Issuu on Google+

Cover.Jan.2010.qx:Layout 1

12/28/09

3:17 PM

Page 1


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/18/09

8:54 AM

Page 1


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

9:00 AM

Page 1


Contents.Jan.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

CONTENTS

10 18 20 30 32 34 40 46

4:50 PM

Page 4

JANUARY 2010 • VOL 53/ISSUE 1

FLORIDA FOCUS FTBOA NEWS DIGEST Gulfstream Park meet offers big money to Florida-breds. By Nick Fortuna

CLASS ACTS The 2009 Florida-bred champions distinguished themselves as talented, determined and versatile throughout the racing season. By Jo Ann Guidry

FTBOA CHASE TO THE CHAMPIONSHIP SUNSHINE MILLIONS EARLY-BIRD NOMS RELEASED By Nick Fortuna

FLORIDA BARGAINS In an economy demanding bargain hunting, breeders need only look south. All the way south. By Bill Heller

STALLIONS ON PARADE EQUINE CARE: PREDICTING FOALING By Dr. Catie DeLuca

SPECIAL TRANSPORTATION SECTION

52 58 62 64 65 66 67 70

TRAVELING WITH YOUR HORSE By Dr. Amanda House

ZOOM, ZOOM, ZOOM Throughout the past few centuries, horses have been wrapped, packed and shipped in a multitude of ways. By Summer Best

INSIDE TRACK YOUR FLORIDA HORSE PARK By Connie Duff Wise

DO HORSES NEED ORANGES? By Dr. Karen Davison

PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: HORSE HAULIN’ By Mark Shuffitt

FLORIDA’S LEADING SIRES PLAYER’S PAGE By Paul Moran

4 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

COVER PHOTO BY EQUISPORT/ECLIPSE SW: CONTENTS PHOTO BILL DENVER


Masthead.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

10:28 AM

Page 5

801 SW 60th Avenue • Ocala, Florida 34474 (352) 732-8858 • Fax: (352) 867-1979 • www.ftboa.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Michael Compton BUSINESS MANAGER

Patrick Vinzant MANAGING EDITOR/ADVERTISING MANAGER

Summer Best ART DIRECTOR

John Filer CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

JoAnn Guidry WRITER

Nick Fortuna ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Beverly Kalberkamp CORRESPONDENTS

Jay Friedman, Doug McCoy, Cynthia McFarland, Mark Shuffitt PUBLISHER Florida Equine Publications, Inc. (A corporation owned by the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association)

Executive Office - 801 SW 60th Avenue • Ocala, Florida 34474 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Gilbert Campbell, President/Board Chairman Fred Brei, 1st Vice President J. Michael O’Farrell, Jr., 2nd Vice President George G. Isaacs, Secretary Diane Parks, Treasurer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Richard E. Hancock CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Michael Gilliam

© THE FLORIDA HORSE (ISSN 0090-967X) is published monthly except July by THE FLORIDA HORSE, INC., 801 SW 60th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34474, including the annual Statistical Review in February. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Florida Equine Publications or the Florida Thoroughbred Breedersʼ and Ownersʼ Association. Publication of any material originating herein is expressly forbidden without first obtaining written permission from THE FLORIDA HORSE©.

Statistics in the publication relating to results of racing in North America are compiled from data generated by Daily Racing Form, Equibase, Bloodstock Research Information Services, and The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc., the copyright owners of said data. Reproduction is prohibited. A dvertisin g co py d ead lin e 5th o f mo n th p recedin g p ub licatio n. Su bscrip tio ns and ch ang e of add ress: Please m ail to – Circulation s D ep artment. T HE FL ORIDA H ORS E, 801 SW 60th Ave., O cala, Florida 34474.

Printed by Boyd Brothers, Inc.

BOYD

American Horse Publications • FLORIDA MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION • MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU

FTBOA OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS Gilbert G. Campbell, President Fred Brei, First Vice President J. Michael O’Farrell, Jr., Second Vice President George G. Isaacs, Secretary Diane Parks, Treasurer

DIRECTORS Joe Barbazon Dean DeRenzo Sheila DiMare Donald Dizney Barry W. Eisaman

Brent Fernung Bonnie M. Heath III Phil Matthews Jessica Steinbrenner Peter Vegso

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Richard E. Hancock THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 5


Publishers Point.qx:EditorWelcome

publisher ’s point

12/29/09

12:18 PM

Page 6

of view

Winning Combination:

A

Florida-breds and Gulfstream Park

A

BILL DENVER/EQUI-PHOTO

Richard E. Hancock/ELEANOR HANCOCK

s you know, there is a strong correlation between purse money offered during a race meet and the quality of racing stock taking to the track each day to settle the scores. If the recent agreement between the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association, the Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association and Gulfstream Park, which increases opportunities for Floridabreds to the tune of up to $1.4 million is any indication, the next few months in South Florida should feature competitive racing with large fields of quality Sunshine State products. All races during the meet—with the exception of stakes and races restricted to Floridabreds—will offer Florida Owners’ Awards totaling 30 percent of the race’s gross purse, up to $30,000 per race. The contract provides more opportunities for Florida-breds, with a big emphasis on the 90 percent of horses that run in allowance and claiming races. Fred Brei, FTBOA’s first vice president and chairman of the Florida Stakes Committee, Ken Dunn, Gulfstream Park president and general manager and Kent Stirling, FHBPA executive director, all were instrumental in putting this agreement together. Florida-breds will also take center stage at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 30 during the $1.8 million Sunshine Millions, featuring six races (three at Gulfstream and three at Santa Anita Park) between Florida-breds and California-breds.

6 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

Gulfstream will also offer 10 starter allowance races for Florida-breds worth $30,000 each. Another highlight for breeders and owners of Florida-breds will be the inaugural running of the $60,000 Florida Thoroughbred Charities Stakes April 24. The event is for 3-year-olds and up who are registered Florida-breds by Florida stallions that have had seasons offered at the Florida Thoroughbred Charities live auction. A list of eligible stallions will be available on the FTBOA’s website, www.ftboa.com. That same day will feature six to eight starter allowance races for Florida-breds worth $50,000 apiece. For more details on the Gulfstream Park meet, see the article on page 18. The expanded opportunities at Gulfstream Park follow on the heels of a lucrative season for Florida-bred juveniles at Calder. Purses for Calder’s juvenile racing program last season were also increased through a cooperative effort between the FTBOA, FHBPA and Churchill Downs. Straight maiden purses were hiked to $32,000, which included $5,000 in FSS supplements and $5,000 in Florida Owners’ Awards. These programs have proved beneficial for everyone involved in Florida’s Thoroughbred industry. We look forward to continuing our positive work with the horsemen and racetracks to implement earning opportunities for breeders and owners of Florida-breds at all levels— stakes, claiming and allowance—to ensure the thrill of victory and the challenge of breeding a good horse are worth the investment. ■

Executive Vice President Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’Association


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/21/09

9:56 AM

Page 1


EditorsWelcome.qx:EditorWelcome

editor’s

12/30/09

10:20 AM

Page 6

welcome

Whatever Michael Compton/JOE DIORIO PHOTO

Works

t’s 10 minutes before post for the first of the day’s 18 live races. Under a blanket of blue sky, bells that call the runners to the track can be heard ringing off in the distance. You read correctly, 18 live races, and bells, not bugles, announce a race is near. With small, measured steps and eyes focused on the program in my hands, I cautiously make my way to the bank of pari-mutuel clerks. Generally, my handicapping prowess, or lack thereof, is enough impetus to stir some nervous anxiety prior to placing a wager. In this instance, however, there is even greater cause for not exactly charging to the windows overflowing with confidence. The marathon offering of races, replete with full fields (upwards of 20 runners in some contests), is at a circuit new to me with unfamiliar names in a different country with a different language. As if selecting winners—even in my native tongue—is not challenging enough. “Hola,” I say, greeting the clerk and acting as if I have complete command of the Spanish language. Her smile in return suggests strongly that she is aware I don’t. I pause and then deliver my line just as rehearsed moments earlier back at our table. “Diez pesos para ganar en el numero cinco.” Or, simply, 10 pesos to win on number five. It didn’t sound smooth, but whatever works. It is, as some say, a chamber of commerce day made to order at Hiprodomo de San Isidro in Buenos Aires, Argentina on Dec. 12th. The feature race is the Grade 1 Gran Premio Carlos Pellegrini, the last leg of Argentina’s Triple Crown. A crowd in excess of 40,000 has turned out for the festivities that began in late morning and will spill over well into the evening hours. As guests of the Argentine Jockey Club and the Argentina Thoroughbred Breeders Association and its President, Ricardo Soler, our party, which includes Paul Davis from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, enjoys Pellegrini day from a tent reserved for breeders, owners, officials and their guests positioned just past the finish line. Our conversations with horsemen in Argentina mirror the discussions we have with horsemen at home. As much as this experience is different than a typical visit to a racetrack in the United States, it’s also the same in many respects.

I

In Argentina, as at home, the industry’s leaders have had to get good at managing change.

8 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

Paramount issues facing our industry are universal. Horsemen here, as at home, are concerned about the Thoroughbred industry’s future. They care passionately about the health and welfare of the horses themselves, about medication issues, integrity, landing top stallions, alternative gaming at the racetrack and attracting new fans, breeders and owners to the business. InArgentina, as at home, the industry’s leaders have had to get good at managing change. The biggest difference I notice on this day is that there are a large number of families at the racetrack. Officials at San Isidro are reaching out to a younger audience in a way that might just engage the next generation for life. Plenty of entertainment opportunities are wrapped around a day and night of racing.Art exhibits and sculptures are stationed throughout the facility. Live music can be found at various locations around the plant.There is a miniature soccer field in front of the grandstand and away from the track with inflatable boundaries marking the field of play.A referee supervises the action and the children while parents gather around the walking ring to watch horses being saddled.There is even a vintage car show that attracts interested eyes between races. Most importantly, though, there are long lines of bettors at the windows in the grandstand. Whatever works. Winners of each of the day’s three Grade 1 races are seriously celebrated in the winner’s circle following their victories. Approving fans are loud in their support of the winners and all the connections. The atmosphere feels like Breeders’ Cup day in the U.S. My Spanish has improved ever so slightly as the card heads into the stakes action. I hit my largest wager of the day, 100 pesos (less than $30) to win, on a gray filly named Cacho de Baires. I backed her simply because her breeder had the same name as my wife’s grandfather. Whatever works. It’s now well after 8 p.m., the sun has set and the runners in the next-to-last race just crossed the finish line under lights. I loosen my tie and think about how far away from home I am, but how similar our worlds really are when it comes to the horse business. I consider that I have just met everyone I spent the day and part of the evening with and yet, it feels like we have worked together a lifetime. I guess we have in the sense that we have dedicated careers to preserving and advancing this great game of ours. ■ Enjoy the January issue.


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

9:01 AM

Page 1


Focus.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

12:22 PM

Page 10

By NICK FORTUNA

Benny the Bull to Stand It’s not often that breeders can send their mares to an Eclipse Award winner for just $4,000, but such is the case with Benny the Bull, who recently arrived at Vinery in Summerfield to begin his stud career. Benny the Bull, bred at Tomoka Hills Farm in Alachua, won an Eclipse Award as

the nation’s top sprinter in 2008 after going 4-for-4 during his 5-year-old campaign. He won the Dubai Golden Shaheen (G1) at Nad Al Sheba, the Smile Sprint Handicap (G2) at Calder Race Course, the True North Handicap (G2) at Belmont Park and the Sunshine Millions Sprint at Gulfstream

Black Hills Goes the Distance at Zia Park Florida-bred gets third stakes win in $200,000 Distance Handicap If a race covers nine furlongs, then Florida-bred Black Hills figures to be tough to beat. The gelding improved to 3-for-3 at that distance Dec. 6, rallying to win the $200,000 Zia Park Distance Handicap by 1¼ lengths. Black Hills, a 5-year-old son of Judge T C, stopped the clock in 1:53.22 to win the richest race of the meet at the New Mexico track. With Catalino Martinez aboard, Black Hills ran toward the back of the field of six 3-year-olds and up for most of the race before going four wide to close the gap at the quarter pole. Black Hills caught secondplace finisher Orientate Express with about half a furlong to go and surged clear late to earn his third stakes victory. “He outran some decent horses,” winning trainer Bart Hone said. “When they turned for home, I knew he had quite a bit of horse left, and then the ones in front started weakening.” Black Hills was bred by Juan Centeno 10 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

and is owned by A and R Stables and Class Racing Stables. He’s won seven of his 17 starts for $317,580 and has finished in the money in all eight of his starts for Hone. Prior to being transferred to Hone’s barn in January, Black Hills Black Hills had made nine starts for Jeff Mullins but had won just once. “If there’s enough speed in the race, he runs a really good race,” Hone said. “Since we’ve gotten him, he’s run good every time. When he has gotten beat, he’s had some excuses. Either there was no pace or he got into trouble. The horse was going to be a good horse for Jeff, but he had a suspensory ligament injury and needed some time off. I think Jeff thought the horse was going to tail off, and that’s why they sent him to me, but he’s gotten healthy and has flourished out here.” ■

Park during a dominant year in which he became one of Florida racing fans’ favorite runners. “We’re really excited to have a champion and a two-time Grade 1 winner with earnings like he has,” said Declan Doyle, who manages Vinery’s Florida stallions. “So far, we’ve been thrilled with the response we’ve gotten. We’ve had a lot of calls from breeders. The fact that he’s a Florida-bred and has a great race record is all really positive.” Benny the Bull arrived at Vinery several days after the farm held a two-day stallion show for prospective breeders last month, so Doyle said the farm is planning another open house to showcase the 6year-old horse during the OBS winter mixed sale, scheduled for Jan. 19-20. Doyle said Benny the Bull likely would be standing for a higher stud fee if not for the sour economy. “I think it’s one of those situations where the stars have kind of aligned for the breeders because it’s a tough year, and you can’t bring any horse in for a high stud fee,” he said. “I think probably in a normal year, he’d stand for a lot more, but with a first-year stallion, you have to get the mares to him, and in order to do that, you have to make the fee reasonable.” Benny the Bull was set to begin his stud career last year after suffering an ankle injury, but he recovered and returned this year to run in three races. He was the runner-up in both the Smile Sprint and the True North, losing to Eaton’s Gift and Fabulous Strike. Benny the Bull finished his career with nine COADY PHOTO

Florida-bred Eclipse champion will have $4,000 stud fee


Focus.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

12:22 PM

Page 11

Bridlewood Farm Stallion Black Mambo Euthanized

Benny the Bull

the horse for stud duty. “I’m very excited about his future at Vinery, and with the stud fee we have decided on, I think he will offer breeders a wonderful opportunity to breed to a champion at a very fair and reasonable price.” Benny the Bull is easily the most successful horse ever sired by Lucky Lionel, who won the Prix Robert Papin (G2) in France and the Norfolk Stakes (G3) in England as a juvenile in 1995 and finished his career with $208,568 in earnings. Benny the Bull is Black Mambo out of the Birdonthewire mare Comet Cat, a stakes winner at age 2 who earned $52,657 at the racetrack. ■ LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

wins in 20 starts for $2.35 million. He had six stakes victories. Benny the Bull was purchased at the 2004 Keeneland September yearling sale for $38,000 by Greg James, who campaigned him early in his career. The horse made his debut at age 3, winning two out of five starts. As a 4-year-old in 2007, Benny the Bull won the Iowa Sprint Handicap at Prairie Meadows, and a group led by IEAH Stables soon purchased a majority interest in him. Benny the Bull finished his 4-yearold season with a win in the Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash (G1) at Laurel Park. He also finished second to Midnight Lute in the Forego Stakes (G1) at Saratoga that year. “Benny the Bull has been a dream horse – talented, totally sound and brilliantly fast,” said James, who reacquired

COGLIANESE PHOTO

at Vinery

Bridlewood Farm stallion Black Mambo was euthanized last month after suffering from a severe case of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM),a disease caused by a protozoan parasite that affects a horse’s central nervous system. He was 10. “Black Mambo contracted EPM in June,” said George G. Isaacs, Bridlewood’s general manager.“From Day 1, an aggressive treatment program was administered to combat this insidious disease.Although he fought valiantly, he was not able to recover from the damage that the parasite caused. In my entire career, I have never seen a horse so affected by this condition. We’re very saddened by his passing, and our hearts go out to all involved.” Black Mambo ranked second among Florida’s second-crop sires with $1.2 million in progeny earnings in 2009 and had gotten 42 winners this year. Only Signature Stallions sire Chapel Royal, with $2.99 million in progeny earnings this year, had been more productive among Florida’s second-crop stallions. Black Mambo’s career as a stallion had hit a high note Dec. 3 when two of his Florida-bred sons, Big Push and African King,finished first and second in the $65,950 Chan Balum Stakes at Aqueduct. It was the second career stakes victory for Big Push, who also captured the $60,000 Gilded Time Stakes on the Monmouth Park turf course in September. Big Push has won five of his 14 starts and is the most successful horse ever sired by Black Mambo with $204,034 in earnings. African King, who was making his stakes debut, has won six of his 11 starts for $135,442. Black Mambo, a son of Group 1 winner Kingmambo, won three of his 21 career starts for $100,790 and finished second behind Love That Moon in the Reappeal Stakes at Calder Race Course as a 5-year-old in 2004. He began his stud career at Bridlewood in 2005. Horses most commonly contract EPM by coming into contact with the feces of infected opossums. Horses cannot pass the disease to one another. Symptoms include a lack of coordination; stiff, stilted movements; abnormal gait or lameness; weakness; muscle atrophy; paralysis of the muscles of the eyes, face or mouth; difficulty swallowing; seizures or collapse; and abnormal sweating. Many horses show improvement when treated with antiprotozoal drugs. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 11


Focus.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

12:22 PM

Page 12

Journeyman Stud freshman stallion Wildcat Heir set a Northern Hemisphere record for 2-year-old winners in a season with 39 when one of his Florida-bred daughters, Future Heiress, won a $23,700 maiden special weight race at Calder Race Course on Dec. 17. The victory allowed Wildcat Heir to break the Northern Hemisphere record of 38 2-year-old winners set in 2008 by Chapel Royal, who stands at Signature Stallions in Reddick. Chapel Royal also got one juvenile winner in Peru last year, so through Dec. 17, he was tied with Wildcat Heir for the worldwide record for 2-year-old winners in a season with 39. Through Dec. 17, Wildcat Heir ranked fourth in the nation among first-crop sires with $1.16 million in progeny earnings, trailing only Offlee Wild ($1.89 million), Roman Ruler ($1.87 million) and Pollard’s Vision ($1.19 million). He has 108 named 2-yearolds in his first crop, and 58 of them have made at least one start. “The horse is having a great year,” said Brent Fernung, the owner of Ocala-based Journeyman Stud, who previously served as general manger at CloverLeaf Farms II in Reddick before the operation was moved to Kentucky in 2007. “This is a new operation, and Wildcat Heir is the first of our horses to send babies to the races, so this is pretty gratifying. “About two out of every three of his horses break their maiden, and he’s had about 25 maiden special weight winners, so not only does he get a lot of winners, but he gets a lot of high-class winners.” Wildcat Heir has had two stakes winners. Florida-bred Wild Mia won the $100,000 12 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

Wildcat Heir

John Franks Juvenile Fillies Turf Stakes at Calder in November, and Karmageddon captured the $60,000 New Jersey Juvenile Stakes at The Meadowlands last month. With $73,130 in earnings, Karmageddon is Wildcat Heir’s most successful horse. Wildcat Heir was bred to 135 mares during the 2009 breeding season, Fernung said. Though the stallion has had a record-breaking freshman season, his 2010 stud fee of $6,500 remains unchanged from 2009. “Perception means a lot in this business, and for people to perceive him as a good deal is important to me,” Fernung said. “Our approach was to put this horse at a level where everybody would love him.” Wildcat Heir is a 9-year-old son of Forest Wildcat out of the Pentelicus mare Penniless

LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

Wildcat Heir Sets Record For 2-Year-Old Winners

Heiress. He made a dozen starts from ages 2 to 5, with six victories and $424,460 in earnings. His biggest win came as a 4-year-old in 2004, when he captured the Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash (G1) at Pimlico. He also captured the $60,000 Icecapade Stakes at Monmouth Park that year, and the following season he won the $100,000 Teddy Drone Stakes at Monmouth. “When I went and looked at him in Kentucky after he had just retired, at a glance I knew I had to have the horse because he’s an exceptionally good-looking horse, and when you combine that with the talent and the race record, to me, he just fit Florida to a T,” Fernung said. “The response he’s gotten from breeders here has a lot to do with the success he’s had.” ■


Focus.qx:Layout 1

12/30/09

10:44 AM

Page 14

Taletobetold Wins Lightning City Stakes

14 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

BY TAMPA BAY DOWNS PUBLICITY The Lightning City Stakes, a $65,000 race for fillies and mares 3 years old and up, headlined Opening Day forTampa Bay Downs’84th live race meeting. In the final start of her career,Taletobetold won the Lightning City for owner Robert DeWitt, trainer Eddie Kenneally and jockey Tony Farina. The mare, a 5-year-old daughter of Tale of the Cat, captured the five-furlong turf dash in front of 5,004 fans. The on-track handle of $449,131.80 was on par with last season’s ontrack handle, while the total handle of $4.92 million was up 7.6 percent from last year, setting an Opening Day record. “The caliber of racing, the great weather and full fields have made a huge impact on the Tampa Bay Downs product,” said Peter Berube, vice president and general manager of Tampa Bay Downs. “The record handle attests to the growing popularity of the track, and we look forward to keeping the momentum going for a successful season.” Taletobetold finished the Lightning City Stakes in 58.19 seconds. Trainer Anthony Pecoraro saddled the winners of opening day’s first three races. It was the first time in the track’s recent history that a trainer has won three races in a row.Two of Pecoraro’s victories came with jockey Juan C. Levya in the irons. Pecoraro and Levya teamed up to win the season’s opener with Arrow’s Flight, a 5-yearold, Florida-bred daughter of Snuck In bred by the University of Florida Foundation and owned by John A. Damico. Pecoraro completed the

early double with Snuck In Love. The Floridabred Snuck In gelding was guided by new Tampa Bay Downs jockey Inez Karlsson, who wore the colors of Roman Hill Farm LLC. Pecoraro rounded out his hat trick with Sunny Exchange, again with Levya in the irons. Sunny Exchange is a 3-year-old son of Exchange Rate bred in Florida by Dr. Thomas Croley and owned by Roman Hill Farm LLC. ■

Longtime Breeder Francis McDonnell Dies at 74 Francis C. “Skip” McDonnell, a longtime horse breeder who owned Cimarron Farm in Ocala, died Nov. 23 at Massachusetts General Hospital after a battle with cancer. He was 74. McDonnell, a native of Saugus, Mass., began his career hauling snow and plowing streets with a dump truck in nearby Lynn before becoming a successful real estate developer, restaurant owner and horseman. He built apartment complexes in New England as well as hotels and motels. McDonnell ran large stables of horses at Rockingham Park and Suffolk Downs,racing New England champions such as Sandy Gator, Nana’s Toy and Cimarron Secret. Cimarron Secret won the Tropical Park Handicap (G3) at Calder Race Course as a 5year-old in 1996 and finished his career with $454,503 in earnings.The horse stood as a stallion at McDonnell’s 130-acre Cimarron Farm in recent years. McDonnell also owned Boston Fox, who was Florida’s 2003 Claiming Horse of the Year after capturing the $40,000 Noel Stakes at Delta Downs that year. Boston Fox had 21 wins for $263,183 in career earnings. McDonnell, a resident of Hampton, N.H., received the Sam McCracken Award for Lifetime Achievement from the New England Turf Writers Association last year. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; sister, Carmel A. O’Brien, of Seabrook, N.H.; son, Michael, of Stratham, N.H.; daughter, Barbara Jean Lanum, of Medford, Mass.; seven grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. A funeral service was held for McDonnell at St.Theresa Church in Rye Beach, N.H. ■ ELEANOR HANCOCK PHOTO

Taletobetold

TOM COOLEY PHOTO

Tampa Bay Downs sees record handle on Opening Day


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/21/09

9:41 AM

Page 1


Focus.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

3:49 PM

Page 16

She’s Our Annie Gets Fifth Straight Win Florida-bred filly earns third straight stakes victory in Esplanade

Sweet Repent really seems to have a nose for the wire – literally. The Florida-bred filly won a race by a nose for the third time in her career Dec. 26 at Calder Race Course, where she earned the first graded stakes victory of her career in the $100,000 Stage Door Betty Handicap (G3).

JIM LISA PHOTO

Sweet Repent

Sweet Repent, bred by Nikki and Roger Schick, delivered as the even-money favorite in a field of a dozen fillies and mares, getting up just in time to nip Florida-bred Amazing at the wire. The 3-year-old daughter of Repent has won four straight races at Calder, having captured a $25,000 optional claimer by a nose in August and the $75,000 Judy’s Red Shoes Stakes in September. Her biggest victory came without as much drama, a 3 ¼-length score against rival Florida-breds in the $200,000 Elmer Heubeck Distaff in November in Miami. Owned by the Buongiorno A Tutti Stable, Sweet Repent has won six of her 12 starts for $299,190. She’s finished in the money in all nine of her starts in Miami, where she’s earned all six of her victories. She’s also hit the board in all five of her starts at the 11⁄16-mile distance, including three wins. “I definitely wasn’t sure she could get there with the way that horse (Amazing) was going so well on the lead, but she did,” winning trainer David Braddy said. “This was definitely the best field of horses she’s beaten so far, and winning a graded stakes certainly takes her to another level.” Braddy said Sweet Repent will be pointed toward the $300,000 Sunshine Millions Distaff, a 11⁄16-mile contest that pits Florida-breds against California-breds at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 30. She’ll likely get a break after that race, Braddy said. ■ 16 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

She’s OurAnnie did her best impersonation of Horse of theYear candidate RachelAlexandra in the $60,000 Esplanade Stakes at Fair Grounds on Dec. 19, leading every step of the way to earn her third consecutive stakes victory. She’s Our Annie, who, like Rachel Alexandra, was sired by Medaglia d’Oro and is out of a Roar mare, stretched her winning streak to five races with a 2 ½-length victory. The 3-year-old filly, bred and owned by the Ocala-based Destiny Oaks farm of Bill and Janet Grube, delivered as the even-money favorite in a field of nine fillies and mares. She’s OurAnnie, with usual rider Jon Court aboard, broke sharply from the No. 1 post and was pressured by Florida-bred Juliet’s Spirit while setting fractions of 22.53 seconds for the opening quarter-mile and 45.86 seconds for a half-mile. She’s Our Annie widened her lead around the turn to get to the top of the lane with a 2 ½-length advantage and preserved her lead down the stretch, finishing the 5 ½-furlong sprint in 1:03.97. “With her natural speed, I wanted to use the (No. 1 post) to my advantage,” Court said. “It takes a few jumps for her to get her feet underneath her. She has such a long stride, and she’s ready to contest anything that wants to challenge her, and at the same time, I was able

HODGES PHOTO

Sweet Repent Wins Another Close One

She’s Our Annie

to get her to relax on the front end. I had enough horse to finish in front of them today without having to ask her for everything she had.” She’s Our Annie has been perfect in five races since finishing third in her career debut at Oaklawn Park in January. She captured a $34,000 maiden special weight race and a $55,000 optional claimer there by a combined nine lengths in February. She then made the jump up to stakes company in March and captured the $50,000 Prima Donna Stakes at Oaklawn Park by 2 ½ lengths with a 102 Beyer Speed Figure. Over the spring, She’s Our Annie had surgery to repair a hairline fracture and a chip in her left front knee. She returned to the barn of trainer Jinks Fires in the fall and captured the $52,800 Dream Supreme Stakes by 2 ½ lengths at Churchill Downs. She bruised her foot in that race and hadn’t been able to train hard heading into the Esplanade. “We knew that we had something special the second time she worked,” Fires said. “Now she’s coming along just like we anticipated. We lost a little time with her with a bruised foot at Churchill, so we backed off and missed some works. I was a little worried going into this race, but with her talent, you might as well take a chance.” After the race, her connections said they’ll likely run her in longer races and could point her toward graded stakes. She’s Our Annie has earned $142,080 through six starts. “She has the bloodlines to go on, and we’re hoping for the best for her future if she continues to train in a positive, forward way,” Court said. “No telling how far she can go. It’s nice to have one that wins that many times in a row. I just kept the whip quiet on her and just kept her gathered up. I really didn’t even have to stroke her. My son had been watching her train and had told me, ‘Dad, she’s not training good; she’s training great.’” Juliet’s Spirit, a 3-year-old daughter of former Florida stallion Exchange Rate, was bred and is owned by Padua Stables. A three-time stakes winner, the filly has won four of her 10 starts for $301,399. ■


– STANDING –

Forty Niner – Narrate, by Honest Pleasure

Stonehedge Farm South

Gilbert and Marilyn Campbell, Owners u

Larry King, Farm Manager u P.O. Box 87, Williston, FL 32696 u 352/528-4951 u Fax 352/528-4952 CINDY MIKELL photo

103830-Stonehedge-FH.indd 1

10/30/08 11:19:20 AM


FTBOA.NEWS.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

1:14 PM

Page 18

Gulfstream Meet Offers Big Money to Florida-breds Gilbert G. Campbell President

Fred Brei First Vice President

J. Michael O’Farrell Second Vice President

George G. Isaacs Secretary

Diane Parks Treasurer

DIRECTORS Joe Barbazon Dean DeRenzo Sheila DiMare Donald Dizney Barry W. Eisaman Brent Fernung Bonnie M. Heath III Phil Matthews Jessica Steinbrenner Peter Vegso Richard E. Hancock

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association 801 SW 60th Ave. Ocala, Florida 34474 Phone: (352) 629-2160 Fax: (352) 629-3603 visit us at www.ftboa.com e-mail: info@ftboa.com

18 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

By NICK FORTUNA

big emphasis on the 90 percent of horses that run in he new year at Gulfstream Park brings new, allowance and claiming races,” said FTBOA Execlucrative opportunities for owners of utive Vice President Richard E. Hancock. “I’d like Florida-bred horses. With up to $1.4 million to thank (Gulfstream Park President and General in Florida Owners’ Awards available at the meet, Manager) Ken Dunn and (FHBPA Executive Diyour Florida-bred runner is eligible for big paydays. rector) Kent Stirling for all their efforts and sugAn agreement between the Florida Thoroughbred gestions in putting this agreement together.” The $1.8 million Sunshine Millions is scheduled Breeders’ and Owners’ Association, the Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association for Jan. 30, with three races to be run at Gulfstream and Gulfstream Park has dramatically increased op- and three more at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. portunities for Florida-bred runners at the Hallandale Gulfstream will host the $300,000 Sunshine Millions Turf, the $300,000 Distaff and the $200,000 Sprint, Beach oval, which opened its 79-day meet Jan. 3. All races during the meet – with the exception of while Santa Anita will host the $500,000 Classic, the stakes and races restricted to Florida-breds – will $300,000 Filly and Mare Turf and the $200,000 Filly offer Florida Owners’Awards totaling 30 percent of and Mare Sprint. Two races were eliminated from the 2010 Sunshine Millions, and the total value of the the race’s gross purse, up to $30,000 per race. “We are pleased with the contract that was races was reduced from $3.6 million in 2009. For Florida-breds, one of the highlights of the agreed to between the FTBOA, Gulfstream Park and the FHBPA,” said Jacks or Better Farm owner meet will beApril 24, when the track will hold the inaugural running of the $60,000 Fred Brei, the FTBOA’s first vice Up to Florida Thoroughbred Charities president and chairman of the Stakes. The event is for 3-year-olds Florida Stakes Committee. $1.4 million and up who are registered Florida“The contract provides more opin Florida breds sired by Florida stallions who portunities for Florida-breds, with a

T

Owners’Awards available


12/29/09

1:14 PM

have had seasons offered at the Florida Thoroughbred Charities live auction. A list of eligible stallions will be available on the FTBOA’s Web site, www.ftboa.com. Florida Thoroughbred Charities benefits the Florida division of the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation, and Dunn said Gulfstream Park will make a contribution to the charity in April. Also on April 24 will be six to eight starter allowance races for Florida-breds worth $50,000 apiece. A starter allowance is a race open to horses that have run in a claiming race within a specified time. “We think it’s going to add very nicely to the program that we have here,” Dunn said of the agreement. “It gives us a chance to feature Florida-breds, and the event day in April gives us something to focus on and promote after the (March 20) Florida Derby. It’s an opportunity to work with the FTBOA on something very positive. Hopefully, we’ll be able to do what we all want to do collectively, and that’s reward the people who support the meet.” Gulfstream Park also will offer 10 starter allowance races for Florida-breds worth $30,000 each. One such race will be held each Friday from Jan. 22 to March 26. “We’re obviously very happy we were able to work this out,” Stirling said. “It’s going to be beneficial for everybody, particularly for owners of Florida-breds. The Friday races and the grand finale in April will be very impor-

Page 19

QUARANTINE LIFTED AT CALDER By CALDER PUBLICITY The three-week quarantine at Calder Race Course was officially lifted Dec. 21. Several infection-control measures were put into effect at Calder when one horse was diagnosed with the highly contagious Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) on Nov. 30. No other horses at Calder have contracted the disease. Lifting the quarantine allowed 60 horses to resume normal training and racing activity at Calder. “While the quarantine was hard on our December performance, our team was successful to effectively isolate the infection and prevent it from affecting others,” said John Marshall, Calder’s vice president and general manager of racing. “We appreciate the patience of our horsemen and cooperation of several agencies at the state and federal levels. We contained a very serious situation, ensuring the overall safety and welfare of our industry’s participants.” December was a high-profile month at Calder’s Tropical meet, featuring competition among an already talented local contingent with horses shipping south for the winter racing season. As the Tropical meet reaches a crescendo, anticipation is also building for the opening of the track’s new slots facility – the Calder Casino – in late January.The 104,000-square-foot casino will feature more than 1,200 slot machines and three new restaurants. Calder also offers year-round simulcasting and live poker action in the Studz Poker Club. ■ tant to people with Florida-breds.” In addition, Gulfstream will offer three Florida-bred-preferred races per day, up from one at the 2009 meet. The Florida-breds can be entered in the race ahead of horses from all other states and countries.

GULFSTREAM PARK RETURNING TO NORMAL AFTER FLOOD Training resumed Dec. 20 at Gulfstream Park after a week that saw massive flooding at the Hallandale Beach track. After more than a foot of rain was dumped on the track over two days, about

MATT DEAN/EQUI-PHOTO

FTBOA.NEWS.qx:Layout 1

150 horses had to be moved to stalls at Calder Race Course and the nearby Payson Park and Palm Meadows training facilities. All told, 12 of the track’s 20 barns and about 600 horses were affected by the flood, which wiped out much of the feed on the grounds as well as training equipment. “The water was two or three feet deep in those 12 barns,” said trainer Tim Ritvo, a vice president of the Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association. “Most of the feed was all wiped out, and there was standing water for 36 hours. It was pretty rough, but everyone’s been great and has been cooperating.” Many of the grooms and hotwalkers who live in the old dormitories at Gulfstream saw their homes flooded and much of their personal property destroyed by the flood. Ritvo said the FHBPA was seeking donations to help buy mattresses, pillows and clothing for the track’s backstretch workers. Ritvo said that as bad as the flood was, it could have been worse had it occurred during the Gulfstream Park meet, which began Jan. 3. “We got really lucky that it happened when it happened, or it would have been a huge disaster,” Ritvo said. “Everybody – horsemen, management, Calder – pitched in to do the best they could with a bad situation.” ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 19


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:42 PM

Page 20

2 0 0 9

Florida-Bred CHAMPIONS

BILL DENVER PHOTO

The 2009 Florida-bred champions distinguished themselves as talented, determined and versatile throughout the racing season.

Class Acts By JO ANN GUIDRY

resious Passion and Vineyard Haven headed the class of 2009 Florida-bred champions, not only repeating as champions but each collecting dual titles as well. Presious Passion developed into one of the best turf horses in the country, earning the the titles of Florida-bred champion turf horse and older male. Vineyard Haven encored his juvenile season with a stellar sophomore one, being named this season’s Florida-bred champion 3-year-old colt and sprinter.

P 20 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

Juvenile runners Bridgetown and Sweetlalalbye emerged as bright new stars. On the distaff side, Hooh Why had a grade-one sophomore season and Dubai Majesty proved to be the best of older mares. The Florida-bred champions are determined by points accumulated during the year-long FTBOA Chase To The Championship. In the case of ties by points, the tiebreaker is most money earned. The Florida-bred Horse of the Year and Florida Breeder of the Year, as well as other awards are determined by the FTBOA Board of Directors and year-end statistics. ■


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/21/09

9:50 AM

Page 1


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:42 PM

Page 22

2 0 0 9

Florida-Bred CHAMPION

MICHAEL BURNS PHOTO

2-Year-Old Colt/Gelding

Bridgetown B BRIDGETOWN 2007 chestnut colt by Speightstown – Ellesmere, by Tabasco Cat Breeders/Owners: Eugene & Laura Melnyk (Melnyk Racing Stables Inc.) Trainer: Kenneth McPeek 2009 Race Record & Earnings 5-2-2-0/$392,198 2009 Stakes Record 1st – Summer Stakes (G3-T) 2nd – Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf (G2-T)

ridgetown comes by his speed naturally. His sire is Speightstown, who won the 2004 Breeders’ Cup Sprint (G1) and garnered that season’s Eclipse Award as champion sprinter. But while Bridgetown inherited his sire’s speed, he utilizes it on the turf instead of the dirt. Bridgetown has excelled on the turf, winning a graded stakes and just missing a victory in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf (G2). In but five lifetime starts, he has posted two wins and two seconds in but five lifetime starts to bank $392,198. A homebred for Eugene and Laura Melnyk, who also raced Speightstown, Bridgetown took quickly to winning. The chestnut colt broke his maiden on August 14 at Saratoga Race Course, winning by five and a quarter lengths in 1:02.09 for the five and a half furlongs. A mere month later, Bridgetown became a graded stakes winner in but his third outing. At Woodbine on September 19, the Kenneth McPeek trainee captured the Summer Stakes (Can-G3) on the turf to guarantee himself a berth in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf (G2). In the Summer Stakes, Bridgetown took over the lead from Stormy Lord at the

22 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

top of the stretch. He held off the late challenges of Becky’s Kitten and Fantastico Roberto to win by a length and a half. Bridgetown’s winning time for the mile over a firm turf was 1:35.04. Bridgetown proved to be the horse to beat in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf (G2) on November 7 at Santa Anita. He led the field from the gate, setting fractions of :23.61, :48.50 and 1:12.47 for the first six furlongs of the mile event. In the stretch, Pounced rallied on the inside and overtook a game Bridgetown by three-quarters of a length. Bridgetown secured a runner-up finish with Interactif third. Out of the stakes-placed Tabasco Cat mare Ellesmere, Bridgetown is a half-brother to Floridabred stakes winner Carnacks Choice. The Melnyks purchased Ellesmere for $380,000 at the 1998 Fasig-Tipton Saratoga August yearling sale. Racing for the Melnyks, Ellesmere won four times, was third in the Miss Moneypenny Stakes and earned $78,994. Ellesmere, who resides at the Melnyk’s Ocala-based Winding Oaks Farm, had a 2008 Strong Hope colt, a 2009 Broken Vow colt and was bred to Harlington for 2010. ■


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/30/09

9:40 AM

Page 23

2 0 0 9 Florida-Bred CHAMPION

FOURFOOTEDFOTOS

2-Year-Old Filly

Amen Hallelujah A AMEN HALLELUJAH 2007 dark bay/brown filly by Montbrook – Sara’s Success, by Concorde’s Tune Breeder: Thorobeam Farm Owners: IEAH Stables & Whizway Farms Trainer: Richard E. Dutrow Jr. 2009 Race Record/Earnings 6-2-1-2/$132,370 2009 Stakes Record 3rd - Darley Alcibiades Stakes (G1) 3rd – Hollywood Starlet Stakes (G1)

classy and talented filly, Amen Hallelujah has her owners singing her praises. Competing against some of the best juvenile fillies in the country, Amen Hallelujah has earned her accolades with a pair of thirds in Grade I events. Amen Hallelujah, a dark bay/brown filly by leading Florida sire Montbrook, broke her maiden in her third start. Actually, she finished in a dead heat win with Malibu Legacy in a maiden special weight on August 23 at Arlington Park. Winning margin was a length in 1:11.37 for the six furlongs. In her next start, Amen Hallelujah had the winner’s circle all to herself. She rolled to a fivelength win in an allowance test on September 19 at Arlington Park. Her winning time in the six-furlong race was 1:11.22. From those two winning efforts, Amen Hallelujah was moved into the big leagues of Grade I competition. On October 9 at Keeneland, Amen Hallelujah finished third to Negligee in the Darley Alcibiades Stakes (G1). Finishing second was graded stakes

winner She Be Wild. Following the Alcibiades Stakes, Amen Hallelujah was sold privately to IEAH Stables and Whizway Farms. Amen Hallelujah’s first start for her new owners came in the Hollywood Starlet Stakes (G1) on December 20. Now trained by Richard Dutrow Jr., she responded with a third-place finish to Blind Luck with Miss Heather Lee nabbing second. Bred by Thorobeam Farm, Amen Hallelujah is out of the stakes-winning Concorde’s Tune mare Sara’s Success. Sara’s Success won four stakes, including the 2001 Calder Oaks, and was stakes-placed five times on her way to earning $422,337. As a broodmare, Sara’s Success has had only two live foals with Amen Hallelujah being her only one to race. Consigned by Hidden Brook, agent, Amen Hallelujah was sold for $40,000 to Cecil Seaman, agent, at the 2008 Keeneland September yearling sale. On six starts for the season, Amen Hallelujah posted two wins, one second and two thirds to bank $132,370. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 23


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:42 PM

Page 24

2 0 0 9

Florida-Bred CHAMPION

MCCUE PHOTO

3-Year-Old Colt/Gelding Florida-bred Champion Sprinter

Vineyard Haven F

VINEYARD HAVEN 2006 gray/roan colt by Lido Palace (Chi) – Princess Aloha, by Aloha Prospector Breeder: Lynne Scace Owner: Godolphin Stables LLC Trainer: Saeed bin Suroor 2009 Race Record/Earnings 4-1-1-1/$282,500 2009 Stakes Record 1st – Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash (G1) 2nd – King’s Bishop Stakes (G1) 3rd – Cigar Mile (G1)

or Vineyard Haven, the 2009 racing season was a bit of the more things change, the more they stay the same. A year older and with a new owner and trainer,Vineyard Haven captured yet another Grade I race and two more Florida-bred champion titles as well. After back-to-back Grade I victories in 2008, Vineyard Haven was sold privately to Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum’s Godolphin Racing LLC and Saeed bin Suroor took over the training duties. For his outstanding juvenile season, Vineyard Haven was named the 2008 Florida-bred champion 2-year-old colt. With another successful racing season as a sophomore, Vineyard Haven was doublyhonored as 2009 Florida-bred champion 3-year-old colt and Florida-bred champion sprinter. Vineyard Haven, who was shipped to Dubai following his private purchase, next made his first U.S. start again in the King’s Bishop Stakes (G1) at Saratoga on August 29. And it proved to be a good news/bad news situation. The good news was Vineyard Haven appeared to have won his third career graded stakes. The bad news was that he bumped Capt. Candyman Can in deep stretch and was disqualified to second.

24 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

But it was all good news in the Frank De Francis Memorial Dash (G1) on October 24 at Laurel Park Overcoming a slow start and traffic problems, Vineyard Haven finally found a clear path on the rail. With a late surge, Vineyard Haven scored a determined half-length win over Ravalo with fellow Florida-bred Fleet Valid third. His winning time for the six furlongs over a sloppy track was 1:09.62. Vineyard Haven closed out the season on November 28 with touch third to Kodiak Kowboy in the Cigar Mile (G1) at Aqueduct. On four starts, the Lido Palace (Chi) gray/roan colt posted one win, one second and one third in three Grade I events to earn $282,500. Bred by owner/trainer Lynne Scace, Vineyard Haven is out of the winning Aloha Prospector mare Princess Aloha. Also bred, raced and trained by Scace, Princess Aloha is also the dam of Florida-bred stakes winner On the Vineyard. Scace owned and trained Vineyard Haven at the time of his maiden victory, selling him privately shortly thereafter to the partnership of the late trainer Bobby Frankel, Louis Lazzinnaro and Joe Torre’s Diamond Pride LLC. After Vineyard Haven’s victories in the 2008 Hopeful Stakes (G1) and Champagne Stakes (G1), the partnership sold him privately to current owner Godolphin Stables. ■


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:42 PM

Page 25

2 0 0 9 Florida-Bred CHAMPION

MICHAEL BURNS PHOTO

3-Year-Old Filly

Hooh Why H

HOOH WHY 2006 chestnut filly by Cloud Hopping – Magic Merger, by Corporate Report Breeder: Gail Gee Owners: Derby Daze Farm & Mark Hoffman Trainer: Kenneth Hoffman 2009 Race Record/Earnings 8-2-1-3/$452,174 2009 Stakes Record 1st – Ashland Stakes (G1) 1st – La Lorgnette Stakes 2nd – Sunshine Millions Oaks 3rd – Santa Anita Oaks (G1) 3rd – Selene Stakes (G3-Can) 3rd – Double Delta Stakes

ooh Why’s motto might be try, try and try again. After being stakes-placed five times in her career, the 3-year-old Cloud Hopping filly was still looking to notch her first stakes win. So it only seemed fitting that when she did, it was a big one and nothing less than a Grade I victory. Bred by Gail Gee, Hooh Why opened the 2009 season with a second to Beltene in the Sunshine Millions Oaks at Santa Anita Park on January 24. A little less than two months later, the chestnut filly finished third to Stardom Bound in the Santa Anita Oaks (G1). Shipped to Keeneland, Hooh Why took to the change of scenery. On April 4 and as a 24-1 longshot, Hooh Why scored a neck victory over graded stakes winner Gozzip Girl in the Ashland Stakes (G1). Finishing third was Santa Anita Oaks (G1) winner Stardom Bound. The winning time for the mile and one-sixteenths race was 1:43.80. Hooh Why encored that Grade I win with a victory

in the La Lorgnette Stakes on May 17 at Woodbine. She defeated Tasty Temptation by a half-length with Milwaukee Appeal finishing third. Winning time for the mile and one-sixteenths race was 1:45.46. Also on the season, Hooh Why posted thirds in the Selene Stakes (G3-Can) at Woodbine and Double Delta Stakes at Arlington Park. Racing for Gee’s Derby Daze Farm and Mark Hoffman, she banked $452,174 on the season. Gee, who owns Ocala-based Derby Daze Farm, bought Hooh Why’s dam, the unraced Corporate Report mare Magic Merger privately. From a Quarter Horse background, Magic Merger was the first Thoroughbred mare that Gee bought shortly after buying her 80-acre farm. In addition to Hooh Why, Magic Merger is also the dam of Florida-bred stakes winner Rumbling Cloud. Magic Merger had a 2007 D’wildcat filly named D’wild Beach, a 2009 With Distinction colt and was bred to Put It Back for 2010. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 25


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:42 PM

Page 26

2 0 0 9

Florida-Bred CHAMPION

COGLIANESE PHOTO

Champion Older Male Champion Turf Horse

Presious Passion A

PRESIOUS PASSION 2003 chestnut gelding by Royal Anthem – Princesa’s Passion, by Marquetry Breeders: Joseph & Helen Barbazon Owner: Patricia Generazio Trainer: Mary Hartmann 2009 Race Record/Earnings 9-4-3-0/$1,524,275 2009 Stakes Record 1st – United Nations Stakes (G1) 1st – Clement L. Hirsch Memorial Turf Classic (G1) 1st – Mac Diarmida Stakes (G3) 1st – Monmouth Stakes 2nd – Breeders’ Cup Turf (G1) 2nd – Pan American Stakes (G3) 2nd – Sunshine Millions Turf

fter Presious Passion won three graded stakes, became a millionaire and was named a Floridabred champion in 2008, it would be asking a lot for the Royal Anthem gelding to top that. But that’s just what Presious Passion did. In 2009, Presious Passion won four stakes, including three graded and with two of those being Grade I events. He set a course record and added $1.5 million to his bankroll. Little wonder that Presious Passion earned the dual title of 2009 Florida-bred champion older male and champion turf horse. Presious Passion opened up the season with a runnerup finish to fellow Florida-bred Soldier’s Dancer in the Sunshine Millions Turf on January 24 at Santa Anita. A month later, the Mary Hartmann trainee led gate-to-wire to best Quasicobra by a half a length in the Mac Diarmida Stakes (G3) at Gulfstream Park. Winning time for the 11 furlongs over a firm course was 2:12.10. Hartmann then shipped Patricia Generazio’s colorbearer back to her Monmouth Park base. On June 13, Presious Passion scored a gutsy nose win in the Monmouth Stakes in his first race back after a three-month break. The best was yet to come with a pair of Grade I triumphs. It was a grand Fourth of July celebration for his connections with Presious Passion’s second consecutive United Nations Stakes (G1) victory. Presious Passion won by two

26 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

in course-setting time of 2:10.97 for the 11 furlongs. The second Grade I win came back out at Santa Anita, where Presious Passion captured the Clement L. Hirsch MemorialTurf Championship Stakes (G1) on October 11. He won by two and a half lengths in 1:59.13 for the 10 furlongs. Presious Passion closed out his stellar season with a gallant and memorable effort in the Breeders’ Cup Turf (G1) on November 7 at Santa Anita. He led by as many as 10 lengths, set fractions of :23.08, :45.14, 1:09.24, 1:34.56 and 1:59.72 before being collared by Conduit (Ire) in deep stretch. Conduit (Ire), who also won the 2008 BC Turf, posted a half-length victory over Presious Passion. Bred by Joseph and Helen Barbazon, Presious Passion is out of the unraced Marquetry mare Princesa’s Passion. The Barbazons, who own 220-acre Pleasant Acres Farm just outside Ocala in Morriston, purchased Princesa’s Passion privately. In addition to Presious Passion, Princesa’s Passion has also produced winner Just Livin a Dream ,a 2006 filly byTrippi, and a 2007 Exchange Rate filly named Exchangeable. Patricia Generazio and her husband, Frank, a retired trainer, are longtime clients of the Barbazons and purchased Presious Passion privately as a yearling. In nine starts in 2009, Presious Passion posted four wins and three seconds to earn $1,524,275. Over five seasons of racing to date, he has banked $2,576,293. ■


Champions.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:43 PM

Page 27

2 0 0 9

Florida-Bred CHAMPION

PALMER PHOTO

Older Female

Dubai Majesty A DUBAI MAJESTY 2005 bay filly by Essence of Dubai – Great Majesty, by Great Above Breeder: Harold J. Plumley Owners: Martin Racing Stable LLC & Dan Morgan Trainer: W. Bret Calhoun 2009 Race Record/Earnings 9-3-1-2/$296,480 2009 Stakes Record 1st – Winning Colors Stakes (G3) 1st – Buffalo Trace Franklin County Stakes 2nd – Sunsine Millions Filly & Mare Turf Sprint 3rd – Humana Distaff Stakes (G1) 3rd – Turf Amazon Handicap

bit of a late bloomer, Dubai Majesty flashed her talent early on but didn’t score her initial stakes win until she was four. As a sophomore, Dubai Majesty was graded stakes-placed three times and her connections knew it was only a matter of time before she came into her own. That confidence paid off in 2009 with two stakes wins, including a graded victory, three stakes-placings and $296,480 in earnings. Dubai Majesty opened the season with a second to High Resolve in the Sunshine Millions Filly and Mare Sprint on January 24 at Gulfstream Park. After an allowance win at Fair Grounds, Bret Calhoun shipped his charge to Kentucky.There Dubia Majesty finished in a dead heat for third with Modification to winner Informed Decision in the Humana Distaff Stakes (G1) on May 2 at Churchill Downs. Three weeks later, Dubai Majesty notched her initial stakes and grades stakes win at the same time in the Winning Colors Stakes (G3) at Churchill Downs. It was Dubai Majesty and Lady Chace battling through the first halfmile, setting fractions of :21.78 and :45.11. Lady Chace actually took a short-lived lead in the stretch before Dubai Majesty rallied to win by a length. Keep the Peace came on for second while Lady Chace hung on for third. The

winning time for the six-furlong race was 1:10.61. After a third to Canadian Ballet in the Turf Amazon Handicap at Philadelphia Park, Dubai Majesty paid a visit to the Keeneland Race Course winner’s circle. On October 16, she showed her versatility and captured the Buffalo Trace Franklin County Stakes by a length and a quarter on the turf. Her winning time for the five and a half furlongs over a soft course was 1:03.64. By Essence of Dubai and out of the winning Great Above mare Great Majesty, Dubai Majesty is owned by Martin Racing Stable LLC and Dan Morgan. Her current owners bought her privately from her breeder Harold J. Plumley, who raced her in her first 10 starts. Plumley, who owns Ocala-based Plumley Farms, purchased Great Majesty for $7,000 in foal to Birdonthewire at the 1998 Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s October mixed sale. Great Majesty would become a stakes producer shortly thereafter when her first foal Majestic Dinner, a 1997 gelding by Formal Dinner, became a multiple stakes winner of $497,374. Barren in 2008, Great Majesty has a 2009 colt by Trippi and is in foal to A.P. Warrior for 2010. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 27


BusinessClimate.C.34706.qx:Layout 1

8/18/09

3:53 PM

Page 1

the Best State for Business


BusinessClimate.C.34706.qx:Layout 1

8/18/09

3:54 PM

Page 2


ChaseToChampionship.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

3:54 PM

Page 36

Following are the “FTBOA Chase to the Championship ” Point Standings through December 23, 2009. Two-Year-Old Colt/Gelding Bridgetown (Speightstown) - 18 Aikenite (Yes It’s True) - 15 Jackson Bend (Hear No Evil) - 11

Breeder

Owner

Trainer

Eugene Melnyk Brylynn Farm, Inc. Jacks or Better Farm, Inc.

Melnyk Racing Stables, Inc. Dogwood Stable Jacks or Better Farm, Inc.

Kenneth G. McPeek Todd A. Pletcher Stanley I. Gold

Thorobeam Farm Rose Family Stable Ltd. Jacqueline Tortora & Toni & Richard Ancona Harold J. Plumley

IEAH Stables Rose Family Stable Ltd. Jacqueline Tortora & Toni & Richard Ancona Robert Abrams, Ron Brewer, Mitch Dutko & Wesley A. Ward

Richard E. Dutrow, Jr. Barry R. Rose Emanuel Tortora Wesley A. Ward

L. M. Scace Gilbert G. Campbell Glen Hill Farm

Godolphin Racing LLC Paul Pompa Jr., Jack Mandata & Michael Dubb Glen Hill Farm

S. bin Suroor Richard E. Dutrow, Jr. Thomas F. Proctor

Gail Gee Robert A. Murphy & Dr. Sandy L. Price-Murphy Cashel Stud, Inc. Donald R. Dizney

Derby Daze Farm, Inc. & Mark Hoffman Lael Stables Frank Carl Calabrese Donald R. Dizney

Donna L. Dupuy Barclay Tagg Danny L. Miller Bob Baffert

Patricia A. Generazio West Point Thoroughbreds Spendthrift Farm, LLC

Mary Hartmann Dallas Stewart Richard E. Mandella

Martin Racing Stable LLC & Dan Morgan David W. & Holly F. Wilson Ike & Dawn Thrash Robert A. Adams

W. Bret Calhoun Vladimir Cerin John W. Sadler Dallas Stewart

Two-Year-Old Filly Amen Hallelujah (Montbrook) - 10 Joanie’s Catch (First Tour) - 9 Sweetlalabye (Sweetsouthernsaint) - 9 Jealous Again (Trippi) - 7

Three-Year-Old Colt/Gelding Vineyard Haven (Lido Palace) - 30 This Ones For Phil (Untuttable) – 12 No Inflation (Repriced) - 10

Three-Year-Old Filly Hooh Why (Cloud Hopping) – 26 Frolic’s Dream (Smoke Glacken) – 8 Romacaca (Running Stag) - 8 Century Park (General Meeting) - 7

Older Male (Four-Year-Olds and up Colt/Gelding) Presious Passion (Royal Anthem) – 57 Macho Again (Macho Uno) - 40 Crown of Thorns (Repent) - 25

Joseph & Helen Barbazon Milan Kosanovich Clover Leaf Farms II, Inc.

Older Female (Four-Year-Olds and up Filly/Mare) Dubai Majesty (Essence of Dubai) - 13 Briecat (Adcat) - 12 Dawn After Dawn (Successful Appeal) – 12 Unforgotten (Northern Afleet) - 11

Harold J. Plumley Ocala Oaks, Inc. & Don R. Graham Hartley/De Renzo Thoroughbreds Charles T. Rognom & Robert A. Adams

Sprint (Three-Year-Olds and up, male and female, race distances one mile and less) Vineyard Haven (Lido Palace) - 30 Crown of Thorns (Repent) - 25 Big City Man (Northern Afleet) - 20

L. M. Scace Clover Leaf Farms II, Inc. Four Horsemen’s Ranch

Godolphin Racing LLC Spendthrift Farm, LLC Prince Sultan Mohammed Saud Al Kabeer

S. bin Suroor Richard E. Mandella Jerry Barton

Patricia A. Generazio Earle I. Mack Lael Stables Glen Hill Farm Herman Heinlein Frank Carl Calabrese

Mary Hartmann John W. Sadler Barclay Tagg Thomas F. Proctor David A. Vivian Danny L. Miller

Turf (Three-Year-Olds and up, male and female, races run on the turf) Presious Passion (Royal Anthem) – 55 Globetrotter (Street Cry) - 10 My Princess Jess (Stormy Atlantic) - 10 No Inflation (Repriced) - 10 Soldier’s Dancer (Lost Soldier) - 10 Romacaca (Running Stag) - 8

Joseph & Helen Barbazon Live Oak Stud Adena Springs Glen Hill Farm Franks Farm Cashel Stud, Inc.

■ Selection Criteria for Florida-bred champions Year-end divisional champions will be determined using the “FTBOA Chase to the Championship” point system, a ranking that awards points for success in stakes races. The “FTBOA Chase to the Championship” allocates points for stakes wins in graded races, open-company stakes and Florida’s signature racing days, with the number of points awarded based upon the classification of the race. International stakes race status is governed by the International Cataloguing Standards Committee. The first three finishers in all Group/Graded and listed races appearing in Part I of the International Cataloguing Standards and International Statistics Book printed by The Jockey Club receive “black-type” designation. The Florida-bred with the most points in each division on December 31 is deemed champion of that division. Horse of the Year, Broodmare of the Year and Breeder of the Year will be voted on by the FTBOA Board of Directors and announced at the FTBOA’s annual awards dinner. In the case of a year-end tie in points in any division, earnings will be used to decide the tiebreaker. Points are assigned as follows: 30 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

■ World Thoroughbred Championship Breeders’ Cup Race: Win: 20 points Place: 15 points Show: 10 points

■ Grade 1 Stakes Race: Win: 15 points Place: 10 points Show: 5 points

■ Grade 2 Stakes Race: Win: 5 points Place: 3 points Show: 2 points

■ Grade 3 Stakes Race: Win: 3 points Place: 2 points Show: 1 point

■ Sunshine Millions (equivalent to a Grade 2 Stakes Race): Win: 5 points Place: 3 points Show: 2 points

■ Other Florida-bred Signature Race Days (equivalent to a Grade 3 Stakes Race):

(The Florida Million, Florida Cup, Florida Stallion Stakes Series): Win: 3 points Place: 2 points Show: 1 point

■ Open-Company Stakes ($50,000 + Purse) Points for WIN ONLY: Win: 2 points


COOKIE SERLETIC PHOTO

Dept.Ag.33546.qx:Layout 1

12/15/08

10:10 AM

Page 1

Florida Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner 850-488-4366 • Fax 850-922-0374 e-mail: davisp@doacs.state.fl.us 407 S. Calhoun • 412 Mayo Building, Tallahassee, FL 32399

Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association 801 SW 60th Ave. • Ocala, FL 34474 352-629-2160 • Fax: 352-629-3603 www.ftboa.com • info@ftboa.com


SunshineMill.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

FLORIDA NEWS

1:51 PM

Page 1

To view all early-bird nominations, visit www.ftboa.com

Six races set for Jan. 30 at Gulfstream Park, Santa Anita

Florida-bred Macho Again Among Sunshine Millions Early Nominees BY NICK FORTUNA

lionaires who finished first and second in last year’s edition. Soldier’s Dancer, bred by Franks Farm, won the $250,000 lorida-bred stakes winners Macho Again, Dry Martini, Duke of Mischief and Palladio were among the 31 horses PTHA President’s Cup at Philadelphia Park for the second nominated to the $500,000 Sunshine Millions Classic, a straight year in September before capturing the $150,000 Bonnine-furlong race that pits Florida-breds against California-bred at nie Heath Turf Cup at Calder in November. Presious Passion finished a disappointing fifth while seeking Santa Anita Park on Jan. 30. The Sunshine Millions will feature three races at Santa Anita a third straight victory in the W.L. McKnight Handicap (G2) at and three more at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 30. Two races were Calder Race Course Dec. 26. Prior to that, he finished second eliminated this year, and the total value of the races was reduced behind defending champion Conduit in the Breeders’ Cup Turf at Santa Anita. The gelding was bred by Joseph and Helen Barfrom $3.6 million last year to $1.8 million this year. Macho Again, bred by Milan Kosanovich at Broken Back Farm bazon at Pleasant Acres Farm in Morriston. Gulfstream Park also will host the $300,000 Sunshine Milin Ocala, had a steller 4-year-old season in 2009, capturing the lions Distaff, which covers nine furlongs, and the Stephen Foster Handicap (G1) at Churchill Downs and $200,000 Sunshine Millions Sprint, which spans the New Orleans Handicap (G2) at Fair Grounds six furlongs. Santa Anita will host the $300,000 before finishing second in both the Whitney Sunshine Millions Filly and Mare Turf going nine Handicap (G1) and the Woodward Stakes (G1) at furlongs and the $200,000 Saratoga. He finished seventh Sunshine Millions Filly and behind Florida-bred It’s a Bird Mare Sprint at six furlongs. in last year’s Sunshine MilAmong the nominees for lions Classic. the Distaff was Florida-bred Dry Martini, bred by Sweet Repent, who won the Marty and Carol Hershe at $100,000 Stage Door Betty Turtle Pond Farm in Williston, Handicap (G3) at Calder on finished second in last year’s Dec. 26 for her fourth straight Classic. He went on to win victory. the Suburban Handicap (G2) Florida-bred Crown of and the $65,000 Three Coins Thorns, who finished second Up Stakes at Belmont Park behind Dancing in Silks in the this year. Dry Martini also Breeders’ Cup Sprint last was nominated to the month, was nominated to the $300,000 Sunshine Millions Macho Again Sunshine Millions Sprint but Turf, a nine-furlong race to might be run in the race because of a severe throat ulcer. Dancing be run at Gulfstream Park. Duke of Mischief, bred by Marilyn McMaster, won the in Silks also was nominated, as were stakes-winning Florida-breds $250,000 Iowa Derby by five lengths at Prairie Meadows in June. Pashito the Che, This Ones for Phil and Accredit. Florida-bred Century Park, who won the $75,000 California Palladio, bred and owned by Ocala’s Haras Santa Maria de Araras operation, won the $147,965 Autumn Stakes at Wood- Cup Distance Handicap at Santa Anita last October, is among the bine last month to get within $40,000 of the million-dollar mark top horses nominated for the Filly and Mare Turf. Florida-bred Dubai Majesty, the winner of the $116,700 Bufin career earnings. Among the top nominees for the Sunshine Millions Turf are falo Trace Franklin County Stakes at Keeneland last season, was Florida-breds Soldier’s Dancer and Presious Passion, a pair of mil- among the leading nominees for the Filly and Mare Sprint. ■ PALMER PHOTO

F

32 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


DD.35397.Sarava.qx:Ad

12/30/09

11:34 AM

Page 1

LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO / INSET: NYRA PHOTO

History is the best guide to future success

SARAVA

Wild A gain—Rhythm of Life, by Deputy Minister

Florida’s only Belmont Stakes winner! An earner of $773,832 during his racing career, Sarava defeated leading sire Medaglia d’Oro in the 2002 Belmont Stakes (G1). Sarava is by Wild Again, sire of such champions as Wilderness Song, and Free at Last, and millionaires Milwaukee Brew, Wild Rush, Shine Again and Elmhurst ♦ 899 S.W. 85th Ave., Ocala, FL 34481 ♦ (352) 237-3834 ♦ Fax: (352)237-6069 ♦ www.doublediamondfarm.com

NOMINATED TO Florida Stallion Stakes

A l s o s t a n d i n g : A M E R I C A N S P I R I T ♦ ♦ P R O U D A N D T R U E ♦ ♦ R E Y D E C A F E ♦ ♦ W E K I VA S P R I N G S


Bargains.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:16 PM

Page 34

Florida

In an economy demanding bargain hunting, Thoroughbred breeders need only look south. All the way south.

By BILL HELLER hile no state can disrupt Kentucky’s dominance in breeding statistics, Florida’s stallions made quite a dent in 2009. Through early December, Kentucky had the top 12 stallions in 2-year-old progeny earnings and 23 of the top 28 spots. Florida had three of the other five, and all three stood for a modest fee in 2009. Wildcat Heir, who stood for $6,500 at Journeyman Stud, ranked 13th. Twentieth-ranked Proud Accolade, who died of a congenital neurological

W

LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

Wildcat Heir, who stood for $6,500 at Journeyman Stud, ranked 13th in progeny earnings for 2009 through press time.

34 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

condition last June 16, stood for $4,000 at Bridlewood Farm. Vinery Ltd.’s D’wildcat ranked 24th after standing for $6,500. Two other Florida sires, Hear No Evil, who moved from Rising Hill Farm to Journeyman Stud for 2010, and Ocala Stud’s Sweetsouthernsaint, ranked 46th and 61st after standing for $5,000 and $2,500, respectively, in 2009. Sweetsouthernsaint, who has just left Ocala Stud, had the lowest stud fee of any of the top 100. Add the five Florida stallions’ stud fees together, and the total ($24,500) was still far less than many individual Kentucky stallions on the list. “Bargains, that’s what we’re known for, we being Florida,” Brent Fernung of Journeyman Stud said. “That’s the key here. Mr. Prospector started out here for $7,500. We do a good job making horses.”


Bargains.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:16 PM

Page 35

Bargains LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

Declan Doyle, stallion administrator for Vinery Ltd., agreed: “It’s difficult times right now, but Floridabreds are very much appreciated within the horse business. As we move on from here, that won’t change that much. It’s a great place to train and run a horse. It’s a great place to breed horses.” Ocala Stud has been doing exactly that for more than 50 years. The farm opened in 1956 and two years later sold its first crop of 2-year-olds. Traditionally, Ocala Stud sells its entire juvenile crop at the Ocala Breeders’ Two-Year-Olds in Training Sales in Ocala. Since its inception, the farm has sold 26 horses who earned more than $200,000 each and more than 90 stakes winners. Ocala Stud consists of three farms in Ocala and Marion County totaling 500 acres. “It’s doing well,” said 29-year-old David O’Farrell, who helps his dad, Michael, Ocala Stud’s general manager, run the operation. “Times are tough, but we’re going to just hang on tight, and we’ll get through this.” D’wildcat (above) ranked 24th in 2009 after standing for $6,500, One stallion who has while Hear No Evil (below), despite his considerable success last helped them do that is will stand at Journeyman Stud for $3,500. Sweetsouthernsaint. Sweetsouthernsaint certainly delivered value in 2009. His 2-year-old filly Sweetlalabye earned $363,700, the top earnings of his four winners from 16 starters. “He had a lot of talent,” David O’Farrell said. “An injury ended his career early. He was a good 2-year-old. That’s one thing we look for in a stallion. That’s important in Florida. We stood his old man, Saint Ballado. We started him out for $2,500. He had Captain Bodgit in his first crop and really took off. Sweetsouthernsaint has been a very good sire. Arguably, he’s the most successful son of Saint Ballado.” One reason for Ocala Stud’s success is the farm’s willingness to breed its own mares to its own stallions. “Michael O’Farrell is proactive,” Journeyman Stud’s Fernung said. “He breeds his own mares to his own stallions. If you’re not willing to support your own horses, nobody else will. I have bred 40 to 45 of my mares to my stallions.” SERITA HULT PHOTO

year,

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 35


12/29/09

1:16 PM

Page 36

Florida Bargains

Florida-bred Jackson Bend (below) has stamped himself as a legitimate Triple Crown contender this year.

Fernung is certainly doing his part to stimulate the economy. Hear No Evil, who stood at Rising Hill Farm for $5,000 in 2009, stands this year at Journeyman Stud for $3,500, despite his considerable success last year. From a first crop of just 11 horses in 2009, Hear No Evil sired three winners from seven runners, including Jackson Bend, who earned $477,820 by winning 3 stakes at Calder—defeating subsequent Grade 2 Saratoga Special and Futurity Stakes winner D’Funnybone in the Frank Gomez Memorial in one of them—to stamp himself as a legitimate Triple Crown contender in 2010. Hear No Evil was one of three stallions to relocate to Journeyman Stud, joining Consolidator, who ranked 59th in 2009 2-year-old progeny earnings, and Teuflesberg. Consolidator will stand for $5,000 in 2010 and Teuflesberg for $3,500. “Hear No Evil didn’t get that many mares last year; he didn’t sell a whole bunch of seasons,” Fernung said. “I want to increase this horse’s book. I want to get him started. The things that this horse has done are tremendous. He just needs numbers now. He just really needs to get mares here. For $3,500, we’ll get them. Maybe that will pay off down the line.” Maybe it already has. “I’m already getting calls for him,” Fernung said in late November. “That’s unusual this time of year.”

36 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

HearYe HearYe’s victory in the $150,000 Jack Price Juvenile Stakes at Calder on Nov. 14th didn’t hurt as he became Hear No Evil’s second stakes winner. Fernung has also received calls for Wildcat Heir, who didn’t benefit from a single six-figure-winning 2-yearold in his first crop. His top earner in 2009, Karmagedden, banked $73,130 as the most successful of Wildcat Heir’s 35 winners from 53 starters out of 107 foals. A day after Karmagedden captured a $60,000 stakes for New Jersey-breds at The Meadowlands, Nov. 13, Wild Mia gave her sire another stakes winner, taking a $100,000 stakes for Florida-breds at Calder. “We got off to a great start with Wildcat Heir,” Fernung said. “He’s not like a horse we get down here. He was the winter-book favorite for the Kentucky Derby. He was the Hopeful winner, by Thunder Gulch. It’s a great family. He was a good 2-year-old, a good 3-year-old and a good 4-year-old. To get that kind of sire in a regional market is very unusual. They just don’t happen.” Fernung and his wife Crystal have been on their present 150-acre farm since 1989, though Brent took a seven-year sabbatical to work at CloverLeaf Farms before returning to Journeyman Stud in 2007. Since his return, Journeyman Stud has added a new barn/office complex. Expansion of the farm is a possibility. “We could use a little more acreage,” Brent said. “This is a tough market economically, but we’ve got some bullets down here.”

JIM LISA PHOTO

Bargains.qx:Florida Horse_template


TAMPA BAY DOWNS 2010 STAKES SCHEDULE Closing Saturday, December 5, 2009 Saturday, December 12, 2009 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE SUPER STAKES

THE FLORIDA OAKS - GRADE III

For Four Year Olds and Upward Seven Furlongs

For Fillies Three Year Olds One Mile And One Sixteenth

THE LIGHTNING CITY STAKES

Closing Saturday, January 30, 2010 Saturday, February 13, 2010 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

Closing Saturday, February 27, 2010 Saturday, March 13, 2010 $150,000 Guaranteed

Closing Saturday, December 12, 2009 Saturday, December 26, 2009 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE SUNCOAST STAKES

For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward About One Mile And One Eighth (Turf)

THE INAUGURAL STAKES

Closing Saturday, January 30, 2010 Saturday, February 13, 2010 $225,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

For Fillies And Mares Three Year Olds and Upward About Five Furlongs (Turf)

For Two Year Olds Six Furlongs

For Fillies Three Year Olds One Mile And Forty Yards

Closing Saturday, December 12, 2009 Saturday, December 26, 2009 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE SAM F. DAVIS STAKES - GRADE III

THE SANDPIPER STAKES

Closing Saturday, January 30, 2010 Saturday, February 13, 2010 $125,000 Guaranteed

For Fillies Two Year Olds Six Furlongs Closing Saturday, December 19, 2009 Saturday, January 2, 2010 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE MINARET STAKES For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward Six Furlongs Closing Saturday, December 26, 2009 Saturday, January 9, 2010 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE PELICAN STAKES For Four Year Olds and Upward Six Furlongs Closing Saturday, January 2, 2010 Saturday, January 16, 2010 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE GASPARILLA STAKES For Fillies Three Year Olds Seven Furlongs Closing Saturday, January 2, 2010 Saturday, January 16, 2010 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE PASCO STAKES For Three Year Olds Seven Furlongs Closing Saturday, January 16, 2010 Saturday, January 30, 2010 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE MANATEE STAKES For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward Seven Furlongs Closing Saturday, January 23, 2010 Saturday, February 6, 2010 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

For Three Year Olds One Mile And One Sixteenth

THE ENDEAVOUR STAKES - GRADE III For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward About One Mile And One Sixteenth (Turf) Closing Saturday, February 6, 2010 Saturday, February 20, 2010 $150,000 Guaranteed(Includes $50,000 from BC Fund)

TAMPA BAY BREEDERS' CUP *ForTHE Four Year Olds and Upward About One Mile And One Sixteenth (Turf) Closing Saturday, February 13, 2010 Saturday, February 27, 2010 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE HILLSBOROUGH STAKES - GRADE III

Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE OCALA BREEDERS' SALES SOPHOMORE For Three Year Olds Seven Furlongs Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE STONEHEDGE FARM SOUTH SOPHOMORE FILLIES For Fillies Three Year Olds Seven Furlongs Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE DAYTON ANDREWS DODGE SOPHOMORE TURF For Three Year Olds About One Mile And One Sixteenth (Turf)

THE WAYWARD LASS STAKES For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward One Mile And One Sixteenth Closing Saturday, February 20, 2010 Saturday, March 6, 2010 $65,000 Guaranteed (Includes $15,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE CHALLENGER STAKES

Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE HILTON GARDEN INN SPRINT For Four Year Olds and Upward Six Furlongs

Stakes For Four Year Olds and Upward One Mile And One Sixteenth

Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

Closing Saturday, February 27, 2010 Saturday, March 13, 2010 $75,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

THE L & D FARM TURF DISTAFF

THE TURF DASH For Three Year Olds and Upward About Five Furlongs (Turf)

Closing Saturday, March 20, 2010 Saturday, April 3, 2010 $85,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

Closing Saturday, February 27, 2010 Saturday, March 13, 2010 $300,000 Guaranteed

THE KINSMAN FARM TURF CLASSIC

THE TAMPA BAY DERBY - GRADE III

For Fillies And Mares Four Year Olds and Upward About One Mile And One Sixteenth (Turf)

For Four Year Olds and Upward About One Mile And One Eighth (Turf)

For Three Year Olds One Mile And One Sixteenth Closing Saturday, February 27, 2010 Saturday, March 13, 2010 $175,000 Guaranteed (Includes $25,000 from FTBOA Stakes Funds)

Please note that the Breeders’ Cup money allotted to the Grade III Endeavor Breeders Cup and the *Tampa Bay Breeders’ Cup is pending the Breeders’ Cup board’s approval

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Contact Duby Christo, Stakes Coordinator Tampa Bay Downs P.O. Box 2007 • Oldsmar, FL 34677 Ph: 800-200-4434 • Fax 813-854-2438 www.tampabaydowns.com


Bargains.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

1:16 PM

Page 38

of the market down here is driven by pinhookers. He throws those speedy types.” Proud Accolade seemed to be doing the same when So does Vinery Ltd., which is taking a gamble with he died last summer just 10 days after getting his first D’wildcat by raising his stud fee from $6,500 to winner, Mr. Green, at Calder. The 7-year-old son of Yes $10,000. “He’s been kind of a bargain the last few It’s True had 15 winners from 28 runners led by Proud Zoe, who bankrolled $154,238. years,” Doyle said. “He was affordProud Accolade spent his first able. A lot of people jumped on it. D’Funnybone two seasons at stud at Padua StaThis year it came down to either an or Jackson Bend makes ble’s Florida farm before moving to increase or a promotion (to Vinery Bridlewood, where he seemed to be in Kentucky).” an impact on this year’s doing fine. Then he died. “It was About to begin its sixth year in Florida, Vinery Ltd. will stand four Triple Crown trail, a lot very disappointing, but in this business, you never know what’s going stallions in 2010. The farm is more breeders will to happen around the corner,” Briowned by Dr. Tom Simon. “We don’t board mares and don’t board wonder why they didn’t dlewood Stallion Director Jeff Schwietert, said. “We feel fortunate yearlings, but we have a training breed their mares to one that we have four Proud Accolade track,” Doyle said. crops out there.” Florida-bred D’wildcat, whose of Florida’s conservaAnother Bridlewood stallion can top earner was D’Funnybone tively-priced stallions. help fill his absence. Indian Ocean, ($278,206), sired 106 2-year-olds who stood for $4,000 last year, in 2009, getting 25 winners from 47 starters, impressive numbers from his first Florida ranked 95th with his first crop of 2-year-olds. His stud crop. “He stood for a few years in Canada, then he fee will remain at $4,000 in 2010, yet another breeding came down here,” Doyle said. “He’s been very well bargain in the state of Florida. If either D’Funnybone or Jackson Bend makes an imreceived and supported in Florida. We were excited to see that first crop run. Last year was a weak economy, pact on this year’s Triple Crown trail, a lot more breeders will wonder why they didn’t breed their mares to one of and he still bred 99.” Doyle thinks he knows why: “I think one of the Florida’s conservatively-priced stallions. Schwietert things is he’s the archetype for pinhook breeders. A lot summed it up: “There’s no question there’s value here.” ■

Florida Bargains

If either

COGLIANESE PHOTO

Florida-bred DʼFunnybone earned $278,206 in 2009.

38 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/28/09

3:24 PM

Page 1


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

2010 Ocala/Marion County Thoroughbred farms opened their doors to prospective breeders last month as the area’s popular stallion shows got underway. More shows are slated for this month, and they will be featured in future issues. PHOTOS BY SERITA HULT

Hartley/ DeRenzo

40 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

12/29/09

12:55 PM

Page 40

Stallions


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

12:57 PM

Page 41

on Parade Opposite page, clockwise from top: City Place, With Distinction and The Green Monkey

Belgravia (above) and Simon Pure

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 41


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

2010

12/29/09

3:57 PM

Page 42

Stallion Shows

Signature Stallions Clockwise from top left: Shakespeare, Bachelor Blues and Chapel Royal

42 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

12:56 PM

Page 43

Clockwise from top: Straight Man, Western Pride and Unbridled Time

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 43


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

2010

12/29/09

12:56 PM

Page 44

Stallion Shows

Get Away Farm Clockwise from top left: Double Honor, Imperialism and Two Step Salsa 44 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Stallion Shows.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

3:40 PM

Page 45

Winding Oaks Strong Hope (at left) and Graeme Hall (above)

Vinery stallions Dʼwildcat (right) and Pomeroy (below)

Vinery THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 45


PredictingFoaling:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

4:01 PM

Page 46

Predicting It’s that time of year again, and babies are soon to be born. Only Mother Nature knows for sure when a mare will foal, but we can use a variety of different clues to help us predict the big event. By CATIE DELUCA, DVM, MS DiplomateACT University of Florida irst, refer to the mare’s breeding dates. The average gestation length for a horse is 330-360 days, which is a pretty big window of time. Most owners don’t want to sleep in the barn for three weeks waiting for their mare to foal, so we use other information to help narrow the window. If a mare has had foals before, you can use her previous gestation lengths to help predict future ones, as mares tend to be fairly consistent. Still, relying on gestation length alone to predict foaling is a great way to miss everything! Luckily, the mare goes through some other changes that help us predict when she will foal. The mare’s udder begins to develop and fill with milk three to six weeks prior to foaling. Mares

Dr. Catie DeLuca with a new born foal

46 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

PHOTO COURTESY DR. CATIE DELUCA

F

that have never foaled before (termed maiden mares) will sometimes develop their udder only in the final two to three weeks, whereas mares that have foaled in previous years tend to develop more slowly over five to six weeks. In the final week prior to foaling, the teat ends will start to fill and finally engorge with milk, and in the final one to three days prior to foaling, the mare will often “wax up.” This means that some thick, sticky secretions will leak from the mare’s udder and dry on the end of her teats. Since the secretions are so thick, they look like drops of candle wax on the end of the teat. This is a very good indication that the mare will foal soon. Calcium levels in the mare’s milk are also useful in the prediction of foaling. A variety of stall side kits are available and are simple to use. A small amount of milk is collected from the mare’s udder and the calcium level is tested. As mares get close to foaling, the calcium level in milk increases. The level typically increases a few days prior to foaling, however some mares will have a dramatic increase in just one day and foal that night. These tests are best performed daily once the mare develops a large udder and milk can be expressed relatively easily. While certainly helpful, the kits are not perfect for every mare. In the last day or so before foaling, many mares will show some behavioral changes. These changes are most obvious in maiden mares and may not be observed at all in experienced broodmares. The mare will often go off feed, and she may separate herself from her herd mates if out at pasture. She may urinate and defecate frequently, and appear to have trouble getting comfortable. She may be somewhat restless or even show signs of mild colic. This is likely due to some discomfort during repositioning of the fetus for delivery, and foaling usually commences in the next few hours. If there is excessive activity in the barn or too many onlookers, the mare may delay foaling until things quiet down. Many experienced horse-


PredictingFoaling:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

4:01 PM

Page 47

Foaling men have observed that while the foal controls the day that it is born, the mare controls the hour. What mare would want to give birth with a barn full of people? Most mares wait until late at night, usually between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., to have their foals. The best advice is to leave the mare alone as much as possible and watch her by a video camera or very quietly from a few stalls away. Once labor begins, it can be very tempting to rush in and help deliver the foal, however doing so may upset the mare and actually slow the process down. The first stage of labor usually lasts several hours and consists of “warm-up” contractions where the fetus gets positioned for delivery. The duration of stage 1 is variable, with maiden mares having the longest duration, but usually lasts several hours. The signs described above (off feed, mild discomfort or colic) are an indication that the mare is in stage 1 of labor. Stage 1 ends when the mare’s water breaks. Stage 2 of labor involves delivery of the foal. Contractions are strong and frequent, and stage 2 is usually only 10-30 minutes in duration. Once the foal is deliv-

ered, the mare usually rests for a few moments before getting up and greeting her foal. A longer duration of stage 2 can indicate a problem, such an improperly positioned foal, and can result in serious complications if not corrected promptly. Inexperienced mare owners may choose to have their mares foal at a farm where experienced help or a veterinarian is close by. While foaling problems are uncommon (12 percent of deliveries), the consequences can be life-threatening for the mare and foal, and time is often the most important factor. The final stage of labor involves passage of the placenta. This usually occurs within minutes to a few hours following birth. A placenta should not be retained longer than 3 hours post-foaling; if it is, you should call your veterinarian. While mares have been delivering foals for centuries without our help, it is still a good idea to have an experienced horseperson present at all foalings. Accurate prediction of foaling helps us be present for deliveries and able to assist or call for help if needed, and ultimately leads to the birth of more healthy foals. ■

About Dr. DeLuca Catie DeLuca, D.V.M., M.S., is a graduate of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. She served an internship at the prestigious Mid-Atlantic Equine Medical Center in New Jersey, then performed her reproduction residency at Colorado State University, one of the meccas of equine reproduction. DeLuca obtained her board certification in theriogeneology in 2009 and recently presented a scientific paper at the annual meeting for the American Association of Equine Practitioners. In her role with the University of Florida’s Veterinary Medical Center, DeLuca manages a mobile reproduction service that focuses solely on breeding work. Her assignments center around repro tasks such as breeding soundness examinations, pre-breeding checks to predict ovulation, ultrasound pregnancy checks, Caslick procedures, and other non-emergency work. “Because we are a teaching hospital, I’ll have students with me,” DeLuca said, “and I’ll often be teaching as I go – talking to the students about what I’m doing and quizzing them on what type of plan we might want to implement for our cases.”—DENISE STEFFANUS THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 47


35000.DontMissHits.FHsize.qx:Layout 1

10/19/09

1:09 PM

Page 1

Don’t Miss HITS! Horse Shows in the Sun

has been an Ocala tradition since 1982. The historic and elite hunter-jumper horse show begins each January with an influx of horsemen and women from throughout the world, infusing an estimated $50 million into our local economy. The show circuits include seven weeks of the highest equine competition, exhibitor parties, an outdoor trade

show, family-fun weekend festivals and spectator activities. Competitors and horse owners arrive in Ocala ready to patronize restaurants, hotels, retail and entertainment venues. Every year, they buy and rent real estate, automobiles, and countless big ticket items.

Reach this affluent crowd ADVERTISE in Horse Capital Digest, official weekly publication of HITS Ocala.

Fit your budget with full-color, glossy, or black & white options.

Discounts available for the seven-week circuit! For rates, deadlines and specifications, contact Summer Best • summer@flequine.com

■ (352) 732-8858, ext. 227 Beverly Kalberkamp • beverly@flequine.com

■ (352) 732-8858, ext. 222

Special Editorial Includes Profiles of Top Riders, ■ Trainers & Horses Show Results ■ Calendar of Events ■ Society Style ■ Places to go, ■ Things to do Gourmet on the Go ■ Judges’ Comments ■ Insight from ■ Course Designers Photo Spreads ■ Grand Prix Coverage ■ The Winning Lifestyle ■ …and More! ■

Magazines are available on newsstands throughout Ocala/Marion County and on the HITS show grounds.


Transition.Section.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/30/09

11:21 AM

Page 1

In this section 50

Editor’s Note

52

Traveling with Your Horse Veterinary advice and reminders for safely hauling horses. By Dr. Amanda House

58

Zoom, Zoom, Zoom Different means and modes of equine transportation. By Summer Best

62

Go, Gators! University of Florida horse judging team brings home top honors. By Dr. Saundra TenBroeck

62

Inside Track Names and faces in our equine industry.

64

News from Your Florida Horse Park By Connie Duff Wise

65

Do Horses Need Oranges? How horses metabolize vitamin C. By Dr. Karen E. Davison

66

Practically Speaking Horse Haulin’ By Mark Shuffitt

49 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


EditorsNote.qx:EditorWelcome

editor’s

12/29/09

5:02 PM

Page 6

note

Summer Best/COOKIE SERLETIC PHOTO

Forward Motion For the past month or so, it’s been tempting to gawk backwards.

ur society closed the first decade of the 21st century with worries and oddities most unbecoming. You know the stories. We’re shouldering a great recession. Massive unemployment. Inflation. Stagnation. Stagflation. Frozen credit and rising everyday costs. Our country is at war. We’re implicated in deeply divided political debates. Runaway deficits. National and international security scares. Food safety. H1N1. Unparalleled energy and environmental concerns. In our personal lives, priorities are shifting – perhaps by default, and perhaps some for the better. The horse industry has received its share of blows throughout the past few years. Our farms, equine businesses, shows, training centers and tracks are stinging from setbacks. It’s easy to get stuck in the negative. Today, at this January juncture of old stuff and new beginnings, we pause long enough to acknowledge, remember, accept and learn. And then we move forward. No muddling or medAs the plain-spoken dling. No could’ve, would’ve, should’ve. You’ve probably heard about the major, successful companies formed in a recession or Will Rogers once said, depression. FedEx began shipping its first packages during the sluggish days of 1973. For“Even if you’re on the tune Magazine was launched in 1930, just four months after the Wall Street crash. IHOP right track, you’ll get served up pancakes in 1958 during the Eisenhower recession. CNN opened its doors in run over if you tough times of the 1980s. Critics from the Wall Street Journal point out that these businesses are few and far between, but their biggest success is due to early tenacity, innovajust sit there. tion, and ability to serve customers with a new product like never before. These entrepreneurs didn’t wait for their ships to come in – they swam out to get them, then they got on board, revved the engines and took off. I’m excited to think about business ideas and models being developed by innovators right now…ideas that will impact our society, economy and equine industry for decades to come.

O

MOVING HORSES

To switch gears on a similar topic, we’ve included in this month’s issue of The Florida Horse a forward motion-esque equine transportation section. It seems that, over the centuries, horses have traveled via every vessel that humans have traveled – maybe with the exception of spaceships. We wanted to take a look at how horses journey today, so we visited with commercial haulers, trailer and truck dealers, an equine airline forwarding company, a lawyer who represents the equine travel industry, a veterinarian who helped us review equine safety, a local horseman who tells scary tales of preventable accidents that can happen on the road, and more. I hope your 2010 is positive and purposeful, full of action. As the plain-spoken Will Rogers once said, “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” It’s a privilege to journey forward with you.

50 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Sutton.32681.qx:Layout 1

7/23/08

4:29 PM

Page 1

The First Name in Equine Air Travel Since 1969

Every Seat is

First Class! • Walk-On Ramp Loading • Direct Flights • Climate-Controlled Cabin • Padded Stalls • Expert Handling

First Class Equine Air Travel www.suttonforwarding.com Toll Free: 800-852-6169 • KY: 502-419-4540 • West Coast: 626-482-2923 • East Coast: 518-470-6531


TravelingWithHorse.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

12:50 PM

Page 54

Traveling With Your Horse Documentation for the Road ■ COGGINS TEST

Horses infected with the equine infectious anemia virus will experience lifelong persistent infection. The disease is also called “swamp fever” because of its historical prevalence in the Gulf Coast States. However, the number of infected horses per year is typically very small (fewer than 10 out of more than 100,000

Veterinary Health Care Reminders For Travel into Florida: Coggins – current original documents or Negative EIA Test Verification Card or Equine Interstate Passport Card Health Certificate or Equine Interstate Passport Card Vaccinations – Recommended but not required by law Provide your own feed and plenty of opportunities for water Shipping boots or wraps to help protect the distal limbs

Trailer First Aid Kit: Thermometer (normal equine temp is 99-101.5 F) Stethoscope Scissors Adhesive tape and duct tape Hemostats Leg wraps Soap Flashlight Clippers Latex Gloves Bandage Materials – roll cotton, gauze pads, cling wrap, sheet cotton, etc. Antiseptics (Chlorahexidine, Betadine solution) Wound dressing Hoof pick and knife Phenylbutazone (Bute) Bottles of Sterile saline PVC pipe for splinting

54 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

S p e c i a l Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e c t i o n Florida horses tested). Transmission of the virus occurs through horseflies and deerflies, or iatrogenically from blood products or needles. The disease has three forms: acute, chronic, and inapparent. It causes anemia, low platelet numbers, and intermittent fevers in most infected horses. By law, all horses are required to have a negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) test, also called a Coggins test, within 12 months of transportation within Florida or when traveling over the state line. (Coggins papers must travel with the horse.) The only exception to this rule: foals under 6 months of age, if they are accompanied by their dam who has had a negative test within the past 12 months. A negative EIA test within the previous 12 months is also required for horses congregated at public or private assemblies, including boarding stables and pastures, shows, exhibitions, fairs, rodeos, racetracks, trail rides, and any other public or private assemblies. ■ COGGINS TEST CARDS

FRONT

The Division of Animal Industry of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services offers two types of lamiBACK nated Coggins test cards. As a voluntary alternative to the standard paper EIA document, these sturdy cards are approximately the size of a credit card and contain digital pictures of the horse. The Negative EIA Test Verification Card will be accepted within Florida as proof of a negative test. The card has the same expiration date as the official Coggins reporting form, FRONT but is not valid for change of ownership (original form is required). ■ PASSPORT CARD

The Equine Interstate Passport Card will be accepted by participating states as proof of a negative EIA test and as an Official Certificate of Veterinary

BACK


TravelingWithHorse.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

Inspection (health certificate) within the previous six months. The Passport Card is not valid for change of ownership. The states that honor the Florida Equine Passport Card are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Health certificates are required for horses transported into Florida from other states, but not specifically for movement within the state. The health certificate requirement is waived for horses being moved across state lines for emergency medical treatment at a veterinary facility.

Final Notes In addition to aforementioned state regulations and recommendations, a first aid kit is a valuable addition to every trailer. To minimize the possibility of limb abrasions or lacerations, shipping wraps or boots can provide an additional layer of protection for your horse. If a commercial or private shipper is hauling your horse for you, be certain that they have your contact information, insurance information, and can authorize emergency veterinary treatment for you. Ideally, provide your own feed and plenty of opportunities to drink water, especially during prolonged trips. Bringing your own feed and water buckets if you plan to stable overnight, as well as grooming and cleaning equipment, will help reduce your horse’s exposure to infectious disease. Most importantly, drive safely and enjoy your time away with your equine companion. ■ For updates on equine travel restrictions throughout Florida, visit ftboa.com, or contact the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Animal Industry at (850)410-0901.

Pre-Travel Option For very long distance traveling, some horse owners feel it may be worthwhile to have a veterinarian administer 1 gallon of mineral oil or water and electrolytes via nasogastric tube (tubing) within 24 hours of shipping. Because some horses may not drink as well while trailering, this practice might help lubricate the horse’s digestive tract.

12:50 PM

Page 55

Recent Health Alerts Affecting Equine Travel OUTBREAK OF EHV-1

On Nov. 30, Calder Race Course placed three barns under restrictions after a filly was diagnosed with Equine Herpes Virus Type-1 (EHV-1), wild type (non-neuropathogenic). The filly, which began showing signs of illness on Thursday, Nov. 27, was referred to the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine on Sunday, Nov. 29, where she was diagnosed with EHV-1. In addition to the three barns under restriction at Calder, three horses exposed to the positive filly were then quarantined in Ocala. According to the state veterinarian’s office, authorities worked closely with Calder Race Course management to ensure the appropriate precautions were taken to prevent the spread of the virus. Enhanced biosecurity was established at the track and the three restricted barns were not allowed to race or have horses ship in or out for at least three weeks. EQUINE PIROPLASMOSIS

In November 2009, a temporary restriction was added for importation of horses to Florida from Texas due to equine piroplasmosis. Piroplasmosis results from a tick-borne protozoal infection of horses with Babesia caballi or Theileria equi. Clinical signs may be variable but include anemia, low platelet counts, icterus, and swelling of the limbs. Due to piroplasmosis being identified in Texas, health certificates must be issued within 14 days prior to entry into Florida and must include specific statements on the premises the horse is coming from as well as testing information for Theleria equi. Horses must be examined and found free of ticks. Horses from Florida that are consigned to Texas and are returned to Florida within 30 days of the Florida issued health certificate are exempt from the requirements of this rule. ■

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 55


34387.FTC.Charities.WTW:Layout 1

4/29/09

11:26 AM

Page 1

Florida Thoroughbred Retirement Farm

Situated on 100 grassy acres in northeast Marion County,

The farm is operated in conjunction with the Florida Department of Corrections and Marion Correctional Institution and all the horses are cared for by female inmates from the Lowell Correctional Institute. The women, all non-violent offenders, spend their days learning barn management skills including grooming, feeding, doctoring, and physical therapy and they help teach the horses new disciplines. It’s a symbiotic relationship whereby the horses learn the skills they need to go on to new careers and the inmates learn about teamwork and trust. At the conclusion of the year-long program, having successfully passed 22 written tests covering all aspects of horse care, inmates graduate with a vocational certificate in equine care technology. Upon their release, some of the graduates have gone on to work in the industry as grooms and stable managers. Two famous Florida-bred champions permanently reside at the farm: Carterista, the 1993 Florida Champion Turf Horse and winner of eight stakes races, and Shake You Down, the 2003 Florida Champion Sprinter and winner of nearly $1.5 million.

Meredith Woods Photos

the Florida Thoroughbred Retirement Farm is home to more than 50 Florida-bred ex-racehorses. All of the horses arrive at the farm after their careers on the racetrack are over. Sure, their racing days are behind them, but after rest and retraining, many of the horses at the Florida TRF are ready for adoption. Many go on to enjoy second careers in dressage, trail riding, jumping, pleasure riding and other uses. Even those horses that are not rideable may find adoptive homes as companion animals. As more horses are adopted into new homes, more spaces are available for horses to join the Florida TRF program.

The Florida TRF currently has a waiting list for incoming Thoroughbreds. In order to join the list, the horse should be a Florida-bred Thoroughbred, coming straight from the track. The horse should be retired due to age or physical condition. Contact Florida Thoroughbred Charities for more information at 352-629-2160. A donation is requested along with each horse accepted into the program. Founded in 2001, the farm is supported though the concentrated efforts of Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association, Florida Thoroughbred Charities, Ocala Breeders’Sales Company, Gulfstream Park, Calder Race Course, Tampa Bay Downs, the Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, the national Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation, as well as by many individuals who contribute through donations and fundraising efforts. For more information on adopting a retired Florida-bred racehorse, please contact the FTBOA offices at 352-629-2160. Since 1990 Florida Thoroughbred Charities, the non-profit, charitable arm of the FTBOA has raised more than $3.5 million for a variety of community and Thoroughbred industry causes. Much of the fundraising efforts are made possible due to the support FTBOA and FTC receive from corporate sponsorship.

FLORIDA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS’ AND OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION 801 SW 60th Ave. • Ocala, FL 34474 352-629-2160 • Fax: 352-629-3603 www.ftboa.com • info@ftboa.com


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/15/09

10:08 AM

Page 1


Transportation Section.qx:Florida Horse_template

ALL ABOARD!

12/29/09

3:22 PM

Page 58

S p e c i a l Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e c t i o n

Zoom, Zoom, Throughout the past few centuries, horses have been wrapped, packed and shipped a multitude of ways. By SUMMER BEST t’s a total cliché, but it still rings true: Our world is more connected and mobile than ever. And just as we have come to casually journey the miles, our horses have joined us as frequent travelers. They have voyaged by sea. By rail. By highway. By air. This month, we’ve taken a look at equine mobility – from safety concerns, to efficiency and proper documentation. Plus, the financial considerations. When is it practical to own your own truck and trailer? When does it make sense to hire a commercial hauler? Why might you consider loading your horse onto a jet?

I

“Everything is changing quickly. We sell some unique trailers, too, like cargo trailers. The biggest advantage for us is our hands-on approach. You can custom-order a living quarters trailer or any size, and you can visit the factory here locally to see it being built.” To diversify and serve the broadest range of customers, the company also offers bumper-pull horse trailer rentals and a full maintenance service. LEAVIN’ ON A JET PLANE

When time is money, the expediency of air travel is unparalleled. Consider that by highway, a trip from Ocala to the Los Angeles area will take days when OWNING THE RIG pulling a horse trailer or driving a van. By air, that trip For many individuals, purchasing and maintaining a should last approximately 5 ½ hours, start to finish. truck and trailer to haul their own horses is an obvious “The main reason customers choose to ship horses by choice. Trucks can double as personal vehicles, and the air is that it saves time,” said Rob Clark, president of H.E. convenience of hitching to a trailer on a whim can be in- Sutton Forwarding Company. It also triggers a trickle-down valuable. Still, there are maintenance costs to factor, and effect: less time spent traveling translates to less stress on drivers must be confident and skilled to pull thousands the horse, less chance of health problems, and less rest time of pounds of cargo down the road. needed once the horse reaches its final destination. As with all markets, consumer confidence influences “We work symbiotically with van companies and purchases of horse trailers, said Mike Petty, general man- ground transportation,” Clark said. “Obviously, air travel ager of the Ocala-based Shadow Truck and Trailer. If doesn’t make sense for short distances. For longer dispeople feel nervous about the future, they hesitate before tances, we provide a quality service that is useful to a lot of people and horses.” reaching for their checkbooks. Tightened-down financing for H.E. Sutton contracts a Export and import quarantine luxury items has also added a Boeing 727-200 series, which new perspective for some. holds a maximum of 21 horses. requirements and restrictions Still, Petty feels positive about When fully loaded with horses, vary from country to country the horse trailer industry, espeminimal equipment, shavings and can change frequently. cially as Florida’s busy equine and hay, the aircraft weighs in training, showing and breeding Refer to a quarantine facility for at 45,000-48,000 lbs. season picks up this winter. Owners can purchase one updated rules and regulations. stall, or ante up for a larger stall“Trailer purchases fluctuate with seasonality,” Petty said. and-a-half, or a converted box

58 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Transportation Section.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

3:22 PM

Page 59

Zoom stall. Stalls are filled with shavings, and hay and water is available. Five handlers travel with the horses, and a foreman on board is authorized to sedate horses if necessary. “If they are good shippers, they are good fliers,” Clark said, noting that few horses need sedation. “The only moment when they might hesitate is going up the ramp. Sometimes the horses will get up that high and see all the activity going on in the airport and pause. After they enter the plane, there are no windows, and it feels just like a horse trailer or van.” Greg Otteson, sales manager for H.E. Sutton, reiterated the efficiency of the flight process.

To Own or Not to Own?

“Typically, when people think of buying their own rig, they think of it in terms of equipment cost,” said Nicole Pieratt of Salle Horse Vans. “For some, that works out perfectly. Others donʼt realize the cost of upkeep and labor. Youʼre often paying an employee to leave your farm and drive the truck and trailer. If they donʼt take care of the equipment or arenʼt accustomed to hauling horses, then the additional cost will add up quickly.” “Our biggest advantage is that we concentrate on the horses,” Otteson said. “We minimize ground time. We only fly horses, so the plane isn’t stuck on the ground waiting for other freight to arrive. Our crews are horse-

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 59


Transportation Section.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

3:22 PM

Page 60

S p e c i a l Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S e c t i o n men, and they understand the necessity for being fast, efficient and safe. That’s what we wake up every morning thinking about.” The pilot and flight crew are cautious with their equine cargo. Planes take off gradually. They corner slowly. The idea is for horses to feel that they are taking a normal trailer ride. A flight from the Ocala International Airport to the Ontario International Airport in California (outside Los Angeles) will usually fly for 2 ½ hours then touch down in Dallas to refuel. Within 30-45 minutes, the plane is on its way again and typically reaches California in another 2 ½ hours. COMMERCIAL VAN

Nicole Pieratt, third-generation owner/operator of Sallee Horse Vans based in Kentucky, Florida and New York, explained the three biggest variables that affect a commercial van fee. “Stall space, distance and carrier’s convenience are the main factors affecting price,” she said.

WD

TRANSPORT LOCAL/LONG DISTANCE

Your horse arrives ready to perform. No need for "down time." We rest, water several times during the trip. Reasonable rates.

352-215-9702

60 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

—Weighty Stuff!— A full load of 21 horses and minimal equipment on a 727-200 series weighs in at 45,000-48,000 lbs. A full load of human passengers with luggage on the same plane weighs about 35,000 lbs. Think of stall space rates like airline travel, she said. Economy class is the smallest space – three horses stand cross-tied, abreast, in three individual stalls, taking up the width of the van. Coach class would be similar to a larger stall-and-a-half, whereby two horses travel abreast and cross-tied. First-class travel is likened to a roomy box stall, actually the size of three single stalls with petitions removed. The term “carrier’s convenience” refers to just how flexible owners can be on shipping dates and times. The more you are flexible, the better price you can secure. And the third variable, distance, is obvious: The longer the distance, the higher the cost. Some owners prefer to send their own grooms with their horses; others pay additional to have a groom provided by the van company. On a typical long-distance trip, Pieratt said the vans stop about every 3 ½ to 4 ½ hours. Hotter weather usually calls for more frequent stops and more opportunities for horses to be offered water. THE LEGALESE

Rob Kinsey, general counsel for the National Horse Carriers Association, reminds horse owners that not all horse haulers come with the same credibility. In fact, anyone who hauls a horse, for a fee, must be an authorized carrier, having met all filing and insurance requirements and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Transportation, as well as individual state regulations. “The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association is the enforcement side of the Department of Transportation,” Kinsey said. “Carriers who are not authorized to ship horses can be fined and potentially impounded. You can imagine how that could impact a horse in transit.” Since 1971, Kinsey has assisted haulers with the authorization process, which costs less than $1,000 and includes a $350 fil-

ing fee. For most carriers, that procedure takes 65-75 days. “When you entrust someone to haul your horse, you want to make sure they adhere to strict safety standards,” Kinsey said. “You want them to be good horsemen and you want them to put your horse’s safety first and foremost.” For a list of interstate and intrastate authorized carriers in the U.S., visit www.horse-transporters.com, or contact the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association and Department of Transportation.

Ocala Breeders Sales Standard documentation for horses consigned in an Ocala Breeders Sales Company auction.

If you purchase a horse at an OBS auction, the horse will likely have most, if not all, the paperwork youʼll need to transport to another location. Horses consigned at OBS must have: • Jockey Club registration papers • Negative Coggins test within the past 6 months • Negative Equine Viral Arteritis test within the past 3 months • Veterinary verification of having received a rhino-flu shot (EHV1) • Mares must have verification of breeding soundness or breeding status within 10 days of when they sell. • Horses entering the sale from outside Florida must have a current health certificate. Note: Any horse traveling across state lines must have a current health certificate. Horses may not leave the OBS grounds without a stable release, which is given upon payment for the horse or after acceptable credit has been established. Jockey Club papers are given to new owners when the horse has been paid for.


PetersonSmith.35343.Jan.10.qx:Layout 1

12/16/09

3:00 PM

Page 1

Over the Thanksgiving holidays, 69 Thoroughbreds in various states of poor condition were taken under the protection of the Horse Protection Association of Florida. Dr. Bill Russell of Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital volunteered his services to perform minor treatments, microchips and to pull Coggins on these horses. However, the association still needs help - donations of money or feed or hay would be welcome. Helping the needy at Christmas instead of holding our annual staff Christmas Party this year, Peterson & Smith decided to donate the food to the local kitchens to help feed those less fortunate. Golden Ocala cooked and prepared the food, which was taken to Brothers Keeper and served as part of the Christmas dinner.

CONTINUING EDUCATION Ten Peterson & Smith veterinarians attended the American Association of Equine Practitioners annual convention in December, some as speakers or facilitators and others as attendees. The conference, with over 4,000 registered participants, provides over 30 hours of continuing education on subjects ranging through medicine, surgery, management, and ethical issues.

Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital A tradition of leadership and excellence in equine medicine 4747 SW 60th Avenue, Ocala, FL 34474 • 352 237 6151 www.petersonsmith.com

VETS ON SITE January 16-17 Horse Shows in the Park, Gainesville January 19-21 OBS Winter Mixed Sale


JudgingTeam.GoGators.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

4:47 PM

Page 62

, he University of Florida’s Horse Judging Team wrapped up the 2009 judging year with outstanding performances at both the All American Quarter Horse Congress and the AQHA World Championship Show. The team outperformed all previous UF Horse Judging teams, setting the bar high for the new members who will begin spring term. As a team, the group placed 5th in Halter, 7th in Performance, 7th Reasons and 5th Overall at the Congress, and 1st in Halter, 5th in Performance, 6th in Reasons and 3rd overall at the World Show.

T

Outstanding individual performances were turned in by Sandy Bass, Jocelyn Skipper and Katie Batten. Sandy Bass, from Vero Beach, was 8th in halter, 1st in performance, 3rd in oral reasons and 2nd high overall at the Congress and 1st in Halter, 8th in reasons, and 6th overall at the World Show.

Jocelyn Skipper from Zolfo Springs was 10th in halter and 12th overall at the Congress while Katie Batten from Palm Coast was 2nd in halter and tied for 10th overall at the World Show. Financial support for the team’s travel was sponsored by Seminole Feed and the University of Florida Foundation. ■

TYLER LENNON JONES/IFAS

Pictured from left to right: Saundra TenBroeck, UF Associate Professor and team coach; Samantha Wilson, assistant coach; Eric McCarthy, senior from Newberry, Fla.; Stephanie Wilson, senior from Oveido, Fla.; Katie Batten, senior from Palm Coast, Fla.; Sandy Bass, senior from Vero Beach, Fla.; Justin Forehand, senior from Green Cove Springs, Fla,; Kayla Kurtz, assistant coach

INSIDE TRACK CFCC EQUINE STUDIES PROGRAM WINS STATE AWARD

The Equine Studies program Central Florida Community College has received the Chancellor’s Award in Academic Affairs for the Florida College System. The Equine Studies Program educates its students with a businessbased model and provides students with the skills needed for new and emerging professions in the equine industry. CFCC initiated the program in 2004 as a response to local business needs for qualified workers to fill farm management positions. “We appreciate the partnerships we have formed with local horse farms as a cost-effective means to educate students,” said Dr. Charles Dassance, CFCC president. “I am extremely proud of our Equine Studies program and this well deserved recognition’’ CFCC is the only two-year institution in Florida that offers an equine program and Equine Studies is the college’s most popular Associate in Science degree program. The Chancellor’s Award recognizes programs that help students achieve their educational and life goals by improving curriculum or instruction while striving for excellence in the quality of learning. The award was presented Nov. 18 at the annual convention of Florida Association of Community Colleges, which represents faculty, staff, administrators, trustees, presidents and retirees from Florida’s 28 public community colleges. 62 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

MARCIA LIGHTSEY OF LAKE WALES TO BE NAMED WOMAN OF THE YEAR IN AGRICULTURE FOR 2009

The award, now in its 25th year, recognizes women who have made outstanding contributions to Florida agriculture. It is sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Florida State Fair Authority. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles H. Bronson is scheduled to present the award on Feb. 4, 2010, during the opening-day luncheon at the Florida State Fair in Tampa. “Marcia Lightsey and the rest of the Lightsey family are known for their groundbreaking efforts to preserve Florida’s natural places, along with the best of our rural values and traditions,” Bronson said. “The Lightseys have made Florida a better place to live.” Marcia Lightsey was born in 1954 in San Antonio, Texas, to Ralph and Hattie Hubbard. The family settled in Brandon, Fla., in 1962. Marcia’s father was in the Air Force, but the family always lived off base, out in the country. Marcia graduated from Brandon High School in 1972, and in 1973 she married her high school sweetheart, Cary Lightsey, a sixth-generation Florida cattle rancher. Marcia and Cary moved to one of the Lightsey family ranches, east of Lake Wales, where she learned to ride, rope, build fences, plant grass, and sort, brand, and vaccinate cattle. Marcia, Cary, and Cary’s brother, Layne, worked side by side to build their herd and expand


JudgingTeam.GoGators.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

4:47 PM

Page 63

INSIDE TRACK

PHOTO COURTESY FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

land holdings. Today the family runs more than 6,000 head of cattle on over 32,000 acres in three Florida counties. The Lightseys have been honored with countless awards for their many awards and honors. In 1988, after years of working closely conservation efforts. They practice rotational grazing, water recy- with their local FFA chapter, Marcia and Cary were presented with cling, and controlled burning. The family has preserved 40 percent an Honorary Chapter Degree. In 2003 Marcia was chosen as the of their land in its native state to provide wildlife corridors and pro- Florida CattleWomen’s Outstanding Cattlewoman of the Year. In 2005 the Lightsey family won the National tect soil and water quality, and they have Cattlemen’s Beef Association Environmental placed more than 80 percent of their propStewardship Award and the Florida Commiserty in conservation easements to protect it sioner of Agriculture’s Agricultural-Environfrom future development. mental Leadership Award. That same year Marcia enjoys coordinating eco-tours of Marcia received the Florida Agri-Women’s the family’s ranches and has hosted groups Founder’s Award. from the Audubon Society and local Her list of accomplishments just keeps schools. The ranches are home to many rare growing. In 2008 Marcia became Region and endangered species, including scrub II Director for the American National Catjays, gopher tortoises, black bears, and bald tleWomen (ANCW), based in Denver. In eagles. Visitors are always delighted by the this position she oversees membership cowildlife they encounter. They also enjoy the ordination, beef promotion, and beef edu300-year-old live oaks, beautiful views, and cation for seven southeastern states. She open spaces. has conducted two Region II meetings, Marcia is a tireless advocate for agriculone in Georgia in 2008 and one in ture and has long been active in beef promoLouisiana in 2009. She has been successtion and agriculture education. A member of ful in all the tasks she has undertaken for Polk County CattleWomen, Inc., since 1993, Marcia and Cary Lightsey the group, and this summer in Denver she she has held every position on the board sevwas named ANCW Promoter of the Year. eral times over and is currently treasurer and state director. Marcia and Cary Lightsey live near Lake Wales. They have three As promotion chairman for Florida CattleWomen, Inc., she organized a traveling team of CattleWomen to promote beef in Pub- children and seven grandchildren, and the entire family works tolix supermarkets around the state. She managed 20 in-store gether to continue to grow the Lightsey Cattle Company. ■ demonstrations in non-cattle-producing areas, working closely with store meat managers and provided recipes, promotional handouts, nutritional information, and evaluation sheets for each demonstration. She also conducted store surveys for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and worked to place new cooking labels on beef packaging in local grocery stores. In 2001 Marcia became the Florida CattleWomen’s education chairman. She also organized the CattleWomen’s annual beef short course, which included a field trip to the Lightseys’ 3,000-acre ranch in Lake Kissimmee, pristine Brama Island, a haven for 28 endangered species. In 2002 Marcia became president of Florida CattleWomen, Inc. That year, the organization began participating in the popular Southern Women’s Show in Orlando and Jacksonville, conducting cooking demonstrations and passing out tens of thousands of beef samples. During Marcia’s presidency the Florida CattleWomen also hosted the National Beef Ambassador Contest, a competitive public-speaking program for young people. The contest helps students develop leadership skills while spotlighting the positive impact the cattle industry has on the economy and families. In 2004 Marcia was asked by the president of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association (FCA) to co-chair his public relations committee. She helped develop a new web site for both FCA and Florida CattleWomen, Inc., and helped create an FCA calendar featuring beautiful photographs of Florida cattle ranches. She worked with well-known photographer Carlton Ward on the photos for the calendar, whose purpose is to educate Floridians about the importance of preserving our working ranchlands. The calendar has proven very popular and is now in its fifth year of production. Marcia’s service in the agriculture community has brought her THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 63


YourFloridaHorsePark.qx:Florida Horse_template

Your

12/29/09

10:46 AM

Page 1

FLORIDA HORSE PARK

Happy NewYear from the Florida Horse Park W e began 2009 with a lot on our plate. The most looming concern of 2009 was the indebtedness of this organization. We identified our largest issues, and one by one began the tedious job of tackling the monster the only way we know how – one bite at a time. We began 2009 with more than $1.3 million in debt. It is my pleasure to announce we have resolved over $925,000 of this debt. I am constantly amazed by the generosity of our friends and patrons. I would like to thank our patrons and those companies that have reduced, completely eliminated or taken a sponsorship in lieu of payment, such as Lamar Signs, Party Time Rentals and Florida Express and to assure all of you who have donated their time and money in 2009 that we will not let you down. We realize that there are still outstanding debts owed by the Florida Horse Park. We will continue to keep debt reduction at the top

64 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

of our agenda. We must keep in mind that future boards should not be burdened by debt that had no solid source of revenue for repayment. We must steward this organization with an eye to the future. Like many other businesses and organizations, the Florida Horse Park has undergone a thorough reorganization and restructure. Events are ongoing and growing. We have had a recent meeting with Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Charles Bronson. We shared with him the success of the past year, our building and construction plans and our Christmas list. First on our list is the license plate, second is the Coggins test assessment. And last, we wished him good tidings and joy as we discussed the possibilities of future funding. We have an upcoming trip planned to tour the Perry, Ga., Georgia National Fairground andAgri-center show facilities. We will be touring the grounds and plan to spend some time discussing the operations and construction.

Our first vertical structure for the Florida Horse Park – a concession/lavatory facility – is scheduled to be completed by June of 2010. In conclusion, I would like to share with each of you my sincere gratitude. This has not been an easy project. Many of you have been involved with the park for years. You have seen the many changes, many site plans, listened to presentations on how we could raise a million and stayed awake at night thinking of ways to repay debt. I have given much thought to our strengths and weaknesses. I believe that each of us just desires to see the park built. Built for our state, for our community, for our love of the outdoors and for all the agricultural and horse things that go with it. My personal best to all of you. Sincerely, Connie Duff Wise, Chairman


Oranges.Horses.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

10:42 AM

Page 1

DoHorses Need

Oranges? Karen E. Davison, Ph.D. Manager-Equine Technical Services—Land O’Lakes Purina Feed

ranges are an important part of Florida business and culture, where the citrus industry has a $9 billion annual economic impact on the state. That translates to about 1 billion gallons of healthy, refreshing juice recognized throughout the world as nutritious and delicious. O.J., or other vitamin C supplementation (ascorbic acid), is one of the most common dietary supplements taken by people. Vitamin C supplementation is proposed to combat everything from the common cold to cancer, and people have been encouraged to consume “mega-doses” of these supplements. This has been tempered by some reported side-effects of excessive chronic vitamin C intake. Because people take vitamin C supplements and derive some health benefits, it is reasonable to wonder if your horse may benefit from vitamin C supplementation, too. Most species, including the horse, can synthesize vitamin C in the liver from glucose, but not humans, monkeys or guinea pigs. Those species require a dietary supply of ascorbic acid or they develop scurvy, which causes symptoms such as nose bleeds, bleeding gums and skin discoloration. Scurvy, first described by Hepocrates in the fifth century B.C., was a factor in many military conflicts in the early ages as soldiers and sailors actually died from this condition. Scurvy was considered a plague before it was discovered that simply eating citrus fruits, such as oranges and limes, would prevent the devastating health issues incurred by sailors traveling for prolonged periods on a limited diet. Use of the term “limey” to describe the British was originally due to British sailors eating limes on extended military campaigns to prevent the devastating health problems associated with chronic dietary vitamin C deficiency. Vitamin C functions as a biological antioxidant and as a cofactor involved in the synthesis of collagen, carnitine and norepinephrine. Classic vitamin C deficiency has not been reported in the horse, probably because of the effective liver synthesis. Some researchers have suggested a relationship between decreased blood levels of ascorbic acid in horses and several diseases including wound infections, nose bleeds (exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage), strangles, and reduced performance. However, several studies report quite a wide range in serum

O

ascorbic acid levels in healthy horses, so there is no established concentration that is indicative of vitamin C deficiency in the horse. There is also no known toxicity or upper tolerance amount published for dietary vitamin C in the horse. Daily doses of 20 grams per day have been administered to horses over an 8-month period with no reported negative effects. The question still remains whether or not there is a benefit to the horse from oral vitamin C supplementation. Several factors, including disease, transport, recurrent airway obstruction, old age and endurance exercise, have been reported to decrease serum concentrations of ascorbic acid in horses. This may suggest that these states result in an increased consumption of ascorbic acid pools within the body. However, there have also been reports of increased blood levels of ascorbic acid following endurance exercise and in conditioned Thoroughbred race horses over a 12-week period. Horses suffering from Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO) have been found to have lower ascorbic acid levels in pulmonary fluid than unaffected horses. Oral ascorbic acid supplementation increased plasma concentration of ascorbic acid but failed to statistically increase levels in the pulmonary fluid of RAO affected horses. Interestingly, supplementation did result in increased ascorbic acid level in pulmonary fluid of healthy ponies in another study. In calves and other animals, ascorbic acid concentration of body tissues, especially skin and bone, have been reported to be higher than the concentration found in the blood, indicating that blood levels may not reflect total body pool. While oral vitamin C supplementation has been shown to increase circulating blood levels of ascorbic acid in horses in some trials, other studies have actually reported a decrease in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations and still others reported no change. Some of the variation may be due to the chemical form of vitamin C used in each study. Many oral joint supplements contain ascorbic acid and there are clinical trials that report improved soundness in horses supplemented with certain vitamin C supplements. However, controlled scientific studies have not been conducted to prove this effect. In one study feeding oral ascorbic acid to male guinea pigs actually worsened the severity of spontaneous osteoarthritis. This may simply be a matter of “a little is good, but more may not be good” and provides an example of why it is very important to conduct controlled research to measure physiological response to specific nutritional supplementation. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 65


Shuffitt.Column.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

10:51 AM

Page 1

PRACTICALLY SPEAKING

Horse Haulin’

The trailer I was pulling had not been used for a few weeks and the floor, consisting of pressure-treated 2 x 6’s, had several rotten boards that had given way under the weight of the two horses I was hauling. Now, here I was, alone, on an exit ramp and two horses that belonged to someone else were standing on the ground while still inside the parameters of my trailer. The horses were calm as I backed them off and tied them to the side of the trailer while traffic continued to pass. I was able to remove the busted boards and slide enough good boards together to load the horses on the trailer safely. Once the horses were back on the trailer, I drove to the truck stop and called a friend to come aturday afternoon, May 2, 2009, just prior to the 135th running with his truck and trailer to haul the horses home. The horses arrived of the Kentucky Derby, much attention was given to the fact at their destinations none the worse for wear and I learned a hard lesMind That Bird was hauled 1,700 miles in a horse trailer pulled son about the importance of checking your equipment and being reby a pickup truck and driven by his trainer, Chip Woolley. While watch- sponsible for someone else’s horses. A few weeks later, as I was following a livestock trailer up the entrance ing the pre-race TV coverage, it seemed every reporter who interviewed Mr. Woolley was fascinated the trainer had personally driven his horse ramp to the Interstate, I noticed a horse loose in that trailer.The trailer had from New Mexico to Kentucky. So much, in fact, that Mr. Woolley’s one large swinging door that was equipped with an internal sliding door. first comment to the gaggle of trackside reporters after his gelding’s im- The large door was latched and fastened securely, but as the trailer made pressive upset was “Now maybe you all will talk about something else.” its way up the ramp the sliding door kept opening wider and wider. The I know horses travel by commercial vans, tractor-trailers and even air- sliding door had not been latched, and the banking of the ramp – combined transport, but the reality is most horses in the United States are transported with the vibration of the road – set up the prefect circumstances for the door to slide open. As the truck leveled out and started to in a horse trailer driven by their owner. Hauling horses requires merge into traffic, the horse stepped out of the trailer onto the more than just good driving skills. The driver should not only Interstate. The driver had not seen his horse step out of the be experienced with the nuances of transporting large animals, trailer and continued to pick up speed. but should also be a bona fide horseman or horsewoman. The horse was right in front of me and fortunately went To start with, if you are hauling horses, make sure the to his right, toward the shoulder of the road, away from the towing vehicle is the correct size for the trailer you will be median and oncoming traffic. I tried to get the driver’s atusing. Just because you can hook up to a trailer does not tention by flashing my lights and blowing the horn, but he mean your vehicle is suited to pull that trailer, especially never saw me. I was slowing down, trying to keep my truck when loaded. Be sure truck-to-trailer connections are sebetween the traffic behind me and the loose horse on the cure and safety chains are attached. Marion County livestock agent road. When the driver of the tractor-trailer beside saw what Many precarious situations can be avoided by taking a Mark Shuffitt was going on, he pulled up beside me and slowed to a stop few extra minutes to check all tires, including spares, for air pressure, uneven wear and dry-rot. Look over the trailer for excessive as I got out of my truck to catch the horse or at least keep him from runwear and tear. Check for wasp nests, spiders and other critters that might ning back to the road. About that same time, I noticed the trailer the have moved in while the trailer was idle. Inspect the floor as well as all horse was previously riding in had stopped about a quarter mile down windows, doors and latches. Test all lights, turn signals and brakes be- the road. Thankfully, someone up ahead had been able flag them down. The horse was surprisingly calm as I approached him and he alfore loading horses. I’ve learned some of these horse hauling lessons “the hard way.” Back lowed me to grab his halter without incident. The horse’s owner was in the day, when I was a college freshman, I used to break and train horses sheepishly pale as he approached and thanked me for stopping to help. for extra money. One of my clients had two horses outside of Louisville What he said next made a huge impression on me and it’s something and asked me if I would be interested in going up there to get them. He I’ll never forget. His comment was, “They told me you’re good to go!” wanted one delivered to his place and he wanted me to take the other one Lesson learned. Don’t take someone else’s word for “good to go.” Make a habit of conducting a walk-around inspection every time for a couple of months. On my way home, while stopped on the exit ramp at the Shepherdsville truck stop, my entire truck and trailer shook vio- you hook up. This exercise is important for all trips and is extremely lently. I thought someone had hit me from behind and got out to check crucial for trailers that have not been used in several days or weeks. Ulthe damage. To my surprise, I had not been hit, but when I looked in to timately, it is the driver’s responsibility to ensure the safety of the horse(s) they are hauling. ■ check on the horses they were both standing on the asphalt.

S

66 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Leading Sires.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

11:38 AM

Page 67

Leading Florida Sires The following list includes currently active, deceased, and pensioned stallions, with racing results updated through December 28, 2009. Statistics provided by The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc.

MONTBROOK

CHAPEL ROYAL

GRAEME HALL

Name

Sire Name

Farm Name

NA Stk Gr Earnings Strtrs Wnrs SW's Wins SW's

Earnings

Leading Earner

Leading Earnings

Yrlg Sold

Yrlg Avg

2yo Sold

2yo Avg

Montbrook

Buckaroo

Ocala Stud

$3,757,430

144

80

7

11

0

$3,778,725

Big Drama

$358,500

9

$10,856

18

$36,650

Graeme Hall

Dehere

Winding Oaks

$3,553,469

140

90

4

6

1

$3,560,970

Duke of Mischief $312,800

16

$7,430

5

$105,400

Chapel Royal

Montbrook

Signature Stallions $2,931,875

150

75

3

3

1

$3,079,039

Advice

$232,251

43

$13,263

11

$48,364

Put It Back

Honour and Glory Bridlewood Farm

$2,665,015

167

91

10

12

5

$2,986,199

Jessica Is Back

$220,385

11

$38,282

4

$19,500

D'wildcat

Forest Wildcat

Vinery

$2,547,346

91

53

3

4

1

$2,659,055

D' Funnybone

$278,200

14

$14,964

23

$41,661

Concerto

Chief's Crown

Ocala Stud

$2,301,164

111

59

2

3

1

$2,308,199

Finallymadeit

$365,375

2

$4,750

5

$29,200

Three Wonders

Storm Cat

deceased

$2,175,550

136

77

1

1

0

$2,182,190

Helicopter

$108,205

12

$5,300

5

$8,440

Full Mandate

A.P. Indy

Hartley/De Renzo

$2,032,764

149

72

0

0

0

$2,032,764

Kissa Melissa

$147,750

8

$2,325

10

$9,390

Double Honor

Gone West

Get Away Farm

$1,954,233

131

70

2

2

0

$1,977,916

All Night Labor

$122,513

2

$1,850

10

$9,940

Halo's Image

Halo

Bridlewood Farm

$1,854,169

106

58

1

2

1

$1,854,169

How's Your Halo $184,375

15

$7,573

7

$24,500

THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010 67


Leading Sires.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

11:38 AM

Page 68

Leading Florida Juvenile Sires The following list includes currently active, deceased, and pensioned stallions, with racing results updated through December 28, 2009. Statistics provided by The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc.

D’WILDCAT

WILDCAT HEIR Name

Sire Name

PROUD ACCOLADE

Farm Name

NA Stk Gr Earnings Strtrs Wnrs SW's Wins SW's

Earnings

Leading Earner

Leading Earnings

Yrlg Sold

Yrlg Avg

2yo Sold

2yo Avg

Wildcat Heir

Forest Wildcat

Journeyman Stud

$1,169,339

60

39

2

2

0

$1,169,339

Karmageddon

$73,130

56

$20,423

39

D'wildcat

Forest Wildcat

Vinery

$899,758

46

24

1

2

1

$1,011,467

D' Funnybone

$278,200

14

$14,964

23

$41,661

Proud Accolade

Yes It's True

deceased

$959,626

29

15

2

2

0

$959,626

Proud Zoe

$154,238

8

$24,126

14

$39,107

$13,601

17

$64,406

Hear No Evil

Carson City

Journeyman Stud

$640,355

7

3

2

5

0

$640,355

Jackson Bend

$477,820

Consolidator

Storm Cat

Journeyman Stud

$471,815

58

18

1

1

0

$586,118

Absolute Music

$78,862

52

$39,115

Chapel Royal

Montbrook

Signature Stallions $585,465

46

15

0

0

0

$585,610

Dahlgren Chapel

$133,383

43

$13,263

11

$48,364

Montbrook

Buckaroo

Ocala Stud

25

14

0

0

0

$540,286

Amen Hallelujah

$132,370

9

$10,856

18

$36,650

$518,991

Roar of the Tiger

Storm Cat

Hartley/De Renzo

$485,069

39

15

1

1

1

$486,521

Bear Tough Guy

$180,338

23

$5,243

20

$30,220

Indian Ocean

Stormy Atlantic

Bridlewood

$410,118

30

13

1

1

0

$410,118

Winey Taylor

$85,415

22

$5,055

7

$17,857

Concorde's Tune

Concorde Bound Ocala Stud

$368,123

26

12

0

0

0

$368,123

Seeuat Sticknstein

$49,060

2

$23,600

12

$48,250

68 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010


Classifieds.Jan.qx:Layout 1

12/29/09

12:01 PM

Page 1

Classified ADS Call (352) 732-8858 FARM/EQUINE SERVICES

EQUINE TRANSPORTATION

Horse Bedding

DENNIS A MEYERS - HORSE TRANSPORT

REAL ESTATE

Bulk Sales and Delivery of Shavings & Sawdust Also Stay in Compliance With Our Manure Removal Service Southern Debris Mngt. • Dawn Stewart

(352) 572-5167 • EST.2004 sodebris@aol.com•www.horsebeddingsource.com

Timothy Hay Direct Delivery Delivering Pennsylvania’s finest Timothy hay direct to you on our own trucks, NO brokers!

Ship with a professional horseman Custom Hauls - Long or Short Breed & Return - Sales Race & Return Emergencies

(352) 239-1292

C.J. Equine Transportation, Inc. Jon Cowan • Elizabeth Johnson Cell: 352-304-0715 • Office: 352-304-8624 Race & returns to all tracks

Weekly trips to KY & IL • Breeding shed shuttle

To Advertise Call

(717) 250-1097

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

GEORGE E. GLEASON, ESQ. PERSONAL INJURY, AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT & NEGLIGENCE CASES,

Royal Racing Pigs

Fa Ke vo y rit s e!

LEGAL SERVICES

352.732.8858

“Weekend in theKeys”

CRIMINAL DEFENSE CASES

(352) 812-2533

CONSTRUCTION

Fred Burton PAVI NG • 800.709.1903 Specializes in Farm Paving ASPHALT HAULING • PAVING PARKING LOTS SEAL COATING • FARM LANES SMALL DRIVEWAYS • ROAD GRADING

Located in Ocala

INSURANCE

Low-Cost

Life Insurance 1-877-267-1922 No Physical Exam! $100,000 Face Amount Age 30 40 50

Monthly Rate $13.29 $18.83 $35.38

Feb 26-28

Stuffed Pig Restaurant, Marathon MM 49 Gulf 3520 Overseas Hwy. 3-Day BBQ, Pig Roast, Live Music Fest, www.nationalpigday.com Crafts Show, 50-50 Raffles, and the wildly exciting Royal Racing Pigs make this the hottest Key’s event in 2010. Free Parking • Beer Tents • Childrens Games • Evening Shows • Silent Auctions Benefits Charity • Shady Seating • $15 Adult $8 Children All You Can Eat

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX CALDER RACE COURSE INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 BRIDLEWOOD FARM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 JOURNEYMAN STUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 15, 21, 71 OCALA STUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 DOUBLE DIAMOND FARM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE . . . . .28, 29 FLORIDA THOROUGHBRED CHARITIES . . . . . . . . . .56 FTBOA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 GRANTS PRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 H E SUTTON FORWARDING COMPANY LLC . . . . . . .51 JERRY PARKS INSURANCE GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 LOSSING STRICKLAND INSURANCE GROUP . . . . . .68

OCALA BREEDERS SALES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 OCD EQUINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 PENROD LUMBER AND FENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 PETERSON & SMITH EQUINE HOSPITAL . . . . . . . . .61 SALLEE HORSE VANS INC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 SHADOW TRAILERS OF FLORIDA LLC . . . . . . . . . . .57 SIGNATURE STALLIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3, 9 STONEHEDGE FARM SOUTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 TAMPA BAY DOWNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 VINERY LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 W.D. TRANSPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 WIRE TO WIRE RACING DIGEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48


Players.PgMoran.qx:Florida Horse_template

12/29/09

4:10 PM

Page 1

PLAYER’S PAGE

Challenging by Paul Moran

Times

he year from which we have just emerged was a study in stark contrast framed in global turmoil that appears in retrospect no less a trial than is was in passing. If the heroics of Zenyatta and Rachel Alexandra provided racing with relief from the bruised public image the sport has suffered in recent years, the industry has been battered to its core by a hostile economic climate that has spanned the globe, as well as political turmoil. Wagering and purses declined in every American racing market as did sales receipts and the number of mares bred. A bloodletting is no less painful The good news is that selfless, when widely shared. With final figures for concerned and dedicated people are 2009 not yet complete as saviors of the animals who have this is written, betting in the fallen victim to the dire times and U.S. was on pace to decline are an inspiration to us all. by 10 percent year over year to about $12.3-billion, the second straight annual drop of more than $1 billion. Purses were anticipated to decline about 5.8 percent to $1.1-billion, a total comparable with 2005. With yearling prices declining, many breeders have reduced stud fees and breeding activity is anticipated to decline to levels not seen in three decades, this without considering the international fallout from a dicey economic climate in Dubai, home to racing’s most wealthy family. The only growth within the racing business during this dark age appears to be the ever-widening network of organizations devoted to the rescue of horses and the number of animals in dire need of such effort. From upstate New York, where early last year dozens of horses were found starving on a farm owned by Ernie Paragallo, a prominent, highly successful figure who could well afford their support, to stories of farm owners locking gates at night to prevent others already at the door of desperation from turning loose horses they are no longer capable of supporting under cover of darkness.

T

70 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JANUARY 2010

In Florida, abandoned horses were found recently in desperate condition, and far too many animals have become the innocent victims of the economic downturn that has not loosened its grip on the racing and breeding industries. This, even as the stock market recovered in 2009 and depending upon to whom you are listening, the recession abated, remains in full rage or is destined for another, deeper swoon. At least 16 organizations are involved in the rescue of horses of all breeds on national or multi-state levels. They are all busy. There is no agency that counts horses saved from slaughter, neglect or the insolvency of otherwise upstanding owners but the numbers are obviously staggering. The need for permanent homes is not limited to retired geldings and horses not suitable for the stud nowadays. Reduction in the number of mares bred has resulted in hundreds if not thousands of perfectly sound, healthy, fertile broodmares that would be bred in more bountiful times. This is not a movement born originally from economic strife but in recognition of the need to locate homes and purposes for horses no longer capable of racing. The Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation was founded almost three decades ago. Through the years other organizations have taken up the cause which has gained wider attention and support in the face of the antislaughter movement. But difficult economic times have steepened the slope. Economic turmoil in the world, nation and the business of breeding and racing horses promises nothing more than continued uncertainty in the near term. The good news is that selfless, concerned and dedicated people from all walks of life who share a love of the animals central to racing and throughout history the companion of humans work tirelessly to save horses of all breeds. They are saviors of the animals who have fallen victim to the dire times and are an inspiration to us all. ■


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/21/09

9:28 AM

Page 1


AD bleed check.qx:Layout 1

12/21/09

9:22 AM

Page 1


The Florida Horse January 2010