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105 MILLION VISITORS TO FLORIDA IN 2015

SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION Social Media, EMV, Millenials and More HOT MENU TRENDS Locally Sourced Tops the Chef Survey Results 2016 SINE DIE REPORT Full Rundown on Proposed Legislation

Florida's Joseph Kadow Elected 2016 Chairman of the Board for the National Restaurant Association SPRING 2016 | WWW.FRLA.ORG


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contents SPRING 2016 WWW.FRLA.ORG

DEPARTMENTS

4 Food for Thought Florida’s Hospitality Industry Is Filled with All-Stars 4  From the Chairman’s Desk Bad Words 8  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 10  Chefs that Sizzle Tarzi Benazzouz, The Parisian Restaurant, Jupiter 12  A La Carte Industry Information You Need to Know 16  Path to Power Follow Industry Leaders’ Path to Success 21  On the Menu Fresh From Florida: Going Local 22  Tourism Day at the Capitol Photo Highlights 24 Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 40 Educational Foundation $1.4 Million Awarded in Scholarships 42 Movers and Shakers What’s Happening with Industry leaders 45  Powerhouse Luncheon South Florida Hosted the Lt. Governor and Industry Dynamos

50  Corporate Calendar Find Out About FRLA’s Corporate Events

SPECIAL FEATURES 9 VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

Interact With Visitors at the Official Florida Welcome Centers

18  Legislative Updates

Read About How this Year’s Legislative Session Will Impact the Industry

28  Technology Special Section

Cutting-Edge Information You Need to Run Your Business

38 Secrets of Success — Little Palm Island The Island Retreat of Your Dreams

ON THE COVER: Bloomin’ Brands, Joseph Kadow, is the 2016 Chairman of the Board of the National Restaurant Association. w w w.FRL A .org

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FROM THE CHAIRMAN’S DESK

Florida’s Hospitality Industry Is Filled with All-Stars By CAROL B. DOVER

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his year, the national spotlight is on the Sunshine State. We are incredibly proud that our own Joseph Kadow is serving as the 2016 Chairman of the National Restaurant Association. For decades, he’s championed our industry’s success as an original member of the Bloomin’ Brands executive leadership team. Not to mention, he’s always been part of our FRLA family, along with his beautiful wife Teresa and daughters, Kate and Emily. His tireless efforts as an industry advocate certainly helped establish Florida as a mecca for world-class hospitality, and we look forward to his continued success. I am humbled to have the opportunity to sit alongside him and my other wonderful colleagues as I was elected to serve on this year’s NRA Board of Directors. Undoubtedly, we have a great story to share with the rest of the country. Here in Florida, we are projected to employ 1.5 million people by the 2019. That’s an increase of more than 30%. Plus, we’ve enjoyed record visitation — more than 100 million visitors in 2015! That’s quite an achievement and it can certainly be attributed to our fantastic

members, partners and sponsors. We truly appreciate your hard work and dedication. We were thrilled that hundreds of you could join us in Tallahassee for Florida Tourism Day to help educate the Legislature, media and our fellow Floridians about the issues facing our industry. With your support this session, we aggressively tackled the problems that may directly impact your bottom line and supported public policies that will help lift burdensome regulations. We encourage you to review our full Legislative Scorecard online, at FRLA.org. We are also excited our Great Florida Events program is continuing to build momentum. Co-sponsored by VISIT FLORIDA, it’s designed to promote the local tourism and hospitality industry throughout the year. In January, we kicked off another fantastic season of Emeril’s Florida on the Cooking Channel, featuring dozens of FRLA’s unique member properties. Be sure to read about the show on page 8. Then, flip over to page 24 to read about the incredible events we’ve already showcased around the state including the Space Coast Crab Smash and Clearwater Beach Uncorked, plus, the many others we’re

Carol B. Dover

looking forward to: Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In & Expo, South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival, Sunfest and Key West Songwriters Festival. We hope you enjoy this edition of FR&L Magazine and encourage you to mark your calendars for all of our must-attend events in your communities and across the state! It’s always a pleasure to celebrate our industry and the hardworking people like you, who make it a wonderful success. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Bad Words By LINO MALDONADO

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e are all guilty, so don’t even try to deny it. Those of you in management have taught your teams about them without even realizing it. Your associates repeat them to your customers nearly every day in our businesses. We all need our mouths washed out! Everywhere in the industry, including in my own marketing department, there are ugly, hateful and dark words like “shoulder,” “off” and “slow” being combined with beautiful, sunny and happy words like “season.” It’s funny to me that these combinations have somehow been ingrained into our vocabulary, and even the most seasoned marketers use them without even realizing it. Certainly 4  S P R I N G

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there are periods of time in each of our 67 counties that have historically been a little “light” on occupancy, but we shouldn’t continue to shun those periods into forever darkness by calling them nasty names. The good news is that it’s not too late. We should all agree to be friendlier toward these precious periods, to take the time to truly discover what is unique about them and tell their story. Who knows, if cared for and nurtured properly, they might just grow up to be strong, healthy seasons and take care of us someday …

Lino Maldonado 2016 Chairman of the Board F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


In their own words:

Why choose UnitedHealthcare?

Exclusive health care pricing and solutions for FRLA members from UnitedHealthcare Together, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) and UnitedHealthcare offer special advantages for your business: } Health care reform guidance and solutions around the Affordable Care Act

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} Exclusive savings on standard group medical plans and specialty benefits } Wellness programs and services } Bilingual resources for Hispanic/Latino owners, operators and employees Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business, and why others in the hospitality industry are choosing UnitedHealthcare for their health care solutions. Contact your broker, the FRLA or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at (301) 865-7058 or kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

“When it comes to the field of health care, we live in unprecedented times. Both the regulatory and business landscapes are shrouded by a dense fog of uncertainty. What’s more, when plotting a course for success over this rough terrain, a knowledgeable and trustworthy guide is a virtual necessity. At Firehouse Subs, we concluded long ago that the best course of action was to turn a negative into a positive. We took a leadership position in assessing the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and devised a course of action that we believe will help us achieve our business goals of growing sales and improving profitability. We felt so confident in our chosen course that we implemented the offer of qualifying insurance coverage for our hourly employees in 2014 (choosing not to take advantage of the one-year delay granted by the Obama administration). During our many months of studying the ACA and formulating our plan, the support we received from the team at UnitedHealthcare was invaluable. UnitedHealthcare stood side by side with us to help us understand the ever-shifting tenets of the ACA; they were our “go-to” resource. From beginning to end, they differentiated themselves from their competitors by demonstrating their desire to understand the needs of our business. And along the way, they helped us educate our franchise community and arm them with the knowledge they need to make a quality decision about their own path. And finally, as we moved toward the finish line of finalizing the products we would offer our employees, they proved themselves to be a superior choice in the marketplace. I highly recommend UnitedHealthcare for any business seeking a valued partner in today’s challenging business environment.” Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer Firehouse of America, LLC (dba Firehouse Subs), Jacksonville, Florida UnitedHealthcare customer

©2015 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. UHCFL748696-000


CHAIRMAN

SUPPLYING SEAFOOD TO THE FINEST RESTAURANTS THROUGHOUT FLORIDA

Lino Maldonado ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals VICE-CHAIR

Don Fox Firehouse of America, LLC SECRETARY-TREASURER

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Fort Lauderdale DIRECTORS

Chau Nguyen Kobe Japanese Steakhouse

Pam Avery Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore, Tampa

Paul Hineman First Watch Restaurants, Sarasota IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee PRESIDENT/CEO

800-831-4111 • Apalachicola, Florida • Waterstreetseafood.com

Carol B. Dover, FMP EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley EMAIL: EDITOR@FRLA.ORG PUBLISHED BY

Rowland Publishing, Inc.

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1932 MICCOSUKEE RD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 Phone: 850-878-0554 Fax: 850-807-5037

LUXURIOUS. GENTLE. REFRESHING.

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

For more information, visit us online or call us today!

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Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad Rates and Submission Guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org

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Check frla.org/great-florida-events for more information about our upcoming events! Don’t miss Sun ‘N Fun, SunFest, South Walton Beaches Wine and Food Festival, Key West Songwriters Festival and more!

Clearwater Beach Uncorked was a major success!

Peter Miller of the Bass 2 Billfish TV show and Central Florida Chapter members rode the FRLA Seafood Float in the Florida Citrus Parade, one of FRLA’s Great Florida Events.

FRLA sponsored the Space Coast Crab Smash, and it was fun for all!

Emeril’s Florida Season Four Emeril’s Florida Season Four is a 13-episode series highlighting the Sunshine State through the eyes of Emeril, on location, with a focus on food, cooking, events and activities around the state. Throughout the fourth season that aired on the Cooking Channel, Emeril visited several of Florida’s top restaurants and resorts. He also prepared some of his favorite recipes that feature some of the best seafood Florida has to offer. The FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA sponsor the series; it is currently re-airing on the Food Network. 8  S P R I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Interact with Visitors at the Official Florida Welcome Centers By KATE CHUNKA, VISIT FLORIDA, SENIOR MANAGER, INDUSTRY RELATIONS

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roviding fresh citrus juice, clean restrooms and friendly service as you enter the state, the five Official Florida Welcome Centers welcomed more than 2.7 million visitors to Florida in 2015. Located at the state entry lines on I-10, US231, I-75, I-95 and at the State Capitol, these Welcome Centers provide a warm experience for visitors and a unique opportunity for businesses to get their message in front of prospective guests. Did you know that roughly 30% of visitors that stop at the Welcome Centers don’t have finalized vacation plans as they begin their travels? This stat presents an excellent opportunity for businesses to market themselves to visitors and drive them to book additional nights and new experiences during their stays. Getting involved at the Official Florida Welcome Centers is easy. There is truly something for everyone. Brochure rack space display tops the list as an inexpensive way to get information about your businesses to visitors. On average a guest will pick up 10 to 14 brochures, so having a presence at the entrance to the state becomes very important. In fact, 34% of travelers modified their trip due to the information they received at a Florida Welcome Center. Another costeffective way to entice visitors is through VISIT FLORIDA’s Transparency Lease Program. Backlit transparency space is available to prominently displayed photos of your business, event or promotion on the Welcome Centers’ walls.  These displays are available for 12 month leases, but special event leases can also be arranged with the Visitor Services staff. VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partners also receive a discount on both of these programs. For businesses that want a more engaging experience with travelers, there are sponsorship opportunities for a Kids Corner, designed to entertain and educate children while parents seek out travel information. Similarly, there’s an opportunity to “Own a Welcome Center.” Limited only by your company’s imagination, your company can display buildouts and banners, provide literature and giveaways, and make a real impact on travelers as they pass into Florida. These opportunities are open to VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partners only and offer great exposure through an immersive experience for everyone that walks through the Welcome Center’s doors. VISIT FLORIDA also welcomes you to join us each season for our Welcome Center festivals. These events are open to both Marketing Partners and Web Partners/Non-Partners and allow businesses to share an 8’x2’ table with an industry member and bring giveaways, coupons, brochures, characters and specials to interact directly with visitors! These events are on a first-come, first-served chance at putting your business w w w.FRL A .org

front and center with guests as they enter the state. With millions of visitors making the stop on their way into the state at VISIT FLORIDA’s Welcome Centers, participating in programs to get their attention is a must. As new opportunities are frequently available, it’s a great idea to head over to www.VISITFLORIDA.org/ planner to review available Welcome Center programs. You’ll also find contact information and program details for everything VISIT FLORIDA offers. To stay connected, follow our corporate blog, Sunshine Matters. Subscribe today at sunshinematters.org, and connect with our social media channels! For questions and more information, contact at kchunka@VISITFLORIDA.org. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Restaurateur Tarzi Benazzouz OWNER AND RESTAURATEUR, THE PARISIAN RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR JUPITER, FLORIDA The Parisian Restaurant and Wine Bar brings a slice of Paris to Palm Beach County. The restaurant serves French cuisine with a modern twist. The exclusive wine list offering features French wines and two from Washington State and California from the boutique Steele Winery. Restaurateur Tarzi Benazzouz opened The Parisian Restaurant and Wine Bar in Jupiter this past December to sellout crowds and rave reviews. As a hands-on owner restaurateur, Tarzi designed the menu concept himself. With an entire family in the restaurant business in Paris, France, Morocco and Dusseldorf, he understands what it takes to communicate the French concept to different people. Inspired by French greats Alain Ducasse and Jacques Pepin, he collaborates with his Chef de Cuisine to create an experience that is easily interpreted in terms of taste and is also enjoyable, while providing a truly Parisian experience. Describe your restaurant concept.

To bring a Parisian brasserie dining experience to Palm Beach County. This restaurant has been my sole vision ­— from décor, to music, to the menu. What inspires your menu?

It is a modern twist on French classics, as well as new ideas from brasserie fare such as Chicken Fricasse with Calvados Sauce or Sole

Restaurateur Tarzi Benazzouz

with a lemon, shallot and leek sauce. The two culinary icons that greatly influenced our concept here are Alain Ducasse and Jacque Pepin. This is because they are taste and presentation oriented. Describe your wine bar.

Our wine list features wines by the glass as specials on a daily basis, as well as our regular list which is exclusive to The Parisian. The list is comprised of French wines along with offerings out of California and Washington from the boutique Steele Winery. Do you create menu items to complement your wines?

Yes, in fact, we strive to provide a total experience that includes wine, of course. Describe some of your most popular menu items.

One of the most popular items is our Duck Confit because we make it from scratch, but we modernize it with the sauce and the vegetable selection. Another popular item is the Grilled Salmon with garam masala and coriander. What is your “sizzle” — for example, cuisine and food that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using?

Our sizzle is the unique way we present classics and the new sauces we pair with them. Additionally, we strive to provide a “total Parisian experience” in terms of food and wine.

Chef’s Duck Confit

HotChef? Are You Considered Among 2016 Hottest Chefs? Florida’s

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Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to susie@mckinleyhome.com. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine asR I DA Chefs ThatR ASizzle! F LO R ESTAU N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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A LA CARTE

FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services Hosted Spring Break Training Event Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS), a subsidiary of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA), presented its 2016 Spring Break Hospitality Workshop promoting a safe and successful spring break season in mid-February. This free responsible-vendor training session brought together businesses, their employees and Florida Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco agents to promote alcohol sales/service best practices, raise staff awareness and provide valuable resources to assist businesses during the busy season. The event was hosted at the Boardwalk Beach Resort in Panama City Beach. “In preparation for Spring

RCS Director of Operations Christy Crump explains the importance of alcohol compliance training.

Break, we wanted to give local businesses the necessary tools and tips that cultivate a safe and enjoyable environment. We were pleased to present this opportunity, free of charge, to help businesses be responsible vendors. As Florida’s premier provider of responsible alcohol vendor training, we are passionate about risk management and were thrilled to help serve the Panama City Beach community,” said FRLA patron safety. Participants learn alcohol to patrons. Alcohol beverVice President of Education and about alcohol laws, avoiding servage licensees who successfully qualThe Fing RLA  underage App  –  Apatrons n  Overview   Training, Geoff Luebkemann.  and preify and remain responsible vendors Responsible vendor training is venting over-serving patrons. enjoy certain protections under the         a program offered to any entity The training contributes to law for their license and may re   with an alcoholic beverage license. fewer underage alcohol sales, duce their risk liability exposure Instructors present state-manreduced DUIs What   and dincreased oes  the  App  dand o?  costs. dated content that encourages professionalism and knowledge For more information, please :   selling Highlights   and   visit provides   best management practices and among those and serving regcomplianceusa.com information   on   all   upcoming   FRLA   events   including   the   ability   to   What does the App do? register  for  an  event  right  from  your   smart  phone!   • Highlights upcoming FRLA events with the ability for event registration right from your   :   Allows   FRLA  smartphone! to   send   messages   • Asmart   llows phone   FRLA about   to send messages about directly   to   your   important items including legislative alerts important   items   including   legislative   or special member’s only offers. alerts   or   special   offers   for   our   • Saves FRLA events directly to your calenmembers  only.   dar. This includes chapter events right in   backyard! your :   Save   FRLA   events   directly   to   your   How do I download calendar.   This   includes   chapter   the App? events  right  in  •yiour   backyard!   Phone users go to the App Store and search for   FRLA. • Android users go to the Google Play Store How  do  I  download  the  App?   and search for FRLA. :   Simple.   Pull   out   your   smart   phone   and   search   for   the   Florida   Restaurant   and   Lodging   Association.   Download  and  begin  connecting!    

THE FRLA APP IS PRESENTED BY AMERICAN EXPRESS. THE FRLA  APP  IS  SPONSORED  BY  AMERICAN   EXPRESS  AND  VISIT   FLORIDA.    

 

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A LA CARTE

Student Chef Culinary Competition Night at the Panthers Arena Recently, high school culinary students in Browa rd County created some fabulous dishes and received an opportunity to prepare menu items alongside the chefs at Centerplate at the BB&T Center where the Florida Panthers Play. Guests then had an opportunity to vote on their favorites. Winners of the Florida Panthers Student Guest Chef Competition: Club Lexus: William Morales, Walter T. McFatter Technical High School Dish: Vietnamese Shrimp and Vegetable Summer Roll Club 93: Rasheed Beckford, Fort Lauderdale High School Dish: Pasta Louisiana Each winner received a Florida Panthers jersey. Congratulations to all who participated!

Participating School

Instructor

Atlantic Technical High School Coral Glades High School Coral Springs High School Deerfield Beach High School Dillard High School Fort Lauderdale High School McFatter Technical High School Nova High School Plantation High School Stoneman Douglas High School Stranahan High School Taravella High School

David Barbieri Robert DeSabatino Aruna Lien Jennifer McKay Raymond Willey Jerry Guajardo Krysta Tamma Stefany Coalla Mesha Wallace Ashley Kurth Lana Tillman Scott Goodman

Save the Date! FRLA Installation and Awards Gala September 28, 2016 • 6–10 PM Hyatt Regency Orlando 9801 International Drive Orlando, FL 32819 Hotel Room Block information is coming soon, but if you would like to book hotel reservations now, here are several FRLA hotels near the Orange County Convention Center: Loews Hotels at Universal Orlando 407-503-9001 loewshotels.com Loews Royal Pacific Resort at Universal Orlando 407-503-9065 loewshotels.com/royal-pacific-resort Loews Portofino Bay Hotel 407-503-1000 loewshotels.com/portofino-bay-hotel Hard Rock Hotel Universal Orlando 407-503-9065 loewshotels.com/hard-rock-hotel

Ashley Lemond of Atlantic Technical High School with her cake she prepared for the chefs at Centerplate at the NHL’s Florida Panthers Arena last November.

Hyatt Regency Orlando 407-345-4545 orlando.regency.hyatt.com

Coca-Cola and FRLA Help Flint, Michigan, Residents At the request of Representative Allan Williams, Coca-Cola and the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association recently donated 200 cases of Dasani water to residents of Flint, Michigan. The community is experiencing a water crisis caused by lead contamination in the water supply. w w w.FRL A .org

Hilton Orlando 407-313-4300 thehiltonorlando.com Country Inn & Suites Orlando 407-313-4200 countryinns.com/orlando-hotel-fl-32819/florlint Rosen Shingle Creek 407-996-9939 rosenshinglecreek.com

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From complementary flavors

to compliments to the chef

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  5. Natural ingredients/minimally processed foods   6. Environmental sustainability   7. Healthful kids’ meals   8. New cuts of meat   9. Sustainable seafood 10. House-made/artisan ice cream 11. Ethnic condiments/spices 12. Authentic ethnic cuisine 13. Farm/estate branded items 14. Artisan butchery 15. Ancient grains 16. Ethnic-inspired breakfast items 17. Fresh/house-made sausage 18. House-made/artisan pickles 19. Food waste reduction/management 20. Street Food/ food trucks F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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LET’S GET FLORIDA ENGAGED ABOUT THE ISSUES THAT ARE INFLUENCING THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

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RLA grassroots momentum is continuing to grow. As we continue to make our  mark in the Orlando area, we have started expanding  our efforts to  Miami and Tampa. It is critical that  FRLA represent the hospitality industry with  a voice at the local level. If we aren’t in the forefront of industry information, we will not have leverage to assist when an issue arises. Whether meeting with local elected officials, gathering at events to discuss the industry or conducting weekly communications, the participation we have received thus far is extremely positive.   “Our members are the greatest advocates for our industry. We are thrilled that they are continuing to build momentum at the local level by sharing their dedication and passion for hospitality. It’s important that we remain engaged in our communities across the state, and we are excited about this new effort,” said Carol Dover, president and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. Joe Kefauver, managing partner at Align Public Strategies, has been FRLA’s advocate in assisting the expansion of the Engaged Groups throughout Florida. He believes that “the importance of the grassroots program is redefining the role our industry plays in the communities in which we operate. We’re identifying ways to position our industry of opportunity as a vehicle to help local leaders solve problems.” In 2016, we anticipate expanding to additional markets, such as the greater Jacksonville area. If you are a grassroots advocate, you will be hearing from us soon.

w w w.FRL A .org

Align Public Strategies, a full-service public affairs and creative firm that helps corporate brands, governments and nonprofits navigate the outside world and inform their internal decision-making. Align specializes in service sector industries. For more information please email Dan Murphy at dmurphy@frla.org or call him at 850-224-2250 ext. 235.

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PATH TO POWER

PAY LESS for GAS PATH TO POWER SPEAKERS AT FRLA’S 2015 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT

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RLA’s 2015 Marketing and Operations Summit featured Path to Power, a session that offered a panel of accomplished female leaders who shared the decisions, mistakes and daily struggles they endured on their paths to success. They provided practical advice on techniques to build a sustaining career and balanced life that combines professional achievement with personal fulfillment. We are pleased to provide to FR&L readers some of the information that these leaders shared. Panelists included: Jennifer Gudenkauf, VP of Concept HR and Leadership Development, Bloomin’ Brands; Krista L. Schulte, Vice President, Food Service on Premise, East Zone, Coca-Cola; Jennifer Swan, (Moderator), Sr. Director of Human Resources and People Development, First Watch; Barbara Bowden, Managing Director of Operations, Loews Hotels; and FRLA’s CEO/President Carol B. Dover. Watch the full panel: youtube.com/frlanews.

Q: TELL THE AUDIENCE HOW LEADERSHIP HAS COME EASY TO YOU AND HOW IT HAS BEEN A CHALLENGE.

Jennifer Gudenkauf: “The thing that came easy to me as a leader was the ability to motivate people. I came from a large family; I am the oldest girl. I’ve spent a lot of time raising a lot of my siblings, and being able to motivate somebody to get results and get them the right way was something that came easy to me. Where I probably struggled a little bit more was remembering that everyone brings a different strength to the table and might go about how to get a result a little differently than I do. So, learning how to find the strengths that each individual has and capitalize on those and teach them how to be strong and get results through their way, not my way, was something 16  S P R I N G

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I had to learn over time. I made some mistakes early in my career trying to bulldoze my way through things; I learned very quickly the value of letting each individual use their own unique approach to solving a challenge. Not every approach taken is successful and sometimes they fail, but they learn from that and then will be better. That is the best motivation that I can give to anyone.” Q: ARE THERE ANY HINDRANCES THAT YOU SEE PREVENTING WOMEN FROM GETTING INTO LEADERSHIP?

Barbara Bowden: “I think the most important thing for any leader is understanding the culture of the organization, understanding the leadership culture of the organization, but leading in our own style. One of the pitfalls F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


PATH TO POWER

Choose Infinite Energy &

SAVE! Barbara Bowden, Loews Hotels

of some women may be that they try to overcompensate in some ways and by dong that, they aren’t as authentic. That is never well respected. I think to be a good leader you have to be an authentic leader, which means that you show up as yourself You aren’t showing up as a version of yourself that you think the company wants to see. As I have observed women leaders, I think that is one of the pitfalls; they don’t come to the table being themselves. I don’t think that people respect that as much as if you come with your own style.”

AD Krista L. Scchulte, Coca-Cola

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A MALE COUNTERPART REGARDING HOW TO WORK BEST WITH THE FEMALE LEADERS ON YOUR TEAM?

Krista Schulte: “Personally I don’t see that there should be any difference between working with a female or a male. If you feel that they are acting differently or treating you differently, it sort of sets up the differences in gender. You need to understand the Hermann Whole Brian model or something like that. I love that the red, yellow, green, blue describes how people like to work. Are they the brainstorming type or the process type? Are they red, which is the type of person that likes to bring in a personal touch or talk about their family at the start of a meeting? Adjust your style to work with your colleagues. If you are working with a female leader that wants to spend the first five minutes talking about the personal stuff, go there. If you have a female leader that does not, don’t go there. Adjust to the style, not the gender.” w w w.FRL A .org

Jennifer Swan, First Watch

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Jennifer Gudenkauf, Bloomin’ Brands

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEGISLATIVE UPDATES

2016 LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

This year, FRLA tracked dozens of bills that directly impact the hospitality industry. On this final day of Legislative Session, we put together a comprehensive list that details many of the biggest issues we faced this year. BUSINESS RENT TAX: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 116 (Sponsored by Sen. Hukill, R – Port Orange) HB 215 (Sponsored by Rep. Ahern, R – Seminole) HB 247 (Sponsored by Rep. Fitzenhagen, R – Fort Myers) HB 7099 (Sponsored by House Finance & Tax Committee) Florida is the only state that imposes a specific business rent tax. Florida charges 6% on the total rent paid for any commercial property including storefronts, offices and warehouses. HB 215 would have begun the elimination of the business rent tax by removing the tax on the first $10,000 of the total rent or license fee charged by the lessor in 2016, and increasing $10,000 each year thereafter until 2024. SB 116, HB 247, and HB 7099 would have reduced the tax levied on the total rent or license fee charged for real property from 6% to 5%. Although the House included the 1% reduction in their major tax reduction package, the Senate removed it from consideration in the final joint tax reduction package sent to the Governor.

TOURIST DEVELOPMENT TAX (BED TAX): PASSED SB 1520 (Sponsored by Sen. Gaetz, R – Destin) HB 1203 (Sponsored by Rep. Drake, R – Marianna) HB 7099 (Sponsored by House Finance & Tax Committee) There was an assault on the Tourist Development Tax (TDT) this year. The cause of this unprecedented raid on the TDT was due to three northwest counties wanting to use the TDT to fund public safety services. HB 7099, originally included all 18  S P R I N G

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counties that collected TDT. The bill was then reduced to apply to only “coastal counties.” The bill was further narrowed to “Gulf Coast Tourism Counties.” The final result, while not ideal, applies to only Bay, Okaloosa and Walton counties. HB 7099, permits up to 10% of TDT funds to be used for emergency services, including law enforcement. None of the three qualifying counties may use TDT funds to supplant the normal operating expenses of such emergency or law enforcement services. The county commission, by majority vote, must approve any reimbursements made for emergency services upon receipt of a recommendation from the Tourist Development Council.

VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING: $76 MILLION With FRLA as one of its biggest allies, VISIT FLORIDA received additional funding in the 2016 budget. VISIT FLORIDA, the state’s official tourism marketing corporation, serves as Florida’s official source for travel planning to visitors across the globe. VISIT FLORIDA is not a government agency, but rather a notfor-profit corporation created as a public/private partnership by the Florida Legislature in 1996. As the state’s No.1 industry, tourism was responsible for welcoming 105 million visitors in 2015 and employing 1,199,200 Floridians in the tourism industry.

EXPANSION OF GAMBLING: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 7072 (Sponsored by Senate Regulated Industries) HB 7109 (Sponsored by House Regulatory Affairs Committee) HB 7111 (Sponsored by House

Regulatory Affairs Committee) HB 7113 (Sponsored by House Regulatory Affairs Committee) For the first time in six years, a gambling bill received traction in the House. Historically the house has rejected attempts to bring new casinos to South Florida. The 122 page “proposed committee substitute” would keep most of the proposed Seminole Compact intact, while allowing for expanded gambling throughout the state. HB 7109, was voted favorably in the House Regulatory Affairs Committee, but died on the House floor. The Senate version did not gain traction, after various interest groups pushed for changes that were not part of the deal approved by tribal officials. Along with the expansion of gambling, the attempt to legalize and regulate fantasy sports leagues also died this session. In December of 2015, The Seminole Tribe of Florida agreed to pay $3.1 billion to the state over seven years, under an agreement announced by Governor Scott. The deal is believed to be the largest tribal revenue-sharing agreement in the country, and is triple the current $1 billion the Seminoles have paid to the state over the past five years. The fate of the Seminole compact is still unclear as lawmakers could not agree on legislation to ratify a gambling agreement with the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

KEGS (ALCOHOL ISSUES): PASSED SB 698 (Sponsored by Sen. Bradley, R – Orange Park) HB 1079 (Sponsored by Rep. Rodrigues, R – Ft. Myers) A bill that will allow a distributor to implement an annual or semi-annual inventory and

reconciliation process of kegs allowing the loss or variance to be paid by the vendor on a per-keg basis. Requires a food service establishment to meet at least 51% of its gross food and beverage revenue during the first 60 day operating period. Prevents a municipality or county from requiring an additional license or tax for the privilege of selling alcoholic beverages in railroad stations and on passenger trains. Requires a municipality or county to solicit a qualified nonprofit civic or charitable organization for a temporary permit. A nonprofit civic organization, charitable organization, municipality, or county may be issued no more than 12 permits per calendar year.

SEPARATION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES (ALCOHOL ISSUES): NEVER HEARD IN COMMITTEE SB 420 (Sponsored by Sen. Benacquisto, R – Ft. Myers) HB 245 (Sponsored by Rep. Trujillo, R – Miami) Alcoholic drinks are regulated by Florida’s Beverage Law. This law controls the way alcohol is manufactured, distributed and sold to consumers. This is known as the “three tier system.” The law requiring liquor to be sold only in an establishment with a separate entrance from where wine, beer, and other goods are sold, was established in Florida in 1935. There are currently 30 states that allow the sale of liquor without a separation requirement. SB 420 and HB 245 would have repealed the law restricting consumer access to alcoholic beverages by requiring liquor to be sold in a location separate from groceries and other goods.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


LEGISLATIVE UPDATES FRLA will continue to build the coalition and educate lawmakers on the benefits of repealing this outdated and inconvenient separation law.

POWDERED ALCOHOL (ALCOHOL ISSUES): DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 392 (Sponsored by Sen. Margolis, D – Miami) HB 1107 (Sponsored by Rep. Rouson, D – St. Petersburg) In March 2015, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, granted federal approval for a powdered version of alcohol referred to as “palcohol.” Powdered Alcohol can be mixed with liquid to become an alcoholic beverage.SB 392 and HB 1107 would have prohibited the sale, use and possession of powdered alcohol except for research purposes.

SRX REQUIREMENT MODIFICATION (ALCOHOL ISSUES): PASSED HB 1417 (Sponsored by Rep. Young, R – Tampa) HB 1433 (Sponsored by Rep. Magar, R – Hobe Sound) A bill that amends the local exception in Hillsborough and Martin County, reducing the square foot requirement from 4,000 square feet to no less than 2,500 of overall floor capacity, and to allow the sale of nonalcoholic beverages to be included with food, from which the restaurant needs to derive at least 51% of its gross revenue.

REQUIREMENT MODIFICATION (ALCOHOL ISSUES): PASSED HB 709 (Sponsored by Rep. Williams, D – Tallahassee) A bill that revises the boundaries of downtown Tallahassee, allowing nonprofit civic organizations to purchase temporary permits to sell alcoholic beverages at outdoor events.

POLYSTYRENE PRODUCTS: PASSED SB 1010 (Sponsored by Sen. Montford, D – Quincy) w w w.FRL A .org

HB 7007 (Sponsored by Rep. Raburn, R – Valrico) A bill that preempts to the state the regulation of polystyrene products, most commonly known as Styrofoam, by entities regulated by CH. 500. F.S., the Florida Food Safety Act.This preemption does not apply to ordinances or provisions enacted before January 1, 2016, and does not limit the authority of local government to restrict the use of polystyrene by individuals on public property, temporary vendors on public property, or entities engaged in a contractual relationship with the local government.

VACATION RENTAL PROPERTY: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 1158 (Sponsored by Senator Jack Latvala, R – Clearwater) HB 1295 (Sponsored by Representative Trumbull, R – Panama City) SB 1598 (Sponsored by Senator Margolis, D – Miami) HB 4045 (Sponsored by Representative Richardson, D – Miami Beach) SB 348 (Sponsored by Senator Altman, R – Cape Canaveral) SB 1158 and HB 1295 would have required a vacation rental to display a valid certificate of registration number in a rental listing or advertisement. SB 1598 and HB 4045 would have allowed a local law, ordinance, or regulation to regulate the duration or frequency of rental of vacation rentals. SB 348 would have prohibited a local law, ordinance, or regulation from regulating the duration or frequency of rental of vacation rentals.

HOSPITALITY EDUCATION PROGRAM (HEP): FULLY FUNDED HEP provides important workforce-related training and transition programs through Florida’s public school system to students interested in pursuing careers in the hospitality industry. The money in the Division of Hotels and Restaurants’ Trust Fund is derived from a

$10 license surcharge paid exclusively by Florida’s restaurant and lodging establishments for the sole purpose of funding this important program. Approximately 30,000 students and more than 250 high schools participate in HEP. This program helps the hospitality industry grow its future workforce by producing a pool of certified and immediately employable workers with the proper skill set to be an asset to the industry.

BUDGET: PASSED After the required 72-hour “cooling off” period lawmakers voted and passed an $82.3 billion budget. There is speculation as to the extent Governor Scott will use his veto pen, after lawmakers rejected several of the Governor’s budget priorities, including the push for $250 million in economic incentives. Depending on the use of Governor Scott’s veto pen, the Legislature could re-convene to override any veto by the Governor. The approval of the budget is the one duty the Legislature is required to complete each session.

PUBLIC LODGING ESTABLISHMENTS: DIED IN COMMITTEE HB 637 (Sponsored by Rep. Porter, R – Lake City) The bill would have prohibited public lodging establishments from discriminating against a guest based solely upon the age of a person 18 years of age or older.

PAID SICK LEAVE: DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 294 (Sponsored by Sen. Thompson, D – Orlando) HB 205 (Sponsored by Rep. Williams, D – Tallahassee) A bill that would have required all state or local government agencies and all private employers to provide employees with 1 hour of sick and safe leave per every 30 hours worked.

Employers with 10 or more employees would be required to provide paid compensation for sick or safe leave, while employers with less than 10 employees are not required to pay, but employees are still entitled to unpaid sick and safe leave.

RESTAURANT GRADING: NEVER HEARD IN COMMITTEE SB 496 (Sponsored by Sen. Sobel, D – Hollywood) The Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR), Division of Hotels and Restaurants, licenses, inspects and regulates public lodging and food service establishments in Florida under Chapter 509, Florida Statute (FS). DBPR effectively protects public health and safety, evidenced by an 84% decline in restaurant foodborne illness since 1997. Comprehensive, reliable and abundant restaurant inspection data is currently and conveniently accessible to the public. SB 496, would require all public food service establishments to display a letter grade based on a point system.

*MINIMUM WAGE: NEVER HEARD IN COMMITTEE SB 6 (Sponsored by Sen. Bullard, D – Cutler Bay) HB 109 (Sponsored by Rep. Torres, D – Orlando) Florida adjusts the state minimum wage annually based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as part of the Minimum Wage Act. Since the beginning of indexing in 2005, the minimum wage rate has increased an average of fifteen cents per year. Currently, Florida’s minimum wage is $8.05 per hour and the federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. SB 6 and HB 109 would have required employers to pay employees a minimum wage at an hourly rate of $15 for all hours worked. * Indicates the issue may appear on the ballot as a constitutional initiative. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEGISLATIVE UPDATES

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association’s 2016 Legislative Scorecard PASSED FAILED Passed

ISSUE

Failed

Issue

ISSUES OVERVIEW Issues Overview

Business Rent Tax

Reduced the tax levied on the total rent or license fee charge for real property from six percent to five percent.

Tourist Development Tax (TDT) Business Rent Tax

Applies only to Okaloosa, Bay, and Walton counties. Allows reimbursement of up to ten percent of the TDT revenue for emergency services. Must have a majority vote of county commissioners upon receipt of a recommendation Reduced the tax levied on theDevelopment total rent orCouncil. license fee charge for from the Tourist

VISIT FLORDA Funding

With FRLA as one if its biggest allies, VISIT FLORIDA received $76 million in the 2016 budget.

real property from six percent to five percent.

Expansion of Gambling Tourist Development Tax (TDT) Kegs

Applies only to Okaloosa, and Walton Counties. Would have allowed additionalBay, slot machines, provided lower Allows taxes for pari-mutuelsof with machines andofallowed decoupling. reimbursement upslot to ten percent the TDT revenue for

VISIT FLORIDA funding

With FRLA as one if its biggest allies, VISIT FLORIDA received $76 million in the 2016 budget.

emergency services. Must have a majority vote of county commissioners upon receipt of a recommendation the Tourist Allows an annual or semi-annual inventory and from reconciliation Development Council. process of kegs, by qualified vendors.

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Expansion of Gambling

Kegs

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Would have allowed slot machines, provided lower The Lean and Meanadditional Deal taxes for pari-mutuels with slot machines and allowed • $35K franchise fee for the first location. decoupling. • $10K franchise fee per additional restaurant on multi-unit agreements for three or more traditional restaurants. To meet the growing demand for healthy options made with fresh ingredients that taste great, UFood Grill expects to open more than 100 new restaurants over the next four years and is seeking experienced restaurant operators and multi-unit investors for franchise development. For more call or findinventory us online.and reconciliation Allows aninformation annual or semi-annual

process of kegs, by qualified vendors.

Copyright (C) 2016 Healthy Acquisitions Corp. All rights reserved. This advertisement does not constitute an offer to sell a franchise. The offer of a franchise can only be made through the delivery of a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD). Certain states require the we register the FDD in those states. This communication is not directed by us to residents of any of those states. Moreover, we will not offer or sell franchises in those states until we have registered the franchise (or obtained an applicable exemption from registration) and delivered the FDD to the prospective franchisee in compliance with applicable law.

Contact Bob DiBartolomeo, VP of Franchising 850-668-1010 at (850) 668-1010 for more information. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & 2/12/2016 LO D G I N G 9:30:09 A S SO CIAM AT I O N


ON THE MENU

Fresh From Florida By COMMISSIONER ADAM H. PUTNAM

M

ore than 47,000 farmers, ranchers and fishermen in Florida work day in and day out to produce the food and fiber that Florida — and the world — depends on. Florida agriculture produces a variety of world-class products — nearly 300 different commodities — and generates more than $120 billion in annual economic impact. As Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture, one of my most important missions is to strengthen and grow Florida’s agriculture industry. Through the “Fresh From Florida” brand, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services raises awareness for the high-quality products we produce in Florida and promotes the sale of Florida commodities. From TV commercials and digital advertising to in-store promotions and so much more, we’re telling the “Fresh From Florida” story.  And this year, we’ve expanded our “Fresh From Florida: On the Menu” program, which highlights restaurants that feature

delicious, fresh ingredients from Florida, including produce grown by local farmers and seafood caught in Florida’s waters. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is a great partner in expanding this program so visitors and residents alike can enjoy Florida cuisine. Once part of the free program, members can use the iconic “Fresh From Florida” logo in promotional materials, as well as on their menu. To date, more than 100 Florida restaurants have joined the program. I am excited about the success and momentum of the “Fresh From Florida” campaign, and I know that we’re having a positive impact on Florida’s agriculture industry and our hospitality industry. I encourage you to join the “Fresh From Florida: On the Menu” program to support

Florida’s farmers, ranchers and fishermen, as well as to provide patrons with a unique Florida experience. I value your partnership with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and your continued support for our efforts. To learn more about the “Fresh From Florida: On the Menu” program, visit FreshFromFlorida.com. Adam H. Putnam is Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Florida law requires mandatory foodhandler training. FRLA’s online training is easy, self-guided, and this interactive online training program will teach you the basics of safe food handling and preventing foodborne illness.

w w w.FRL A .org

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FLORIDA TOURISM DAY In the early days of the 2016 Legislative Session, the Partnership for Florida’s Tourism proudly celebrated Florida Tourism Day in Tallahassee. Hundreds of tourism and hospitality leaders from across the state spent the day educating the legislature, media and Floridians about the importance of our tourism industry.

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1. Lt. Governor Lopez-Cantera greeted the Tourism Day attendees. 2. Florida CFO Jeff Atwater reported on the positive financial status of the state. 3. Commissoner Adam Putnam spoke to the crowd. 4. Attorney General Pam Bondi discussed scams and others issues that business owners should be aware of. 5. DBPR Secretary Ken Lawson fired up the program with his “crazy pants” and the important role that customer service plays in DBPR’s role for the industry. 6. Senator Jack Latvala discussed industry issues in the Senate with Tourism Day attendees. 7. FRLA representatives discussed industry issues with Florida House and Senate Leadership and members from their districts. 8. Singer Island Marriott GM Roger Amidon and guests walked the halls of the Capitol on Tourism Day. 9. Group of Tourism Day participants. 10. Senate President Andy Gardiner met with industry leaders on Tourism Day 11. FRLA representatives discussed industry issues with Florida House and Senate Leadership and members from their districts. 12. Florida’s state Chef + Florida’s Culinary Ambassador, Justin Timineri prepared red beans and rice for the street party. 13. FRLA Chairman Lino Maldonado and friends at the street party. 14. FRLA’s Ray Kimball and guests enjoyed the cold afternoon of Tourism Day. 15. Leaders of the Partnership for Florida Tourism posed for a moment. (left to right-Malinda Horton, Will Seccombe, John Webb, Bill Lupfer, Robert Skrob, Carol Dover, Bobby Cornwell and Michelle Hillery). 16. River Grace, Trevor Grace, Chuck Wray, Katy Cleary, Dannette Lynch, Andy Brouillard, Eileen Maxham, Christian Passath, David Stefan and Jimmy Walker enjoyed Tourism Day. w w w.FRL A .org

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HOSPITALITY HAPPENINGS

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

FRLA’s Central Florida Chapter hosted a breakfast at the Disney Wide World of Sports. Those on the meeting panel were: Leigh Doyle, FRLA Central Florida Chapter President; Lindsey Sandrin, Orlando Film Commission; Kimberly Faulk, VISIT FLORIDA; Jamie Entwistle - ESPN Wide World of Sports; Dannette Lynch, FRLA Regional Director/Director of Membership; Mitch Doran - Universal City Walk; Dan Leaphart, Cox Events Group.

FRLA’s Tallahassee Chapter gives back! Amanda Morrison of Social Catering and Nick Lowe with Unconventional Strategies presented a check from FRLA to The Shelter — a local homeless agency.

FRLA received recognition for support of the 2016 Menu Directions Conference.

Florida ProStart students got some catering experience at the Space Coast Crab Smash held in Port Canaveral.

RCS regional manager Caitie Mook visits with RCS clients from Buster’s Bait and Tackle at RCS Spring Break event. See Page 12 to read more!

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HOSPITALITY HAPPENINGS

Retiring Director of Hotels and Restaurants, Diann Worzalla, received recognition from the Hotels and Restaurants Advisory Council.

Northwest Florida Chapter Director, Ray Green and guests attended the Engage Tallahassee meeting.

High school students from all over the state competed in the 2016 Florida ProStart Culinary Team Competition.

Thanks to our Central Florida FRLA members that rode the FRLA floats in the Florida Citrus Parade. w w w.FRL A .org

Martin Ocampa won the Keiser High School Recipe Challenge awarded at the ProStart Culinary competition.

Pinellas Chapter’s Installation Dinner was a success!

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JOIN HOSTING FRLA CHAPTERS FOR AN UNPRECEDENTED TRAINING OPPORTUNITY TO EMBRACE THE “FISH” PHILOSOPHY & EXPERIENCE! Want to learn to create a workplace where enthusiasm and productivity flourish? SOUTHWEST FLORIDA Tuesday, May 10 8–11:30 a.m. SUNCOAST Tuesday, May 10 2–4:30 p.m. PINELLAS & HILLSBOROUGH Wednesday, May 11 8–11:30 a.m. CENTRAL FLORIDA Thursday, May 12 8:30–10:30 a.m.

PRESENTS

Charthouse Learning in partnership with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association brings you one of the most popular training programs ever as an exciting and interactive experience — a FISH! Experience. This exciting experience features usable ideas, storytelling, exercises, networking and humor to bring passion and purpose to your work and life. Here’s some of what you’ll take home from a FISH! Experience: • • • •

Practical tools to bring the FISH! Philosophy to life Proven strategies to increase morale, retention and revenue Rekindled passion for what you do and what your organization can become An understanding of how to begin culture change at your workplace

DEENA EBBERT

The FISH! Philosophy is a set of simple, practical tools to help you create the work culture you’ve been looking for. It’s a way to build stronger relationships that equip you to face your challenges more effectively. The FISH! Philosophy fulfills the most basic needs of human beings who, in turn, fulfill the needs of the organization — more connected teams, better communication, extraordinary service and higher retention. FOR FURTHER ATTENDANCE OR SPONSORSHIP INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT DANNETTE LYNCH, REGIONAL DIRECTOR, AT (727) 642-3404 OR DANNETTE@FRLA.ORG

Fuel your success with propane

Florida Propane Gas Safety Education and Research Council For more information, visit PropaneFL.com or email info@FloridaGas.org

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

Lt. Governor Keynoted South Florida Regional Powerhouse Luncheon Alongside All-Star Panel of Accomplished Female Hospitality CEOs FRLA recently hosted the South Florida Regional Powerhouse Luncheon at Jungle Island in Miami. The event, designed to provide exclusive industry insights and share tips to build a sustaining career, featured Lieutenant Governor Carlos LopezCantera, National Restaurant Association President/CEO Dawn Sweeney, American Hotel and Lodging Association President/ CEO Katherine Lugar and FRLA President/ CEO Carol Dover. “I was thrilled to be on a panel with so many incredibly talented leaders who are filled with invaluable knowledge about success and specifically, our hospitality industry,” said Carol Dover, president and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “I was humbled to share the stage with them and enjoyed the experience of being with these leaders and all of our colleagues in South Florida. Carlos Lopez-Cantera is the 19th Lieutenant Governor of Florida. He is the first Hispanic elected to hold this position in Florida. He has been part of the team that has brought over 850,000 jobs to the state, lowered taxes for Florida families, reduced government regulation and increased education spending and achievement for Florida’s students, including making higher education more affordable for Florida’s students and veterans. As president and CEO of the National Restaurant Association, Dawn Sweeney has been instrumental in focusing the mission of the association through a unique, multi-year strategic plan, highlighting key areas of opportunity within the restaurant industry. Before joining the National

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Restaurant Association, Sweeney was president and CEO of AARP Services. Her 25+ years of marketing, advocacy and policy experience also include leadership positions at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and the International Dairy Foods Association. As the head executive of AH&LA, Katherine Lugar implements and directs AH&LA’s services and works directly with the volunteer officers and board of directors in determining the industry’s major strategic initiatives. In addition, Lugar also oversees AH&LA’s two affiliate organizations, the American Hotel & Lodging Educational Foundation (AH&LEF) and the Educational Institute (EI). Lugar has more than 20 years of experience in private sector public affairs, working on Capitol Hill and previously served as executive vice president, public affairs, with the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA).

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SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION

Technology is the key to a successful business. Check out what FR&L has put together in our Special Technology Section.

Digital Natives By DAVE REID

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magine not knowing what it is like to have never had a cell phone. To have lived without email and the ability to text. For many of us, this sounds great, and it was our reality. For millennials the very idea is terrifying. Many of today’s operators remember getting our first fax machines. It was like an episode of Star Trek (“Beam me up Scotty”). Our first cell phones were the size of a house, but man, if you were lucky enough to own one, you sure looked cool. I remember trying to use email with this great website called AOL that announced “you’ve got mail” with each new message – imagine that with today’s email volume. We would log on and go watch an episode of XFiles while the speedy 56k modem worked to download a few messages, which we could retrieve an hour later. And it was magical because it was the fastest documents had ever been sent. Thank you, Al Gore. So who are these millennials who do not know what it is like to have lived without instant access to information? To be hip, I will use Wikipedia’s definition of the millennials: “Millennials (also known as the  Millennial Generation[1]  or  Generation Y) are the demographic cohort following Generation X. There are no precise dates when the generation starts and ends; most researchers and commentators use birth years ranging from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.” So, what’s the big deal about millennials? Well… • Millennials are the largest and wealthiest generation ever. There are 82 million millennials that make up 1/3 of the U.S. population.  • The millennials already account for an annual $1.3 trillion of consumer spending, or 21% of the U.S. total, according to the Boston Consulting Group. • They spend 42% more per business trip than any other generation and 62% have extended a business trip into a vacation. I, for the record, have never done that. Millennials are changing the way we operate our businesses. And like it or not, they are a powerful demographic that cannot, and should not, be ignored. millennials come with some very common (and interesting) characteristics: • Some 84% of millennials said social opinions influence their purchase decisions, and 51% said they trust “strangers” more than friends. (Kelton Research) • They share and are connectors. They are three times as likely to have 500+ Friends on Facebook. • 80% report using two or more Internet devices while watching TV. It’s safe to say it’s hard to hold the attention of a millennial. • 42% watch TV online. millennials are never far away from their next text, with 80% sleeping with their cell phone next to the bed. • Millennials seek peer affirmation. “Like me.” • Millennials are “hooked” on social media in much the same way older generations are “hooked” on email at work.

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While they share many characteristics, millennials are not homogeneous. Their preferences are diverse. According to Pew Research Center, 43% of millennial adults are non-white, the highest share of any generation. So one message, and one concept, does not necessarily fit all. Some commonalities that many share: • Millennials embrace authentic cause marketing and align to brands that are socially responsible and with a purpose. • Millennials can make or break a brand with a few keystrokes. millennials want it fast and configured their way. What moves them? • Millennials are making the move to new brands that are designed around their style, such as: Marriott’s Moxy, Hyatt Centric, Aloft, Indigo, Tommie brand, Citizen M and Radisson Red. • Tech is king – Free, fast Internet is an expectation, not a luxury. They want to bring their own device, watch their own movies and listen to their own music. The upsell is now the spa and amenities. • They love tech ingenuity, particularly when it allows them to avoid human interaction: Starwood has introduced SPG Keyless, an app that allows members to check-in and unlock their door with their smartphone. • They do their research. On average a millennial checks 10.2 sources before booking travel services. And they do so using a variety of devices. Websites need to be accurate, targeted, mobile and adaptive to all screen sizes from phone to tablet to desktop. If your marketing plan includes targeting millennials, you should evaluate your business model and make sure it is in alignment with what millennials are looking for. Reaching millennials is easy. But make sure you understand what matters to them and that you are delivering on it or you are wasting your marketing dollars. millennials are accustomed to having a lot of choices. If you don’t deliver specific to their desires, they will vote with their feet and find another hotel or restaurant that gives them what they crave. Dave Reid is a Hospitality Industry Consultant, Former Executive Vice President of Operations, Millers Ale House Restaurants and Former Chairman of the Board, FRLA F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION

Don’t Let EMV Chargebacks Cut Into Your Profits By HEARTLAND PAYMENT SYSTEMS Heartland has shared some more information about EMV and chargebacks with FR&L readers in this article. With EMV in full swing in the U.S., chargebacks have been on the rise — especially for restaurateurs. We’ve summarized the high points here to help better understand chargebacks and the liability shift.

Why EMV, Why Now?

Protecting against counterfeit fraud is one of the main benefits to implement EMV because it’s virtually impossible to recreate the chip. The October 1, 2015 shift has caused some serious headaches, but the ultimate goal is to fix the payment ecosystem by heightening card security. There is, however, a glitch — if your equipment isn’t EMV compatible, then use of a fraudulent EMV card can go undetected.

code or creating/participating in a blacklist database that tracks customers frequently getting refunds on purchases. Top Merchant Categories At Risk For Chargebacks: • Petroleum/inside sales • Restaurants/bars • Quick Service/vending High Risk Areas: • • • •

TX, NY, CA, FL, IL, NJ Large cities/populated areas College towns Foreign cards/border areas

Here’s How It Works:

Fraudsters take the magnetic stripe information from a stolen EMV card and create a non-EMV forgery. However, the magnetic stripe information still identifies the card as EMV. If one of these forged cards is presented and swiped on an EMV-enabled terminal, the magnetic stripe data tells the terminal that this is an EMV card and notifies the cashier to dip the card in the EMV slot. The cashier then attempts to dip the card and notices the absence of the chip. Fraud averted. With an EMV reader, fraud is virtually impossible unless your terminal tells you to override and swipe — which then puts the liability on the issuing bank. EMV cards also decrease the chance of a data breach before hackers can get into your system and steal card information to make fraudulent cards. Chip cards store data in a more sophisticated, secure way than the magnetic stripe. If a hacker broke into your business’s EMV-enabled system, they would only obtain an encrypted version of the data — completely useless to fraudsters.

Disputes — What’s Different After October 1, 2015? EMV has designated dispute codes. The kind of fraud that EMV solves has always existed, but most merchants weren’t aware because it was the responsibility of the card issuer. Now the party with the least secure technology is liable, so merchants are seeing more of these codes on their chargeback statements. If a merchant doesn’t have a working EMV reader, then a chargeback can’t be disputed under this code — even if the merchant has evidence the customer was present. Another issue is “friendly fraud” — also called chargeback fraud. In this instance, customers fraudulently use the chargeback process to secure a refund. Consumers illegitimately dispute a transaction with the bank instead of contacting the merchant for a refund. In addition, friendly fraud is difficult to prove. A few ways to protect your business include: requiring a signature for goods delivered to customers, asking for credit card verification 30  S P R I N G

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Common Fraudulent Activities To Look Out For When an EMV Card Is Used: • I f an individual is using multiple cards, that should be a red flag. • Keep your eye out for large orders. Many times, if fraudsters are going to steal, they wantw to get the most value they can with one purchase. • Presenting gift cards that are actually EMV cards. Fraudsters are stealing numbers and instead of making magnetic stripe credit cards, they’re making gift cards. To summarize, the sooner you can process EMV cards, the better protected your business will be.

Best Practices If You Don’t Have EMV:

If you decide not to update your equipment, use these best practices and ways to identify counterfeit cards: • M  ake sure the receipt matches the card and verify the last four digits, expiration date and name. Also, compare the signature and facial features to the cardholder’s ID. • Bottom line: The safest bet to protect yourself from chargebacks is to upgrade to EMV. If you do have an EMV terminal, always process chip cards as chip transactions and swipe non-chip cards. • If a card is declined, ask for another form of payment—do not re-swipe or override.

What Heartland Does to Protect and Warn You About Chargebacks: • Makes sure that reported cards are closed • Monitors for issuer/customer abuse and looks for patterns • Monitors for incomplete or incorrect disputes

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5 Tips: More Engaging Social Media By MATT THOMPSON

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adison Social is “Tallahassee’s Social House.” Located next door to Florida State University, Madison Social always has something fun going on. They have made it their business to be present on social media with thousands of followers on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Check out their tips for social media marketing! 1. You are a media/entertainment brand. Most likely consumers place food and beverage in their monthly entertainment budget. So, meet them there. When you create content and events that serve an entertainment purpose, their social media feeds come alive. 2. Social media feeds are real estate. Location, location, location is key in real estate, and today’s digital real estate is the consumer’s newsfeed. Unless you are purchasing ads to expose your brand to new audiences, the consumer has already allowed you to be there. Don’t go from beach front to the suburbs. 3. You must pay for real estate. Just like in w w w.FRL A .org

the brick and mortar world, real estate isn’t cheap. The good news is that social media advertising is a less expensive alternative to traditional advertising (I would argue it is traditional and mainstream) and has the potential to have less waste. If you are active on Facebook you should already know that without media dollars your posts are going to virtually no one with a little help from media. Go ahead, spend the $20 and get back to being beach front. 4. Trust is today’s marketing currency. I spend a lot of time trying to move beyond the transactional nature of business. “I give you $5 and you give me a beer” is a necessity to make investors happy but that doesn’t necessarily build a brand. Trust takes time, but the more your audience trust you the less the relationship is about “what have you done for me lately.” 5. Managing expectations is 90% of the battle. Just like in our personal lives, we have to manage people’s expectations. In the food and beverage world, what I see in my newsfeed

should be what I receive when I order. Ultimately, managing expectations and trust go hand in hand. And yes, we are on Twitter (@madisonsocial) and Facebook (Facebook.com/madisonsocialtallahassee). Matt Thompson is the Managing Partner of Madison Social in Tallahassee.

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SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION

EMV and Restaurants in 2016 By MICHAEL W. ENGLISH

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ast year I wrote an article for the Florida Restaurant Association introducing EMV chip cards to its members. The article addressed how EMV cards would potentially impact the restaurant industry and explained liability for fraud that would begin on October 1 as well as other aspects of EMV. This year, I’m here to give you an update of the state of EMV in the U.S. to date. There is some good news, news to be concerned about and much clarification we can provide for restaurants.

150 Million Cards Issued and Counting

A big question posed by restaurants is “how many people are carrying an EMV chip card?” As of September 2015, there were 159.3 million EMV chip cards issued to U.S. cardholders. That may sound like a lot of cards but keep in mind that there are 1.9 billion cards issued in U.S. according to Statistics Brain, so we have a long way to go until every magstripe card is replaced with an EMV chip card. In regions and countries that have already migrated to EMV, issuance has taken about two to four years to migrate cardholders from magstripe to EMV. Also per Visa, there are 397,000 retailers, restaurants and businesses accepting payment that have installed EMV readers. That is only three percent of the total installed base and, as per industry analysts, we are not expecting to see 90 percent of the installed base migrate to EMV for another three to four years. Visa also reports that 7 percent of the ATMs in the U.S. are now capable of accepting chip transactions. It is estimated that there are between 10 and 12 million payment terminals installed for cardholder payment in the U.S. Why are the number of cards issued and number of EMV chip card readers deployed important? With an inconsistent cardholder experience, consumers will be confused as to how to pay with their EMV card when shopping and dining. Do they swipe or insert their card? When do they sign, input their PIN or is no verification needed at

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all? These factors will impact patron satisfaction, employee training and potentially your staffing at the POS checkouts or counters. Also to be considered is EMV contact and EMV contactless. EMV contact cards are inserted into the EMV reader or “dipped.” EMV contactless cards are tapped on the NFC reader. The vast majority of cards being issued in the U.S. are EMV contact, with a magstripe included in every card issued. Those cards do not include EMV contactless. However, with mobile payments such as Apple Pay, Android Pay and Samsung Pay becoming more mainstream, consumers could start using their phones for payment. Depending on the type of restaurant you have, EMV contactless be beneficial. Why? EMV contactless transactions are faster than an EMV contact transaction, typically a difference of two to three seconds. QSR, fast casual and restaurants with counter service should look at EMV contactless and NFC as a benefit to patrons, a way to manage queuing and an effort to streamline the payment process. As an FYI, the vast majority of EMV-capable devices being sold today provide EMV contact and EMV contactless as well as NFC.

And the Winner is “Chip and Signature”

Initially it was thought that that the credit card companies would implement cards preferring PIN entry also known as “chip and PIN,” whereas the cardholder enters a PIN similar to when you insert your debit card at an ATM. With PIN entry, only the cardholder (hopefully) knows the PIN, making the transaction safer for both the issuer and the restaurant. In reality, the vast majority of EMV cards issued by credit card companies in the U.S. today are “chip and signature,” which do not support PIN entry but do require a signature for transactions over a predetermined dollar amount. The issuance of “chip and signature” cards is actually a potential a benefit to businesses deploying EMV terminals as those devices largely support PIN entry for “chip and PIN.” When one considers the implications of the liability shift, the restaurant will benefit in the event of a chargeback for fraud. I’ll explain why in the very next section.

What is the Real Liability Shift Impact to Restaurants?

On October 1, 2015, card brands Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover established a liability shift as part of the U.S. migration to EMV. They mandated liability shifts for fraudulent transactions to the party using the least secure technology.

Let’s look at counterfeit card fraud liability since October 1, 2015. •

When a Visa-branded card is in question, liability for fraud F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


shifts to the business when a counterfeit magstripe from a chip card is used at a magstripe terminal. •

When a MasterCard- or American Express-branded card is in question, liability for fraud shifts to the business when a counterfeit magstripe from a chip card is used at a magstripe terminal.

Businesses accepting Discoverbranded cards that have deployed EMV technology will not be liable for counterfeit card transactions.

We also need to consider lost and stolen card fraud liability. •

 business is never liable for lost and A stolen card fraud with a Visa-branded card.

 or MasterCard- or American F Express-branded cards, liability shifts to the a business when a lost or stolen “chip and PIN” card is used at a less secure terminal or to the party using the least secure customer verification method — if the issuer and merchant are EMV enabled.

 erchants accepting Discover with M “chip and PIN” terminal capability will not be liable for lost or stolen card transactions.

There has been much said in the press about large number of chargebacks due to fraud, such as in the case of accepting lost, stolen and counterfeit cards to be expected due to the liability shift. For the restaurant industry, this can be summed largely up to be “Much Ado About Nothing”. Why? Restaurants historically have not suffered a large number or sizeable percentage of chargebacks due to lost, stolen and counterfeit card acceptance — unlike other businesses such as petro pay-at-the-pump providers, electronics retailers, fashion-wear specialty and other high-ticket businesses. For restaurants, the occurrence of chargebacks due to fraud runs traditionally at a nominal percentage of sales, which is why restaurants are questioning the rush to deploy EMV. That being said, high-end restaurants may want to migrate to EMV as their risk is higher that a QSR with an average ticket of $5 to $7. w w w.FRL A .org

EMV Fact and Fiction

There is also some misinformation about EMV and essential restaurant functionality that is being tossed around in blogs and Internet articles — specifically about tipping, tip adjustments and bar tabs. One leading misconception is that tips can’t be adjusted for an EMV transaction and that they must be done at the time of the EMV transaction. This notion is false. Not only can tips be adjusted, but restaurants with bar tabs can continue to support them after they’ve rolled out EMV. Here’s the scoop: •

An EMV “chip and signature” transaction can be adjusted after the transaction, just like a restaurant does for a magnetic stripe transaction.

EMV “chip and PIN” transactions can be adjusted after the sale, but it is recommended that the tip be entered at the time of customer PIN entry, saving time and streamlining the payment process.

Heartland’s Spectrum terminal application has supported tip adjustment for “chip and signature” since September 2014.

Heartland has deployed tens of thousands of EMV-ready terminals and PIN pads — many of those installed in restaurants accepting EMV. EMV also allows bar tabs. As per card brand rules (Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover), EMV bar tab functionality should closely mirror the way magnetic stripe transactions work today. The Open Tab function consists of an EMV authorization for a specified amount and the Close Tab function consists of an adjustment of the settled amount. The settled amount can be up to 20 percent higher than the originally authorized amount. If greater than 20 percent, the original authorization must be voided and you will need to run another full EMV authorization for the final amount with the EMV card — just like magstripe.

EMV and Tableside Payment

We have many restaurants asking “can the server handle the EMV card?” or “do we need to bring a payment terminal to the table?” There is nothing in the card brand EMV specifications or documentation that

prohibits a server from accepting an EMV card for payment, taking the EMV card to the POS system or terminal, running the card and returning with the receipt for signature. Nothing! If you have implemented EMV at the POS workstation and have not deployed a device to take to the table for customer-convenient payment, there are no rules that say you need to do elsewise. That being said, there are a few issuers and credit unions that have deployed “chip and PIN” cards. But, there is the consideration of if your establishment is located in an area frequented by international guests who prefer “chip and PIN.” In this case, it’s a good idea to run at least one “chip and PIN” device in your restaurant. A tableside payment device can be a great customer convenience tool that streamlines the payment process and eliminating errors as well as time for tip adjustments. There will be a time where “chip and PIN” cards become more commonly issued in the U.S., as the concern over cardholder verification grows.

What Should Restaurants Do That Have Not Deployed EMV?

Businesses that accept credit and debit cards should work with their acquirer or processor to evaluate current and anticipated fraud chargeback ratios. You should also think about your customers’ sensitivity to card security as well as how your competitors are going to respond to the EMV migration. Many consumers are looking to do business with merchants that they perceive to be secure, and EMV is a tool to curtail counterfeit cards acceptance. Also to be noted is the business’ location and demographics. Is the business located in areas that cater to customers carrying international cards? If so, it would be wise to consider upgrading to accept EMV cards. Keep in mind that every EMV card being issued in the U.S. will have a magnetic stripe on the back — ensuring that cardholders will always be able to use their cards. If you have questions about EMV, lowering your cost of payments, how to better manage your network, improving transaction security, payroll management or anything related to payment processing, please reach out to us at heartlandpaymentsystems.com/contact-sales/. Michael W. English is Vice President, Product Development for Heartland Payment Systems. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Gratuity Solutions Solves Tip Management By CARLO ZAMPOGNA

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ips have been a part of the history of the restaurant culture their tip income through a secure portal, and electronically stores all this in America since its inception. They are given in appreciainformation for the restaurant. tion of an employee’s service and remain a standard. Many A Solution Exists individuals make successful and professional careers of being Gratuity Solutions, a Florida-based company, has developed the first a tipped employee, server, bartender or other tipped staff member in and only fully automated “cloud based” software system that calculates a the hospitality industry. restaurant’s tip distribution through integration with their POS system, Calculating, recording and disbursing tip income can be quite a “GRATSYNC.” The GRATSYNC system and its associated modules challenging task, particularly at the end of long night. A minor mathmay be deployed with various POS systems throughout the restaurant ematical error or intentional miscalculation can lead to significant industry, and as a result of its innovation liability for restaurant owners. the GRATSYNC system is currently patent Recently, some establishments have depending. The company’s software system cided to eliminate employee tipping by "Gratuity Solutions has removes the daily task of manual calculaguests in their operations. Restaurants are improved the productivity tion, allocation and proper tip distribution either electing to pay tipped employees and further protects the restaurant and its through an increased hourly wage or by way of each and every restaurant employees with a precise, secure and insured of service charges. in which our Group has method of tip distribution and management Restaurants that are electing to pay for the restaurant’s tipped employees. By tipped employees are setting a fixed hourinstalled.  Not only have they implementing the GRATSYNC solution, ly wage for previously tipped employees. simplified our tip calculation restaurants can save time, eliminate the liaThese restaurants may increase per plate and distribution process, bility associated with tip distribution, and price in order to pay employees accordalso receive daily detailed electronic reports ingly, thereby passing on this increased but they have also facilitated for all tip distributions automatically. In fact, expense to the patron. This scenario elimiour compliance with certain the restaurant, managers and tipped emnates the patrons’ ability to decide whether ployees can view specific distributions from or not the server’s service should be rewardnew regulations including each shift in real time, via secure web portal ed by way of additional tip. With a fixed the Health Care Act. Gratuity and mobile app. Read more detailed inforhourly wage, tipped employees will not mation about the company and services at have an incentive for attentive service, as Solutions has exceeded our shift pay has already been set. expectations at every turn and gratuitysolutions.com. Gratuity Solutions has also developed In some cases, restaurants have imI would recommend Gratuity a way to eliminate cash tip outs, by way plemented a service charge or automatic of its Tip to Cards program. With Tip to gratuity. This solution is more palatable Solutions to any restaurant Cards, restaurant employers can direct to the tipped employee as it still permits that is looking to set itself deposit a tipped employee’s tip income the patron to reward proper service. Furdirectly to the employee’s personal debit thermore, the customer retains the option apart." — Stewart Newbold, Accordingly, GratSync’s restaurant to leave an additional tip with the service Director of Operations, Jose card. clients can now eliminate cash tenders or charge, creating an additional administraseparate checks for tip income by simply tive hurdle for owners in allocating, calcuAndres’ ThinkFoodGroup depositing it to the employee’s card. lating, distributing and reporting service By utilizing a secure tip distribucharges along with regular tips. tion system, management and tipped employees will be able to Employee tipping is regulated by the federal government. It is critical concentrate solely on service quality, therefore encouraging all that tipping is accounted for correctly. Due to the daily number of transto provide the best atmosphere for the patrons and adding to actions in the restaurant business, it can be difficult to accurately apporthe profits of not only the employees, but also the restaurant owners. tion and allocate earned tips to the correct employees for every shift daily. What if you could eliminate the element of human error? Imagine the Carlo F. Zampogna, Vice President, Director of Operations and Business security of an automated solution that calculates tips for the operation, Development, Gratuity Solutions. loads the tip income on to a debit card, allows tipped employees to see

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Check out GOapp!

Cool Gadgets

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o your customers, their smart phones are their connection to their world; their friends, family, work life and, most importantly, their social life. Beyond being a communication device, the smart phone entertains them, keeps them informed through apps and, at times, even comforts them. Like no other app on the market, theGOapp connects you to our members’ world by leveraging that influence and enhancing their device’s ability to provide them with relevant, real-time information about your business. TheGOapp is a new mobile app designed to socially brand businesses by turning existing clients into your best organic marketers while also pushing new business your way with a timed call to action style promotion / discount to entice passersby with an alert with your offer. Vendors now have the ability to control their marketing with a live on demand dashboard, data analytics and royalty free images of your consumers eating and drinking your products at your location. Now it’s easy reach out to nearby users with a click of a button through theGOapp.  

Try it out today with a commitment FREE trial. For more information please contact Frank: (954) 696-0882 frank@thegoapp.com thegoappworks.com Available for Apple & Android phones keyword: thegoapp

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Your guests are always looking for “mobile freedom.” Why not offer it to them in the way of GO PUCK, wearable power? This neat product can charge two devices simultaneously. And it’s super quick. Users can clip or mount it making it easy to take on the go. The device can also be customized. Check it out! www.gopuck.com

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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SPECIAL TECHNOLOGY SECTION

Where is Wi-Fi Headed in 2016 and Beyond? By TENNYSON LAJEUNESSE

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i-Fi is rapidly replacing the wired network as the primary means of connectivity. According to a new report from the Wi-Fi Alliance, more than 15 billion Wi-Fienabled products are expected to ship in 2016, joining an existing installed base of more than 6.8 billion devices. New standards and technologies are constantly being introduced to meet the insatiable demand for Wi-Fi. The 802.11n standard released in 2009 has given way to 802.11ac, which ups the ante significantly in terms of throughput. Without getting too deep into the “speeds and feeds,” 802.11ac uses more antennas, more spatial streams and a modulation scheme that — in a lab environment — delivers a theoretical data transfer rate of 875 megabytes per second. Your mileage may vary, but in the real world 802.11ac should provide three times the performance of 802.11n. Meanwhile, an alphabet soup of new standards is waiting in the wings: 802.11ad (WiGig), 802.11af (White-Fi), 802.11ah (HaLow), 802.11ax and 802.11ay. Each of these employs different techniques to improve performance, range or power consumption, depending upon the use case. All of this can leave a business owner or manager in a quandary. Do you keep what you have now and wait for the Next New Thing? Or do you go ahead and upgrade to 802.11ac, the current state of the art? Ultimately, your wireless networking strategy should be based upon your organization’s current and future business goals. In hospitality, guests have come to expect high-quality wireless access, and many hotel and restaurant operations are relying upon Wi-Fi to support key business functions. If you’re still using older wireless technologies, an upgrade can

give you the performance and capacity you need to be competitive. Manageability is an important consideration in selecting a Wi-Fi solution. Many of the leading-edge products available today have automatic configuration capabilities and built-in intelligence that creates a more resilient network. Centralized monitoring and management tools provide a network-wide view of devices and enable administrators to troubleshoot problems efficiently. State-of-the-art solutions also incorporate Bluetooth technology to support location-based services enabled by Beacons. Beacons can be used for wayfinding applications and to push proximity-aware notifications to guests’ mobile devices, enhancing loyalty and engagement and providing upsell opportunities. But the key to an effective wireless network lies in its design and implementation. Environmental and other factors can affect Wi-Fi performance and availability, even with high-end equipment. Expert engineering and support services from an experienced technology partner will ensure the success of your Wi-Fi initiative. It can be difficult to plan an IT strategy as technology continues to evolve at a breakneck pace. However, an investment in the latest Wi-Fi technology can pay real dividends in today’s competitive business environment. Red Cell Technologies is a full-service IT solution provider specializing in the design, implementation and support of enterprise-class Wi-Fi networks and supporting infrastructure. Tennyson Lajeunesse is CEO of Red Cell Technologies.

A New Approach to Customer Feedback By JULIEN MEYER

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o you know or want to know what your customers really think about your business? Why is it that some customers return and others do not? BlurtBox was created to help businesses answer these questions. Headquartered in the hospitality epicenter of the world — Orlando, Florida — BlurtBox is built on the belief that customers should always be heard, and that businesses should always be listening and responding. Research shows 92% of people will not alert restaurant staff of a bad experience. Instead of coming to you with the issue, they turn to social media and online review sites — like Trip Advisor and Yelp. Even one negative online review can be crippling, especially for small businesses. Your guests leave unhappy and your reputation is damaged.

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BlurtBox is a proactive approach to customer feedback. BlurtBox provides customers an easy-to-use, comfortable space to share their comments, concerns and kudos, while providing business owners a private dashboard to receive and react to that feedback in real time. With BlurtBox, you’re connecting with your customers directly, privately and instantly. It’s a win-win. Customers know their voices are heard and restaurateurs can address customer service issues and avoid the harsh burn of negative reviews. Plus, it’s easier than ever to connect with customers in the BlurtBox app, available for free download on the Google Play and Apple app stores. With one click, users “blurt” their feedback and it instantly appears on the owner’s device or mobile phone. Even the best businesses have their moments.

It costs eight times as much to get a new customer than it does to retain one. BlurtBox gives you real-time feedback so you can turn a negative experience into a positive one and grow your business. For more information on how BlurtBox can help your customers coming back, please visit BlurtBox.com. Julien Meyer is Founder and CEO of Blurtbox.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Optimize Your Brand’s Potential with SEO By KELSEY MARTINEZ

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parxoo is an integrated digital marketing agency headquartered in Florida that creates competitive advantage at the intersection of digital technology and brand storytelling. We’re wired to disrupt the status quo, staying ahead of the digital marketing curve across web, mobile and social. To learn more, visit Sparxoo.com. It’s no secret that Florida’s bloodline is tourism. Millions of visitors patronize our great state each year in search of the scenery and Southern hospitality provided by our resorts, restaurants and attractions. And, because of society’s reliance on digital, a few clicks of a mouse make booking and planning a trip to Florida easier than ever. If you’re in the travel, lodging or food and beverage industry, you know the value in enhancing your brand’s digital visibility — on social media platforms, mobile applications and across Google’s search tools. Each increases your brand’s recognition, opens up engagement opportunities and improves search engine optimization (SEO), which is the process maximizing a website’s exposure when a user searches for information on a search engine like Google. However, to improve overall search rank and reach to consumers, it’s essential for brands to optimize for local search. This means providing content relevant to a user’s current location or locations they wish to visit. By optimizing your online presence for local SEO, your brand’s consumer-search process is not only streamlined, but you help put your brand on the map — literally. Here are three easy ways to improve your business’s local SEO:

1. Google My Business

In 2014, Google launched My Business, a service that links users with results across Google Search, Maps or Google+. My Business is a great tool for small businesses to build community conversations and provide and connect consumers with valuable information about their business. The tool asks brands key insights about their location, address and website links in order to help improve their overall ranking and visibility across Google’s service platforms. Because My Business asks for specific questions relevant to the brand’s location, this help improves the business’s local SEO.

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Another advantage of Google’s My Business application is that it allows consumers to write reviews about brands. These reviews also help increase a brand’s search visibility and allow users get an understanding of a brand’s experience before walking through its doors.

2. Tag — You’re It!

One of most important and easiest ways a brand can improve local SEO is by incorporating their city and state into their website’s title tag. Title tags define the theme, title or topic of a web page, and provide key SEO insights. When a user enters keywords into a search engine, one of the first places the engine pulls information from is your website’s title tag. By incorporating your brand’s location into the title tag, this helps strengthen your ranking among consumers who are searching for you. For example, Jill has decided she wants to visit Miami Beach and wants to book a local hotel room. So Jill searches, “hotels in Miami Beach” on the Internet. Because your hotel included “Miami” or “Miami Beach” in its title tag, it has the ability to rank among the first search results Jill sees.

3. The NAP Factor

Placing your NAP, or your brand’s name, address and phone number, across all of your website’s pages improves local SEO. How so? This information helps search engines pick up

key insights it can use to optimize a consumer’s search results. In essence, the number of times your NAP is listed across your brand’s website helps improve your SEO ranking and your brand’s searchability. NAPs are commonly placed in website footers or in the same location on every website page. Note: Your website must list your brand’s NAP exactly the same on each web page. This ensures accuracy and eliminates confusion when a search engine accesses your website’s info.

The Digital Truth In a tech-savvy world where the Internet, mobile applications and social media connects us all, optimizing online profiles and websites to effectively and efficiently reach consumers is key. Consumers want to access information in real-time, which creates a need for your brand to be there and provide the information they’re searching for. Factoring in local SEO when building your website or online profiles not only simplifies your consumer’s search process, but also helps your brand’s search rank among all other websites and profiles using similar keywords on the web. Kelsey Martinez is the Digital Marketing Coordinator for Sparxoo. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Secrets of Success

Little Palm Island By SUSIE MCKINLEY, FR&L Editor // Photos provided by Little Palm Island

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ittle Palm Island is nestled off the coast of the Florida Keys and is accessible by boat or seaplane. It boasts that it maintains a no cell phone and no TV island custom, and guests love the relaxed luxury of this island retreat. Fabulous bungalows are located throughout the island and offer a variety of amenities and services. EXPLAIN TO READERS THE STORY OF LITTLE PALM ISLAND.

Then, in 1996, Pat Colee and Noble House Hotels purchased the hotel from Mr. Woodson, did an extensive renovation and the rest is, as they say, history.

WHAT MAKES YOUR HOTEL UNIQUE?

There are lots of things that make the island unique. First and foremost is the fact that you have to get on a boat or a seaplane to get there. The island is located 3 miles due south from Little Torch Key, and a 15 minute boat ride is needed to get to the island. You can walk from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. It feels like a South Seas island, and yet you can drive to it and don’t need a passport if you are an American citizen. There are no televisions in the rooms, and the phones that are in the rooms can only be used to call for service. The suites are all covered with natural thatch. The most unique trait of Little Palm Island is how it juxtaposes the rustic with the luxurious. (There will be a crystal chandelier hanging from that thatched hut roof).

CAN YOU TELL READERS ABOUT YOUR SIGNATURE AMENITIES?

Seaplane arrivals are a favorite. What a way to arrive! All of our suites have outdoor showers, which is a favorite of our guests. Our lagoon pool is large and welcoming with sea grapes hanging lazily over it. The palapa bar is a true tiki bar with natural thatch and is the most popular spot on the island. Diving and snorkeling at Looe Key reef is another popular activity for our 38  S P R I N G

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guests. We run our own dive shop and dive boat, The Island Girl, and run two trips a day (weather permitting). The “Chef’s Table” has become one of our most popular Food and Beverage offerings. This is a private dining experience in the kitchen. Little Palm also offers all sorts of water adventure amenities. Stand-up paddleboards, Hobie Cats, kayaks, fun cats and 14-foot center console Twin Vee runabouts with small outboards are all complimentary for our guests enjoyment. An island Boutique gift shop as well as “Spa Terre” round out the amenities of the island. EXPLAIN TO READERS ABOUT YOUR BEACHSIDE FINE DINING.

It would be better if I could show them a photo. However, I have just not been able to get one that truly describes the ambiance that is created out on that beach with the tiki torches glowing and reflecting off the Atlantic Ocean. The experience is second to none, and, has been designated extraordinary by rating agency Zagat.

YOUR WEBSITE PROMINENTLY DISPLAYS THE RESORT’S ADA COMPLIANCE. THIS IS WONDERFUL. DO GUESTS APPRECIATE YOUR EFFORTS TO BE ACCESSIBLE?

Our guests certainly appreciate our effort to make them comfortable. Our ADA accessibility is just one of those ways. We do have all the necessary equipment such as pool lifts and ramps to facilitate boat access. As well, two of the six rooms that we just upgraded to our “Romance Suite” designation are ADA compliant. These suites have the new private beach areas, as well as the new deck with sunken hot tub and private seating areas with fire pits.

LITTLE PALM ISLAND HAS WON JUST ABOUT EVERY MAJOR AWARD AVAILABLE TO A RESORT FROM CONDE NAST TO WINE SPECTATOR,

AND EVERYTHING ELSE IN BETWEEN. CAN YOU SHARE WITH READERS HOW THE RESORT CONTINUES TO RECEIVE SUCH IMPORTANT ACCOLADES?

We try to never get stale. We are constantly trying to do things better, keeping things fresh. For instance, our menu changes nightly. Depending on what fresh ingredients the chef has at his disposal on that day, he will design a menu around those ingredients. If there is fresh hogfish for a couple of days, the sauces will change, etc. Our wine list is constantly evolving as well. We are lucky in that we are in a position to get wines allocated to us that not a lot of operations have access to. WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU EMPHASIZE WITH STAFF ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMERS?

Discretion. Our guest’s privacy is our No.1 concern. We have numerous celebrities visit the island. You will never see a “tweet,” Facebook post or Instagram, etc. about anyone who is on the island. These guests have come to trust in our respect of their privacy and continue to return year after year. WHAT CRITICAL OR PRIORITY AREAS DO YOU EMPHASIZE IN TRAINING YOUR STAFF, AND HOW DO YOU MANAGE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER?

Guest service training is critical. However, we do not train “white glove” service. We practice a style of service that I would describe in one word as “gracious.” We are not stuffy. We genuinely take care of our clientele like they are guests in our own homes. The best way to describe the way we control turnover is that we give our team the tools to do their job. They are the soul of the island and we treat them with the same respect that we treat our guests. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SECRETS OF SUCCESS WHAT ARE LITTLE PALM ISLAND’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS?

The main secret to Little Palm’s success is our team. As I mentioned earlier, they treat our guests with graciousness and the utmost respect. The leadership team on the island treats our team members the same way. Team empowerment. Any one of our team can take care of our guests without looking around for management. We trust in our team, and they know they will never be in a situation that they cannot take care of with the full faith and confidence of the leadership team. Little Palm embraces the logo of “get lost.” Every decision we make, (whether or not to put televisions on the island — we didn’t) which boat to use to transfer either team members or guests to the island are all made with the guest experience in mind. If it is shift change and there will be a substantial number of guests on the ferry, we will use another boat so that the guest’s arrival experience truly embodies our “get lost” philosophy. For this same reason you will not see any of our team members walking around with iPad’s, etc. Our concierge hut still has an actual photo album to showcase the different amenities and activities available to them. However, we embrace technology (there is Wi-Fi on the island), it’s just that we go out of our way to make sure that experiencing Little Palm is not dependent on or encumbered by this technology, and it has an overall positive impact on the guest experience.

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2016 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT th

JULY 27 -28

th

BOCA RATON RESORT & CLUB, BOCA RATON, FL

EARLY BIRD TICKETS: $169 www.frla.org/event/2016-frla-marketing-operations-summit/ FEATURED KEYNOTES SCOTT STRATTEN is one of the world’s leading experts in viral, social, and authentic marketing. He offers an enlightened fresh perspective on how to effectively market, sell and engage, that flips traditional advice on its head. He encourages individuals and businesses in all industries to think differently, in order to achieve results. JOHN MOORE has been intimately involved with Starbucks’ epic growth to a global iconic brand and has helped transform the way businesses look at marketing and branding. Moore continued his out-of-the-box marketing mastery as the director of national marketing for Whole Foods Market.

PLATINUM

GOLD

WHAT YOUR PEERS ARE SAYING “There was a lot of solid networking. I will definitely attend next year.”

“Great content and any vendor that works it really gets their money’s worth!

– Mike Vinik, Area VP, BJ’s Restaurants

- Harry Price, Sales Director, Coca-Cola North America

“The 2015 Summit was my first and certainly won’t be my last, I thoroughly enjoyed the programs.” - David Mariotti, GM, Ponte Vedra Inn & Club

Questions? Contact Marjorie Stone mstone@frla.org

OVER 350 ATTENDEES LAST YEAR! DONT MISS OUT! 40  S P R I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


$1.4 Million in Scholarships Awarded to Florida High School Students Participating in ProStart Culinary Team Competition

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total of 49 schools participated in the ProStart Culinary Team Competition at Orlando’s Rosen Plaza Hotel with 13 schools winning top awards throughout the day’s events. More than $1.4 million in scholarships was distributed to the winning schools. All winners and participants are a part of Florida’s ProStart program — a career technical education program where high school students learn from an industry-derived curriculum that teaches culinary techniques and restaurant management skills. More than 20,000 students from across the state are enrolled in the program. The four main event competitions included: the Cracker Barrel Management Competition, the Johnson & Wales University Culinary Competition, the Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition and the Coca-Cola Company

Waiters Relay Competition. Gainesville’s Eastside High School won first place in the overall competition. East Ridge High School in Clermont took home second place in the overall competition, with J.P. Taravella High School in Coral Springs placing third. “These students absolutely represent the future of Florida’s hospitality industry and we are proud to help support their education by awarding more than $1 million in scholarships. We are passionate about investing in the lives of these student all-stars and are thrilled we get to watch them craft their incredible talents and build successful careers,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association.

Overall Competition Winners First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Eastside High School East Ridge High School J.P. Taravella High School Leto High School Seabreeze High School

Instructor: Billie DeNunzio Instructors: Lucressie McGriff and Ken Pitts Instructor: Scott Goodman Instructor: Debra Hladky Instructor: Samantha Crouch

Johnson & Wales University Culinary Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative abilities during the competition through the preparation of a meal consisting of: starter (such as soup, salad or appetizer), protein (such as meat, fish or fowl), starch, vegetable and dessert. First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Leto High School Eastside High School East Ridge High School J.P. Taravella High School Steinbrenner High School

Instructor: Debra Hladky Instructors: Billie DeNunzio and Pam Bedford Instructors: Lucressie McGriff and Ken Pitts Instructor: Scott Goodman Instructors: Philip Meola and David Walesheck

Cracker Barrel Management Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their knowledge of the restaurant and food service industry by developing a business proposal for a new restaurant concept. The business proposal consisted of a defined restaurant concept, supporting menu and supporting marketing plan. Teams prepared a comprehensive written proposal, verbal presentation and visual display. First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Eastside High School Deland High School East Ridge High School Mainland High School Northeast High School

Instructors: Billie DeNunzio and Pam Bedford Instructor: Renee Scarborough Instructors: Lucressie McGriff and Ken Pitts Instructors: Jason Kester and Troy Logan Instructors: John Beck and Curtis Serata

Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative ability during the competition through the preparation of an edible centerpiece consisting of fruits and vegetables. Contestants explained nutritional information, product availability and preparation techniques. First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

Tarpon Springs High School Eastside High School Mainland High School Seabreeze High School Northeast High School

Instructors: Cathleen Ryan, Vincenzo Pesce and Tony DeVincenzo Instructors: Billie DeNunzio and Pam Bedford Instructors: Jason Kester and Troy Logan Instructor: Samantha Crouch Instructor: John Beck and Curtis Serata

Coca-Cola Company Waiters Relay Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their ability to duplicate a table setting while racing against the clock. First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place

J.P. Taravella High School Seabreeze High School East Ridge High School Bartow High School Stoneman Douglas High School

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Instructor: Scott Goodman Instructor: Samantha Crouch Instructors: Lucressie McGriff and Ken Pitts Instructor: Rosalind Chan Instructor: Ashley Kurth

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PROSTART CULINARY COMPETITION

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2

3

1. Eastside High School won 1st Place Overall, 2nd Place in Culinary, 1st Place in Management and 2nd Place in Edible Centerpiece. 2. The competition was fierce! 3. Taravella High competitors placed 3rd Overall, 4th in Culinary and 1st in Waiters Relay. UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Bloomin’ Brands CEO Liz Smith Named Industry Power Player Bloomin’ Brands CEO and Chairman of the Board of Directors, Liz Smith, was named to Nation’s Restaurant News’ prestigious “Power List 2016” spotlighting the 50 most powerful people to watch in the food service industry.

Craft Beer Entrepeneur Chan Cox Congratulations to businessman and entrepreneur Chan Cox! His new concept, The Craft Bar, has three locations in Northwest Florida: Destin, Miramar Beach, Panama City Beach and two more are about to open! Expect The Craft Bar on 30-A in South Walton County to open in March 2016 and a downtown Pensacola location in December 2016. The Craft Bar offers 30 extraordinary beers on tap and are some of the rarest and most sought-after in the nation. Guests can also enjoy seasonal cocktails and chef-inspired tavern fare with a Southern flare. In addition to The Craft Bar, Cox operates The Wine Bar and Wine World, a retail operation. There are three Wine Bars and seven Wine World locations in Northwest Florida. Keep on opening those concepts Chan!

Chef Ashley Nickell on Hell’s Kitchen Chef Ashley Nickell of the Funky Monkey Bistro and Bar in Orlando is one of 18 chef contestants competing for the head chef’s position at Chef Gordon Ramsay’s restaurant in Las Vegas on the premier season of Hell’s Kitchen. The show airs on Fox Network Friday nights. The winner not only gets the position, but also a prize of $250,000. Good luck Chef Ashley!

NRA Appoints Board Members from Florida Carol Dover, FRLA President and CEO, has been named to the board of directors of the National Restaurant Association along with Susan M. Connelly, senior vice president, Communications and Public Affairs, of Darden and Blanca Cabrera, founder and president of Sergio’s Family Restaurants in Miami, Florida. Congratulations! w w w.FRL A .org

Diann Worzalla, Respected DBPR Director Retires Diann Worzalla, longtime public health advocate and most recently director of Hotels and Restaurants, retired earlier this year. After 35 years in food safety and environmental health, Worzalla stepped down from her position feeling good about how far the Division of Hotels and Restaurants has come. Under her leadership, the Division received much recognition on its efforts and commitment to food safety. Diann was honored by both Secretary Lawson and DBPR’s Hotels and Restaurants Advisory Council prior to her last day. Thank you Diann for a job well done!

Rick Akin Has Been Promoted Rick Akin has been promoted by DBPR Secretary Ken Lawson as the new director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants. He is replacing Diann Worzalla who recently retired with 35 years in public health. Prior to this appointment, Rick served as the Deputy Director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants since April 2013. Previously, Rick worked for the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Food Safety and also served as an inspector in the Tampa District for DBPR. Rick has more than 20 years of experience in food safety and is a graduate from Eckerd College. Congratulations, Rick!

International Society of Hotel Association Executives Names FRLA Director of Membership to Board FRLA is thrilled to be represented on the 2016 International Society of Hotel Association Executives (ISHAE) Board of Directors. During its annual meeting in December, ISHAE named Dannette Lynch, FRLA Director of Membership, an At-Large Member. “Dannette is truly dedicated to Florida’s hospitality industry, will be a fantastic representative for our great state and is certainly an asset to the ISHAE Board of Directors,” said Carol Dover, president and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “We are pleased to continue our partnership with

ISHAE and always proud to ensure Florida is involved in the global conversation.” ISHAE provides professional development and networking opportunities for lodging association executives and represents the unified voice of state lodging associations in collaboration with our national industry partners. For more information on ISHAE please visit ISHAE.org. Dannette joined the FRLA team in 1997. In addition to her role as director of membership, she serves as regional director for eight local chapters: Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Desoto, Sarasota, Polk, Central Florida and the Space Coast. Dannette came to FRLA with more than fifteen years of marketing, special event and sales management experience. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Floridian Joseph Kadow Elected 2016 Chairman of the Board for the National Restaurant Association Joseph Kadow has been elected chairman of the NRA’s Board for 2016. Kadow is the executive vice president and Chief Legal Officer of Bloomin’ Brands Inc. An original member of the Bloomin’ Brands executive leadership team, Kadow leads the legal, human resources, communications and government relations functions for the company. “The collective guidance of our board members is essential as we work on initiatives that strengthen the restaurant and food service industry and enhance the quality of life for all we serve,” said Dawn Sweeney, president and CEO of the National Restaurant Association and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. “This year, our boards are fortunate to be led by food service veterans Joe Kadow of Bloomin’ Brands Inc. and Lorna Donatone of Sodexo, whose leadership and expertise will be vital in representing our industry and our mission in the year ahead.” The NRA board consists of roughly 75 voting directors, representing every facet of the restaurant and food service industry across the nation. These leaders provide strategic guidance to the NRA in its efforts to advance and protect the restaurant and food service industry. Kadow began his career at Bloomin’ Brands in 1994 as senior vice president, general counsel and secretary. He previously was a partner in the Orlando office of the national law firm BakerHostetler. Kadow is a member of the Board of Directors and Audit Committee of The Habit Restaurants Inc. He is a graduate of the University of Scranton and earned his juris doctor degree from Dickinson School of Law.

In Passing: James Koutsos

In Passing: George Husum George Husum, a longtime Panama City restaurateur, passed away recently. Husum served as managing partner at Outback Steakhouse and Red Elephant before becoming co-owner of G. Foley’s — Panama City’s best and favorite “intown” restaurant. Husum was FRLA’s current Bay Chapter Vice President/Restaurants. He was actively involved in the community and loved by everyone who knew him. Husum graduated from Florida State University. 44  S P R I N G

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James Koutsos, owner of the Spartan Manor banquet hall and Koutsos Spartan Restaurant, passed away recently. Koutsos was a former FRLA board member and helped to found the local chapter in his area of West Pasco. Koutsos was on the FRLA Board for 25 years. Together with Bob Leonard and other innovators, he worked to move the Florida Restaurant Association (one of FRLA’s predecessors) from Hollywood, Florida, to Tallahassee. In addition, Koutsos was one of the founding members of the FRPG- Florida Restaurant Purchasing Group. Koutsos was born in Kouluri, Greece, and was a shepherd and tended his flock until he moved to the U.S. at 20 years old with $7 in his pocket. He lived on Long Island and worked for family until he moved to California working in the hospitality industry. Koutsos moved his family to New Port Richey in 1969 and opened a successful restaurant and then the Spartan Manor banquet hall. Koutsos provided in-kind, financial or event planning support to nearly every organization and nonprofit event in the area. He was an Ahepan, Mason, Shriner and a Rotarian. He also brought AHEPA to the community in 1973 and formed the local Chapter 489. Jimmy’s passion, the AHEPA Senior Living Apartments, a low-income center for seniors, became a reality after he purchased land and facilitated construction and opening of the apartments in 2003. Koutsos’ wife Judith noted, “Jimmy left a lasting impact on our community, and his legacy will live on in our memories. His family’s respect and admiration will never fade. He will be greatly missed.” Jim is survived by his wife of 55 years, Judith Anna, and six children, Nickos, Anthony, Laura Sue, Leander, Theodore and Daphne, as well as 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA

WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

BAY

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION CLAY

LAFAYETTE

DIXIE

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

LEVY

DANNETTE LYNCH DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

727.642.3404

MARION

PINELLAS, HILLSBOROUGH, SUNCOAST SOUTHWEST FL, POLK, CENTRAL FL, SPACE COAST

dannette@frla.org

VOLUSIA LAKE

CITRUS

727.953.6803

SUMTER

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

ORANGE

NORTHEAST FLORIDA

PASCO

904.880.6964

cbergamo@frla.org

POLK

PINELLAS

TROY CONNER 239.476.0666

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

BREVARD

INDIAN RIVER

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA MANATEE

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

tconner@flra.org

SAINT LUCIE DESOTO

HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

LOIS CROFT

PALM BEACH & HENDRY COUNTY

RAY GREEN

561.270.6878

2016

850.224.1590

MARCO ISLAND MONROE

MIAMI-DADE

SOUTH FLORIDA

888.612.7115

ESCAMBIA & SANTA ROSA COUNTY

cradford@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

PALM BEACH

BROWARD

lhernandez@frla.org

COLLEEN RADFORD 850.516.2803

HENDRY

COLLIER

LYNNE HERNANDEZ 305.710.3962

LEE

GLADES

NORTHWEST FLORIDA

rgreen@frla.org

850.545.5901

46  S P R I N G

CHARLOTTE

lcroft@frla.org

561.410.0035

MARTIN

BROWARD COUNTY

asallee@frla.org

844.253.0850 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


In their own words:

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You asked for it. You got it. UnitedHealthcare has created a new discount program for self-funded medical products for FRLA members. Effective immediately, new UnitedHealthcare employer groups with 100+ eligible employees are entitled to a discount up to 5% on administrative fees for self-funded medical products.

Exclusive health care pricing and solutions for FRLA members from UnitedHealthcare

Together,Discounted the Florida Restaurant &solution Lodging Association This joins (FRLA) and UnitedHealthcare offer special advantages for UHC’s suite of solutions for your business: } Health care reform guidance and solutions around the FRLA members including: Affordable Care Act

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“When it comes to the field of health care, we live in unprecedented times. Both the regulatory and business landscapes are shrouded by a dense fog of uncertainty. What’s more, when plotting a course for success over this rough terrain, a knowledgeable and trustworthy guide is a virtual necessity. At Firehouse Subs, we concluded long ago that the best course of action was to turn a negative into a positive. We took a leadership position in assessing the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and devised a course of action that we believe will help us achieve our business goals of growing sales and improving profitability. We felt so confident in our chosen course that we implemented the offer of qualifying insurance coverage for our hourly employees in 2014 (choosing not to take advantage of the one-year delay granted by the Obama administration). During our many months of studying the ACA and formulating our plan, the support we received from the team at UnitedHealthcare was invaluable. UnitedHealthcare stood side by side with us to help us understand the ever-shifting tenets of the ACA; they were our “go-to” resource. From beginning to end, they differentiated themselves from their competitors by demonstrating their desire to understand the needs of our business. And along the way, they helped us educate our franchise community and arm them with the knowledge they need to make a quality decision about their own path. And finally, as we moved toward the finish line of finalizing the products we would offer our employees, they proved themselves to be a superior choice in the marketplace. I highly recommend UnitedHealthcare for any business seeking a valued partner in today’s challenging business environment.” Don Fox, Chief Executive Officer Firehouse of America, LLC (dba Firehouse Subs), Jacksonville, Florida UnitedHealthcare customer

©2015 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. UHCFL748696-000


SAFESTAFF CITY

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

PENSACOLA

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-

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-

PENSACOLA

24

21

Hilton Garden Inn Airport

FORT WALTON

3

7

Wyndham Garden

DAYTONA BEACH

18

15

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

ST. AUGUSTINE

4

8

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

PANAMA CITY

10

7

TALLAHASSEE

26

ORANGE PARK

3

7

SARASOTA

5

2

7

4

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

TAMPA - ENGLISH

16

20

18

15

Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

9

13

11

8

Ramada

BRANDON

3

1

6

3

Embassy Suites

LAKELAND

6

3

8

5

Courtyard by Marriott

PORT RICHEY

25

29

27

24

Days Inn & Suites

ST. PETERSBURG

27

27

29

26

Holiday Inn Express

12

9

LOCATION Pensacola Bay Center

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall Lively Technical Center Hilton Garden Inn

GAINESVILLE

5

9

Hilton Garden Inn

JACKSONVILLE

17

21

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

11

14

Four Points by Sheraton

FORT MYERS

5

2

7

4

Hilton Garden Inn

NAPLES

19

16

12

18

DoubleTree Suites

MIAMI

24

21

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

10

7

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

TAMPA - SPANISH

9

13

Hilton Garden Inn

ORLANDO - SPANISH

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ORLANDO - SPANISH

23

20

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ISLAMORADA

19

20

Islander Resort

5

6

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

23

20

Seralago Hotel & Suites Maingate East

ORLANDO - ENGLISH

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ORLANDO- ENGLISH

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6

ORLANDO - ENGLISH FRLA SHOW

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Rosen Inn International

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Orange County Convention Center

FORT PIERCE

5

2

UF Indian River Research

MELBOURNE

12

9

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

BOCA RATON

19

23

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT LAUDERDALE

17

14

19

16

Embassy Suites

WEST PALM BEACH

23

27

25

22

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

10

7

12

9

Ramada Inn

OCALA

24

21

26

23

Homewood Suites by Hilton Ocala at Heath Brook

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Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866372-SAFE (7233) or visit www. safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Rosen Inn International

KEY WEST

safestaff.org

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

ServeSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServeSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


TM TM

APRIL 28TH – MAY 1ST, 2016 Grand Boulevard at Sandestin® Miramar Beach, FL

sowalwine.com ALL PROCEEDS SUPPORT

PRESENTING SPONSORS:

MEDIA SPONSOR

FOUNDING PARTNERS:

OFFICIAL LODGING PARTNER

Benefiting Children in Need in Northwest Florida

PREFERRED LODGING PARTNER

VISIT SOWALWINE.COM FOR TICKETS

Contact Susie McKinley Editor at Editor@frla.org or 850.508.1139

w w w.FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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APRIL 20, 2016 • 8: 00 a m –1: 00 p m P O LO GRILL , L AKE WO O D R AN CH R E G I S T E R N OW: $ 50 (includes a light breakfast & lunch) frla.org/event/independent-operators-workshop

FRLA INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP Q U E S TI O N S? CO NTAC T M A RJ O RIE S TO NE AT: M S TO NE@ FRL A .O R G

W HY SH O U LD I AT TEND ? :: THE ONE PLACE you will find solutions immediately applicable for business growth. :: THE ONE EVENT where you can share best practices and learn relevant new management skills. :: THE ONE WORKSHOP you’ll leave with practical, real-life tips and techniques to accelerate business.

F E ATU RED KE YN OTE S Kathleen Wood How to Compete and Win in Today’s Market

Jim Knight Hiring and Retaining Great Employees

• 5 must-have ingredients for brand/business success • Power connections with your customers • How to be THE communities’ restaurant • Build your plan of attack to be OUTstanding

B O NUS SE SS I O NS

• • • • •

Organizational culture World-class service Employee branding Performance management Leadership skills

P R E S E N T E D BY

• Tips for Effective Purchasing Panel • The Social Engagement Sales Approach Amanda Morrison and Eric Pounders, Madison Social • Successful Independents Sharing Best Practices Moderated by Kathleen Wood

O U R 2016 S P O N S O R S GOLD

BRONZE

SILVER

suncoast chapter

50  S P R I N G

2016

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SUMMER BOARD MEETING

FALL BOARD MEETING

JUNE 6 TH - 8 TH

SEPTEMBER 27 TH - 29 TH

Opal Sands Resort Clearwater Beach, Florida

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT

INSTALLATION & AWARDS GALA

JULY 27 TH - 28 TH

SEPTEMBER 28 TH

Boca Raton Resort Club Boca Raton, Florida

Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, Florida

The FRLA hosts a full slate of state and local industry events throughout Florida. Make plans to join us at our statewide events! We encourage you to get involved locally in our chapter events too! Contact your local FRLA Regional Director, at www.FRLA.org, to find out what's happening next.

NRA / FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC SEPTEMBER 26 TH Championsgate Golf Course Championsgate, Florida

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.FRLA.ORG/EVENTS EMAIL MARJORIE STONE AT MSTONE@FRLA.ORG OR CALL 850-524-1747

Is Your Business Ready for 105 Million Tourists?

F

lorida has experienced five years of unprecedented growth in tourist visits, and 2016 shows no sign of slowing down. Florida is advertising throughout the year, both domestically and internationally, which is driving tourist numbers higher. While that is great news for your business’s bottom line, it could spell trouble if you aren’t prepared. This is especially true for Florida’s popular restaurants, hotels and bars. Beyond the logistics of preparing for so many new customers, you need to ensure your establishment’s alcohol compliance training is updated. It might seem like something that can wait, but training now can save you big money down the road. With a drastic increase in domestic and foreign patrons, the potential for staff to slip up on something as simple as checking an ID for alcohol sales increases. Just one employee not paying attention can be a costly mistake. The penalty for your first violation can be a seven-day alcoholic beverage license suspension, and the second violation can be up to a 30-day suspension. Do you think your business could survive for seven or 30 days with no liquor sales? Are you willing to risk losing business because one of your employees is not properly trained? Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association’s Regulatory Compliance

w w w.FRL A .org

Services (RCS) offers a full-service program to protect you, your staff and your business from such a disaster. We train your staff according to the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (F.S. 561.701-706), maintain required paperwork in a secure database and manage other statutory requirements on your behalf. Being a responsible vendor can save your business. In the event of a first mistake, it won’t cost an immediate suspension, and your business will still be able to serve alcohol. Qualification also leads to possible liability insurance discounts, an affirmative defense in civil proceedings and more confident employees. If one of your employees does make a mistake resulting in an administrative violation, we take immediate action to ensure the mistake is not duplicated. And, the complete training and records management package costs less than the price of one drink per day. Make sure your business thrives through the 105 million tourists expected to visit our state in 2016. At RCS we say, “Our business is protecting your business.” Give us an opportunity to prove that to you. Visit us online at regcomplianceusa.com or contact us at 800-537-9863 for a free on-site consultation. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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s r o t i s i V e r o M t c A a r D t I t R A O L F T I S I V a p i h h t i s r w e n t r a P g n i t e k Mar

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Spring 2016  
Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Spring 2016  
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