around-the-clock service from our Tampa-based headquarters

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW STERLING’S SOLUTIONS AND SERVICE CAN CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR SUCCESS. Call (800) 591-6098 / Visit sterling.cc/caters 20  W I N T ER

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Florida Atlantic University’s 23-month MBA in Hospitality & Tourism Management prepares graduates for leadership roles in one of the world’s most dynamic industries. Traditional core MBA courses are blended with hospitality-specific classes to prepare leaders for executive level careers in this rapidly expanding industry. The program is designed with the highest level of CONVENIENCE in mind. Students can attend on campus, fully online, or combine both methods to easily accommodate life’s other responsibilities. Our LOW TUITION has ranked us 1st in Florida and 5th in the U.S. for return on investment in an MBA. The same tuition applies to everyone – in-state, national or global.

Apply Today

HOSPITALITY.FAU.EDU • 561.297.6000

Program coordinators offer PERSONALIZED ASSISTANCE with registration, ordering textbooks, and academic and career advising.

ARTISTRY IN OUTDOOR LIGHTING s e r v i n g t h e e n t i r e s tat e o f f l o r i d a s i n c e

Regulatory Compliance Services protects your business by making sure you are compliant with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (Florida Statute 561.701-706)

2004

For less than the price of one drink per day, you can protect your alcoholic beverage license from suspension or revocation.

CONTACT US TODAY FOR A FREE ON-SITE CONSULTATION.

800-537-9863 Hotel and Resort Lighting Commercial Services

Restaurant Lighting Turtle-Friendly Lighting

813.785.7557 | BRILLIANTNIGHTS.COM w w w.FRL A .org

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SAVE THE DATE FOR 2017: SEPTEMBER 13

CONGRATULATIONS TO NRA/FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC WINNERS!

F IR ST P L ACE International Course: Seth Davis, Andrew Fichthorn, Nick Gigliotti & Jeff Jabot National Course: Drew Jasinski, Leigh Doyle, Nick Lowe & Andy Gross

SECO ND PLAC E International Course: Kevin Johnson, Chris Johnson, Jim Ridenour & Shelly Pappas National Course: Sean Daugherty, Todd Tanis, Diane Mrdjenovich & Rhett Fischer

CLOSE ST TO TH E PIN International Course: Kevin Johnson National Course: Jeff Smith

LONG E ST DRIVE International Course: Megan Stasi & Bryan Detert National Course: John Johannsen & David Martino

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F LO R I DA Price R ESTAU R A NPhotography T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N Photos provided by Brion


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HELPING

Support

CORE

(Children of Restaurant Employees) is a nonprofit organization that provides support to the children of food and beverage employees navigating life-altering circumstances or conditions. Since 2004, CORE has raised over $2 million and provided support to over 100 families across the industry and the country! With families supported in 27 states, CORE grants up to $10,000 per family to help food and beverage employees navigate a medical diagnosis or death of a parent, spouse or child; loss of housing due to fire or natural disaster; or other unexpected situation. By helping these families cover expenses for childcare, hospital bills, rent and utilities, groceries and clothing, and much more, CORE fulfills our vision to bring support, joy and a sense of caring to food and beverage families during times of extreme emotional and financial strain. The Lees family from Tampa, Florida, became part of the CORE Family in 2013

after the birth of their daughter Cadence. Cheli and Matt Lees already had one son, Jack, and Cheli, who worked as a Reception Supervisor at the Renaissance Tampa International Plaza Hotel, was pregnant with identical twin girls. A few months into the pregnancy, Cheli was diagnosed with “Twin to Twin Syndrome.” Occurring in only 10% of identical twin pregnancies, the babies shared connections in the blood that could cause both babies to die if left untreated. Cheli had emergency surgery. Unfortunately, only one baby survived. After returning home for a week of bedrest, Cheli delivered Cadence at only 26 weeks. Cadence only weighed 2 lbs 7 oz at birth and was in the NICU for 90 days. Cheli’s husband Matt, who has MS, was undergoing a total hip replacement at the same time and missed Cadence’s birth. To help the family during the first crucial months of Cadence’s life, CORE provided the Lees family with a full year of childcare: nine months of a personal nanny and three months

of daycare. This support allowed Cheli to return to work and Matt to recover from his hip surgery, and provided Cadence with the best chance at life. Now over 3 years old, Cadence is a healthy, happy child who loves her big brother Jack! CORE was honored to be a part of the Lees family story and loves seeing updates on Jack and Cadence. Do you know a family who could qualify for CORE support? Are you interested in becoming a COREporate sponsor or individual donor, or would like to learn more about CORE? Visit our website at COREgives.org or contact Executive Director Lauren LaViola at Lauren@COREgives.org or 404-655-4690.

2016 FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW

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ver 8,000 restaurant and foodservice industry professionals saw new products and services from more than 400 exhibiting companies — 170 of which were new to the show — covering 100,000 square feet of exhibit space at the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show, held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando this fall. The event was produced and managed by Urban Expositions and sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association. Thousands of attendees took advantage of the 30-plus education sessions offered at The Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum. The conference kicked off with a brand new half-day FRLA Independent Operators Workshop, which featured keynotes by Kathleen Wood, Jim Knight and a panel of leading independent operators. Other conference sessions featured interesting and timely topics including; How to Navigate the Menu Labeling Regulations; The Celebration and Discussion with Women Chefs; Building Customer Loyalty Programs; Employee Recruitment Methods; and much more. At the close of the Show, the exhibitors of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show donated thousands of pounds of food to The Second Harvest Food Bank of Orlando. The 2017 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 10 through Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. The show is produced and managed by Urban Expositions (urban-expo.com) and sponsored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (frla.org). 24  W I N T ER

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BETTER STEWARDS

Sea Turtles Welcome The Sheraton at Sand Key Resort Allows Turtles to Check In on Shores

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s General Manager of the Sheraton Sand Key Resort in Clearwater Beach, Russ Kimball’s priority is to keep hotel guests safe and happy. So when Clearwater Marine Aquarium notified him two years ago that his hotel’s outdoor lighting needed to become sea-turtle compliant, he was nervous. “I wasn’t sure if a different kind of lighting would allow my guests to see well enough to move around safely outside of the hotel, especially near the pool,” said Kimball. “And I was hesitant to start a big job that would disrupt my customers.” Since sea turtles are a protected species, state laws and local ordinances mandate that beachfront hotels abide by strict lighting guidelines during

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“We came away with a solution that works well for guests and is helping to keep sea turtles safe.” sea turtle mating season, which runs from May 1 to October 31. Improper lighting represents a threat to the endangered species because hatchlings have an instinct to travel toward the brightest horizon — normally the moon’s reflection off of the ocean. But near many beachfront hotels, hatchlings become disoriented and travel toward artificial bright lights and often die from dehydration or are killed by fire ants and ghost crabs. To increase their chances of survival, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

(FWC) adopted guidelines to ensure that beachfront hotel lighting doesn’t confuse the young turtles. Knowing that he needed to abide by these guidelines, Kimball called Brilliant Nights last May to get a clearer picture of what such a lighting job would require. Rick Bequette, owner of the Tampa-based outdoor lighting company, explained that turtle compliant lighting has a red or amber hue that turtles don’t confuse with the moon’s reflection. He demonstrated what turtle-friendly lighting would look like in several areas of the hotel, including near the pool, and proposed an installation schedule that would not disrupt guests. Kimball hired Brilliant Nights to install 500 new fixtures around the property and in July, the hotel was declared turtle-friendly by Clearwater Marine Aquarium. “It really helped for Rick to show me how the lights would look,” said Kimball. “We came away with a solution that works well for guests and is helping to keep sea turtles safe.” Brilliant Nights can offer solutions to help your beachfront property become sea-turtle compliant. To make an appointment or to learn more about turtle-friendly lighting, contact Rick Bequette at 813-785-7557 or visit brilliantnights.com. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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the

TECH issue

If you aren’t thinking about how to keep your business on the cutting edge of technology, you aren’t thinking about the future of your operation. From baby boomers to today’s millenials, your customers crave technology. If you want to be successful, embrace all that is available and utilize technology to your advantage. FRLA’s Technology Issue provides some insight into what is happening in the world of technology.

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SPECIAL TECH SECTION

Don’t Let Fraudsters Eat Your Lunch Liability Shift Lifts Veil on Small Counterfeit Charges By Georgia Stavrakis, CPP

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t’s been a year since the U.S. migrated to EMV technology, and more than 1 million businesses now use EMV chip-embedded credit card readers. Unfortunately, criminals are taking full advantage of businesses that haven’t fully made the switch, leaving even small businesses vulnerable to costly chargebacks. Restaurants have been plagued for years by counterfeit, stolen and cloned credit card activity, but it’s much more apparent now that liability for these fraudulent charges shifted to the party using the least secure technology — most often the merchant. Customers who may frequent your restaurant could have been using counterfeit cards for months without exposure, because the issuing bank was taking the loss. But now, your business and livelihood could be held liable. If you haven’t enabled EMV chip-reader technology in your restaurant, here are a few reasons you should do it before you serve up that next batch of sweet tea. CRIMINALS PREFER MAGSTRIPE If a credit card does not have a physical EMV chip (magstripe only card), the data on the card may still be EMV. Here’s how. When criminals purchase credit card numbers online, the data — regardless of whether it is magstripe only or EMV technology — is loaded on a standard magstripe counterfeit card and shipped to them. With more than 67 percent of U.S. credit cards now using EMV technology, odds are that the counterfeit magstripe card they received uses EMV data. This is when having an EMV chip-embedded card reader at your business comes in handy. If the criminal swipes the counterfeit magstripe credit card housing EMV data on an EMV card reader, it will prompt them to use the chip reader. They won’t be able to use the card, because no actual chip exists. For this reason, fraudsters intentionally seek out non-EMV enabled businesses because the transaction process is not secure, and they can use the counterfeit magstripe card successfully, bringing unwanted chargebacks to your business.

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THE TAB IS ON ME

Although most restaurants don’t have to worry about professional thieves racking up thousands of dollars in fraudulent charges like retailers, these low-level fraudsters target restaurants and bars for a quick win. Whether it’s just a $50 dinner and drinks, a gift-card purchase or a college student picking up the beer tab for friends, restaurants and bars are low-risk targets for criminals because law enforcement generally does not assist with recouping such a relatively small loss. But these small one-off losses add up, potentially leaving more than just your ketchup bottles in the red. PROTECT YOURSELF

College and university towns, large cities and major metropolitan areas are the most vulnerable, but credit card fraud can happen to businesses anywhere. The best defense for your restaurant against credit card fraud is to install EMV chip reader terminals as soon as possible. If that simply isn’t an option, here are a few additional tips you can use to protect your business. • Verify the last four digits of the card number match the last four digits on the printed receipt • Compare the signatures on the card and receipt • Check cards for legitimate features like holograms, logos, CVV/CID/CVV2 and AVS verification, etc. • Never rerun a card if it declines — for any reason. Georgia Stavrakis is the senior director of loss prevention at Heartland Payment Systems.

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Social Media Driving Engagement Through Free Wi-Fi Service By Tennyson LaJeunesse

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spend a considerable amount of time traveling for business. Because of this, it’s essential I find locations that offer free Wi-Fi services to work from. On rare occasion I hit the jackpot, but it never ceases to amaze me the number of venues that offer Wi-Fi services that simply don’t work. I’m confident in saying that most of us have experienced these never ending “connecting” issues no matter where we travel, and we often experience the same thing right here at home. Users become frustrated in trying to access poor Wi-Fi and will often reflect negatively on their experience based on this issue alone. The bottom line is Wi-Fi that doesn’t work is worse than not providing Wi-Fi service at all. If you really want brand awareness, then social media engagement should be at the forefront for all hospitality marketing managers out there today. Instead, I’m seeing their efforts to engage customers through the use of traditional printed materials such as table tents, coasters and signs. Additionally, many do very little in the way of marketing to loyal recurring patrons. This is mainly due to an information gap; a lack of email addresses for example. In the past I have written articles on how to build successful Wi-Fi networks. Today I will extend this conversation to show how you can drive social media engagement with success. • First, invest properly in the infrastructure to provide a stable and robust connection. • Segment guest users from internal and POS systems.

• Make use of a captive portal page to “sign in.” This is the true “key to success” by using social media logins, e.g. “Like us on Facebook” to gather customer information. • Employ a marketing automation system like Google Analytics, MailChimp and Constant Contact to set up time injection advertising. • Now take the gathered information and market to your regular patrons as well as new ones. Our company has developed several products that directly address this situation. SEC360 (Firewalls), LAN360 (Switches) and WLAN360 (Access Points) all improve security and compliance while giving your customer exceptional quality and performance. The service along with our hardware provides internet security, user segmentation and a rock-solid Wi-Fi connection. CP360 is our captive portal solution that provides easily customizable captive portal pages, social login capabilities, revenue generating mobile billboard, and it also improves search engine ratings­­­— and our solution costs less per month than a meal for four people! So as business professionals look to you to provide high quality Wi-Fi remember that more and more customers are Instagramming their meals, posting photos of themselves with your business in the background, all while writing reviews of their experience while in your establishment, and they are doing it in real time! Tennyson LaJeunesse is CEO/Founder of RedCell Technologies, Inc.

Data Security Small-to-Midsize Businesses Reviewing Data Security Benefit From By Jacey Kaps, Partner with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, P.A. a Lawyer in the Middle

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etaining counsel to conduct a review of data security carries with it more than just the benefit of a neutral opinion. The process can help create an attorney-client privilege that can prevent discovery of potentially harmful communications. Conversations between the SMB client and an attorney are privileged. The same is not true for communications with consultants that are hired by the SMB to review, investigate and train about data security and privacy. However, when the attorney conducting the review retains the consultants as part of the delivery of legal advice for the engagement, the communications between the SMB, its attorney 28  W I N T ER

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and the consultants are likely protected by the attorney-client privilege. This tri-partite relationship can create a safe shelter where confidential information can be frankly exchanged in a space where potentially harmful information about data privacy and security would have to be produced in litigation or regulatory investigations. To maintain the protection of the process, it is necessary that the attorney retain consultants, guide the consultants, and be the “man-in-the-middle” when it comes to all communications. By contrast, SMB direct engagement of a consultant, even with later involvement of a lawyer, will likely not qualify as confidential communication and may be turned into evidence against

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SPECIAL TECH SECTION

Abolish Tips: NOT SO FAST! By Carlo F. Zampogna, Gratuity Solutions, Director of Business Development

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s you may have read or heard in the news over the last 24 months, a few restaurants and restaurant chains across the country have started a “movement” to completely abolish tipping. These restaurants favored paying wait staff a higher base salary or instituting service charges. But the question remained, would this experiment work or was this just another short-lived trend within the restaurant industry? The results may surprise you. Some restaurants and eateries felt that banning tips would allow the restaurant to save the time and money expended in tip calculating and distributing, as well as redress a perceived pay imbalance between tipped employees (servers, bartenders, food runners, bussers) and hourly waged employees like cooks. Other restaurants thought that providing a higher base salary would increase employee retention and thereby minimize the costs associated with hiring and training newer staff. However, as many restaurant chains and individually owned eateries across the country soon learned, the shift toward higher hourly wages over tips was not well received. In fact, the biggest issue that restaurants experienced was an increase in turnover, the very problem they were trying to remedy in the first place. Many employees felt the financial impact and noticed that they were not receiving a high enough wage after gratuities were eliminated. Other restaurants reported increasing menu prices (some as much as 40%) to offset the increased costs of employee salaries, which was not well received by patrons. In other words, previously tipped staff felt they earned less, and patrons felt the increase in prices were too high. If the staff and patrons are unhappy, then what is the motivation behind removing tips from the restaurant industry? The issue is not the customary practice of tipping itself, but rather (1) the mismanagement or misappropriation of tips and

(2) the time and money expended in the management of each restaurant’s tip calculation and distribution system. One of our clients estimated that each of its 1,200 nationwide restaurants spent a minimum of one hour every night calculating and distributing tips to their restaurant staff. On an annual basis, that came out to approximately $6 million in tip management expenses! Gratuity Solutions developed the first and only fully automated “cloud based” software system that calculates, allocates and distributes a restaurant’s tailored tip distribution schedule, and management can allocate and pay out that tip income immediately. The solution may be deployed with various POS systems and removes the daily task of manual calculation, allocation and proper tip distribution and further protects the restaurant and its employees with a precise, secured and insured method of distribution and management of tips for the restaurant’s tipped employees. By implementing the Gratuity Solution software, restaurants and their managers can save MILLIONS by eliminating the daily time consuming exercise, eliminating the liability associated therewith and also receive detailed electronic reports for all tip distributions automatically at the end of every single day. Management and tipped employees will be able to concentrate solely on the quality of their services, allowing them to provide the best atmosphere for the restaurant patrons and adding to the profits of not only the employees, but also the restaurant owners. Gratuity Solutions is a company that specializes in the technological improvement of the payment of tips and tip-related income, including Tips to Paycard, and the integration between Point of Sale systems and the payroll payment methods and related platforms. You can learn more at gratuitysolutions.com.

the business in later litigation and regulatory action. Similarly, non-specific communications with different consultants who were not directly engaged by the attorney are subject to disclosure, even if those communications are intended for the purpose of review and analysis of data security and privacy. Why does it matter who hires the consultants? In a word, evidence. If there is a breach that leads to subsequent litigation or regulatory action, the protection of communications that occurred during a data security and privacy review may be used against an SMB. In many circumstances the SMB may want to keep those critical communications about the process confidential. The attorney-client privilege works to accom-

plish that end, while allowing for the delivery of critical data infrastructure services. Jacey Kaps, a partner with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, P.A., assists small to mid-sized retail and hospitality businesses and law firms with issues arising from data security breaches, the ensuing claims and regulatory investigations. He is able to provide guidance on cybersecurity risks and cyber incident readiness. When online and offline privacy assessments and information security audits are needed, Jacey is able to assist his clients with identifying the relevant legal considerations and retaining the appropriate consultants to accomplish the task.

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Idea Driven

C

uttlesoft is an award-winning custom software development and consulting agency that specializes in beautifully designed and highly scalable web and mobile applications. Founded in 2014, Cuttlesoft provides flexible software solutions for a variety of clients in the nonprofit, education and hospitality sectors. Cuttlesoft offers a wide range of services including but never limited to: full stack development, design, DevOps consulting, cloud migration and cognitive computing. Past clients include The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA), WeatherSTEM and Brewfest! Tallahassee. The company was founded by Florida State University graduates Emily Morehouse and Frank Valcarcel, two expert programmers with a passion for building amazing software. Since its inception, Cuttlesoft has provided software solutions to over two dozen clients and currently employs four full-time employees, two regularly contracted employees and two interns. Cuttlesoft is the winner of the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce’s Entrepreneurial

Startup of the Year Award, and CTO Emily Morehouse was recently recognized with Governor Scott’s Young Entrepreneur award. The company’s namesake and mascot is the Cuttlefish, one of the ocean’s most fascinating and intelligent creatures. Cuttlesoft feels that the flexibility, adaptability and agility of the Cuttlefish make it an apt embodiment of the company and its services. In the past, Cuttlesoft has built software and apps designed to make events easier to plan and manage for organizers and more memorable and enjoyable for guests. The Brewfest! Tallahassee app was designed to provide a convenient source of information to guests and a voting system where beer aficionados selected their favorite beers for the annual brewing competition. Since all Brewfest proceeds benefit charity, Cuttlesoft built the app pro-bono on behalf of the Tallahassee Sunrise Rotary.

In 2015, Cuttlesoft built the FRLA’s mobile app to help them keep members informed and engaged across the state, as well as to make planning more convenient for organizers. The FRLA app makes it easy for members to keep up with the latest news, get updates about events and stay engaged with FRLA. To download the FRLA app, visit frla.org/app. To find out more about Cuttlesoft and its offerings to the hospitality industry, visit cuttlesoft.com.

The GO App World’s First App for Crowdsourcing Licensed Brand Content for Restaurants, Bars, Events and Beverage Brands

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heGOapp has created a new way for brands to connect with the actual consumers enjoying the product on the spot as well as when and where they are making their purchase decisions locally. There is one universal language that people from all over the world can understand. No, it’s not English and it’s not love either. What we’re talking about here is not the language that you hear or speak, but the language you see and interpret emotionally: THE LANGUAGE OF PICTURES AND IMAGES.

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Some studies have found that around 90% of the information transmitted to the human brain is visual. You may not believe it, but your brain can register 36,000 visual images per hour, and your eyes can process an image within 13 milliseconds. It’s no wonder, therefore, if you prefer visual content over large chunks of text. When done right, visual content has too much potential to ignore. If you want people to recognize and engage with your brand, you should start going VISUAL with theGOapp. For more information about beverage, restaurant,

bar and event social branding campaigns through theGOapp contact: Frank B 954-696-0882, frank@thegoapp.com, thegoappworks.com. Available for iOS and Android phones keyword: theGOapp.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SPECIAL TECH SECTION

Get Ready Our Guests Expect Your Home to Be Their Home By Dr. Anil Bilgihan and Dr. Peter Ricci

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otels and restaurants are transforming into places where hightech meets high-touch. The availability of in-room technology amenities is on the rise and evolving at a rapid pace. Hotels are offering improved technology amenities in guest rooms in an effort to differentiate themselves in the competitive marketplace and also to generate ancillary room revenues. Restaurants are offering touch-screen menus and tablets for ordering and updating menus at the touch of a button. Restaurant guests also expect to make reservations using their mobile devices. Table management systems increase your guests’ satisfaction while improving your restaurant’s efficiency. Guests use table management system apps to add themselves to a restaurant’s list, get notified when their table is ready, and rate their experiences at the end of the meal. Cutting-edge in-room technologies help hotels to improve the guest experience; for example, with technology, guests can change the room’s physical attributions like color, sound and smell. Guests can play video games or order room service via a tablet in their guest rooms. Such technology attributes could significantly influence a hotel guest’s overall satisfaction and are direct determinants of future behaviors, such as revisit. Hotels also rely on in-room technologies to provide high-quality personalized services. A recent study shows that in-room technologies are the third most useful amenity option when guests evaluate a hotel, just behind the guest bath facilities and bedding. Hospitality Technology’s 2016 Lodging Technology study revealed 54% of hotels will spend more on technology this year, and guest room technologies ranked second in priority. Innovative technologies will be one of the prime differentiators of hotel companies in the 21st century. However, it is important for hoteliers to answer questions w w w.FRL A .org

such as which technology amenities do their guests desire when choosing overnight accommodations? Where should they start? Capital costs and ability of staff members to utilize technology to its fullest are additional considerations. Further, what are the importance levels assigned by guests of these various technology amenities? Hotels and restaurants operators throughout Florida should take a cautious approach to study what their specific guests desire before they simply go out to purchase the hottest technological trend. We tried to answer these questions by surveying 2,500 U.S. travelers. Hotel guests want, and expect, venues to offer the technologies they enjoy at home. This suggests that hotels should give their guests the capability of leveraging all of the technology that guests are traveling with on their own person: tablets, high-speed internet access, smart televisions, etc. Offering far beyond just a clean and comfortable bed, your guests now want the room layout to be user-friendly and accessible for multiple digital devices. Highspeed internet access and guest device connectivity were perceived as “musts” that should be incorporated and not ancillary “add-on” items. Recognizing guests’ needs

and answering those needs have always been important to the overall experience; in 2016 and beyond, recognizing their technological needs are now just as important. Dr. Anil Bilgihan is an assistant professor at the FAU Hospitality & Tourism Management program with an educational background in both computer sciences and hospitality and tourism management. His research is dedicated to technology, revenue management and consumer behavior. Dr. Peter Ricci is the director of the FAU Hospitality & Tourism Management program with over 20 years of hospitality industry experience in DMOs, restaurants/catering, and hotels from event planner to general manager. His doctoral studies are in higher education administration and leadership. He holds various industry certifications including CHA, CHSE, CRME, CHIA and CHRM. FAU’s Hospitality & Tourism Management Program is a Top 30 Program in the United States (see thebestschools.org/ rankings/best-hospitality-degree-programs, thebestschools.org/rankings/best-hospitality-degree-programs ) Specific information on the program may be found at business.fau.edu/hospitality or business.fau.edu/mbahospitality.

Guests Are Game for Technology* CONSUMERS WHO SAY THEY ARE WILLING TO USE THESE TECHNOLOGY OPTIONS AT RESTAURANTS IN THE FUTURE ALL ADULTS

AGE 18-34

AGE 35-44

AGE 45-54

AGE 55-64

AGE 65+

CHILDREN UNDER 18 IN HOUSEHOLD

Free Wi-Fi

67%

84%

81%

70%

53%

37%

83%

Tableside payment terminal or device

63%

79%

75%

58%

55%

39%

76%

Electronic ordering kiosk at a fast food place

61%

78%

63%

62%

52%

38%

72%

Electronic menu and ordering station or tablet at a sit-down restaurant

57%

72%

69%

53%

50%

35%

69%

None/don’t know

20%

8%

9%

19%

31%

42%

9%

*SOURCE: National Restaurant Association, Technology Consumer Survey 2015

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Rediscovering Your Florida Main Streets

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lorida is known for its numerous overflowing avenues for tourists to venture and explore. This wondrous state offers visitors different perspectives of coastal views, space camps and of course Disney World, in addition to the vast array of other theme parks and historic sites. Nowadays, Florida’s locals and tourists alike are looking for more than just a day at the beach or a trip to Magic Kingdom. They seek a more authentic and unique setting filled with local restaurants, microbreweries and wineries native to the region, along with a retail experience you won’t find at a shopping mall or big box store. What they seek are Main Streets. The benefit of belonging to a Main Street community is a combination of having pride in your historic commercial district and the mutual support from other downtown businesses to create a healthy and vibrant downtown atmosphere. As a member of a local Main Street program, restaurant and hotel owners have an advocate for their businesses who will help promote the area as a sense of place for locals and tourists through the revitalization and restoration of the downtown’s uniquely distinct architecture, while marketing the authenticity of the local 32  W I N T ER

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cuisine and the beauty of its historic hotels. Main Street programs also host monthly and annual special events that are used to attract visitors to the sites, enjoy the festivities, sample local food and brews in hopes that they will stay and play a while. The Main Street program encourages economic development through historic preservation at the local, state and national level. The National Main Street Center is a 35-year-old program that has continuously proven to help bring back life into blighted and abandoned downtowns and commercial districts. The Florida Main Street program,

under the Florida Department of State, Bureau of Historic Preservation was created in 1985 and coordinates 47 active local programs throughout the state. Through the preservation and revitalization of downtown buildings, cities are able to successfully house local businesses within a welcoming and walkable environment that caters to all types of interests for families, residents and tourists. By visiting a Main Street community, you are helping to grow Florida’s economy through the support of local businesses. For information about becoming involved in a Main Street district near you, visit: dos.myflorida.com/historical/preservation/mainstreet-program or contact Katerina Paliwoda, MHP, Program Assistant at: katherina.paliwoda@dos. myflorida.com or at 850-245-6346.

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ENGAGE

FRLA’s Engage Gains Momentum Engage Locations Jacksonville, Tampa, Orlando, Miami and Broward

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association’s Engage program has been continuing to gain momentum. The initiative has spread from Central Florida to Tampa, Miami, Broward County, Tallahassee and Jacksonville. Our continued focus is to build relationships with our local leaders and help change the nature of the conversation to show that our industry can be great partners across many platforms. Additionally, we have expanded outside of local elected officials and have started to meet with city offices, such as permitting and health departments, to build relationships and better understand the process in each city and how we can work better with these offices in the future. Engage Jacksonville recently sat down with the city of Jacksonville Permit Division and discussed the challenges business owners come across when trying to open a new business or renovate their business in city limits. Additionally, the Engage Orlando team met with the Orange County Permit Office for a roundtable breakfast and had a successful conversation on the permit process and ways to help expedite the process in the Central Florida area. We are continuing to set up similar meetings in Tampa, Broward and the Miami areas. Engage Tampa will be sitting down with the School Superintendent and multiple local elected officials in the upcoming weeks for an industry travel and tourism meeting, and Engage Jacksonville will be sitting down with Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry to introduce the industry and the association. As a National Reputation Initiative from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the FRLA Engage program highlighted Hispanic Heritage Month. This is an initiative the National Restaurant Association promoted across the w w w.FRL A .org

“This pr ogram is changing the conversation and per ception of the hospitality industry at every City Hall. We want to continue this momentum and encourage people to get involved in the Engage pr ogram in your community.” — JOE KEFAUVER, Managing Partner at Align Public Strategies country. Across all of our Engage markets, we collected profiles highlighting stories of those who have worked their way up in the industry. Engage Orlando was recognized at an Orlando City Council meeting by City Commissioner Tony Ortiz and Mayor Buddy Dyer proclaiming the month officially as Hispanic Heritage Month in the city of Orlando and recognizing hospitality leaders in the community from Red Lobster, Marriott, Ale House and more who were in attendance at the city council meeting. In Broward County, our Engage Broward team focused on Feeding South Florida’s Hunger Action Month for the month of September. The Broward chapter raised enough for more than 5,000 meals. For the remainder of the year, our Engage programs will be focusing on Veteran’s Month in November along with a Restaurants Give Back Initiative as the holiday season comes

upon us. We would also like to recognize those Engage members who made the trip to Orlando and participated in the FRLA Hospitality Stars of the Industry Gala on Sept. 28. We had multiple Engage members participate in the Dine Out for Orlando United, and we were honored to recognize first responders who were involved in the Orlando tragedy at the gala. We could not have raised the funds we did if it were not for the participation of our Engage teams and members across the state. Thank you! We are excited to continue growing our Engage program! Are you or your company interested in getting engaged? Call Dan Murphy, Vice President of Membership and Corporate Relations, 850-879-2650 or Rachel Moalli, Align Public Strategies, 850-510-6205.

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2016 FRLA YEAR IN REVIEW

2016 was a great and inspiring year for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and Florida’s hospitality industry. With visitor numbers increasing and in-state travel booming, the hospitality industry achieved success like never before. FRLA hosted more than 150 corporate and chapter events in 2016. The following “Year in Review” showcases many of these events that reflect FRLA’s leadership and dedication to Florida’s hospitality industry.

APRIL

MAY

FRLA represented Florida at the National Restaurant Association’s Public Affairs Conference in Washington, D.C. FRLA’s Independent Operators’ Workshop Series kicked off in Sarasota. FRLA’s Great Florida Events program, in partnership with VISIT FLORIDA and Main Street Florida, sponsored Downtown Brew, Savor the EDGE and Vilano Beach Dish N Fish. The program also sponsored the FSU Spring Game, SunFest, Sun ‘N Fun and SOWAL Wine. FRLA E.A.T.S. educational fundraiser was hosted by FRLA’s Palm Beach Chapter for hospitality industry students.

The FRLA Broward Chapter held its 7th Annual Excellence in Education Gala at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa. FRLA’s Great Florida Events sponsored the Key West Songwriters Festival. FRLA attended the AH&LA Legislative Action Summit in Washington, D.C. FRLA’s Southwest Florida Chapter brought A FISH! Experience training program to the area.

SEPTEMBER FRLA held its Fall Board Meeting at the Orange County Convention Center. FRLA held the NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic at the ChampionsGate Golf Club in honor of our dear friend, Bob Leonard. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show was better than ever this year with more than 400 booths and dozens of educational programs, including FRLA’s second successful Independent Operators Workshop. The Opening Party for the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show was at Lafayette’s. FRLA honored first responders who risked their lives to protect and serve during the Pulse nightclub tragedy, and celebrated industry stars at the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Gala. FRLA sponsored the ’Noles Friday Night Block Parties, Downtown Getdown, the Island Hopper Songwriter Fest, Florida FanFest, Florida Jazz & Blues Festival and Nashville Songwriters Florida Sunshine Tour at Al’s Beach Club through the VISIT FLORIDA in-state marketing campaign, Great Florida Events. FRLA’s Escarosa Chapter held a workshop covering Overtime and Exemption Changes to FLSA.

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FEBRUARY

JANUARY FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA sponsored Season 4 of Emeril’s Florida! This show features the Florida lifestyle, restaurants, hotels and resorts. Florida Tourism Day brought more than 500 industry leaders to Tallahassee to speak to lawmakers about the importance of Florida’s hospitality industry. The Florida Legislature convened in Tallahassee. FRLA through Great Florida Events sponsored the Space Coast Crab Smash event.

FRLA sponsored Clearwater Beach Uncorked, one of our Great Florida Events in 2016! South Florida Powerhouse Luncheon was hosted by FRLA’s Dade Chapter at Jungle Island featuring the Lt. Governor, NRA President/CEO Dawn Sweeney and AH&LA CEO Katherine Lugar. The FRLA Educational Foundation hosted the 16th annual ProStart Culinary Team Competition in Orlando along with the Salute to Excellence Awards Dinner honoring many of FRLA’s star students.

JULY

FRLA held its Summer Board Meeting at the beautiful Opal Sands Resort.

FRLA and Great Florida Events sponsored Friday Night Soundwaves, a weekly concert series at the Fort Lauderdale Beach Hub, and Orlando Restaurant Week.

Florida’s hospitality industry and FRLA members raised more than $800,000 for victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting on June 30 during the statewide Dine Out for Orlando United.

FRLA held its Marketing + Operations Summit at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. This outstanding event drew a huge crowd.

JUNE

AUGUST FRLA, through its Great Florida Events program, sponsored the Annual Florida Main Street Conference in Deland, Florida, and Dine Out Lauderdale. The 17th Annual Hospitality Golf Tournament was hosted by FRLA’s Pinellas Chapter. FRLA’s Suncoast Chapter held its 6th Annual Chairman’s Luncheon at the Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota.

NOVEMBER

FRLA’s NW Florida Chapter held the Coastal Boil in Destin.

FRLA sponsored more Great Florida Events this month: Nashville Songwriters at Sandestin, College Park JazzFest, Blast on the Bay, Autos and Oysters and Cows ‘n Cabs. FRLA’s Monroe Chapter set sail on its 7th Annual Wine on the Water cruise. FRLA sponsored the Old School Open in Tallahassee.

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FRLA’s Tallahassee Chapter held its Bust-A-Clay Shoot at Coon Bottom Gun Club.

FRLA’s Hillsborough Chapter held its 5th Annual Bowling Tournament in Tampa.

FRLA Southwest Florida Chapter held its 9th Annual Turkey Trot benefitting the Harry Chapin Food Bank.

OCTOBER

MARCH FRLA’s First Coast Chapter hosted their Legislative Luncheon in St. Augustine.

FRLA sponsored the Ormond Beach Riverfest Seafood Festival and the Florida Seafood Festival in Apalachicola.

DECEMBER FRLA’s Great Florida Events program sponsored the Florida Citrus Parade, one of the largest parades affiliated with a sporting event in the nation! Many of FRLA’s chapters hosted holiday events and installed new leadership. FRLA held its final Independent Operators Workshop for the year.

FRLA’s Broward Chapter held it 9th Annual Golf Invitational to support scholarships for ProStart and Hospitality Management Programs in local high schools. FRLA’s Escarosa Chapter hosted Shoot the Clays with FRLA, a networking and team building event.

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R E G U L AT I O N

FDA Changes Tobacco Regulation

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ffective Aug. 8, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authority to regulate tobacco products was extended (1) to include e-cigarettes/vaporizers, dissolvables, pipe tobacco, hookahs, cigars, gels and any future tobacco products (2-7). If you manufacture, distribute or sell these items, you need to be aware of the new labeling and reporting requirements. These products require registration and product ingredient review and approval by the FDA. Product and advertisement warnings along with other new requirements are extended to May 10, 2018, (8) to allow manufacturers, distributors and retailers to bring products into compliance, and ensure you are not selling any tobacco product that does not meet the requirements. The FDA also is cracking down on the sale of tobacco to minors. This year, the FDA has issued over 1,000 warning letters to businesses selling tobacco products, with a majority of the violations for sale to a minor. You must be educated on the new requirements and emphasize the importance of checking a photo ID for tobacco sales. The Florida Division of Alcoholic Beverages & Tobacco and the FDA use underage decoys to conduct compliance checks or “sting operations.” If you are a tobacco retailer, it is imperative that staff check photo IDs, and never allow products to be sold to anyone under 18. If you need assistance with staff training, Regulatory Compliance Services trains staff to understand the responsibilities associated with selling tobacco and how to prevent tobacco sales to minors.

An FDA warning letter is issued for the first violation. The letter indicates the inspection date, officer observations and the statute violated. If you receive a warning letter, an inspector will return to ensure violations have been corrected. When a warning letter is received, you have 15 working days to respond and explain how you corrected the violations observed. Warning letters must include steps you take to correct the violations and prevent future violations (for example, retrain your employees, remove the problematic items, etc.). On a second violation, you will be fined. In order to determine the fine, the FDA reviews violations at your establishment for the 48-month period preceding the most recent violations and determines the appropriate discipline per the chart below. NUMBER OF VIOLATIONS

FINE

1

$0.00 w/ warning letter

2 within a 12-month period

$250

3 within a 24-month period

$500

4 within a 24-month period

$2,000

5 within a 36-month period

$5,000

6 within a 48-month period

$11,000

If you are unsure if you have an FDA violation or if you have received a warning letter, check the FDA database(9). Additional information on these new regulations can be found on the FDA’s website: fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Retail/ucm205021.htm Resources: Rule link: federalregister.gov/articles/2016/05/10/2016-10685/deeming-tobacco-products-to-be-subject-to-the-federal-food-drug-and-cosmetic-actas-amended-by-the • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm456610.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm482569.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm482580.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm482575.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm482562.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/ProductsIngredientsComponents/ucm482571.htm • fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm500778.htm • accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/warningletters/wlSearchResult.cfm?qryStr=&sortColumn=4%20desc&Go=Go&office=Center%20for%20Tobacco%20Products&webSearch=false FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services provides Responsible Vendor Training for managers and employees that benefits the business by: 1) educating servers and sellers on the proper and legal manner of selling tobacco products and 2) protecting your investment in your tobacco license. Contact us at 800-537-9863 for a free on-site assessment of your responsible vendor training needs.

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H E A LT H C A R E

“We rely heavily on our partnership with UnitedHealthcare for their expertise and guidance in the protection and benefit coverage areas.” — MICHAEL QUILLEN, President of Gecko’s Hospitality Group

UnitedHealthcare Take Advantage of Exclusive Health Care Pricing and Solutions

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ecause health care is a top concern for businesses like yours and to help meet your needs, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and the National Restaurant Association (NRA) are working with UnitedHealthcare to provide easier access to health care coverage and related products and services. UnitedHealthcare, the FRLA and the NRA offer an alliance program to NRA/FRLA members, featuring exclusive health care pricing and solutions: • Up to a 5 percent discount on medical rates for fully insured groups with 51 or more eligible employees. • Annual invoice credit of up to 5 percent on 38  W I N T ER

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administrative fees for new ASO medical products for self-funded groups with 100 or more eligible employees. • Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision, life and disability) for fully insured groups — in addition to all other discounts including the Packaged Savings® program.

• Wellness programs and services aimed at helping people live healthier lives. • Health care reform guidance and solutions and access to the NRA’s Notification Tool to help employers meet the exchange notification law requirements from the Affordable Care Act (ACA). • Latino Health Solutions resources and tools for Latino/Hispanic owners, operators and employees through UnitedHealthcare’s PlanBien® program. • Lower-cost “preventive” medical plans that meet minimal essential coverage requirements for the Individual Mandate under the ACA for self-funded groups with 100 or more eligible employees. The NRA and the FRLA chose to work with UnitedHealthcare because of its wide range of innovative products and services to address the diverse health care coverage needs of hospitality industry employers, employees and their families. UnitedHealthcare offers access to its expansive network of health care providers and services, online tools and a range of wellness programs. In addition, it provides guidance and solutions around health care reform. To help illustrate the advantages of the alliance program from an FRLA member customer, Michael Quillen, President of Gecko’s Hospitality Group, says: “As a growing independent family of restaurants in the highly competitive hospitality industry, we rely heavily on our partnership with UnitedHealthcare for their expertise and guidance in the protection and benefit coverage areas. UnitedHealthcare works closely with our insurance broker to provide us with a professional suite of services and the personal attention we have come to rely on. Our partnership with UnitedHealthcare comprises an invaluable component of our strategic and operational plans, and delivers the peace of mind that comes with knowing we have the coverage and resources we need so that we can devote our time to managing our business.” Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business. Visit uhctogether.com/FRLA. For more information, contact your broker, UnitedHealthcare representative or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at 301-865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Take Control of Your Worker’s Compensation, Take Control of Your Bottom Line By BRENDAN GRIFFIN, BROWN & BROWN INSURANCE OF FLORIDA

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he rates for Worker’s Compensation in the state of Florida will be increasing by 14.5% as of Dec. 1, 2016. The reason for this rate increase is based on two recent rulings by the Florida Supreme Court. The Castellanos v. Next Door Company case challenged the legality of the state placing a statutory cap on what attorneys can charge in work comp related lawsuits. The Supreme Court decided the statutory cap is unconstitutional. The Westphal v. City of St. Petersburg case challenged the current Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Benefit for worker’s compensation. Currently workers are entitled to 104 weeks of indemnity benefit in the event of an injury resulting in a TTD loss. The Supreme Court also decided that this was unconstitutional and increased the benefit to a maximum of 260 weeks. Based on those decisions, there will be a significant increase in the overall cost for worker’s compensation in Florida. Since the state of Florida determines the rates that all carriers must offer coverage at, the state was compelled to increase those rates. I often hear from prospective clients, “Worker’s compensation is just worker’s compensation; it is what it is.” I’m sure this is what they’ve been told over the years, however, this is far from the truth. While the worker’s compensation system can appear to be punitive and unforgiving, business operators can take control of their program and ultimately reduce the costs of their worker’s compensation insurance. Every year the National Council on Compensation Insurance or NCCI evaluates a majority of the businesses in the state of Florida. w w w.FRL A .org

Based on a number of factors, NCCI produces an experience modification worksheet or MOD for those businesses. The experience modification worksheet is basically a road map to your company’s worker’s compensation program. The par level scoring for the MOD is a 1.0, so if your score is below that number you will be entitled to a premium discount. Conversely if your score is above a 1.0 you will be paying an increased premium. All employers receive the same schedule A benefits regardless of what they are paying in premium. The driving force behind your MOD is based on your payroll vs. claims expenses incurred. Companies with the exact same payroll and exposures can be paying the same, a fraction of, or double or triple in premium compared to their competitors based on the MOD score. Controlling your MOD is of the utmost importance for any business trying to keep their annual insurance costs in line. When evaluating an experience modification worksheet, we are typically able to identify errors in the MOD that are costing businesses unnecessary premium dollars year after year. We find errors in payroll, classification, overturned fraudulent claims, as well as subrogation returns and reserves. These errors can be identified, but more importantly they can be corrected. This can often lead to a return of overcharged premium dollars to the client if corrected quickly. In addition to correcting errors that are artificially inflating your MOD, there are a number of business practices we coach our clients on that can have a lasting impact on the MOD. Worker’s compensation claims are

inevitable for most businesses, but how the company reacts to the claim in conjunction with the carrier can significantly impact the MOD and ultimately your annual premium. Return to work programs, safety and drug free programs, as well as other individual operating procedures can have a significant impact on the annual premium. Some of the other mitigating factors in keeping comp costs in line come from the carriers themselves. While the individual rates for each job code are determined by the state of Florida and are uniform among all of the carriers, the dividend programs and claims handling procedures are not. Carriers may offer dividend programs which can have a significant impact on the overall cost of the annual premium. Some carriers utilize in-house legal counsel and medical staff as opposed to going outside, which has an effect on the amount paid for a claim ultimately impacting the MOD. While there are hundreds of carriers offering worker’s compensation in Florida, certain carriers specialize in the hospitality industry. In short, individual companies have much more control over their MOD and their annual premium than they realize. Worker’s compensation is truly a team effort between the business and its agent in order to be successful. With the right coach and a business that is an active participant, your company can win at the game of worker’s compensation. Brendan Griffin is a Commercial Property & Casualty Agent with Brown & Brown Insurance of Florida, Fort Lauderdale Division and specializes in the field of Hospitality. bgriffin@bbftlaud.com; 954-331-1375 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP Thursday, December 8, 2016 | 8:00am - 12:30pm One Ocean Resort & Spa, Atlantic Beach, FL The ONE PLACE operators can find solutions for immediate impact to their business; the ONE EVENT operators can learn best practices, share best practices and grow; the ONE WORKSHOP designed for operators to leave with practical, real life tips and techniques to accelerate their business.

PURCHASE TICKETS NOW BEFORE WE SELL OUT! Restaurant and Hotel Operators = $10 Suppliers = $20 Here’s the line-up: 8:00 – 8:30 am 8:30 - 8:45 am 9:00 - 10:00 am 10:15 - 11:00 am 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

www.frla.org/event/indie-ops

Networking Breakfast Welcome Announcements Keynote: Kathleen Wood “BOLD Leadership: How to Compete & Win in Today’s Marketplace” Power Panel: Successful Independents Sharing Best Practices Keynote: Jim Knight “Hiring Rock Stars”

For sponsorship or additional event information, visit the event webpage or contact Marjorie Stone, Director of Corporate Events, at 850-524-1747 or mstone@frla.org.

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 WORKSHOP SPONSORS Presenting

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Gold

Bronze

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W H AT ’ S H A P P E N I N G

TOP TRENDS

Movers & Shakers RCS Adds Training Manager to Orlando Area

Jacqueline Hayman is a new addition to the RCS Team. She is the Regional Training Manager for portions of Orlando. Jacqueline’s professional experience includes posts as a marketing consultant for local radio in Daytona Beach; special events coordinator for the Daytona Regional Chamber of Commerce; and food and beverage operations management, including time with Club Corp. A multi-lingual graduate of the University of South Florida, Jacqueline enjoys community service, having served as President of Halifax Business & Professional Women, Board Member of the Daytona Beach Half Marathon, Member of Volusia Young Professionals Group, Mentor for the FUTURES Foundation Take Stock in Children program, and Small Business Committee Member of the Daytona Regional Chamber of Commerce. Jacqueline’s experience in community relations, customer service, sales management and operational management will serve RCS and FRLA well, and we look forward to great success in Central Florida.

JACQ U E L I N E H AY M A N

Jodi Cross

Corey Mobley

FRLA welcomes Jodi Cross, our new Palm Beach Regional Director. Jodi has over 20 years of experience in sales and marketing in the hospitality field, including with Sonesta, Doral Golf Resort & Spa and PGA National Resort & Spa. She has a Masters in Business Administration from Nova Southeastern University, founded a marketing consulting firm, and married her passion for travel and desire to give back by launching a peer mentoring organization for women CEOs. FRLA is proud to add her to our growing team.

Corey is our new regional manager for the EscaRosa Chapter (formerly Penscola). Corey has worked as a general manager and marketing coordinator for Johnny Huston’s Grille and Bar. His strong restaurant background comes with fundraising and event experience. Corey will be working part time selling and retaining memberships and promoting and running chapter events.

Top Trends! Culinary Themes 1. Chef-driven fastcasual concepts 2. Hyper-local sourcing 3. Natural ingredients/ minimally processed food 4. Environmental sustainability 5. Artisan butchery

TOP TABLESERVICE MENU TRENDS

Preparation Methods 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Pickling Fermenting Smoking Sous vide Fire roasting

Global Flavors 1. Ethnic condiments / spices 2. Authentic ethnic cuisine 3. African flavors 4. Ethnic-fusion cuisine 5. Latin American flavors

*SOURCE: National Restaurant Association, What’s Hot in 2016 chef survey, Food and Menu Trends Survey, 2015 w w w.FRL A .org

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A LA CARTE

HELL’S KITCHEN Season 16 of “Hell’s Kitchen” heats up FOX every Friday night at 8 p.m. ET/PT. Watch 18 ambitious chefs face executive producer and award-winning Chef Gordon Ramsay and be put through rigorous culinary challenges for a chance to win the coveted head chef position at Yardbird Southern Table & Bar. 
 Throughout the season, tensions will rise and emotions will flare as Chef Ramsay puts on the pressure, demanding absolute perfection. Each week, the hopeful chefs are put through hellishly intense tasks, keeping only those who possess the right combination of ingredients to run an entire restaurant. The last contestant to withstand the pressure of “Hell’s Kitchen” will claim the grand prize — a head chef position at Yardbird Southern Table & Bar at The Venetian Las Vegas. 
 “Partnering with Chef Ramsay and Hell’s Kitchen was a perfect fit. We have enjoyed watching the growth of the show and are excited to be a part of season 16. Offering one of the talented chefs an opportunity to become our head chef at the acclaimed Yardbird Las Vegas in The Venetian is an honor, and we look forward to seeing the season unfold,” said John Kunkel, Founder/CEO 50 Eggs, Inc. 
 Get a first glimpse of the new season of “Hell’s Kitchen” at youtu.be/DnCN91lWAZg.
 Viewers can also follow the series on Twitter at @hellskitchenfox and Facebook at facebook.com/hellskitchen.

RAPID FIRE CHALLENGE Hundreds of attendees watched as rising star chefs competed in the Rapid Fire Challenge: Appetizer Competition, which was moderated by Edible Orlando. Tavoris Ingram of The Twisted Tuna won the competition and $1,000 for his delicious Tuna Poke appetizer. The other two competing chefs were Ernie Danjean of Dockside Café and Eric Parker of Duffy’s Sports Grill. The competition was judged by Ryan Vargas, Emeril’s Tchoup Chop; James McGuinness, Keiser University; and Keith Keogh, Total Food Network. 42  W I N T ER

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A LA CARTE

CAMARADERIE FOUNDATION UPDATE In early fall, the Camaraderie Foundation held its Third Annual American Patriot’s Gala at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. Over 450 people attended this year, and $150,000 was raised at this event for veteran’s and their families’ counseling. On Sept. 11 starting at 5:00 in the morning, 25,000 flags were planted at Orlando’s Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, which is across from City Hall in downtown Orlando. These flags represented the 25,000 estimated vets that have PTSD in Central Florida alone. When you consider that the Camaraderie Foundation will help around 270 veterans and/or their families in 2016, you can see what a monumental job the foundation is facing. Orlando’s Police Chief, John Mina, and Fire Chief, Roderick Williams, participated as well. It was an awesome sight on the 15th anniversary of 9/11 and fitting to draw attention to those that have been protecting us and that now need assistance. If you would like to help, please go to camaraderiefoundation.org and give what you can to this important veterans assistance program. Every $100 provides a counseling session that can save a vet’s life.

PFIZER FOUNDATION GRANTS DOH $1 MILLION FOR ZIKA RESPONSE The Florida Department of Health received a grant from the Pfizer Foundation for $1 million to support efforts in responding to the Zika virus. One hundred percent of the funds will be used for Zika activities. Grant funds will be used for assisting with ongoing investigations, education efforts, supplies and response to resident and visitor concerns. In addition, DOH will use part of the funds to purchase additional laboratory equipment and supplies. The department will also be using these funds to purchase Zika prevention kits to distribute in Miami-Dade County. “A challenge like Zika requires every organization to bring forward their resources and expertise to manage health risks that exist for people in affected areas of the country,” said Sally Susman, Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Pfizer Inc. “We welcome the opportunity to partner with the Florida Department of Health and health care professionals in the state to address today’s health needs while work continues to identify longer-term solutions.”

NIGHTCLUB & BAR SHOW FRLA members are invited to attend Nightclub & Bar Show, the nation’s most influential gathering of bar and nightlife professionals! Annually, for more than 30 years, close to 36,000 bar, beverage and hospitality professionals gather from across the U.S. and 50 other countries to learn, network and grow the industry. The 2017 show will host more than 600 suppliers on our innovative expo floor, leading experts from the industry in our comprehensive conference program and an unparalleled nightlife lineup. Don’t miss your opportunity to explore the bar and nightlife world, March 27–29, 2017, at the Las Vegas Convention Center! Register today at ncbshow.com and save an extra $10 off early bird rates! Use promo code: FRLA10. All Nightclub & Bar Show registration passes include: Exhibit Hall Floor, F&B Innovation Center, Craft Brew Pavilion, Emerging Brands Pavilion, New Product Pavilion, Keynotes, Shake It Up Competition & Welcome Kickoff Party. w w w.FRL A .org

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LEADERSHIP

Get to Know Your 2017 FRLA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

DON FOX

KEVIN SPEIDEL

Chairman of the Board, FRLA 2017

Vice Chairman, FRLA 2017

Please read about your new Chairman on Page 10 of this magazine.

Speidel is Vice President of Resort Operations for Hilton Grand Vacations (HGV). In this role, he is responsible for the operations function of all Hilton Grand Vacation locations domestic and international. A 15-year employee of Hilton Worldwide, Kevin joined HGV in July of 2016. Prior to working with Hilton, Speidel was general manager of the Sheraton Miami and the Providence Marriott. He is a graduate of Lynn University with a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in hospitality management.

CHAU NGUYEN Secretary-Treasurer, FRLA 2017 Nguyen has been an Owner/Operator of the Kobe Japanese Steakhouse chain in Central and West Coast Florida since 1984. Kobe has been recognized as being one of the top Japanese restaurants in the region for the last 30 years. Along with his restaurant businesses, Nguyen also owns several real estate investments in the Central Florida area. Nguyen holds several degrees including MBA, CPA/CMA. 44  W I N T ER

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ALAN PALMIERI FRLA Director 2017–18 Palmieri is a co-owner and a partner in Marlow’s Tavern. With over 40 years in the restaurant industry, he is currently responsible for the growth, development and operations of the Marlow’s brand in Florida. Palmieri retired from Darden Restaurants after 13 years as Executive Vice President of Operations in the Specialty Restaurant Group. Prior to Darden, he worked with S & A Restaurant Corporation working for Steak & Ale, Bennigan’s and Bay Street Seafood Restaurants. He served as President and CEO of a 110-unit Boston Market franchise in Southern California. In addition, he spent three years at the Boston Chicken headquarters as one of eight founding officers holding several positions.

SHELDON SUGA FRLA Director 2017–18 As Vice President/Managing Director of Hawks Cay Resort located in the Florida Keys, Suga is a seasoned hospitality executive with over 35 years of industry experience. After graduation from college, Suga entered Sheraton’s General Management Training program. During his time with ITT Sheraton, he attained the ITT Ring of Quality Worldwide Team Award and served as general manager at properties in West Hartford, New York City, Halifax, LaJolla and Los Angeles. He also worked in Tokyo and was country manager for ITT Sheraton. Additionally he has worked for Wyndham Hotels and Resorts, the Gaylord Palms and the Gaylord National Resort. He received a degree in Hospitality Management from Ryerson University in Toronto.

OLIVIA HOBLIT FRLA Director, 2016–17 Hoblit is the General Manager of Seaside Amelia Inn on Amelia Island. Through her leadership, the hotel has moved to the ranking of #2 Best Hotel on Amelia Island by Trip Advisor. Prior to this position, she was general manager of the highly acclaimed Elizabeth Pointe Lodge. She has over 18 years of experience in hospitality, six years in food and beverage and 11 years in law for personal injury and worker’s compensation.

LINO MALDONADO Immediate Past Chair, FRLA 2017 Lino Maldonado is Vice President of Operations for the Gulf Region for Wyndham Vacation Rentals North America, and Lino sits on the executive board of VISIT FLORIDA serving as Treasurer. Most recently Lino was selected by Governor Rick Scott as one of his six appointees to serve on the Gulf Consortium which is tasked with helping to structure the state’s expenditure plan for the settlement funds from the BP Gulf Oil spill. w w w.FRL A .org

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E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule CITY

MAR LOCATION

JAN

FEB

FT WALTON

10

7

7

Wyndham Garden

PENSACOLA

24

21

21

TBD

PANAMA CITY

10

14

28

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall

TALLAHASSEE

26

23

30

Lively Technical Center

MELBOURNE

12

6

9

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

ORANGE PARK

3

7

7

Hilton Garden Inn

ORLANDO

3

7

7

Embassy Suites

SARASOTA

12

9

2

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

TAMPA

23

13

20

Hilton Garden Inn

KISSIMMEE

23

20

20

TBD

BRANDON

20

17

17

TBD

LAKELAND

12

13

10

Courtyard by Marriott

PORT RICHEY

18

15

15

Days Inn & Suites

JACKSONVILLE

12

9

7

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

10

7

1

Four Points by Sheraton

ST AUGUSTINE

18

15

9

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

FT MYERS

9

23

2

Hilton Garden Inn

NAPLES

26

16

9

DoubleTree Suites

MIAMI

19

28

16

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

10

7

7

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami Blue Lagoon

ISLAMORADA

26

21

6

Islander Resort

KEY WEST

17

7

21

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

GAINESVILLE

5

2

2

Best Western Gateway Grand

OCALA

24

21

21

TBD

ST PETERSBURG

20

15

10

TBD

BOCA RATON

18

8

8

Hilton Garden Inn

FT LAUDERDALE

31

21

28

Embassy Suites

FT PIERCE

19

16

16

UF Indian River Research

WEST PALM BEACH

10

13

13

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

17

14

21

Ramada Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

11

9

8

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

* Dates are tentative

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule. To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least 3 business days prior to exam date, or 10 Business Days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

safestaff.org 46  W I N T ER

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RESILIENCE

Post-Matthew Florida Is ‘Open For Business’

W

hen a disaster strikes, it is vital for our hospitality community to band together to quickly recover, reopen and get back to business, not only for its bottom line, but for its employees and community. After Hurricane Matthew, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and VISIT FLORIDA traveled Florida’s northeast coast to spread the message that Florida’s tourism industry is “Open for Business.” Industry partners Carol Dover, President/CEO of FRLA, and Will Seccombe, President of VISIT FLORIDA, visited with local hotels, restaurants and

attractions to encourage residents and visitors to dine, stay and play in the Sunshine State. The tour began in Daytona Beach with a press conference kicking off Biketoberfest at the Daytona International Speedway. Next, the tour traveled up the coast of Flagler Beach where industry representatives enjoyed local cuisine at Vessel Sandwich Co. and had a close encounter with dolphins at the Marineland Dolphin Adventure in the Palm Coast. The final stop of the tour was in St. Augustine on Florida’s Historic Coast which featured a second press conference highlighting the tourism industry’s strength and resilience.

Florida law requires mandatory foodhandler training. FRLA’s online training is easy, self-guided, and this interactive online training program will teach you the basics of safe food handling and preventing foodborne illness.

w w w.FRL A .org

Official DBPR Contracted Provider

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P R O S TA R T

Perspective of a Mentor to a Culinary Program Management Competition By JOHN BARLI, Prostart Management Competition Mentor with Eastside High School

I

am now in my fifth year of mentoring culinary students at Eastside High School in Gainesville. I was skeptical when I was told these high school students were going to design their own restaurants for a management competition. It’s one thing to come up with an idea for a restaurant; it’s another to build a menu, complete with recipes, formulate a marketing plan, design a floor plan for the front and back of the house, come up with a budget, put it all in a PowerPoint and then present it to a group of industry professionals and ask them to invest in the business. I am always up for a challenge, so watching the sun rise over University Avenue, I drove to Eastside High School to see what they had to show me. The students I have worked with have had incredible dedication and commitment to the UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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program and to the competition; they work harder than many professionals I have seen in the industry. The competition team has to be at school earlier than the other students; they meet before the first period and then meet at other times throughout the day and many times stay after school as well. Team competition cannot be won in the normal class time; it requires enormous amounts of free time. By the time I begin working with the students, they have come up with their concept, they design a preliminary menu, recipes, floor plan and marketing scheme. Now comes the fun part — ­ will it work? I normally just have to ask a question, and the students start to realize what will work and what won’t, and more importantly, they learn to tell me why. What I see on the first day looks entirely different

when the students leave to go to competition. More important than the recipes, menu, floor plan or marketing is the team’s ability to present and defend their idea. This is where we really see them grow, what to wear, how to wear it, how to stand, body language, shoes, where they should look, when to smile and when not to. These are skills that they will use throughout their lives. They learn them for competition, but I teach them for their future. By the time they leave for competition, I have heard the presentation so many times I could do it by myself without notes, and their confidence level is through the roof. I have never actually attended the competition — I think I would be too nervous. I just wait for the call or text ... “We won!” It makes all those sunrises on University Avenue worthwhile. GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


P R O S TA R T

Eastside High School won 1st Place Overall, 2nd Place in Culinary, 1st Place in Management and 2nd Place in Edible Centerpiece at the 16th Annual Florida ProStart Competition.

2017 CORPORATE EVENTS CALENDAR

MARK YOUR CALENDARS AND GET PLUGGED IN

FLORIDA TOURISM DAY

FALL BOARD MEETING

MARCH 14 , 2017

SEPTEMBER 10 11

Tallahassee, FL

SUMMER BOARD MEETING JUNE

Location TBD

MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT AUGUST 2 3

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL

HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY SEPTEMBER 11

Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, FL

Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa Fort Lauderdale, FL

NRA/FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC

FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW

SEPTEMBER 13

SEPTEMBER 10 12

The FRLA hosts a full slate of industry events throughout the state. Visit frla.org and click on the orange button, “FIND A CHAPTER,” to get plugged in with your local FRLA Representative. For a full listing of FRLA corporate and regional events, visit frla.org/events.

Championsgate Golf Course Orlando, FL

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, FL

EMAIL OR CALL MARJORIE STONE, DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE EVENTS, AT w w w.FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

49


REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

BAY

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION

DIXIE

DANNETTE LYNCH DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

727.642.3404

PINELLAS, HILLSBOROUGH, SUNCOAST, POLK, SPACE COAST

dannette@frla.org

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

561.410.0035

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

LEVY MARION

727.953.6803

VOLUSIA LAKE

CITRUS

NORTHEAST FLORIDA

SUMTER

904.880.6964

cbergamo@frla.org

JODI CROSS

CLAY

LAFAYETTE

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO ORANGE PASCO

PALM BEACH & HENDRY COUNTIES

jcross@frla.org

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

561.744.7669

POLK

PINELLAS

BREVARD

INDIAN RIVER

LOIS CROFT 239.339.7692

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

DESOTO

HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

SOUTH FLORIDA

lhernandez@frla.org

MARTIN CHARLOTTE

888.612.7115 LEE

DANIEL LAVAN

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

SAINT LUCIE

lcroft@frla.org

LYNNE HERNANDEZ 305.710.3962

MANATEE

GLADES

HENDRY

PALM BEACH

CENTRAL FLORIDA BROWARD

407.280.6599

dlavan@frla.org

NICK LOWE 850.661.4256

MARCO ISLAND

TALLAHASSEE & NORTHWEST FLORIDA

CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

SANTA ROSA & ESCAMBIA COUNTIES

cmobley@frla.org

ROSIE RICCARDI 407.304.8773

MONROE

nlowe@frla.org

COREY MOBLEY 850.375.8373

COLLIER

BROWARD COUNTY

asallee@frla.org

844.253.0850


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s r o t i s i V e r o M t A c D I a r R t t O A L F T I S I V p i a h s h r e n wit t r a P g n i t e k r Ma

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Winter 2016-17  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed towards our hotel a...