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HORSECAPITAL

D I G E S T TM

801 SW 60th Avenue Fax: (352) 867-1979 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CHIEF OF OPERATIONS & DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTING EDITOR-INDUSTRY & COMMUNITY AFFAIRS ART DIRECTOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PRODUCTION PRINT TECH OPERATIONS & FACILITIES

CEO & PUBLISHER CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Ocala, Florida 34474 • (352) 732-8858 e-mail: info@wiretowire.net • www.ftboa.com Brock Sheridan Jane Murray Tammy A. Gantt John D. Filer Antoinette Griseta Emily Mills, Nancy Moffatt Jeff Powell

LONNY TAYLOR POWELL CAROLINE T. DAVIS

Florida Equine Communications, Inc. (A corporation owned by the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association)

Executive Office – 801 SW 60th Avenue Ocala, Florida 34474 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Horse Capital Digest is published monthly by Florida Equine Communications, 801 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34474. Advertising rates available upon request. All rights reserved. Reproduction of contents without permission prohibited. Opinions expressed in Horse Capital

BRENT FERNUNG, PRESIDENT/BOARD CHAIRMAN PHIL MATTHEWS, DVM, 1ST VICE PRESIDENT GEORGE RUSSELL, 2ND VICE PRESIDENT GREG WHEELER, SECRETARY JOSEPH M. O’FARRELL III, TREASURER Digest are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the editors and owners of this publication. Horse Capital Digest attempts to print reliable results and entries. Printed by Florida Equine Communications

AMERICAN HORSE PUBLICATIONS • FLORIDA MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION • MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU

FLORIDA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS’ AND OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT CEO & EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FIRST VICE PRESIDENT SECOND VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURER DIRECTORS

Brent Fernung Lonny Taylor Powell Phil Matthews, DVM George Russell Greg Wheeler Joseph M. O’Farrell III Barry Berkelhammer, Fred Brei, Gil Campbell, Mark Casse, Valerie Dailey, Sheila DiMare, George Isaacs, Richard Kent, Milan Kosanovich, Diane Parks PAST PRESIDENTS Don Dizney, Harold Plumley, Stanley Ersoff, John C. Weber,MD, Douglas Oswald CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER/ ASSISTANT TREASURER Caroline T. Davis ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT/ MEMBER SERVICES & EVENTS Tammy A. Gantt

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT/ ADMINISTRATION & OPERATIONS

Jane Murray

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/ ASSISTANT SECRETARY Becky Robinson REGISTRATIONS & PAYMENTS COORDINATOR Sheila Budden

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HORSECAPITAL DIGEST

CONTENTS 5

Letter from the Editor

6

The Charitable Horse

12

International: Three Day Eventing

15

Eventing Primer

16

Breed Spotlight: Gypsy Vanner

23

Community: Caribbean Hurricane Horse Relief

26

National: Farm City Photo Contest

30

Awards: Heubecks/Winghams for Conservation

36

Compost Cost-Share Program

IN EVERY ISSUE: 5 12 23 28 32

Saluting Leaders for Equines Breed Spotlight Community Global Equine Events

cover

The Charitable Horse, is a tribute to the charitable nature of the horse, the charitable programs that use horses to inspire others, and programs that give back to the horse.

Brought to you by Horse Capital Digest of Ocala/Marion County, The Horse Capital of the World®. 4 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GYPSY GOLD

about the


Letter from the Editor Dear Readers, Our first monthly issue, Art & Horses, hit Marion County last month and was well received. We received many positive comments regarding the art-themed cover and the special reader-initiated features (Salute to Leaders, Spotlight, Global). One of the most popular pieces was the global column which featured Dawn Limehouse’s first-hand account of her horseback riding trip with friends. Another popular piece was the breed of the month feature. Last month, the Morgan was the showcased breed. Who knew so many amazing breeders with top champions hailed from Florida? Among the many compliments we received for covering the breed was one from MorganShowcase.com’s dynamic marketer Tami Johnson. She said, “Thank you for the super write up on MorganShowcase and myself! I’ve actually never had a publication in our breed mention me in any way, or do an article on me or find anything interesting to write about me. You’re the first.” Her feedback had deep meaning because it is at the crux of what we are trying to do with Horse Capital Digest, which is to highlight the many unsung heroes in the Florida equine industry that are leading their breeds quietly in the 21st century. Our other goal is encouraging equine businesses and the businesses that serve them to advertise in the publication. Advertising not only gives your business exposure in a market with buying power, but also shows your true support of the equine industry. So, please if you enjoy the publication, take action and run an ad. Even if you don’t have a business, thanking an equine professional or congratulating a top horse in an ad goes a long way to show support of the equine world. This month’s theme, the Charitable Horse, is a tribute to the charitable nature of the horse, the charitable programs that use horses to inspire others, and programs that give back to the horse. So, the next time as a horse owner, you are picking up feed, buying hay, cleaning stalls, or just taking time in your busy life to fit your horse in and you begin to feel the burden of your horse chores, remember your horse is there for you. Your horse can inspire you to truly enjoy the moments you have, if you only allow those moments to happen with your horse.

Tammy A. Gantt Contributing Editor Florida Equine Communications

SALUTING LEADERS FOR EQUINES Barbara Fitos

Retired from a 25 year career as a banking executive in human resources, Barbara Fitos, a former County Commissioner, is active in many civic, cultural and community causes. It is for her support of the equine community she is being recognized this month as a Leader for Equines. Barbara is a key member of the Equine Alliance, a group of like-minded people who promote the connection of the equestrian world to the business world and community in Ocala. The goal is to Connect, Communicate and Educate. Barbara did just that connecting equine leaders for a focus group for the Florida Chamber of Commerce 2030 Vision program. She was instrumental in making the event happen and has been instrumental in following up on the outcomes that will shape the equine community in the future in the county. Marion County was the only county in the state to host an equine focus group, thanks to Barbara. Barbara also looks for opportunities at every turn for equine professionals to be integrated into the cultural and community framework. She is currently the Executive Director for the Communication Foundation, formed by Frank Hennessey, a dedicated philanthropist and top Arabian horse breeder. The local foundation taps into the extraordinary giving and caring nature of the Ocala Marion County community, and attract those committed to philanthropic causes and who recognize their importance in community building. As Executive Director, Barbara works to provide access and resources to all non-profit entities and the vital work that they do for the betterment of all.

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6 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


A Charitable Life of Horses By Tammy A. Gantt

A

Charitable Horse celebrates the spirit of the horse and the generous nature of people who support horse charity programs and their causes. Horses have long been celebrated for their kindness and in turn, horsemen have returned the favor. The following are a few programs that showcase the horse’s unique talents for sensitivity to humans both physically and mentally and also some of the programs that give back to horses.

sponsible to do the “checks” needed to make it from point A to point B. This is a completely liberating experience. In addition to the physical connections horses offer, there is equine-assisted psychotherapy which helps people begin to understand and recognize unhealthy patterns and to help them build on their personal strengths. A few examples of equine psychotherapy work includes military veterans, troubled teens, inmate programs, and those for people who have experienced emotional, behavioral, or mental health traumas.

Veterans Therapy Riding There are many programs designed for the horse to assist in helping others both physically and mentally. Therapy riding programs are among the ones which most people commonly are aware. Therapy programs assist those with physical issues, examples being cerebral palsy, paralysis, and even amputees. The horse’s natural gait assists riders with physical challenges to move in a way that matches the human gait. In turn, many benefits are derived from the physical connection with the horse. Therapy riding helps keep disease progression at bay and also improves certain types of limited mobility to achieve greater mobility. While the physical part is important, the mental boost that comes from greater mobility and a feeling of freedom and accomplishments with the horse are equally as great for people. The easiest way to see this connection is to watch a blind rider. People who are blind move methodically when they walk as they feel out their surroundings. However once up on a horse, an immediate trust is formed in which the sighted horse gives the blind rider freedom to move more rapidly and not feel re-

Treating the effects of trauma as it relates to military service is not easy. The psychotherapy that some veterans need seems counter-intuitive to the culture they’ve learned on the battlefield where getting things done and action are required, not talking about feelings. Veterans, who are in need of help sometimes, do not get it because of the feeling of being stigmatized. The use of horses in the process of healing veterans is powerful. Military training is hands on and those professionals base their confidence on trusting their experience and trusting those with whom they serve. Clinical evidence shows that horses have a special ability to help people work through their emotional barriers without stigma, as horses can meet people on their own terms naturally. The horse does not ask a veteran “how are you doing?”, a horse simply brings it forth. The horse also presents the opportunity to interact physically. Horses are used as metaphors and standin for the people, issues and challenges a veteran may be facing. A horse’s unique sensitivities like their special capacity to read and respond to human’s non-verbal signals and cues leads to powerful emotional breakthroughs. These breakthroughs create life-changing insights. www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 7


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A list of human needs a horse assists with:

Troubled Teens Psychologists and counselors have found leading treatments for teens with common social, and behavioral disorders are relatively new and involve equine assisted activities that include the use of professionally trained horses as part of the counseling process. Teens who struggle in school, have alcohol or substance abuse problems, or have social or mental disorders find benefit from horse therapy programs. Endorphins are released into the body and decrease chemicals which cause stress and alertness is heightened when sessions with horses are experienced by youth dealing with aggression, defiance, or anger issues. Using horse therapy helps maintain a constant and healthy chemical balance.

Prison Programs In addition to the positive results of the chemical connection between the human and horse, horses also give their students a way to learn how to develop control by working with them. Learning how to 8 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

work with horses helps in their day to day lives as they begin to understand how to deal and work with other humans. For example, horses can at times be stubborn, reluctant to follow orders, and have to learn how to get along with a team. Inmates in equine programs must learn how to properly lead, groom, and take care of the animals. Inmates realize that they themselves may exhibit some of the exact same behaviors as the horse. If a horse knows you are not paying attention, he may try to pull one over on you or if a horse thinks you are passive, he may take advantage of you. This is a similar psychology that inmates may have used to deal with and manipulate others. By learning how to get along and work with the horse they gain a better understanding of their own emotions and body language. Horses cannot speak like humans, so inmates are required to pay careful attention to a horse’s body language. Horses say, “I’m nervous, relaxed, frustrated, excited, or dangerous”, all with their body language. Learning

Abuse or Trauma Alzheimer's/Dementia Amputee patients Anger and acting out Anxiety At Risk Youth Autism Burnout Cerebral Palsy Communication Developmental Delay or Disability Down Syndrome Emotional, Behavioral, or Mental Health Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders Focus and Attention Deficit Disorder Genetic Conditions/Disorders Grief and loss Head Trauma/Brain Injury Hearing Impairment Hyperactivity Disorder Intellectual Disability Interpersonal relationships Learning Disability Multiple Sclerosis Muscular Dystrophy Orthopedic Issues Paralysis Personal issues Poor self-esteem PTSD Social anxiety or shyness Speech Impairment Spina Bifida Spinal Cord Injury Stress Stroke Substance Abuse Substance abuse recovery Terminal Illness Trauma Violence Visual Impairment Weight Control Disorders


how to recognize the language is key in learning how to develop a relationship with the horse. The Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ & Owners’ Association raises funds for one of these programs at the Florida Thoroughbred Retirement Farm at the Lowell Correction Institute near Ocala. The farm, established in 2000, provides the opportunity for female inmates to learn horse skills and earn an equine certification degree. When they are released from prison, they are employable in the equine industry. In addition, the women in the program care for retired thoroughbreds. While the over 50 horses on the farm give inmates the skills to work with horses, they also give inmates a chance to overcome some of the reasons they got into prison in the first place. Inmates learn how to overcome past issues through their proximity to horses. When the women in the program are asked, “what they learned”, it is amazing to see them talk about themselves changing not the skills gained. They also talk about the horses they care for as their true friends.

Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy EFP is the use of horses experientially for emotional growth and learning with a licensed clinical professional. It is not horsemanship training. The focus is not riding, but on the psychology surrounding being in proximity of a horse. EFP is work performed by a therapist and/or horse professionals with clients that have treatment disorders. The best comparable is a team building ropes course in an outside natural environment. From a ropes program or an EFP program, students learn feelings, behaviors, teamwork, and patterns. EFP’s added bonus is of using living animals that are both beautiful and powerful which leads to an emotional connection between the horse and individuals involved in therapy with it. EFP can tackle serious issues but there is also equine facilitated experiential learning that is used by business professionals for team building, leadership development, better communication, problem solving, dealing with organizational change and decision making.

books from the popular children’s series and then were given opportunities to meet horses close-up and spend one-on-one time. A community of equine professionals would come together to host the program. For many children, it was their first time to meet a horse close up.

Hospital Therapy Officials at HealthSouth in Ocala realized how horses can lead to powerful healing, so they have become one of the handful of hospital rehabilitation programs in the country to add a miniature horse to therapy sessions . The mini horses also add to the morale of patients, visitors and staff.

Disaster therapy program Teams of tiny horses from Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses of Gaineville visit first responders and others who have experienced traumatic events. They ease suffering during times of natural emergencies, violence, traumatic events and loss. This program is one of several nationally and disaster therapy is just a small but vital part of their overall work as they also are involved in many other therapy aspects also.

Equine Access Many underprivileged and disadvantaged in our communities do not have access to horses even to just meet a horse, learn skills, ride or actually watch a horse in a pasture. Since Ocala is the “Horse Capital of the World”, it would seem access would be relatively easy. But issues of transportation to farms and the costs associated with tours and riding programs can make it prohibitive. So, in recent years programs have cropped up giving access to horses and are funded by grants or the generosity of horse people as their way of giving back. The Black Stallion Literacy program for first and fourth graders was developed for this purpose. Students read www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 9


Giving Back

RRP has inspired thousands to choose an Off-the-track thoroughbred (OTTB).

Retirement In recent years, there has been a growth in promoting the healthy retirement of horses of all breeds from their primary careers. In the thoroughbred world, the first national program was established in the early ‘80s, the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation (TRF). Currently, the TRF herd lives within 24 TRF facilities in nine states. Nine of those farms are located at state correctional facilities, including the Florida Thoroughbred Retirement Farm at Lowell. Also, nationally the Unwanted Horse Coalition was formed after recent horse health summits. UHC is broad alliance of equine organizations under the American Horse Council to

Rescue Strides in the rescue of equines has moved to the cutting edge. The ASPCA maintains a fully equipped Forensic Services Team who stand ready to assist law enforcement officials and veterinary professionals throughout the United States. Their system of vehicles includes surgical suites with digital x-ray, anesthesia, and oxygen so that immediate life-saving medical care can be provided on-scene to animals in need. Providing capability on-site allows for state-of-the-art veterinary care. The unit is also used to preserve evidence against someone who may have caused a horse to need rescue.

educate the horse industry about making the unwanted

Precious time

horse wanted.

Horses love to have a job. Horses love to have companions. Many of the programs mentioned here give horses those opportunities to heal, nurture and help people grow. One of the best ways we can give back and be charitable to horses is to give them our time, our dedication and love. With the advent of cable TV, social media and other distractions, we as horse lovers must continue to carve out time to dedicate to our horse or to programs that promote the horse. Our time is the precious commodity that all charitable horses deserve. HCD

About the same time, the Retired Racehorse Project was formed to facilitate placement of thoroughbred ex-racehorses in second careers by increasing demand for them in equestrian sports and serving the farms, trainers, and organizations that transition them. RRP now has nationwide directories of placement programs and also the celebrated Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium which has led to positive reports from Florida racetracks that racehorses are being sought after before the ends of their racing careers. Since 2010, 10 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

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Local breeder Don Love shows his ‘love’ for his horses.


December 16 Watch FSS 3 Year olds compete!

FTBOA

FTBOA FSS City of Ocala Stakes FTBOA FSS Marion County Stakes

Join the bus from Ocala to Tampa Bay Downs

Enjoy seminars, racing and special activities!

For details, e-mail info@ftboa.com or call 352-629-2160


HCD SHANNON BRINKMAN PHOTO

INTERNATIONAL

12 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


Three Day Eventing Draws Top Riders T

he Ocala Jockey Club announced the CIC3* and CCI1*/2* 3-Day Event for Nov. 16 to 19. Eventing organizer Shelley Page will be leading the team for the 2018 WEG Tryon and OJC, along with Alec Lochore who is returning as part of the Organizing Committee and brings his vast experience from the world stage of organizing eventing competitions at the Olympic levels. The CIC 3* course has been designed by Mike EtheringtonSmith, former head of British Eventing, and the course designer for the Sydney and Beijing Olympic Games as well as the Kentucky CCI4*. Olympian Clayton Fredericks will again design the CCI 1*, and 2* courses. Tyson Rementer will be returning to build the cross-country jumps. Riders are excited

to have the same course designing team back. All three courses received rave reviews in 2016 for the traditional galloping courses reminiscent of the English rolling hill countryside. The courses were described as tough and fair, with technically challenging questions such as the water cascade CIC3* jump by the clubhouse pond. When asked in an interview by Eventing Nation about the Ocala Jockey Club, Astier Nicolas replied, "This is a great venue; I am amazed. I came here during November from Europe, so it's great to be here in the U.S.A. with the sunshine. There's a lot of room here and there's some great galloping courses. The event looks like a success. I hear everyone praising it." The 2016 inaugural event attracted 115 entries from nine countries and from four continents. Top level riders included

OJC PHOTO

Compiled by Tammy A. Gantt

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the Rio 2016 Olympics Gold Medalist (team) and Silver Medalist (individual) Astier Nicolas from France, as well as other Olympians

SALLY MOEHRING PHOTO

OJC PHOTO

Boyd Martin, Clayton Fredericks, Leslie Law, Lynn Symansky and other elite eventers. The Ocala Jockey Club International 3-Day Event is a stepping stone for competitors onto the world stage as it can qualify them to represent their country in the 2018 World Equestrian Games held at Tryon, NC. The Fall Family Festival production is spearheaded this year by Jaqui De Meric and Stephanie Brennan, both part of husband-wife top consignor teams of thoroughbreds. But they are also connected by their love for the Ocala Farm Ministry led by Chaplain Bob Miller. The Ministry and their volunteers will be hosting a variety of family activities to enThe Ocala Jockey Club course builders hance the already action-packed 3-Day event. The activities will include horse themed games, scavenger hunt and other games and prizes. The family festival is an extension of the efforts by the Ministry to help provide physical, emotional and spiritual growth to the horse farm workers and their families across the county. The Ocala Farm Ministry is a local division of the Racetrack Chaplaincy. On a regular basis they provide the assistance needed to help make a difference to others. Each general admission gives access to all spectator areas for the horse competition, Vendor Village and all other family activities. Admission for kids 16 and younger is free. Adult admission is free on Thursday, $5 on Friday, $10 on Saturday and Sunday. Parking is $5. Packages are available for $25 for adult admission and parking for all days of event ($45 value), and includes an event program or $75 for a family/group package that covers adThe Three-Day Eventing Fall Family Festival is being produced this year mission and parking for all occupants of one by Jaqui De Meric and Stephanie Brennan, both part of husband-wife top single-family vehicle, and includes two event consignor teams of thoroughbreds. But they are also connected by their programs. love for the Ocala Farm Ministry led by Chaplain Bob Miller. The group Tailgating is an exciting way to picnic and and their volunteers will be hosting a variety of family activities to enspend a day. Visitors can bring food and drinks hance the already action-packed 3-Day event. The activities will include sack races, scavenger hunt along with other games and prizes. The family festival is an extension of the efforts they put into the Ministry to help provide physical, emotional and spiritual growth to those who work on the farms across the county. On a regular basis they provide the assistance needed to help make a difference to others. 14 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

in their own vehicle, pitch a tent, and make their own seat for front-row cross-country jumping action as horses gallop by so close you can feel the wind from the speed. Tailgating is available on Saturday and Sunday only and the cost is


Eventing Primer

$350 per day for the available premium locations close

off the next day's tailgating fees. Tailgating fee includes 4 general admission tickets for all days of event, and an event program. Tailgating is first come, first serve regarding location assignments. VIP Passes give access to be wined, dined and entertained while rubbing shoulders with Olympic athletes and networking with Ocala’s equestrian elite business owners. Passes range from $250 for dressage day VIP access, to $1,875 for a top-class experience including a golf cart for the weekend, backstage tours, access to all event socials and parties, and a special event gift bag. The four VIP experience options include the VIP Experience with access to the OJC Clubhouse for all days of competition, as well as to all social events requiring access passes. These include the Sponsor and Competitor Welcome Reception on Wednesday, Competitor Party on Saturday and Winners' Celebration on Sunday afternoon. The VIP Experience also includes a special event gift bag, magazine quality event program, VIP parking pass, and extra general admission passes to give away. The All-Star Experience is the top class way to experience the event. On top of all that is included in the VIP Experience, this package also includes access to an Event Concierge, golf cart for use during the event, an exclusive Ocala Jockey Club Farm tour, exclusive backstage competitor area tour, exclusive photo opportunity with the event stars (human and equine), and an 8'x10' print. The Welcome Experience is a VIP on a budget. The package provides a VIP hospitality pass to the event's dressage days on Thursday and Friday and includes a VIP parking pass on those two days along with an event program. The package also includes access to Wednesday night Sponsor and Competitor Welcome Reception. The OJC facility, with its rolling hills and showcase old-growth Spanish moss-laden oak trees, is located in the horse country of Ocala, Fla. About 200 acres of the 950-acre Ocala Jockey Club property serve as a thoroughbred training farm, and the facility also includes townhouses and an iconic 9,700 square-foot clubhouse, a unique venue for weddings, event hospitality, meetings and other special events. HCD

Eventing is an equestrian triathlon with three sports performed – dressage, crosscountry and show jumping. It is one of the few Olympic sports where men and women compete equally. Eventing is a test of both the rider and horse compared to other equestrian sports with the sports origin as a mounted cavalry test.

Dressage is a sequence of movements that shows the grace of both the horse and rider together. Traits are looked for like balance, rhythm, and suppleness as the horse obeys to subtle cues given by the rider. Each movement is scored on a scale of 0 to 10 (0 the lowest and 10 the best). The sum are combined with the overall collective marks, gaits, impulsion submission and rider, for a total score. The score is subtracted by the number of total possible points, then multiplied by 100 and subtracted by 100. The score is penalty points aka points that were not earned in the phase. Penalty points carry to each round. SALLY MOEHRING PHOTO

the cross-country course. Book for one day, get 50%

Cross country showcases the bravery, fitness, and guts of horse and rider as they cover a cross country course with changing terrain over mostly solid obstacles with fences, water jumps, and the like. The goal of cross country is to finish with the fewest penalties possible by jumping every fence on the first try and finishing the course in optimum time. Show jumping is held in an arena where horse and rider must clear a course of jumps in sequence for time. The pair with the lowest score takes home the top honors. Scores are determined by penalty points given at each phase and at the end of the event. A round is typically 12 to 15 jumps. The slightest bump could cause a rail to fall, resulting in four penalty points. This shows the recovery and stamina of the duo.

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other option is $250 per day along open areas next to

SALLY MOEHRING PHOTO

to the most thrilling and iconic jump locations. An-

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HCD PHOTO BY KATHY CLINE

BREED SPOTLIGHT

16 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


Gypsy Vanners Are Inspiring by Kym Rouse Holzwart

D

ennis and the late Cindy Thompson of Ocala were captivated by a black and white stallion they saw in a pasture while driving through the English countryside in 1995. This magical horse was the height of an average horse, but he was built like a draft horse, with a refined head, feathered legs, and a very friendly personality. This stallion was a perfect example of the caravan horses created by Gypsies soon after World War II by selectively breeding Friesians, Clydesdales, Shires, and Dales Ponies. To develop the perfect caravan horse, British Gypsies used only feathered breeds that were descendants of the Forest Horse, an ancient, gentle, featherlegged, cold-blooded horse that lived in the European forests. Selective breeding for feathering resulted in an extremely gentle horse. Calm horses were also a result of their environment: travelling with Gypsy families and being cared for by children. The discovery of the magical stallion changed the Thompson’s lives forever and set them off on a fantastic adventure, which is still going on today. The Thompsons spent four years learning everything they could about these horses, spending time and working with Irish and British Gypsy breeders. The name for this new breed was chosen: Gypsy Vanner Horse. The word “vanner” is an old English word that means “a horse suitable to pull a caravan.”

The Thompsons named their Ocala farm Gypsy Gold and imported 14 quality mares for foundation breeding stock. The first two mares, Bat and Dolly, arrived in the U.S. in November 1996. In 1997, they imported the magical stallion, named Cushti Bok, to the U.S. A second stallion, The Gypsy King, was imported to this country in early 1998. The process of understanding the breed and importing the first 16 took a total of four years. In addition to importing horses, in late 1996, the Thompsons established a U.S. registry for the new breed: the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society. The Gypsy Vanner Horse Society preserves and protects the look and temperament envisioned by the Gypsy families, the genetics that created the look, and the feelings of the status, pride, and values felt by the Gypsy families for the Gypsy Vanner Horse. The Society’s mission is to bring honor, recognition, and a better understanding to one of the world’s least understood and most colorful societies and their beloved horses; to respect the spoken words of Gypsy families who dedicated their lives in the pursuit of a dream to create the perfect caravan horse; and to be quality based, culturally sensitive, and socially responsible. The Thompsons introduced the Gypsy Vanner Horse to the world at Equitana USA in Louisville, Kentucky and on the Internet in June 1998. Being the first horse breed introduced to the world during the Internet age, news of this www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 17


ADRIANNE RYAN PHOTO

magical, versatile breed spread quickly. Not surprisingly, the Gypsy Vanner Horse excels at driving. They also do well in trail riding, Western pleasure, hunter/jumper, and dressage, because the perfect caravan horse is intelligent, strong, calm, athletic, colorful, and has outstanding endurance. The most common colors of the Gypsy Vanner Horse are black and white and brown and white, but they can be any color. In fact, some of most famous Gypsy Vanner mares and stallions are solid black. However, the Gypsy Vanner Horse is a body type and not a color breed. Gypsy Vanners resemble small Shires. They have refined heads, strong necks, broad chests, short backs, heavy round hips, and heavy flat bone with ample hooves. With long, flowing manes and tails, hair on the legs or feathering begins at the knees on the front legs and at or near the hocks on the hind legs and covers the front of the hooves. The average height of the Gypsy Vanner Horse is 14.2 hands; they range in size from 12.2 to more than 15.2 hands and weigh from 1,100 and 1,700 pounds. In March 1999, the first Gypsy Vanner Horse was born in the U.S. at Gypsy Gold Farm: a filly named Kuchi, sired by The Gypsy King and the only foal of Bat. In addition to being a Breyer model horse, Kuchi is a champion halter horse, has excelled in dressage and driving, and has produced many outstanding foals. The Gypsy King is also a Breyer model horse. 18 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

Even though the breed was established just over 20 years ago, there are now a few thousand registered Gypsy Vanner horses in the United States from the first 16 horses that were imported to this country. Registries have also been established in other countries, as well as horses imported. You can experience the magic of the Gypsy Vanner Horse first-hand. Tours of Gypsy Gold Farm are conducted Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday mornings. They include an informative presentation by Dennis Thompson, followed by a tour of the grounds to see the stallions, broodmares, and foals that are direct descendants of America’s first Gypsy Vanner Horses. Other farms that breed and show Gypsy Vanners that can be toured in the Ocala area include WR Ranch in Oxford and Shenandoah Gypsy Vanner Horses in Weirsdale. HCD For more information about the Gypsy Vanner Horse in Central Florida: • Gypsy Vanner Horse Society, 888-520-9777, gvhs@vanners.org, www.vanners.org • Gypsy Gold Farm in Ocala, 352-817-1777, ggvannerhorse@gmail.com, www.gypsygold.com • WR Ranch in Oxford, 954-540-5582, wjricci@aol.com, www.wrranch.net • Shenandoah Gypsy Vanner Horses in Weirsdale, 352-205-7312, info@SGVHorses.com, www.shenandoahgypsyvanners.com


FLORIDA DEPT. OF AGRICULTTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES Adam H. Putnam, Commissioner • 850-617-7289 • Fax 850-617-7281 e-mail: Paul.Balthrop@freshfromflorida.com • 407 S. Calhoun The Mayo Building, Taallahassee, FL 32399

FLORIDA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS’ AND OWNERS’ ASSOCIATTION Lonny T. Powell, CEO and Executive Vice President 801 SW 60th Avve. • Ocala, FL 34474 • 352-629-2160 • Fax: 352-629-3603 www.ftboa.com • info@ftboa.com • www.facebook.com/thefloridahorse


$1 BILLION INDUSTRY Y 12,000 DIRECT JOBS $2.6 Billi B on+ Overalll Economic Impactt** 19,000+ Direct//Indirect jobs* *Equine Marion County


Florida helps hurricane horses M

any area horse industry leaders have been working tirelessly to develop relief channels for equines in need after the hurricanes in the Caribbean.

Virgin Islands – Equines and Feral Donkeys Focused on the Virgin Islands is equestrian Carolyn Smith, who runs a website promoting both Ocala and the Virgin Islands tourism and equine industries. Even amidst many set-backs with logistics from finding a plane to ensuring items get to V.I., Smith has been working with a network of contacts provided by the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association. In addition, the V.I. Thoroughbred Breeders Association’s Garrett Shaboo Ritter and the V.I. government ‘s Department of Agriculture connected with Smith to get donated feeds, hays, and medicines to the island’s equine and feral donkey population. The islands of St. Thomas, St. Croix, St. John and Tortola were stripped of vegetation completely by recent hurricanes forcing the animals to fend for themselves. The racetracks in St. Thomas, St Croix and Tortola also had significant damage and destruction. Smith has been coordinating with the only veterinarian left in 22 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

the Virgin Islands currently, Dr. Laura Palminteti. Paminteti said the St. Thomas racetrack reported no deaths of horses and that in Tortola two horses were swept away by water. Smith was also reached by Cruzan Cowgirls’ Horse Rescue that reported they were caring for 17 horses wandering the island of St. Croix. Smith noted that Chip Hudson and Creech Horse Transportation and David Stephens at Seminole Feed were very supportive with their goods and services to assist among other businesses.

Puerto Rico – People, Pasos and Racehorses Alberto Rullan of Equine Performance Center and Performance Equine Veterinary Services in Ocala began offering assistance last week to the relief forces helping in Puerto Rico. The stated goal of the company is to make a difference and save some animals on the Island of Puerto Rico. The Center helped privately in humanitarian efforts with an organization specialized in relief and clean up after disasters. Rullan is originally from a farm in the mountainous center of the Puerto Rico and had lost communication with many family members there. He offered and continues to offer resources to organiza-

tions and relief units on the island where he has access to personnel who have access to farms and access to trucks, tractors and pick-ups which can go with relief agents to help organize distribution He has enlisted the help of his Equine Performance Center staffer Monika Salgado and brother William Rullan. Rullan has been assisting with distribution to the most needed areas and animals, as long as feed/medications for the animals could arrive to any location on the island. He also began to fly items to the island. Florida thoroughbred breeders Bonnie and Kim Heath of Bonnie Heath Farm also worked to develop relief channels for equines in need after the hurricanes in the Caribbean getting needed items donated and then flown to the island. Creech Horse Transportation volunteered right after Hurricane Maria struck to assist with serving as a drop-off point for collecting hay and grain to deliver to the islands. They dedicated time and resources as early as Hurricane Harvey in Texas. Berrentini Feeds has also been a site where customers can purchase a bale to go to the efforts. Additional feed stores in the Marion County area also offered the option. Brook Ledge Horse Transportation also played a vital role See CARIBBEAN on page 38


Florida helps hurricane horses By Tammy A. Gantt

M

any area horse industry leaders have been working tirelessly to develop relief channels for equines in need after the hurricanes in the Caribbean.

Virgin Islands – Equines and Feral Donkeys Focused on the Virgin Islands is equestrian Carolyn Smith, who runs a website promoting both Ocala and the Virgin Islands tourism and equine industries. Even amidst many set-backs with logistics from finding a plane to ensuring items get to V.I., Smith has been working with a network of contacts provided by the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association. In addition, the V.I. Thoroughbred Breeders Association’s Garrett Shaboo Ritter and the V.I. government ‘s Department of Agriculture connected with Smith to get donated feeds, hays, and medicines to the island’s equine and feral donkey population. The islands of St. Thomas, St. Croix, St. John and Tortola were stripped of vegetation completely by recent hurricanes forcing the animals to fend for themselves. The racetracks in St. Thomas, St Croix and Tortola also had significant damage and destruction. Smith has been coordinating with the only veterinarian left in

the Virgin Islands currently, Dr. Laura Palminteti. Paminteti said the St. Thomas racetrack reported no deaths of horses and that in Tortola two horses were swept away by water. Smith was also reached by Cruzan Cowgirls’ Horse Rescue that reported they were caring for 17 horses wandering the island of St. Croix. Smith noted that Chip Hudson and Creech Horse Transportation, Finish Line Feed, and David Stephens at Seminole Feed were very supportive with their goods and services to assist among other businesses. Smith took initiative and coordinated with ASCPC and IFAW, who have been conducting assessments to organize relief efforts with Dr. Bethany Bradford and the V.I. Dept of Agriculture. AAEP is funding container shipments. Dr. Bethany Bradford and Commissioner Robles of the V. I. Department of Agriculture made assessments for relief and will be distributing items and ASPCA will be managing the efforts. IFAW will be establishing a Dept. of Ag. distribution center for small and large animal sheltering, Search and Rescue, and Medical Units.

Puerto Rico – People, Pasos and Racehorses Alberto Rullan of Equine Performance

Center and Performance Equine Veterinary Services in Ocala began offering assistance last week to the relief forces helping in Puerto Rico. The stated goal of the company is to make a difference and save animals on the Island of Puerto Rico. The Center helped privately in humanitarian efforts with an organization specialized in relief and clean up after disasters. Rullan is originally from a farm in the mountainous center of the Puerto Rico and had lost communication with many family members there. He offered and continues to offer resources to organizations and relief units on the island where he has access to personnel who have access to farms and access to trucks, tractors and pick-ups which can go with relief agents to help organize distribution He has enlisted the help of Equine Performance Center staffer Monika Salgado and his brother William Rullan. Rullan has been assisting with distribution to the most needed areas and animals, as long as feed/medications for the animals could arrive to any location on the island. He also began to fly items to the island. Florida thoroughbred breeders Bonnie and Kim Heath of Bonnie Heath Farm also worked to develop relief channels for equines in need after the hurricanes in See CARIBBEAN on page 24

www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 23


CRUZAN GIRLS HORSE RESCUE, ST CROIX PHOTO

CARIBBEAN continued from page 23

the Caribbean getting needed items donated and then flown to the island. Creech Horse Transportation volunteered right after Hurricane Maria struck to assist with serving as a drop-off point for collecting hay and grain to deliver to the islands. They dedicated time and resources as early as Hurricane Harvey in Texas. Berrentini Feeds has also been a site where customers can purchase a bale to go to the efforts. Additional feed stores in the Marion County area also offered the option. Brook Ledge Horse Transportation also played a vital role with shipping items. Bonnie Heath has noted of the efforts and support, “that the outpouring has been more than amazing, it’s so rewarding.” The Heaths began efforts for Hurricane Harvey relief and they continued for Puerto Rico with particular focus on the racetrack, Hipódromo Camarero in Canóvanas, east of the capitol city of San Juan. Hard hit, the barn area lost 90 percent of the roofs off the stables. The horses were short on water, feed and the 24 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

area was hard to reach. Ocala Breeders’ Sales teamed up with Kim Heath and organized five shipping containers of supplies and feed for cargo ships bound for the island. Wellington resident Shelley Blodgett of Caribbean Thoroughbred AfterCare took it upon herself to contact equine industry press outlets writing “Letters to the to Editor” to inform the greater equine community of the plight of the animals on the island. Blodgett knew first-hand from the horse’s dire need from Kelley Stobie, VP, CFO & coordinator of thoroughbred adoptions onsite at the racetrack in Puerto Rico. Blodgett and Stobie are well known in thoroughbred circles for their work in the healthy retirement and placement of thoroughbreds from the Caribbean back to Florida. Blodgett’s pleas led to action. A Swift Air plane, funded by The Jockey Club and Thoroughbred Charities of America’s Horses First Fund, was the result of a week-long effort undertaken by her and numerous equine groups to get aid to the more than 800 thoroughbreds at the Camarero Race Track and to begin as-

What can you do for Caribbean Horse Relief? 1. Share information so others are informed on how they can assist 2. Contact your feed or hay supply store to see if they are participating in collections 3. Go online on social media to search for relief efforts and direct contacts on islands 4. Utilize the additional resources here to see if your business or farm or logistical company can assist Carolyn Smith, (Virgin Islands) 340-998-3860 Shelley Blodgett (Caribbean - US liaison Wellington, FL) 561-308-2185 Kim Heath (Ocala) - supporting Equine Relief Facebook page Types of items needed after disasters: Feeds, hay and pelleted hay IV fluids with catheters Needles Anti-inflammatories (bute, banamine) Antibiotics (topical, inject with syringes) Iodine solutions Swat and similar ointments Epsom salts and other for feet Lead ropes and halters


sisting other horses on the island. It carried 20 tons of hay cubes and veterinary supplies. The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation, Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA), The Jockey Club, Brookledge’s Horse America, Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare, and the Texas Equine Veterinary Association (TEVA) worked closely with Ranch Aid, a FEMA-appointed organization that assists with logistics and care for large animals during natural disasters. The Humane Society of the United States also assisted by facilitating the federal approval of the shipment. “There were many, many challenges but we are thrilled to see feed and vet supplies finally reaching the horses in Puerto Rico,” said Erin Crady, executive director of TCA. “This effort would not have been possible without the incredible team work and support of so many organizations and people working tirelessly to get this plane into Puerto Rico.” Groups reported that finding an available aircraft to carry the feed and supplies was a daunting challenge given that most cargo planes were being utilized understandably for humanitarian efforts. Thoroughbred Charities of America board member Terry Finley reached out to friend Vincent Viola, the owner of St. Elias Stables and a shareholder of Swift Air, who immediately put TCA in contact with Swift

Air to ship the much-needed equine supplies. The veterinary supplies and medications were donated in part by MWI Animal Health and purchased by TEVA and delivery assistance by South Florida veterinary practice, Teigland, Franklin, and Brokken. The hay cubes were donated in part by Cargill/Nutrena and purchased by the AAEP Foundation. Additionally, two satellite phones were purchased by the AAEP Foundation and delivery assistance provided by south Florida Purina Animal Nutrition representative Sheila Conde.

Additional Islands Raphael Green, a pilot and secretary of the Barbados Thoroughbred Breeders Association said, “there has been an outpouring of support from Bajans to Dominica and the other affected countries.” He noted Barbados had no significant damage and he was doing relief flights to other islands to assist. On the island of Martinique, residents posted photos of horses turned out to wander since there were no residents to tend to them. Boats made daily treks for weeks with buckets of fresh water and grain to support the horses. As relief workers dropped water and grain, they noticed the horses eventually began using their owners’ vacant damaged homes as sun-shelters, staying close in hopes their owners would return. HCD

www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 25


Photos Promote

By Tammy A. Gantt

T

he Marion County Farm City Week Coalition offers a photo contest designed to celebrate the diversity of life in the county with a focus on farm animals & crops, landscapes and flowers, and farm people. Aspiring Florida photographers of all ages are encouraged to enter striking images that celebrated Farm City week and what it represents. The goal of the contest is to highlight the diversity of farm life in Marion County and Central Florida. A prize winner in each category was chosen in November and the finalists will be up for public voting throughout December. The 2016 grand prize photo was a photo of a thoroughbred mare and foal on a foggy Sunday morning near Ocala. The thoroughbred mare is Raphaela with her Corfu-sired foal. The photo was submitted by Michael and Martha Borchetta and

26 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

was taken with a cell phone. The 2015 grand prize winner Cheryl Magana was first runner up in 2016 with her photo In Perspective which was a peak through an Adena Springs thoroughbred farm barn. The 2016 second runner up titled Pumpkin Patch was a photo taken by Amy Douglass at Wet Hammock Farm in Citra with her little pumpkin Lucy Douglass as the model. Entry forms are available at the Marion County Extension Service offices at 2232 NE Jacksonville Road, at the Marion County Farm Bureau, at the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ & Owners’ Association (FTBOA) at 801 SW 60th Avenue, online at www.ftboa.com or e-mail info@ftboa.com. Students and all community members are encouraged to enter and entries are accepted in person, by mail, via Facebook at facebook.com/FloridaThoroughbredBreedersAndOwnersAssociation, via Twitter at twitter.com/@florida_horse , or via text to 352-598-6832.


Farm City Week

Left: Grand Prize winner of last year’s photo contest, by Mike Borchetta. Above: Runner up winner, by Amy Douglass.

The deadline is October 30. Farm City Week is celebrated nationally each year the week leading up to Thanksgiving. It reminds us of the interdependency of food producers and food consumers, as well as those who process, package, transport and retail food. America has good soils, good rainfall, good farmers and good technology, all of which have allowed production agriculture to increase the number of people one farmer feeds from 26 in 1960 to 155 today. Marion County offers limestone rich, natural spring water and abundant land with

good soils and a mild climate. The week also features several events including: Open House at the Plant/Science Research and Education Unit, Citra November 15 - 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Free tour, luncheon and seminars on poultry, organic farming, honeybee basics, rabbits/goats, retired thoroughbred and planting for pollinators. Book online at Eventbrite: goo.gl/hfYvoM. Marion County Agriculture Hall of Fame/Farm City Week Banquet November 16 - 6 p.m.

Join the induction of Willet (Bud) Boyer into the Marion County Agriculture Hall of Fame at the Marion County Extension Service Auditorium, 2330 NE Jacksonville Road, Ocala. Call 352-671-8400 for reservations, $20 per person, reservations due by October 9. Ocala Downtown Farmers’ Market November 18 Join the Farm City Week booth at the Ocala Downtown Farmers’ Market for games for children and information for adults. HCD www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 27


HCD

GLOBAL

28 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

Belize


Abroad By Alicia Halbritter

O

nce upon a time I was a college student needing summer credits and somehow stumbled upon the adventure of a lifetime. In July of 2015 I went to Belize for a two week work study trip with the Center for Engaged Learning, which was a program supported by The University of Florida. My trip focused on large animal veterinary medicine and earned me 3 (yes, 3!) college credits. But the college credits paled in comparison to the hands on experience, the beauty of Belize, and the amazing group of connections, resources, and friends I walked away with. I had the experience of working with cattle, pigs, goats, sheep, some dogs and cats, but most importantly, horses. Working with horses, or any livestock for that matter, in a developing country is an extremely different environment than what I was used to in the United States. Traveling from farm to farm, you would often see horses staked to the side of the road, a loose rope around their neck and a railroad nail or some other heavy duty stake driven in the ground to keep them in place. The horse could graze in a circle around the stake depending on how long their lead was. Most horse owners do not have pastures to allow horses out in, due to either finances or lack of usable land. I saw hundreds of horses tied like this, and it still baffles me today. Could you imagine how your horse would react to that situation? Mine would have been long gone, stake dragging behind as he galloped down the road. At the local public park near our hotel, there was a mare staked with a rather long lead, she had a foal by her side who loved to be loved on. In my entire two

weeks in Belize I never saw the same per- more nerve-racking. son tending to the mare, it was a commuWe had long days working on farms but nity effort. Children brushed her and Dr. T and his brother Ruben didn’t let that played with the foal and adults kept the stop us from having fun. We visited many trough filled with water. I am sure everyone waterfalls to cool off during the day, we knew who the horse belonged to and none went canoeing through caverns, ziplining seemed to mind her presence in the park. through the jungle, and even got to go to One of the best experiences I had in Be- the zoo! Overall this was an incredible welllize was being able to castrate a stud. This seven-year-old stud was a total sweetheart and the perfect horse for us to learn on. Arriving in an open field, he was quietly standing tied to a tree. Once the sedative was injected he soon gave in and laid down, the castration was quick, less than 5 minutes from start to finish and he was soon back on his feet within 20 minutes or so. Alicia (far right) and other students working at a small animal clinic Our vet, Dr. Tesecum, guided me along but let me do the dirty work. It is rounded experience. I got unbeatable an incredible experience to finish your first hands-on experience, friends to last a life surgery! We also spayed and neutered dogs time, and an open invitation to return to Beand cats but this was not nearly as dramatic lize at any point and be welcomed with and thrilling as castrating a horse. open arms. If you have the chance to expeOne other girl and I were the only expe- rience the horse industry in another counrienced horseback riders in the group of six try, take it! You definitely won’t regret it. and we had the pleasure of leading the othJob recruiters love international experiers on two trail rides through the Belizean ence! My trip to Belize helped me land a job jungle and through open pastures. At one as the Duval County Livestock and Forage farm, Olivia and I had the pleasure of get- Extension Agent with the University of ting on two Arabian racehorses. In an open Florida and I still use everything I learned (uphill) pasture we let the horses run full to this day! tilt ahead‌I can still hear how loud my Check out CELA Belize here: heartbeat sounded in my ears because that http://www.celabelize.com/ HCD was the most intense adrenaline rushes I Experiencing Equine Travels around the Globe! have ever experienced. As a barrel racer I Each month we will feature equine trips from around the am used to going fast, but on a foreign globe introducing readers to first-hand accounts of exotic horse in a foreign country it seemed a lot trips, new breeds and new experiences. www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 29


HCD

AWARDS

County residents honored for conservation The Heubeck and Windham families recognized with the Robert N. Clay Conservation Award

(Left) Elmer Heubeck with Menocal (Right) Harriet Heubeck with Wolf Gal 30 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


(Top) Elmer and Harriet Heubeck

E

quine Land Conservation Resource (ELCR) is pleased to announce that The Heubeck Family and James and Lee Windham of Marion County, Fla., have been

named co-recipients if the 2017 Robert N. Clay Conservation Award. Established in recognition of Robert N. Clay’s equine land conservation leadership in the thoroughbred industry, the 2017 Award was presented at the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association National Awards dinner on September 9 in Lexington, Ky.

be recognized for this prestigious honor. Thanks goes to the ELCR and TOBA for sponsoring the Robert N. Clay Conservation award,” said Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association CEO Lonny Powell. “The Heubecks have long played a valuable role with the FTBOA and in the community with their Quail Roost Foundation dedicated to preservation, to funding student scholarships and to aiding local programs like Strirrups and Strides Therapeutic Riding. “

Harriet and Elmer Heubeck and their son Kerry Heubeck,

Marion County is the heart of the second largest thor-

along with current farm owners James Windham and his late

oughbred breeding industry in North America. This award

wife Lee, have been recognized for preserving Quail Roost

recognizes the Heubeck and Windham families for their ef-

Farm II as horse land.

forts in creating and sustaining the equine environment that

H’Krih Shelhamer, daughter of Kerry Heubeck, who spent

helped establish Marion County’s equine prominence. The

a good deal of her youth at the Heubeck’s Ocala farm ac-

winners were nominated by the Florida Thoroughbred

cepted the award on behalf of the Heubecks and Windhams

Breeders’ and Owners’ Association and Heubeck was a for-

at the 32nd Annual TOBA event.

mer president of the Association. HCD

The Heubecks are associated with the development of early thoroughbred farms in Marion County, and subsequently developed their own unique property, Quail Roost Farm.

About the Equine Land Conservation Resource (ELCR): ELCR builds awareness of the loss of lands available for horse-related ac-

Harriet and Elmer both passed away in 2003, and their son

tivities and facilitates the protection and preservation of those

Kerry sought to protect the 1,000-acre Quail Roost II as a me-

lands. We work to ensure America’s equine heritage lives on and

morial to his parents. Kerry, along with new owners James

the emotional, physical and economic benefits of the horse-human

and Lee Windham, worked with Conservation Trust of

relationship remains accessible. ELCR serves as an information re-

Florida to protect and limit development on approximately

source and clearinghouse on conserving horse properties, land use

800 acres of Quail Roost II as a working thoroughbred and

planning, land stewardship/best management practices, trails, li-

cattle farm.

ability and equine economic development. For more information

“We are pleased to see the Heubeck and Windham family

about the ELCR visit www.elcr.org or call (859) 455-8383.

www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 31


Equine Events October 20 & 21

October 27 & 28

Florida Agricultural Museum, The HOLLER-Ween

Florida Agricultural Museum,

Festival

The HOLLER-Ween Festival

7900 Old Kings Road North, Palm Coast.

Sean Patrick Training Clinic

7900 Old Kings Road North, Palm Coast.

6:30 pm until 11 pm Kids events and haunted attrac-

6:30 pm until 11 pm Kids events and haunted attrac-

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit

tions. $15 for adults.

tions. $15 for adults.

OCTOBER October 14 & 15

www.seanpatricktraining.com/contact or www.flhorsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699

October 21 - 22 SEC Hunter Jumper Dressage Show

October 14 - 15 Southern Baroque Association Breed Show.

Sumter Equestrian Center, Bushnell. For more information visit: www.sumterequestriancenter.com or contact Martin at 352-303-4325

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information visit www.southernbaroqueas-

October 21

sociation.com/spring-classic-march-2017/

POP XC Schooling Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.fl-

October 14 4-H Horse Specialty Show

horsepark.com October 22

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For more information

POP Schooling Show

visit: www.horsespecialtyclub.com or call

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.fl-

(352) 351-9557

horsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699

Agriculture Tip of the Month “Improving your farm’s grazing management practices often increases forage yield more than increasing your fertilizer application will..” – Caitlin Bainum UF/IFAS Ag. Extension Specialist

2018 OBS Calendar Open to the Public! Stop by to watch, register to bid or enjoy lunch.

WINTER MIXED Including Horses of Racing Age Section January 24 – 25 Under Tack: January 22

MARCH TWO-YEAR-OLDS March 13 – 14 Under Tack: March 8–10

SPRING TWO-YEAR-OLDS April 24 – 27 Under Tack: April 16– 21

JUNE TWO-YEAR-OLDS & HORSES OF RACING AGE June 12 – 14 Under Tack: June 4 – 9

SELECTED YEARLINGS October 9 OPEN YEARLINGS October 10 – 11 32 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


Equine Events October 28 - 29

November 4 - 5

Hunt Country Horse Show

November Open Show Series

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information

Fox Lea Farm, Venice. For more information visit:

visit www.horseshowsinthepark.com or

www.foxleafarm.com or contact: Jacqueline

http://thegrandoaks.com/events

Desormier (941) 809-6361; email: foxleafarm2@aol.com

October 29 STRIDE Dressage Show Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.stridedressage.org or www.flhorsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699

November 10 - 12

Spotlight

Pac West Barrel Racing Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For more information visit: http://www.marioncountyfl.org/departmentsagencies/departments-a-n/extension-service/southeastern-livestock-pavilion-and-extension-auditorium

NOVEMBER

or call (352) 671-8600

November 4

November 11- 12

Ocklawaha River Raid Civil War Re-Enactment

Western Dressage Show

Florida Horse Park. For more information, contact

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale.

Lt. Col. Keith Kohl at ltcol2ndbattalion@gmail.com or

For more information visit www.wdafl.org or

visit www.floridareenactorsonline.com/ events.html

http://thegrandoaks.com/events

and www.flhorsepark.com November 11 - 12 November 4 - 5

Florida Harvest Classic AQHA Show

Holiday Kick Off Dressage Show

Canterbury Showplace, Newberry. For more informa-

Canterbury Showplace, Newberry. For more informa-

tion visitcanterburyshowplace.com; email:

tion visitcanterburyshowplace.com; email:

canterburyshowplace@gmail.com or

canterburyshowplace@gmail.com or call

call (352) 472-6758

Writer Amanda Duckworth and friend enjoy visiting Florida-bred legend Silver Charm at Old Friends Farm in Kentucky

(352) 472-6758 November 11 November 4 - 5 Marion Saddle Club Show Longwood Farm South. For more information call Kelly Myers at 352-572-6147,

4-H Horse Specialty Show Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For more information visit: www.horsespecialtyclub.com or call (352) 3519557

email: mschorseshow@gmail.com, or visit: www.mschorseshows.net

November 11 POP XC Schooling

November 4 - 5 Florida Ranch Horse Show Sumter Equestrian Center, Bushnell. For more information visit: http://floridaranchhorse.com; www.sumterequestriancenter.com or contact Martin at 352-303-4325

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.flhorsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699 November 12 POP Schooling Show Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.flhorsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699 www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 33


Equine Events DAY OF THE MORGAN National AMHA Open Barn Day

October 28, 2017 Call for specific times

Central Florida locations: Bobbin Hollow Equestrian Center, Reddick 8990 NW 187th Ln. Reddick, FL 32686 Cheri Barber Stables, Reddick 9200 NW 125th St, Reddick, FL 32686 (352) 591-3225 Costa Nova, Pierson Tom Johnson, Vice President 980 Still Rd. Pierson, FL 32180 772-812-9729 tomj772@aol.com West Coast Morgans, Odessa 17126 Boy Scout Rd, Odessa, FL 33556 (813) 920-9870

November 13

November 17 - 19

Insider Tips and Etiquette for International Three

Tour of Champions Barrel Race

Day Event spectators

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For more information

The Ocala Jockey Club hosts the second annual

visit: www.tourofchamps.com

$100,000 International 3-Day Event on November 16 through 19. Come learn the lingo and what a 3-Day

November 18

Event is, get the scoop on the best spots to enjoy the

Ocala Downtown Farmers’ Market Farm City

event, best days to go, best food and booths to visit

Event

and what to bring.

8 a.m. – 2 p.m. - Games for children and information

4 pm to 5 pm - Course #: EQU114 - $10. Sign up at

for adults about Farm City life and the impact of

Master the Possibilities at http://www.masterthepos-

horses in the community

sibilities.org/ or call (352) 854-3699 November 18 November 15

Florida Agricultural Museum, The Walk Back In

Farm City Week at the Plant Science Center with

Time

UF/IFAS

900 Old Kings Road North, Palm Coast.

Ocala has a rich tradition of being a Farm City. Since

10 am- 4 pm Historical reenactors illustrating differ-

1963, agriculture leaders share their areas of interest

ent periods in Florida's past. Meet Timucuans, 16th

with the community. Tours start at 11 a.m., lunch and

century Spaniards, Seminoles, free black militia of

choice of afternoon seminars until 3 p.m. on back-

Fort Moses, British, cow hunters, 19th century farm-

yard poultry, rabbits, goats, retired racehorses, or-

ers, and moonshiners. Crafts. Admission $5. 7

ganic gardening, beekeeping and pollinator plants. Book at Event Brite at goo.gl/hfYvoM or call the Mar-

November 18 - 19

ion County Ag Extension Center.

SEC Hunter Jumper Dressage Show Sumter Equestrian Center, Bushnell. For more infor-

November 16

mation visit: www.sumterequestriancenter.com or

Marion County Agriculture Hall of Fame/Farm City

contact Martin at (352) 303-4325

Week Banquet

Whispering Oaks Equestrian Center, Tampa 7631 Gardner Rd, Tampa, FL 33625 (813) 409-5272

Induction of Willet (Bud) Boyer into the Marion County

November 18 - 19

Agriculture Hall of Fame

Hunt Country Horse Show

6 pm - Call 352-671-8400 for reservations due by

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information

Nov. 10, $20 per person

visit www.horseshowsinthepark.com or http://thegrandoaks.com/events

November 16 - 19

LIKE US ON

Ocala Jockey Club 2017 International 3-Day Event

November 18 - 20

Ocala Jockey Club. For more information visit:

Florida Paint Horse Club Show

www.ojc3de.com/ or call (352) 591-1212

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit http://www.floridapainthorseclub.org/shows-and-

November 16 - 19

events/ or email: info@floridapainthorseclub.com

Fox Lea Farm November Competition

www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest/ 34 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

Fox Lea Farm, Venice. For more information visit:

November 24 - 26

www.foxleafarm.com or contact: Jacqueline

Rice’s Annual Roping

Desormier (941) 809-6361; email:

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit

foxleafarm2@aol.com

www.flhorsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699


Equine Events DECEMBER

December 2 - 3

December 29

December Open Show Series

Cypress Springs Pony Club Winter Camp

December 1 - February 11

Fox Lea Farm, Venice. For more information visit:

For more information visit: www.flhorsepark.com or

Winter Horse Festival

www.foxleafarm.com or contact: Jacqueline

call (352) 307-6699

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information

Desormier (941) 809-6361; email:

visit www.facebook.com/GrandOaksWinterHorseFes-

foxleafarm2@aol.com

December 29 - 31 7th Annual Stopanio Memorial Barrel Race

tival/ or http://thegrandoaks.com/events December 8 - 10

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For more information

December 1 - 3

Sneak Peek — 3-Day Event & Training Expo

visit: http://keytoheavenranch.com

HITS Ocala Holiday Premiere

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information

For more information visit: www.hitsshows.com or

visit: http://thegrandoaks.com/events

Spotlight

email: info@hitsshows.com December 13 - 17 December 1 - 3

Ocala Holiday Classic

North American Preliminary Championships

For more information visit: www.hitsshows.com or

Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information

email: info@hitsshows.com

visit: http://thegrandoaks.com/events December 15 - 17 December 1 - 3 Southern Cowboy Classic Rodeo and Stock Show Florida Horse Park. For more information visit

Chris Cox Horsemanship Clinic Grand Oaks Resort, Weirsdale. For more information visit: http://thegrandoaks.com/events

www.flhorsepark.com or contact Amanda Hayward (352) 446-4480, email: SouthernCowboyClassic@outlook.com

December 16 - 17 Show Your Horse Western Dressage Show Florida Horse Park. For more information visit:

December 2 - 3 Marion Saddle Club Show Longwood Farm South. For more information call Kelly Myers at (352) 572-6147, email: mschorseshow@gmail.com, or visit: www.mschorseshows.net

www.flhorsepark.com or http://showyourhorsellc.com/events-calendar/

Paula Hofford visited Gypsy Gold Farm while touring Ocala and met one of the many Gypsy Vanner horses.

December 16 FTBOA Bus trip to Tampa Bay Downs races From Ocala to Tampa Bay Downs for the 2 threeyear-old FSS races. It is the City of Ocala and Marion County Day at the track. Call (352) 629-2160 for de-

December 2 - 3

tails.

FQHA Last Chance Show Jacksonville Equestrian Center, Jacksonville. For more information visit www.fqha.net

December 16 POP XC Schooling Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.fl-

December 2 - 3

horsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699

Florida Ranch Horse Show Sumter Equestrian Center, Bushnell. For more infor-

December 17

mation visit: http://floridaranchhorse.com;

POP Schooling Show

www.sumterequestriancenter.com or contact

Florida Horse Park. For more information visit www.fl-

Martin at (352) 303-4325

horsepark.com or call (352) 307-6699

www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 35


Pilot Program Offers Cost Share The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) and Florida Department of Agriculture (FDACS) through the Marion County Soil and Water Conservation District has implemented a pilot program to cost share manure management best management practices for Marion County area horse farms to improve water quality and protect Rainbow Springs. The pilot program will reimburse 75% of total project costs up to $50,000 and is seeking horse farms to sign up for the program. Costshare funds are available now and will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. To be eligible to participate in the cost-share program, the horse farm must meet minimum requirements including being a commercial equine operation and located in Marion County, in the Rainbow Springs Basin, and within the SWFWMD. To determine if your property is in the proper area, view map. The goal is to gather the interested farms for cost-share by the end of October. For more information or to sign up for the program, contact Gene Altman, P.E., at 352-796-7211, Ext. 4248 or Gene.Altman@swfwmd.state.fl.us. HCD 36 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017


HCD

BusinessPlace

PLACE AN AD IN BUSINESS PLACE CALL 352.732.8858

Where your business gets the recognition it deserves Art Galleries

Professional

ONGOING

Bobbie Deuell

Fine Art Portraits

Florida Thoroughbred Museum & Gallery 801 SW 60th Ave., Ocala 34474

Sally y Moehring

Abrightideafarm@yahoo.com

cottagefarminc@gmail.com ail com

(closed noon to 1 p.m. and holidays) Free and open to the public.

www.bdfineart.net

( (352) ) 895-8525

open Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

www w.equinetherapyint.com

352-207-7820

ADVA VANCED EQUINE THERAPY SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT

For information, call 352-629-2160

See her at FAFO on Oct. 28-29 in Booth 69

Photography

Louise E. Reinagel

HORSE PHOTOGRAPHER

Visit me at www.horsesites.com/r E-Mail: limelightf@mfi.net

(352) 237-3809

Charities

Spotted Dance Ranch - Brooksville -

Cowboy Cottage, camping hookups, stalls, paddocks, clinics, events, retreats, horse trails

813-482-4028 or 352-442-8737 email: kymrouse@a atttt.net

http://www.spotteddanceranch.com/

Boutique breeder of quality Spotted Saddle Horses

Stirrups & Strides Therapeutic Riding Center Jammin’ at Jumbolair Extravaganza Charity Benefit 5 – 10 pm • December 2, 2017 Live auction, silent auction, dinner, dance and more! Tickets $75 per person $800 for table of 8 Call Betty Gray at 352-427-3569 Email: graytime@windstream.net www.stirrupsnstrides.com

City of Ocala/Marion County Day

Tampa Bay Downs

December 16 Ride the event bus from Ocala to Tampa. Only $25

RSVP: 352-629-2160

Florida Thorobred Fillies Charity JOIN TODAY Make Friends! Fun Events! Raise Funds with Bake Sales at OBS! Stop by the cake table at OBS on Oct. 10-12 for more information

Advertise in Horse Capital Digest’s Business Place! Only $45 per issue Call 352-732-8858 to reserve your space today. www.facebook.com/horsecapitaldigest 37


CARIBBEAN continued from page 23

with shipping items. Bonnie Heath has noted of the efforts and support, “that the outpouring has been more than amazing, it’s so rewarding.” The Heaths began efforts for Hurricane Harvey relief and they continued for Puerto Rico with particular focus on the racetrack, Hipódromo Camarero in Canóvanas, east of the capitol city of San Juan. Hard hit, the barn area lost 90 percent of the roofs off the stables. The horses were short on water, feed and the area was hard to reach. Ocala Breeders’ Sales teamed up with Kim Heath and organized five shipping containers of supplies and feed for cargo ships bound for the island. Wellington resident, Shelley Blodgett of Caribbean Thoroughbred AfterCare Director took it upon herself to contact equine industry press outlets writing “Letters to the to Editor” to inform the greater equine community of the plight of the animals on the island. Blodgett knew first-hand from the horse’s dire need from Kelley Stobie, VP, CFO & coordinator of thoroughbred adoptions onsite at racetrack in Puerto Rico. Blodgett and Stobie are well known in thoroughbred circles for their work in the healthy retirement and placement of thoroughbreds from the Caribbean back to Florida. Blodgett’s pleas led to action. A Swift Air plane, funded by The Jockey Club and Thoroughbred Charities of America’s Horses First Fund, was the result of a week-long effort undertaken by her and numerous equine groups to get aid to the more than 800 Thoroughbreds at the Camarero Race Track and to begin assisting other horses on the island. It carried 20 tons of hay cubes and veterinary supplies. The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation, Thorough38 Horse Capital Digest • October 2017

bred Charities of America (TCA), The Jockey Club, Brookledge’s Horse America, Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare, and the Texas Equine Veterinary Association (TEVA) worked closely with Ranch Aid, a FEMA appointed organization that assists with logistics and care for large animals during natural disasters. The Humane Society of the United States also assisted by facilitating the federal approval of the shipment. “There were many, many challenges but we are thrilled to see feed and vet supplies finally reaching the horses in Puerto Rico,” said Erin Crady executive director of TCA. “This effort would not have been possible without the incredible team work and support of so many organizations and people working tirelessly to get this plane into Puerto Rico.” Groups reported that finding an available aircraft to carry the feed and supplies was a daunting challenge given that most cargo planes were being utilized understandably for humanitarian efforts. Thoroughbred Charities of America board member Terry Finley reached out to friend Vincent Viola, the owner of St. Elias Stables and a shareholder of Swift Air, who immediately put TCA in contact with Swift Air to ship the much-needed equine supplies. The veterinary supplies and medications were donated in part by MWI Animal Health and purchased by TEVA and delivery assistance by South Florida veterinary practice, Teigland, Franklin, and Brokken. The hay cubes were donated in part by Cargill/Nutrena and purchased by the AAEP Foundation. Additionally, two satellite phones were purchased by the AAEP Foundation and delivery assistance provided by south Florida Purina Animal Nutrition representative Sheila Conde.

Additional Islands Raphael Green, a pilot and secretary

What can you do for Caribbean Horse Relief? 1. Share information so others are informed on how they can assist 2. Contact your feed or hay supply store to see if they are participating in collections 3. Go online on social media to search for relief efforts and direct contacts on islands 4. Utilize the additional resources here to see if your business or farm or logistical company can assist Carolyn Smith, (Virgin Islands) 340-998-3860 Shelley Blodgett (Caribbean - US liaison Wellington, FL) 561-308-2185 Kim Heath (Ocala) - supporting Equine Relief Facebook page Types of items needed after disasters: Feeds, hay and pelleted hay IV fluids with catheters Needles Anti-inflammatories (bute, banamine) Antibiotics (topical, inject with syringes) Iodine solutions Swat and similar ointments Epsom salts and other for feet Lead ropes and halters

of the Barbados Thoroughbred Breeders Association said, “there has been an outpouring of support from Bajans to Dominica and the other affected countries.” He noted Barbados had no significant damage and he was doing relief flights to other islands to assist. On the island of Martinique, residents posted photos of horses turned out to wander since there were no residents to tend to them. Boats made daily treks for weeks with buckets of fresh water and grain to support the horses. As relief workers dropped water and grain, they noticed the horses eventually began using their owners’ vacant damaged homes as sun-shelters, staying close in hopes their owners would return. HCD


at Florida Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation, 801 SW 60th Ave., Ocala FL 34474 The program gives inmates an opportunity to learn equine skills so they can find employment in Florida’s equine industry after release. The farm is funded by Florida Thoroughbred Charities, a subsidiary of Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association.

at Lowell Correctional Institute CH Registration number (CH8627) issued by the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. Florida Horse of the Year Forbidden Apple / Photo by Sally Moehring


Hcd october 17  
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