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SEPTEMBER 2010 VO L 5 3 / I S S U E 8

8

FLORIDA FOCUS

19 TRUE GREEN AND WHITE For nearly five decades, Larry Cowan has been Ocala Stud true green and white. By Jo Ann Guidry

24 FTBOA BOARD CANDIDATE BIOGRAPHIES 27 FLORIDA-BRED FILLY LEADS OBS AUGUST SALE By Nick Fortuna

30 CALDER SERVES UP AN ‘AWESOME DINNER’ Awesome Feather, Gourmet Dinner win second legs of the Florida Stallion Stakes. By Nick Fortuna

34

DOUBLE THE DRAMA

Veteran Ocala Thoroughbred horseman Harold Queen records milestone day with homebreds Big Drama and Little Drama. By Jo Ann Guidry

38

Editor’s Note By Summer Best

40

DEWORMING

Many horse owners are in the habit of deworming on a set schedule. Unfortunately, most are unaware that this routine is based on out-dated recommendations, and can actually end up causing harm to the very horses they are trying to protect. By Cynthia McFarland

47 NEWS BITS 51 HORSE COUNCIL NEWS 55 YOUNG HORSES AND BUCKED SHINS By Denise Steffanus

57 YOUR FLORIDA HORSE PARK By Connie Duff Wise

58 FARM MANAGEMENT By Jamie Cohen

58 FERGUS By Jean Abernethy

59 FTBOA CHASE TO THE CHAMPIONSHIP 60 FLORIDA’S LEADING SIRES 62 PLAYER’S PAGE By Paul Moran 4 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

COVER PHOTO: LIZ LAMONT / CONTENTS: CINDY MIKELL


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801 SW 60th Avenue • Ocala, Florida 34474 (352) 732-8858 • Fax: (352) 867-1979 • www.ftboa.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Michael Compton BUSINESS MANAGER

Patrick Vinzant MANAGING EDITOR/ADVERTISING MANAGER

Summer Best ART DIRECTOR

John Filer CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

JoAnn Guidry WRITER

Nick Fortuna ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Beverly Kalberkamp CORRESPONDENTS

Jay Friedman, Doug McCoy, Cynthia McFarland, Mark Shuffitt PUBLISHER Florida Equine Publications, Inc. (A corporation owned by the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association)

Executive Office - 801 SW 60th Avenue • Ocala, Florida 34474 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Gilbert Campbell, President/Board Chairman Fred Brei, 1st Vice President J. Michael O’Farrell, Jr., 2nd Vice President George G. Isaacs, Secretary Diane Parks, Treasurer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Richard E. Hancock CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Michael Gilliam

© THE FLORIDA HORSE (ISSN 0090-967X) is published monthly except July by THE FLORIDA HORSE, INC., 801 SW 60th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34474, including the annual Statistical Review in February. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of Florida Equine Publications or the Florida Thoroughbred Breedersʼ and Ownersʼ Association. Publication of any material originating herein is expressly forbidden without first obtaining written permission from THE FLORIDA HORSE©.

Statistics in the publication relating to results of racing in North America are compiled from data generated by Daily Racing Form, Equibase, Bloodstock Research Information Services, and The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc., the copyright owners of said data. Reproduction is prohibited. A dvertisin g co py d ead lin e 5th o f mo n th p recedin g p ub licatio n. Su bscrip tio ns and ch ang e of add ress: Please m ail to – Circulation s D ep artment. T HE FL ORIDA H ORS E, 801 SW 60th Ave., O cala, Florida 34474.

Printed by Boyd Brothers, Inc.

BOYD

American Horse Publications • FLORIDA MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION • MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU

FTBOA OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS Gilbert G. Campbell, President Fred Brei, First Vice President J. Michael O’Farrell, Jr., Second Vice President George G. Isaacs, Secretary Diane Parks, Treasurer

DIRECTORS Joe Barbazon Dean DeRenzo Sheila DiMare Donald Dizney Barry W. Eisaman

Brent Fernung Bonnie M. Heath III Phil Matthews Jessica Steinbrenner Peter Vegso

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Richard E. Hancock THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 5


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Good Time

For a Comeback By MICHAEL COMPTON loverLeaf Farms II, closed since 2007, is set to reopen its doors in the Sunshine State. Owner John Sykes acquired the property in 1997, built it into a full-service facility and then moved his operation to Kentucky in 2007. Due to the direction of Florida’s Thoroughbred industry and the early success of theVinery stallion Congrats—whom Sykes owns in partnership with Vinery—Sykes has decided to utilize the Reddick property once again. “The recent legislation and the direction of Florida’s Thoroughbred industry certainly played a role in our decision,” said Matt Lyons, general manager of Sykes’ Woodford Thoroughbreds and CloverLeaf Farms. “Of course, the Congrats horses have really come out running as well and we want

C

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CloverLeaf Farm

Susan and John Sykes

6 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

to support him over the next few years.” Congrats, the top freshman sire in the country, stands at Vinery for a $4,500 stud fee. Through Aug. 30, Congrats is represented by 11 winners from 34 starters. He has two stakes winners and total progeny earnings of $477,364. His leading runner is Sorrento Stakes (G3) winner Wickedly Perfect, a Florida-bred OBS graduate with earnings of $114,600. Lyons said he expects CloverLeaf to house 20 to 25 of Sykes’ broodmares. Among Sykes’ broodmare band are the likes of Florida champions Bsharpsonata and Set Play, Turko’s Turn, the dam of Point Given, and Grade 1 winner Celtic Melody, according to the Woodford Thoroughbreds website.

Lyons indicated there are a few mares on the property currently (late August) and more will take up residence over the next couple of weeks. Lyons also said that Cory Stayner has been hired as the farm’s manager. “We have a lot of nice mares,” Lyons said. “Right now the plan is to board only our horses. If a good client were to come along, however, we may be open to that in the future. “We know these are tough economic times,” he added, “but the farm is there, it’s a beautiful property and the grounds have been maintained. The industry in Florida seems headed in the right direction, and having Congrats is a big draw for us. Everything pointed to reopening.” While an operation with the size and scope of CloverLeaf positioning itself back in the picture in Florida is certainly welcome news, the industry had even more to smile about last month as all the economic indicators at the OBS August yearling sale showed improvement. During the sale’s selected session, gross sales increased 29.8 percent. A total of 131 horses brought a total of $4.71 million compared to 110 head selling for $3.63 million a year ago. The selected session’s average price of $35,981 climbed 9 percent from last year’s average of $33,023. Topping the select session was a Florida-bred Any Given Saturday filly purchased by trainer Jeff Bonde and Mersad Metanovic for $280,000. Steve Schrivever bred the filly, who was consigned by Beth Bayer, agent. For the two open sessions, 478 horses sold for a total of $4,214,850 compared to 541 horses bringing $3,789,200 in three open sessions last year. The average price was $8,818, up 25.9 percent from $7,004 last year, while the median price rose 60 percent to $5,600 compared with $3,500 in 2009. For more on the OBS sale, please see Nick Fortuna’s coverage on page 27. ■ Enjoy the September issue.


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Compiled by Nick Fortuna

Florida Stallions Enjoying

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LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

good 2-year-old sale season, and now we’re seeing those horses go out and pay quick dividends. We’re pleasantly surprised. A lot of people were expecting him to throw a two-turn horse, so people were going to have to be patient with him, but we’re seeing his babies win early.” Wildcat Heir, who stood for an $8,000 stud fee at Journeyman Stud in Ocala this year, set a Northern Hemisphere record for 2-year-old winners with 39 as a freshman stallion last year. He ranked second in midAugust among leading juvenile sires. Wildcat Heir’s top earner is Florida-bred Derwin’s Star, who finished third behind Blind Luck in the Delaware Oaks (G2) last month en route to $139,770 in winnings. He’s had 49 winners from 98 starters this year. “He really picked up right where he left off last year,” said Journeyman Stud owner Vinery stallion Congrats (above) and Florida-bred Wickedly Perfect (below) Brent Fernung. “Hopefully, we’ll keep him The stallions standing in Florida haven’t Congrats, who stood for a $4,500 stud fee here and he’ll just keep on siring a lot of nice stopped competing just because they’ve left at Vinery in Summerfield this year, had seven Florida-breds. He’s such an impeccable physthe racetrack, and this year, many of them winners from 22 starters and Wickedly Per- ical horse, and I thought the first time I saw have been outperforming their more expen- fect, a $70,000 purchase at OBS in April, is him that he’d get a lot of 2-year-old winners, so he was a no-brainer sive peers. his leading earner with for me. But what’s been The Sorrento Stakes (G3) at Del Mar last $114,600. really encouraging is month served as a showcase for two of The stallion conhow they’ve gotten betFlorida’s top stallions, Vinery’s Congrats and cluded his racing career ter at age 3, and he’s gotJourneyman Stud’s Wildcat Heir, who rank with seven wins from 26 ten a lot of repeat among the leading sires in North America in starts, including a vicwinners. That shows that several categories and lead the way in Florida. tory in the 1 1/16-mile he has soundness workFlorida-bred Wickedly Perfect, a daughter San Pasqual Handicap ing for him.” of Congrats bred by Morriston’sY-Lo Racing (G2) at Santa Anita Park We’re really happy to see On the track, Wildcat Stables, remained unbeaten in two career as a 5-year-old in 2005. him do so well so quickly. He Heir won six of his 12 starts, rallying for a one-length victory in the He earned $998,960. had a really good 2-year-old starts for $424,460 and “We’re really happy Sorrento. Florida-bred She’ll Heir, a daughter of Wildcat Heir bred by Ocala’s Michelle to see him do so well so sale season, and now we’re scored a Grade 1 win in Redding, finished fourth after capturing the quickly,” said Vinery seeing those horses go out the Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash as a 4$70,000 Cinderella Stakes at Hollywood Park stallion manager Declan and pay quick dividends. Doyle. “He had a really two starts back. —Declan Doyle on stallion Congrats year-old in 2004.

8 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010


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Strong Year He’s such an impeccable “ physical horse, and I thought BENOIT & ASSOCIATES PHOTO

the first time I saw him that he’d get a lot of 2-year-old winners, so he was a no-brainer for me.

—Brent Fernung on Wildcat Heir OTHER FLORIDA STALLIONS ENJOYING STRONG YEARS.

With Distinction, who stood for a $7,500 stud fee this year at Hartley/De Renzo Thoroughbreds in Ocala, ranked fifth among freshman sires with $195,244 in progeny earnings. Among his top runners is Florida-bred Decisive Moment, who was third in the $75,000 Dr. Fager division of the Florida Stal-

lion Stakes at Calder Casino and Race Course. Vinery’s Pomeroy, Journeyman Stud’s Mass Media, Signature’s Chapel Royal and Stonehedge Farm’s West Acre also are success. Editor’s Note: For updated earnings on Florida’s stallions, please see page 60.

Journeyman stallion Wildcat Heir (below) and Florida-bred Sheʼll Heir (above)

Fawkes Eyes Breeders’ Cup for Florida-breds Harold’s Queen’s 4-year-old Big Drama, the son of Ocala Stud stallion Montbrook trained by David Fawkes, has a long-term goal of the $2 million Breeders’Cup Sprint (G1) at Churchill Downs. Big Drama most recently finished second in the $250,000 Alfred G. Vanderbilt Handicap (G2) at Saratoga on Aug. 8. His connections are considering options for his Breeders’ Cup prep race, including the $350,000 Vosburgh Stakes (G1) going six furlongs at Belmont Park on Oct. 2. Two years ago, Big Drama swept the open division of the Florida Stallion Stakes. At Calder, he’s won his last six starts after a third-place career debut. Prior to the Vanderbilt this summer, he won the $65,000 Ponche Handicap and the $350,000 Smile Sprint Handicap (G2) in Miami. Fawkes has another 4-year-old colt that could go in a Breeders’ Cup race in fellow Florida-bred Duke of Mischief, the winner of the $300,000 Philip H. Iselin Handicap (G3) at Monmouth Park on Aug. 21. Duke of Mischief has won six of 15 career starts for earnings of more than $900,000 for a partnership of Joann and Alex Lieblong, breeder Marilyn McMaster and Fawkes. Earlier this season, the chestnut son of Winding Oaks Farm stallion Graeme Hall won the Ft. Lauderdale Stakes (G3) at Gulfstream Park and the $500,000 Oaklawn Handicap (G2). Fawkes said he will point Duke of Mischief to the $1 million Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile (G1), with a possible tune-up in the $300,000 Monmouth Cup Stakes (G2), formerly known as the Meadowlands Cup, on Oct. 9.

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David Fawkes

THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 9


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Dynaslew Gets Second Graded Win in Ballston Spa Florida-bred Dynaslew overtook the pacesetting Silver Reunion near the sixteenth pole and crossed the finish line half a length in front of that rival to win the $200,000 Ballston Spa Handicap (G2) at Saratoga on Aug. 28, her second career triumph in a graded stakes race. Dynaslew, a homebred for Ocala’s Live Oak Plantation, had come up just short of a Grade 1 victory at Saratoga in July, finishing fourth in the Diana Stakes, just a neck behind the victorious Proviso, in a blanket finish. Dynaslew had set the pace in that race, but in the Ballston Spa, the 4-year-old Dynaformer filly stalked Silver Reunion in second place for much of the 1 1/16-mile race on a firm inner turf course. Jockey Eibar Coa had Dynaslew about two lengths behind the leader as Silver Reunion carved out fractions of 23.44 seconds for a quarter-mile and 47.54 for a half. Dynaslew ranged up on the far turn to get within

Florida-bred Dynaslew

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half a length of Silver Reunion at the top of the lane and gradually wore her down through the stretch, finishing in 1:40.58. “In the stretch, she just kept digging and digging and digging,” said Coa. “She never stopped running.” Dynaslew earned her first graded stakes win in the Beaugay Stakes (G3) at Belmont Park in May and was the runner-up to Shared Account in the All Along Stakes (G3) at Colonial Downs in June. She has five wins and four runner-up finishes from 13 career starts and has earned $365,852. “I was real happy with our position,” said winning trainer Seth Benzel. “Eibar has ridden this horse to a T. Dynaslew is a versatile filly who doesn’t need to have the lead. Eibar felt our filly had that option, but she didn’t need it to win. It’s a perfect union between the two.”

Unbridled Essence Wins Matchmaker at 42-1

10 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

She had run in two stakes prior to Sunday’s race, finishing second behind Redreamit in the $65,000 Twin Lights Stakes on Monmouth’s turf course in September and ninth in the Valley View Stakes (G3) on Keeneland’s grass course in October. “We gave her the winter off,” trainer Gregory Sacco said. “She came back bigger and stronger. In her first start back, she finished just behind Queen Martha, who gave Rachel Alexandra a race here last week. In her last start, she ran her eyeballs out. It was very special to win this for the Brunetti family.” Unbridled Essence was the second-longest shot in the field. Quiet Meadow is a 5-year-old daughter of El Prado bred by the late Arthur I. Appleton at Bridlewood Farm in Ocala. The mare, out of the Unbridled broodmare Unbridled Waters, has won three of her 19 starts and earned $296,408 for owners Hidden Brook Farm and Dan Zucker and trainer Chad Brown. She’s been the runner-up in all three of her races on Monmouth’s turf course, including a loss by a head to All Is Vanity in last summer’s Eatontown Handicap (G3). DENVER PHOTO

Unbridled Essence and jockey Paco Lopez are a perfect match, and they proved it once again Aug. 1 at Monmouth Park, scoring a 42-1 upset over fellow Florida-bred Quiet Meadow in the $210,000 Matchmaker Stakes (G3). Unbridled Essence, a homebred for John J. Brunetti’s Ocala-based Red Oak Stable, won the ninefurlong race on firm turf by half a length for her first stakes victory.The 4-year-old filly by Essence of Dubai has won five of her 15 starts, with Lopez aboard for each of those wins. She’s earned $278,597. Unbridled Essence ran in fourth place early as Tizaqueena and Giant Mover battled for the lead, taking the field of 11 fillies and mares through a quarter-mile in 24.38 seconds and a half-mile in 48.96. Unbridled Essence went threewide around the far turn to move up to second place and Florida-bred battled the length of the Unbridled Essence stretch with Quiet Meadow, who had run just behind her most of the way under Alan Garcia. Unbridled Essence finished in 1:47.97. Unbridled Essence was making her third start of the year and entered the Matchmaker off a win in a $79,800 allowance on the Monmouth lawn in June.


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FTBOA, FHBPA and Churchill Downs are raising purse money in the juvenile racing program at Calder this year and making the program more lucrative

than ever in 2010!

$36,700 minimum purses for maiden special weight, which includes $7,000 Florida Owners’ Awards. Take advantage of your next opportunity to purchase a Florida-bred at the OBS October sale in Ocala!


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Duke of Mischief Delivers in Iselin

12 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

Duke of Mischief ran in fourth place early as Florida-bred Our Edge led the field through a slow quarter-mile in 24.95 seconds and a half-mile in 49.52. He angled out to find running room while going around the far turn and entered the stretch fourwide to pull even with Redding Colliery, who had stalked Our Edge in second place before inheriting the lead from that tiring rival. Duke of Mischief drew off in the final furlong and stopped the clock for the 1 1/8 miles on a fast track in 1:51.15. “This horse likes to get an outside trip,” Fawkes said. “Going down the backside, I got a little nervous because he was still on the inside, but (Coa) said he was just biding his time.” Duke of Mischief got his first stakes win in the $250,000 Iowa Derby at Prairie Meadows last summer. He’s had a stellar 2010 campaign, earning victories in the offthe-turf Fort Lauderdale Stakes (G3) at Gulfstream Park in January and the Oaklawn Handicap (G2) in April.

Florida-bred Duke of Mischief

DENVER PHOTO

Florida-bred Duke of Mischief entered the $297,000 Philip H. Iselin Stakes as a two-time graded stakes winner, but he wasn’t getting much respect from racing fans prior to the Grade 3 event at Monmouth Park on Aug. 21. The son of Winding Oaks Farm stallion Graeme Hall was sent off at odds of 16-1, making him the second-longest shot in the field of six 3-year-olds and up. Duke of Mischief ran like he had something to prove, rallying past the favored Redding Colliery in the final furlong for a 2 ¼-length victory. The 4-year-old colt, ridden by Eibar Coa, has won six of his 15 starts and earned $910,642 for an ownership group consisting of trainer David Fawkes, breeder Marilyn McMaster and Alex and Joann Lieblong. “One thing about this horse, when he shows up and runs his A-1 race, I don’t think there’s anyone that can beat him,” Coa said after getting his first win in the Iselin. “I moved him to the outside and let him go. That was the plan from the beginning, and I wasn’t going to change that.”


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Pleasant Prince Victorious in Ohio Derby

Dubai Majesty Beats West Ocean by a Neck throughout the 5 ½-furlong race on firm turf. West Ocean and jockey Chris Decarlo moved up to second place around the turn and got within a length of Candy Cane at the top of the lane. Dubai Majesty also had made up ground on the leaders but was still in fifth place at the top of the lane. Mena swung her to the outside and found running room, and Dubai Majesty reeled in West Ocean in the final strides to be up just in time. Dubai Majesty finished in 1:02.20. Dubai Majesty, owned by Martin Racing Stable and Dan Morgan, has won 10 of her 31 starts.

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Dubai Majesty has earned the lion’s share of her $769,243 bankroll on dirt tracks, including victories in the last two editions of the Winning Colors Stakes (G3) at Churchill Downs. But after a gusty win in the $93,000 Incredible Revenge Stakes at Monmouth Park last month, trainer Bret Calhoun said the Florida-bred mare might be at her best on turf. Dubai Majesty, a 5-year-old daughter of Essence of Dubai bred by Ocala’s Harold J. Plumley, rallied from last place to beat the favored West Ocean by a neck in the Incredible Revenge, improving to 3-for-5 on turf. “I’ve been looking forward to getting her back on the turf,” Calhoun said. “She’s run well on all surfaces, but her best surface might be turf. She ran huge. She was last getting away from the gate and last turning for home, and she ran down a very good filly. She’s got a tremendous turn of foot on the turf. She’s got a huge kick, a lot stronger kick on the turf than she does on dirt or synthetic.” With Miguel Mena aboard, Dubai Majesty saved ground after breaking from the inside post and was last as Forever Grateful and Candy Cane took the field through an opening quarter-mile in 22.61 seconds. West Ocean was in fifth place early and ran four-wide 14 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

Florida-bred Dubai Majesty

Florida-bred Pleasant Prince

stopping the clock in 1:43.90. Pleasant Prince has won two of his 11 starts and earned $284,398 for owners Ken and Sarah Ramsey. He was a $30,000 purchase at OBS as a yearling in August 2008. Pleasant Prince has made six consecutive starts in graded events. In addition to his runner-up finish in the Florida Derby, he ran third in the Derby Trial Stakes (G3) at Churchill Downs in April, then finished a disappointing 11th in the Preakness Stakes (G1) at Pimlico in May.

Bea Oxenberg Passes Away Longtime Thoroughbred owner Bea Oxenberg passed away last month in Boca Raton at the age of 89. Oxenberg, who often purchased horses at OBS, had owned horses for nearly 40 years with her late husband Bernie.They were married 62 years when Bernie died in 2003. “She was like an owner from a bygone era,” trainer Edward Plesa Jr. told Daily Racing Form. “I had horses for her and Bernie for nearly 30 Bea Oxenberg years, and she was a true asset to the game. She was both a great owner and a great friend.” Millionaire Florida-bred Best of the Rest and Florida-bred graded stakes winner Hey Byrn, named for her husband, were among the top horses that carried Oxenberg’s hot pink silks to victories. In an article in the March 2008 issue of The Florida Horse magazine, Bea recalled her many afternoons at the racetrack with Bernie watching their horses run. “I have so many great memories of our days at the track together,” Bea said,” and we traveled a lot. They were special times.”

EQUI-PHOTO

Prince’s trainer,WesleyWard. “I’ve got to give all the credit to Alex Solis. This horse can be lazy, and he got into him right-handed and left-handed and split a pair of horses. He made the difference.” Pleasant Prince, bred at Adena Springs South in Williston, took his usual position near the back of the pack early in the 1 1/8-mile Ohio Derby but remained in striking distance throughout. He was in seventh place after Slewzoom led the field through a quarter of a mile in 24 seconds flat and moved up to sixth as Mykindacandy took over the lead and covered a half-mile in 48.16 seconds. Solis sent Pleasant Prince three-wide around the far turn, and the colt steadily made up ground on the leader, getting to fourth place at the top of the lane. He split horses inside the sixteenth pole and got up in the final strides,

The most heartbreaking loss of Pleasant Prince’s career came by a nose, so it was only fitting that the Florida-bred colt’s biggest win came by the same margin in the $100,000 Ohio Derby (G3) July 31. Pleasant Prince’s hard-charging stretch run came up just short against Ice Box in the Florida Derby (G1) at Gulfstream Park in March, but the son of Indy King wound up on the right end of a photo finish at Thistledown. WithAlex Solis aboard for the first time, Pleasant Prince made a bold move to split horses down the stretch and nail Worldly at the wire for his first graded stakes victory. “I got beat by the dirtiest nose in the Florida Derby, so for me, this race was one of the greatest races I’ve ever seen, of course, because I was on the right end of the photo,” said Pleasant

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Impeccably bred, Rey de Café is by sire of champions Kingmambo, out of a stellar female family that includes perennial leading sire Seeking the Gold. Rey de Café won sprinting and routing on both dirt and turf, suggesting his offspring will relish today’s synthetic surfaces.

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PHOTOS BY COOKIE SERLETIC

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Forget true blue. For nearly five decades, Larry Cowan has been Ocala Stud true green and white. By JO ANN GUIDRY

cala Stud broodmare manager Larry Cowan has been working for the historic farm almost as long as it’s been in existence. The oldest active Thoroughbred operation in Florida was established in 1956 and Cowan began working there in 1961. In fact, Cowan, better known by everyone by the nickname “Brother,” can tell you the exact date his nearly 49-year employment began at Ocala Stud. “I rode a Greyhound bus down from Georgia and arrived in Ocala on September 6, 1961,” said Cowan, who was 18 at the time. “On September 9, I started working as a hot walker in the training barn. I’ve been working for Ocala Stud ever since.” Hailing from Warner Robins, Ga., where his parents worked on the air force base there, Cowan didn’t grow up around horses. But his younger brother Ray who was small in stature had somehow made his way down to Florida and was galloping horses at Ocala Stud. “Ray told me that I should come down and work at Ocala Stud,” said Cowan. “I was working in a grocery store and making $18 a week at the time. Ray told me I could make a lot more than that at Ocala Stud. So I thought I’d give it a try.”

O

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LARRY COWEN True Green & White

good fortune to work for the late Joe O’Farrell, who had been part of the nine-man synCowan was larger than Ray and too big dicate that had established Ocala Stud Farm to gallop horses, which was why he started in 1956. The 800-acre property had origias a hot walker and how he got his nick- nally been Dickey Stables and later another name. Because he was smaller, Ray be- parcel was purchased from Carl Rose to excame known by everyone on the farm as pand Ocala Stud to more than 900 acres. “Little Brother” and Cowan became “Big There was even an employee trailer park, Brother.” Over the years and following where Cowan lived for many years, and a Ray’s retirement, Cowan’s nickname got staff kitchen on the farm that then encomshortened to simply “Brother” and has re- passed land that stretched to where the Paddock Mall is today. mained so to this day. The Ocala Stud iconic “I liked working with Joe O’Farrell was green and white barns, as the horses from the first well as the farm sign on day,” recalled Cowan, one of a kind. He Shady Road, still draw the who still comes across could be tough, but he attention of passersby. The as a good ol’ Georgia boy. “And I was making looked after everyone main farm, which was the $45 a week, so I thought heart of the original one, who worked for him. is now 188 acres. There is I was rich.” Cowan also had the He made me feel like also a 120-acre Shady

Cowen now oversees the broodmare operation at Ocala Stud

20 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

part of the family.

—Larry Cowen

Lane broodmare division a half-mile south and a 240-acre Ocala Stud Annex 15 miles north of town. “Joe O’Farrell was one of a kind,” said


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Cowan. “He could be tough, but he looked after everyone who worked for him. He made me feel like part of the family.” Cowan also worked with Rough’n Tumble, the legendary Ocala Stud stallion. After Rough’n Tumble foundered, a swimming pool was built to exercise him and it was Cowan who was in charge of swimming the stallion. In 1972, National Geographic magazine visited Ocala Stud for an article on Rough’n Tumble’s swimming pool, which was the first equine swimming pool built in the Marion County area. In the picture accompanying the article, Cowan was shown swimming a horse. The National Geographic article is one of Cowan’s treasured keepsakes. “Over the years, so many horses have come and gone,” said Cowan, “but I’ll always remember Rough’n Tumble. He was so special that Mr. Joe put down a red carpet at the swimming pool for him to walk on.” During those early years, Cowan remembers “Ocala Stud having 300 mares and taking 90 head to the 2-year-old sales.” It was Joe O’Farrell who began the juvenile sales concept, staging the first official one in 1957 at Hialeah. When O’Farrell loaded up some young horses to take to the first-ever juvenile sale at Fair Grounds in New Orleans, it was Cowan who went with him on the adventure. Also during those early years, Cowan would work in the training, stallion and the broodmare barns. But for the last 30 years,

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LARRY COWEN True Green & White he’s overseen the broodmare operation solely. Between the Ocala Stud broodmares and those of clients, Cowan is responsible for the daily care of on average 100 mares. He’s up at 3am and at the broodmare barn by 4:30am. Of course, breeding and foaling season are hectic and can be exhausting, but there’s also the reward of that new crop of foals. Cowan is now working with the third generation of O’Farrells to be involved with Ocala Stud. When then 18-year-old Cowan first began working at the farm, Mike O’Farrell was but 14. By the time he was 22, the younger O’Farrell was running Ocala Stud with his father. Today Mike O’Farrell’s sons, Joe and David, are actively involved in the farm. Joe is the farm’s accountant and David is the assistant farm manager. When

David began working on the farm in 2003 following graduating from college, it was under Cowan’s watchful eye. “Mike, Joe and David are just great people. They’re like family to me,” said Cowan. “When David came to work on the farm, Mike told me not to give him any slack and I didn’t. David really enjoys the breeding part of the business. The first thing in the morning, we jump in the broodmare truck and go check up on the mares.” Cowan and his wife Shirley, who have been married 38 years, live at the Ocala Stud Annex. They have four children, 10 and counting grandchildren and one great grandson. “I’d like to be able to make it to 50 years working for Ocala Stud,” said Cowan, 67, and then added with a chuckle, “My wife says I bleed green and white.” ■

Cowan is now working with the third generation of O’Farrells to be involved with Ocala Stud. When then 18-year-old Cowan first began working at the farm, Mike O’Farrell was but 14. By the time he was 22, the younger O’Farrell was running Ocala Stud with his father.

22 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010


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(ex•cel•lence) noun the fact or state of excelling; superiority; distinction; possessing good qualities in high degree. For the fourth consecutive year, The Florida Horse magazine was honored as the top equine regional publication in the industry by American Horse Publications. Judges’ comments included: “The Florida Horse meets its mission

with style and class. The publication offers

gorgeous photography and excellent writing. Profiles of industry leaders invite the reader into the Florida horse world.”

Get noticed!

Advertise in The Florida Horse Call to reserve your space today

352.732.8858 The Florida Horse is the official publication of the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association. Publisher: Richard Hancock Editor in chief: Michael Compton Business manager: Patrick Vinzant Managing editor/Advertising manager: Summer Best Art director: John Filer Administrative assistant: Beverly Kalberkamp

www.ftboa.com


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FTBOA The nominating committee of the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders' and Owners' Association selected five individuals as candidates for the 2010 election of the FTBOA Board of Directors. FTBOA Bylaws also provide for the nomination of candidates by member petitions, and two petitions were filed. As a result, the following seven individuals are running for the five director vacancies: Linda Appleton Potter, Bonnie M. Heath, III, Roy Lerman, Gordon Reiss, Bill Steele, Francis Vanlangendock and Charlotte C. Weber. ■ LINDA APPLETON POTTER

(Bridlewood Farm) Appleton-Potter registered 45 Florida-breds in 2009 and again in 2010. Linda Appleton Potter has been a regular visitor to Marion County since her mother’s death in 1998. During the past 12 years she has become more and more involved in the fabric of not only Bridlewood Farm, but also the Ocala community where she has made and cultivated many new friends. Linda , a resident of Hailey, Idaho, is the daughter of Arthur and Martha Appleton, who built Bridlewood Farm in Ocala in 1976. She is a 1973 graduate of Wellesley College and after teaching for a short time, she has devoted almost all of her time to her family and community service. Like her parents she has an innate strong sense of stewardship for the land, horses, and employees of the farm and is

24 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

passionate about her parents’ legacy being perpetuated through the future of Bridlewood and Marion County. She loves the simple raw beauty of the farm, the many good memories past and present, and particularly the challenge of breeding and raising a good racehorse. “My father’s dream was to race or breed classic winners, and now that he has passed away, it is my fervent desire to make that dream come true...over and over again.” Linda was an elected member of the Solana Beach School District Board of Trustees for nearly 16 years, serving 8 of them as president. She sat on the North County Consortium for Special Education which served 13 school districts in San Diego for 15 years. She was also member of the San Diego National Charity League and its president in 1996. Linda taught art as a volunteer in the elementary schools for 11 years. In her hometown of Hailey, Idaho, Linda is a member of the Board of the Sun Valley Center for the Arts for the past 6 years. Linda and her family are involved in the STEPS scholarship program at The College of Central Florida and she is also a member The Appleton Museum of Art Advisory Council (since 2005). In December of 2008, Linda received the Distinguished Service Award from The College of Central Florida.

■ BONNIE M. HEATH, III

(Bonnie Heath Farm) Heath registered two Florida-breds in 2009 and four in 2010. Bonnie M. Heath, III was first introduced to the Thoroughbred industry as a child when his father campaigned Florida-bred Needles in partnership with Jack Dudley in the mid 1950s. Bonnie’s first recollection of the business was attending Hialeah to watch morning workouts. The Heath family lived in Ft. Lauderdale for much of that time and moved to Ocala in the fall of 1956, the same year Needles became the


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Candidate Biographies first Florida-bred to win the Kentucky Derby (G1). Bonnie worked on the farm every summer beginning at age eight. He graduated Ocala High School in 1967 and graduated Oklahoma State University in 1971 with a degree in business administration. Bonnie married his wife, Kim, in 1988. Together, they took over the management of Bonnie Heath Farm in 1991 and turned it into a full service operation, standing stallions, training, selling at auction, boarding and foaling the family horses, as well as those of select clientele. The first foal born at Bonnie Heath Farm after Bonnie and Kim took over was subsequent Horse of the Year and Champion Three-Year-Old Holy Bull. Other top runners bred, raised or trained at Bonnie Heath Farm include Honor Glide, Quick Mischief, A In Solciology, His Honor, Epic Honor, Outstander and Kalu. Bonnie is a past board member of The Centers, the Ocala Farm Ministry and the Marion County Sheriff’s Advisors.

■ ROY S. LERMAN

(Lambholm) Lerman registered 21 Florida-breds in 2009 and 20 in 2010.

NICK FORTUNA PHOTO

Roy S. Lerman, a NewYork native and graduate of Syracuse University with a degree in political science, received his law degree from Georgetown University and practiced law in Washington D.C. for more than 30 years. Lerman’s passion for the Thoroughbred industry reeled him in and he has been an increasingly active participant as an owner, breeder and trainer for more than 40 years. One of Lerman’s greatest accomplishments to date was breeding Breeders’ Cup Classic (G1) winner Alphabet Soup. In 1980, Lerman and his wife of 40 years, Shirley, established the original Lambholm in Middleburg, VA. Looking to expand their operation, the Lermans purchased the late Allen Paulson’s Brookside Farms in Reddick, Florida in 2000, which gave rise

to Lambholm South. Lambholm South outgrew that location, and in 2005, the Lermans purchased Jack Dreyfus’s historic 1,800-acre Hobeau Farm, where Lambholm South is now located. Roy is an avid supporter of the Florida Thoroughbred industry and is involved in every aspect of the business, including horse rescue. Lambholm South is consistently one of the top 10 breeders of Florida-breds, and Roy has also formed a strong partnership with Tampa Bay Downs as one of that track’s main supporters.

■ GORDON REISS

(Ocala Bloodstock) Reiss registered one Florida-bred in both 2009 and 2010. Gordon Reiss, President of Gordon Reiss Insurance LLC, first moved to Ocala in 1985 after graduating from the University of South Florida. He opened Reiss andAssociates Advertising, an Addy-award winning full-service equine advertising agency. In 1988, Reiss became General Manager for Warnerton Farm, quickly acquiring Meadowlake and Stalwart for stallion duties. Meadowlake became a leading first-year juvenile sire with Eclipse Award Champion Meadow Star ($1,445,740) from his first crop. In 1998, Reiss opened Gordon Reiss Insurance LLC, offering a full range of farm property, liability and mortality coverages. Leading companies represented include Travelers, Great American and XL Insurance. During the past year, Reiss supported Florida Thoroughbred horsemen by actively lobbying for legislative support of the Florida Gaming pari-mutuel bill. This included a 1052 signature petition list to House Speaker Larry Cretul and 22 House Representatives asking for a reduction in slot taxes and expanded gaming. On Feb. 23, Reiss organized a meeting sponsored by the Florida Farm Managers Association between local horsemen and

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Board of Directors Candidates Biographies House Representative Bill Galvano (Chairman of the Select Committee on Seminole Indian Compact Review) and House Speaker Cretul prior to the 2010 legislative session.

■ BILL STEELE

(Ridan Lark Farm) Steele registered two Florida-breds in both 2009 and 2010. Bill Steele was born in St Helens, Lancashire, England and grew up as an Air Force Brat, which afforded him a great opportunity to observe racing at many venues and more importantly, gave him a greater understanding of people from all walks of life. At 16, living just outside of Newmarket, England, he tried to convince his father to let him quit school to become a jockey. A wise father and a growth spurt nipped those dreams, but a genuine love of horse racing kept him in the game. A graduate of the University of South Florida, a Florida resident since 1965 and an Air Force veteran, Steele made Marion County his home in 1988. He and his wife, Ellie, reside at their Ridan Lark Farm in Citra where they have a small breeding operation. The Steeles have nine children and 15 grandchildren. Bill served on the Board of Directors for the Florida Thoroughbred Farm Managers for eight years and worked for The Florida Horse magazine and Wire to Wire as an advertising executive for four years. He currently is the owner, publisher and editor of Hold Your Horses Magazine.

■ FRANCIS VANLANGENDONCK

LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTO

(Summerfield) Vanlangendonck registered five Florida-breds in 2009 and seven in 2010. Francis Vanlangendonck was born and raised in Louisiana where he started working with horses after school at the age of 14. While attending LSU he realized that horses were his true passion and thus began a self-education program that took him from New York to California to Kentucky. He learned to ride as an apprentice to the Master of the Hounds in a Richmond, Virginia Hunt Club. Eventually he took a farm manager’s position in Ocala, Florida, and knew he had found a home. Vanlangendonck has owned and managed the same piece of land in Northwest Marion County since 1983. He and his wife, Barbara, oversee Summerfield Sales

26 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

Agency, Inc. which is the largest Thoroughbred sales agency based in Florida and has been one of the largest nationally for over a decade. Summerfield has historically been a leading consignor at all the local yearling and mixed sales. A long time and faithful supporter of the Florida Thoroughbred industry, Francis has been instrumental in bringing quality stallions into the state as well as selling high-priced Florida-breds on a national level. In September of 2009, Summerfield consigned the highest-priced filly at the Keeneland SeptemberYearling Sale for $1.3 million; a Florida-bred for a Florida breeder. Francis has been a member of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s Board of Directors since 1990 and currently serves as its Vice-President.

■ CHARLOTTE C.WEBER

(Live Oak Stud) Weber registered 23 Florida-breds in 2009 and 21 in 2010. Charlotte C. Weber’s Live Oak Stud has been a prominent Florida Thoroughbred operation since 1968 and is a perennial leading Florida breeder. Racing under the name of Live Oak Plantation, the 4,500-acre operation has produced such outstanding racehorses as Floridabred millionaires Solar Splendor and Sultry Song, the 1992 Florida-bred Horse of the Year, 2006 Breeders’ Cup Mile (G1) winner and champion turf male Miesque’s Approval and Florida Derby (G1) Derby winner High Fly. This year she is represented by multiple graded stakes winner Dynaslew. Introduced to horse racing at an early age by family members, Weber was instrumental in acquiring what had previously been the Florida farm of P.A.B. Widener III and expanding it to its current entity. A native of Pennsylvania, Weber studied art and interior design at the Sorbonne in Paris. A member of The Jockey Club in both New York and Kentucky, she also serves as a board trustee to Campbell Soup Company; The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Thoroughbred Owners’ and Breeders’Association; she is also a former board member of the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’Association and is a trustee of the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame.


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Florida-bred Filly Leads OBS Sale By NICK FORTUNA filly by Any Given Saturday capped a strong sale session for Floridabreds by drawing a final bid of $280,000 to lead the OBS August sale of selected yearlings Aug. 24. Also, a Florida-bred filly by Tiznow sold for $105,000 and a pair of Florida-bred colts

A

– one by Congrats and the other by Pomeroy, who stand at Vinery in Summerfield – sold for $100,000 apiece. A colt by Malibu Moon brought the select session’s second-highest price of $135,000. Five horses drew final bids of at least $100,000. There were only three six-figure horses at last

LOUISE REINAGEL PHOTOS

Hip No. 117 topped the Select Session at $280,000.

year’s OBS August selected session. For the session, 131 horses brought a total of $4.71 million, a 29.8 percent increase from last year’s selected session, where 110 head sold for $3.63 million. The average price of $35,981 climbed 9 percent from last year’s mark of $33,023. Median price was $27,000, up from $25,000 last year. Buybacks were down to 27.6 percent Tuesday from 39.9 a year ago. The Any Given Saturday filly, consigned by Beth Bayer as agent, was purchased by Jeff Bonde and Mersad Metanovic. The bay filly, listed as hip No. 117, is named Going Mavericki and is out of the Prized mare Ricki S. The dam is a sister of Grade 1 winner and multimillionaire Brass Hat, and her only other registered foal, Jeannie S, is a winner. The filly was bred by Steve Schrivever. Any Given Saturday’s first foals are yearlings this year. As a 3-year-old in 2007, he won the Haskell Invitational (G1), the Dwyer Stakes (G2) and the Brooklyn Handicap (G2) on his way to $1.08 million in career earnings. The Tiznow filly, bred by Marshall and Suzanne Novak, was consigned by Francis and Barbara Vanlangendonck’s Summerfield Sales Agency and was purchased by The Big Stable. Her sire, a two-time winner of the Breeders’ Cup Classic (G1), earned $6.43 million. The bay filly, listed as hip No. 184, is out of the Proudest Romeo mare Abounding Truth, a winner of $156,869. The Congrats colt, listed as hip No. 10, also was consigned by Summerfield Sales as agent. His sire is North America’s leading first-crop stallion with $412,416 in progeny earnings through Monday. The yearling is out of the Awesome Again mare Cajun Dawn, who also produced graded-stakes-placed Florida-bred Peace At Dawn. The colt, bred by Curtis Mikkelsen and PaTHE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 27


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tricia Horth, was purchased by local pinhooker Nick de Meric as agent for a client he wouldn’t name. De Meric said the client hasn’t decided whether to race the horse or resell him as a 2-year-old. “I’m a fan of the stallion, Congrats,” de Meric said. “I think he’s an up-and-coming young stallion, and his progeny seem to be winning at a variety of tracks, on different surfaces and at different distances, which is often the sign of a good, young stallion. And, of course, A.P. Indy has proven to be a tremendous sire of sires. But more than that, I liked the colt himself. I thought he was a very balanced, athletic colt. He looked precocious, but he also had the look of a horse who will train on. He has everything I was looking for in a yearling purchase. We have high hopes for his future.” The Pomeroy colt, listed as hip No. 38 and consigned by Richard Kent’s Kaizen Sales as agent, sold to Patrice Miller as agent. The yearling’s sire is NorthAmerica’s fifth-leading firstcrop stallion with $211,764 in progeny earnings through Monday.The colt’s main claim to fame, however, is that he’s a half-brother of Floridabred D’ Funnybone, a five-time Grade 2 winner. The yearling and D’ Funnybone are out of the Woodman mare Elbow, a winner of $45,960 in her own right. Harold J. Plumley bred the colt. “He was a really athletic, not overly big horse, but nicely balanced,” Kent said. “I knew Patty really liked him. She bought him for someone to race in the Northeast, and that thrills me. She’s got a very good eye for horses. I always feel better when they give a horse every chance to be a top-class racehorse.” The Malibu Moon colt, listed as hip No. 193, was consigned by Legacy Bloodstock as agent and purchased by de Meric as agent. She’s out of the Unbridled’s Song mareAmbition Unbridled, a stakes winner who banked 278,286. The colt was bred by CloverLeaf Farms II. A Florida-bred colt by Mass Media sold for $50,000 to top the first open session of

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were happy – we thought that was a good price.” The Congrats filly, hip No. 244, is out of the winning West by West mare Chelsea Rose, and both of the dam’s foals of racing age are winners. Congrats stands at Vinery in Summerfield, and is North America’s leading firstcrop stallion. The filly was bred by Alan Pesch and (from left) Mersad Metanovic, Phil Lebherz, trainer Jeff Bonde SecondWind Racing, LLC. and Susan Montanye The Friends Lake colt, the OBS August sale of yearlings Wednes- bred by Brereton Jones, is out of the Torrenday, highlighting a second straight day of tial mare Miss Shower, a winner at ages 3 and 4 and an earner of $41,714. The dam has prosignificant gains. Also Wednesday, a Florida-bred filly by duced two other runners, both winners. Congrats sold for $47,000 to Paul Sharp, a Friends Lake, the winner of the 2004 Florida colt by Friends Lake went to Tony Bowling Derby (G1), earned $696,400. The Sunriver filly, hip No. 367, is out of of All In Sales for $44,000, and a filly by Sunriver went to trainer Wesley Ward as agent for the winning Capote mare Flylightly. That $42,000. Both fillies were consigned by Beth broodmare has sent six runners to the track, Bayer as agent, and the Friends Lake colt was all winners, including the stakes-placed Eluconsigned by Chapman Farm. Also bringing sive Air. The filly was bred by Hidden Point $42,000 was a With Distinction colt, who Farm Inc. The Florida-bred With Distinction colt, went to Riley James. For the session, 243 head sold for $2.33 bred by Harold J. Plumley, is out of the West million, a 65 percent increase over the corre- by West mare Dance For the Green, from the sponding session last year, when 190 year- family of graded stakes winner Brooke’s lings brought $1.41 Halo. With Distinction, a son of Storm Cat million. The average and a leading first crop sire, stands at Hartprice of $9,582 ley/De Renzo Thoroughbreds. Hip No. 727, Sing a New Song, a filly by climbed 29 percent from last year’s average Congrats consigned by Perrone Sales, Ltd., Agent, went to H.H.T.S. for $64,000 to top of $7,423. The Mass Media the second and final open session of the colt, listed as hip No. Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s 2010 Au300, was consigned by gust Yearling Sale. The bay filly is out of Sharon Biamonte as agent and purchased by stakes placed Singsingasong, by Sultry Song. A Florida-bred Trippi filly sold for Sarah McCord. Mass Media stands at Jour$50,000 to bring the second-highest price of neyman Stud in Ocala, Hip No. 300 is out of the winning Defrere the day. The Trippi filly, listed as hip No. 645, was mare Defrills. The colt was also bred by Biaconsigned by Sue Vacek as agent and purmonte in partnership with Al Milano. “We thought that he was an athletic indi- chased by Riley James. She’s out of the Formal vidual and a really good mover, and he’s from Dinner mare Pyrite Bonds, who won the Ohio a speedy family,” Biamonte said of the dark Debutante Handicap and earned $89,875. This bay or brown yearling. “He’s a pretty horse. We is the dam’s only registered foal. ■

Florida-breds led the way at a strong renewal of the OBS August Yearling Sale

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Calder Serves Up an Awesome Feather, Gourmet Dinner win second legs of the Florida Stallion Stakes series By NICK FORTUNA wesome Feather and Gourmet Dinner remained undefeated after capturing divisions of the Florida Stallion Stakes on Aug. 28, as Floridabreds swept the six stakes races that made up Calder Casino and Race Course’s Juvenile Showcase. Awesome Feather, a homebred for Fred Brei of Jacks or Better Farm, improved to 4-for-4 by cruising to a four-length victory in the $100,000 Susan’s Girl division of the FSS. Gourmet Dinner, bred by Ocala Stud Farm and owner William J. Terrill of Our Sugar Bear Stable, stayed unbeaten in three career starts, taking the $100,000 Affirmed division by 2½ lengths. Awesome Feather can become the first filly to sweep her division of the FSS since Aclassysassylassy in 2004 by winning the final leg of the three-race series, the $375,000 My Dear Girl division going 1 1/16 miles Oct. 16. Gourmet Dinner can

JIM LISA PHOTOS

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become the third colt in as many years to sweep his division by winning the $375,000 In Reality division at the same distance that day, joining Florida-breds Big Drama in 2008 and Jackson Bend last year. Awesome Feather, a daughter of Awesome of Course, has the same connections as Jackson Bend – owner/breeder Brei, trainer Stanley Gold and jockey Jeffrey Sanchez. She raced in second place early in the seven-furlong Susan’s Girl as Florida Cristal Jak took the field through a quarter-mile in 22.74 seconds and a half in 46.06. Awesome Feather engaged Cristal Jak at the quarter pole and drew off, stopping the clock in 1:24.57. “This filly impresses me more and more each time I ride her,” Sanchez said. “She did it all on her own. I was just along for the ride. That’s the great thing about her – she’s so easy to ride. I let her move up close to the filly on the lead just

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to keep my filly in position, and then she just did the rest herself.” Awesome Feather has won her four starts by a combined 15 lengths. She rallied to win the $100,000 J J’s Dream Stakes by half a length after a troubled trip in July and came back to take the opening leg of the FSS, the $75,000 Desert Vixen division, by 4 ¾ lengths Aug. 7. She’s earned $196,235. Brei said Awesome Feather likely will run in the final leg of the FSS before being pointed toward the $2 million Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies (G1) at Churchill Downs on Nov. 5. Cristal Jak, a daughter of Drewman bred by Ocala’s HelenY. Painter, finished second in her stakes debut. She had won a $40,000 maiden claimer by seven lengths in her third career start Aug. 12. Florida-bred Silverest, a daughter of Vinery stallion Congrats and a homebred for Jupiter’s David and Teresa Palmer, was third in the Susan’s Girl. In the Affirmed, Gourmet Dinner raced fourth place early as Florida-bred Rough’n Royal took the field through fractions of 22.35 seconds and 45.29. Gourmet Dinner and jockey Sebastian Madrid fanned out three-wide around the turn to find running room, caught Rough’n Royal inside the sixteenth pole and drew clear, finishing the seven furlongs in 1:25.69. “This horse can really run, and he’s going to be even tougher to beat when he goes two turns next time out,” Madrid said. “He just takes a while to get himself going, but when he does, he fires in a big way.” Gourmet Dinner, a son of Trippi, rallied to win the first leg of the FSS, the $75,000 Dr. Fager division, by a half-length Aug. 7. He’s earned $137,390. Rough’n Royal, a son of Vinery stallion Pomeroy bred by Flying H Enterprises, finished second. He had wired a $36,000 maiden special weight race by 13 ¾


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‘Awesome Dinner’ lengths in his second career start Aug. 13. Vee’s Accolade, a son of Proud Accolade bred by Venice’s Martha Magliacane, finished third in the Affirmed. IN OTHER STAKES ACTION AT THE JUVENILE SHOWCASE:

Blue Eyed Sweetie romped to a 6 ¼length victory in the $100,000 Lindsay Frolic Stakes, finishing the one-mile test in 1:40.96 with Manoel Cruz aboard. The filly is a homebred for Gilbert Campbell of Stonehedge Farm South in Williston and a daughter of Stonehedge stallion West Acre. Blue Eyed Sweetie, trained by Kathleen O’Connell, has won two of her four starts and earned $109,050. She finished third behind Awesome Feather in the J J’s Dream and second to that rival in the Desert Vixen. “I could’ve let her go to the lead at any time,” Cruz said. “Halfway down the backstretch I could tell the pace was too slow, and I gave her her head, and from then on she just powered home. I was easing her up coming to the wire.” Ayoumilove rallied to win the $90,000 Catcharisingstar Stakes by 1 ½

lengths, finishing the five-furlong turf race in 57.15 seconds with Luis Saez aboard. The daughter of Gibson County, bred by Reddick’s Mike and Beth Smith, is owned by trainer Jose Pinchin. Ayoumilove won a $41,000 maiden special weight race and a $32,500 allowance, both at Calder in July. She’s won three of her five starts and earned $112,367. “This filly showed speed running on the main track, but she was doing better just

aboard. The son of Drewman was bred by Micanopy’s Steve Tucker and slipped through the cracks at the OBS April sale of 2-year-olds in training, selling for only $1,000. Too Experience, trained by Mark Passley for Move Horse Inc., won a $16,000 maiden claimer and a $25,000 claimer by a combined 5 ½ lengths to start his career. He’s earned $80,160. “This horse has a lot of class,” Chirinos

This horse can really run, and he’s going to be even “ tougher to beat when he goes two turns next time out. He just takes a while to get himself going, but when he does, he fires in a big way. —Jockey Sebastian Madrid on Gourmet Dinner

sitting back and making one big run in the stretch. I think turf is going to be the best thing for her and even better when she runs longer races.” Too Experience improved to 3-for-3 by rallying to win the $83,000 Seacliff Stakes by three-quarters of a length over Andersonstate, stopping the clock for the one mile in 1:41.40 with Roimes Chirinos

Florida-bred Gourmet Dinner

said. “He’s very professional, and he knows how to win. He’s won all three of his races so far, and I think he will keep on maturing and improving with the distance.” Machisa scored a huge upset by wiring the $70,000 Fasig Tipton Turf Dash by 5 ¼ lengths. The son of Safado, a homebred for Richard G. Rowan, who shares ownership of the horse with Mary L. Bonham, finished the five-furlong race in 56.51 seconds with Madrid aboard. Machisa, trained by Juan D. Arias, entered the race off a win in a $32,000 maiden claimer at Calder on July 1. He’s won two of his five starts and earned $45,090. “He just barely got up in time to break his maiden last time out, and he didn’t really beat much of a tough field either,” Madrid said. “Mr. Rowan and Juan Arias told me they were going to run him on the turf and he would be even better. I have to give both of them all the credit because he didn’t just win, he did it impressively. He broke so sharp, and his acceleration was much improved over last time.” ■

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From coast to coast, Florida’s tax-friendly, pro-business environment is poised and ready to attract new companies and create new employment opportunities. “Florida Once Again Named a Top State for Business…” The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council ranks Florida’s state tax system among the nation’s Top 10 on its “Business Tax Index 2010: Best to Worst State Tax Systems for Entrepreneurship and Small Business.” The index ranks the 50 states and District of Columbia according to the costs of their tax systems for entrepreneurship and small business. Florida ranks sixth for the best business tax system, when compared to all 50 states.

ELEANOR HANCOCK PHOTO

Florida’s recent legislative changes now allow for improved racing structures, higher breeders’ awards, more lucrative purses at racetracks, and the excitement of live racing in Ocala/Marion County – Horse Capital of the World ®.

• No personal state income tax. • No individual capital gains tax. • Ranked third in the U.S. for number of horses and size of horse industry. • National leader in veterinary and equine research. • Horses are exempt from sales tax when purchased from their original breeder. • Feed and animal health items, along with other specific items, are also exempt. • Florida’s greenbelt exemption provides property tax breaks for Florida horse farms. • No tax on stallion seasons. • Physical climate allows for year-round training, racing, showing and business opportunities.


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Double the

DRAMA By JO ANN GUIDRY

or Harold Queen, it was a milestone day that many in theThoroughbred business dream about but few are fortunate enough to experience. The dream became a reality for Queen when homebred half-brothers Big Drama and Little Drama each won a stakes race on July 10 at Calder Race Course. Little Drama got the festivities started when he broke his maiden by winning the Frank

F

“It was just a great, great day all the way around,” said Queen, 74, who happily made those two trips to the winner’s circle. “Those are the kind of days that we breeders and owners work so hard for and dream about.” Of course, Big Drama has been delivering plenty of excitement for Queen since he broke his maiden. In 2008, he swept all three races – Dr. Fager Stakes,Affirmed Stakes and In Reality Stakes – of the open division of the Florida

reer earnings of $1,509,560. “From the time Big Drama was an hour old, I knew this was one I wanted to keep,” said Queen, whose 82-acre Hal Queen Farm is based at Nelson Jones Farms and Training Center in Ocala. “And I felt the same way about Little Drama. But they are physically different horses and have different attitudes.” Big Drama is a compact dark bay colt with but a thin white stripe down his face. Little Drama is a rangy bright chestnut with a splashy white blaze. Queen describes Big Drama as “a pure sprinter with a laid-back attitude,” while Little Drama is “bred to go a distance and is a bit more aggressive.” Queen, who has been an owner, breeder and trainer for nearly five decades, bought Riveting Drama, the dam of Big Drama and Little Drama, for $36,000 at the 1996 Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s March juvenile sale.

Florida-breds Big Drama (above) and Little Drama

Gomez Memorial Stakes by nine and a half lengths. It was only the second start for the 2year-old chestnut colt by Burning Roma. Then about 90 minutes later, older brother Big Drama grabbed his share of the spotlight with a handy win in the Smile Sprint Handicap (G2). Big Drama, a 4-year-old colt by Montbrook, qualified for the Breeders’ Cup championship day with the Smile Sprint Handicap win. And it gets even better. Not only does Queen still own the Florida-bred duo’s dam, the multiple stakes producing Notebook mare Riveting Drama, but he also owns Little Drama’s sire, Burning Roma. Queen raced Grade I millionaire Burning Roma and now stands him at Jim and Shelia DiMare’s Rising Hill Farm in Ocala. 34 THE FLORIDA HORSE • JSEPTEMBER 2010

JIM LISA PHOTOS

Veteran Ocala Thoroughbred horseman Harold Queen records milestone day with

Stallion Stakes at Calder Race Course. To date, Big Drama is one of only seven colts who have accomplished that feat in the 29-year-old history of the FSS: Smile (1984), Naked Greed (1991), Seacliff (1995), Express Tour (2000), Sir Oscar (2003) and Jackson Bend (2009). After sweeping the FSS, Big Drama notched his first graded stakes win when he captured the Boyd Gaming’s Delta Jackpot Stakes (G3). Trained by David Fawkes, Big Drama also won the 2009 Red Legend Stakes while finishing second in both the West Virginia Derby (G2) and Swale Stakes (G2). This season prior to his Smile Sprint Handicap win, he’d won the Ponche Handicap and posted a second in the Alfred G. Vanderbilt Handicap (G1). To date, Big Drama has ca-

Plagued by recurrent bucked shins, Riveting Drama was unraced but quickly earned her keep as a broodmare. In addition to Big Drama and Little Drama, she has also produced stakes winner Drama’s Way, by Farma Way, and stakes-placed Coffee Can, by Kissin Kris. Riveting Drama, who is currently not in foal, produced fillies by Burning Roma in both 2009 and 2010. CLYDESDALES TO THOROUGHBREDS

Queen’s earliest memories of the racetrack actually involve Clydesdales. “I grew up on a farm in New Jersey,” said Queen. “My father had Clydesdales as work horses on the farm. But he also used them to pull the starting gate at Garden State Park and that’s one of my most vivid memories. I was about five years old and I remember standing next to those big horses’ legs and feeling so small.” Queen claimed his first racehorse, Blue Tattoo, in 1963. Thirty days later, he won his first race as an owner with Blue Tattoo on July 20.


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“I remember that date because it’s also the day my daughter Shari was born,” he said. “So we had a lot to celebrate that day.” Not long after that, Queen and wife Jean moved the family to Lodi,Ohio, where he bought a farm, began breeding Thoroughbreds and got his trainer’s license. Gasmegas, who won the 1965 Ascot Gold Cup, became his first stakes winner as an owner/trainer. While based in Ohio, Queen began what is now a long list of stakes winners that he bred and/or raced. Included among that number are stakes winners I Jean E (first stakes winner bred by Queen), Stevie’s Queen, Glencreek, Inside Affair, Learn by Heart, Song of Ambition and Burning Roma. While still living in Ohio, Queen often raced in Florida and began to buy Floridabreds to add to his stable. The first Floridabred that he purchased was Inside Affair,

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Harold Queen with Little Drama

homebreds Big Drama and Little Drama. buying her for $30,000 at the 1997 OBSC March juvenile sale. By Black Tie Affair (Ire) out of the Slew o’Gold mare Inside Line, Inside Affair went on to win seven stakes, including the 1999 Marlboro Handicap at Laurel, and earned $431,392. At the 1999 OBSC August yearling sale, Queen paid $90,000 for a Rubiano out of While Rome Burns, by Overskate colt. Entered in the 2000 Fasig-Tipton Florida February 2-year-olds in training sale at Calder, the colt was a $40,000 buy-back by Queen. It proved to be a prudent decision. Named Burning Roma, the colt went on to win 12 stakes and be stakes-placed 12 times in 36 starts to earn $1,500,200. Among his stake victories were the Futurity Stakes (G1), Meadowlands Cup Handicap (G2) and Red Bank Handicap (G3). “I wasn’t even looking for another horse when I bought Burning Roma,” said Queen. “I was just walking around the sales ground at OBS and saw him being shown to someone else. I thought he was a beautiful colt and I fell in love with him right there. I thought I’d go to $50,000 and stop, but I kept going. Of course, now I’m glad I did. We had a lot of

fun racing him and now we’re enjoying watching his first babies run.” FLORIDA SUNSHINE

In 2003, Queen moved his operation to Ocala and settled in on the 400-plus acre Nelson Jones Farms and Training Center, which is located on what was previously the late legendary Florida horseman Fred Hooper’s farm. Officially known as Hal Queen Farm, the 82acre operation includes a 24-stall training barn located adjacent to the communal mile track with a seven-furlong turf course. “Our training barn is one of the original Hooper barns and it’s a great solid concrete block barn that we renovated,” said Queen. “We stay full with half being my horses and the other being horses belonging to longtime clients and friends of mine.” The farm is also home to Queen’s nine broodmares, including the latest addition of Perf. By Burning Roma out of the deceased Marquetry mare Hermoine, the 4-year-old old filly won the 2010 Minaret Stakes at Tampa Bay Downs. She also won the 2009 Autumn Leaves Stakes at Mountaineer Park and retired with earnings of $189,328. Perf is in foal to Put It Back.

At the racetrack, Queen has 11 horses spread out among four different trainers at four different tracks. In addition to Calder, he has horses with trainers at Monmouth Park, Presque Isle Downs and Mountaineer Park. “I believe you have to put horses at racetracks where they can win,” said Queen. “It just doesn’t seem like good business to me to do anything else.” Two 3-year-old geldings that Queen is excited about are Capitol Appeal and Dixie Loe, both co-owned with Gene Gilmore and trained by Gerald S. Bennett. Capitol Appeal, by SuccessfulAppeal out of Jill Robin L, by Precocity, was third in the Ohio Derby (G3) and has to date earned $66,890. Dixie Loe, by Dixie Union out of the Gone West mare Currane, has to date banked $56,000. Both CapitolAppeal and Dixie Loe were bought at the 2008 Keeneland yearling sale for $90,000 and $100,000, respectively. “When you see your horses do well at the racetrack, it makes all the hard work worthwhile,” said Queen. “I still get excited when we win races and as long as I do, I’ll be in the business.You never know when the next great day is going to be.” Or the next good drama. ■ THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 35


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The 2011 Florida Horse

Time to Act! Stallion Register Call in today to make sure your stallion is not left out!

352.732.8858


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Visit www.ftboa.com TWO-PAGE FORMAT

Write up of stallionʼs accomplishments on the racetrack and at stud STALLION WRITE-UP

PUT IT BACK

1998 Dark Bay or Brown - Height 16.1 - Dosage Profile: 9-3-4-0-0; DI: 7.00; CD: +1.31 Intentionally In Reality My Dear Girl Relaunch The Axe II Foggy Note Silver Song Honour and Glory (1993) Lyphard Al Nasr (FR) Caretta (IRE) Fair to All Francis S. Gonfalon Grand Splendor Put It Back

Bold Ruler What a Pleasure Grey Flight Exuberant

FIVE-CROSS PEDIGREE

Beau Purple Out in the Cold Articana Miss Shoplifter (1991) Swaps No Robbery Bimlette Articulate Robbery Speak John Art Talk Tattooed Miss

RACE AND (STAKES) RECORD Age

Starts

1st

2nd

3rd

2 3

2 5 7

0 5(2) 5(2)

1 0 1

1 0 1

Earnings

$12,710 220,185 $232,895

At 3, WON Riva Ridge S.-G2 at Belmont Park (7 fur.), Best Turn S.-L at Aqueduct (6 fur., by 5 1/2 lengths), an allowance race at Belmont Park (7 fur., equal top weight of 122 lbs., by 5 1/4 lengths), an allowance race at Aqueduct (7 fur.), a maiden special weight race at Aqueduct (6 fur., by 7 1/4 lengths).

IN THE STUD PUT IT BACK entered stud in 2002.

CROP ANALYSIS YR

FLS

03 04 05 06 07

34 92 84 79 34 323

RNRS WNRS

SWS

31 78 75 65 15 264

4 10 6 2

28 62 61 46 5 202

$ CROP AVG EARNINGS PER RNR

3,733,828 120,446 3,250,154 41,669 2,378,879 31,718 1,865,892 28,706 124,607 8,307 22 11,353,360 43,005

through Nov. 29, 2009

PUT IT BACK HAS SIRED REQUEBRA (2004 f., dam by Lode). 7 wins, 2 to 5 in Brazil, champion sprinter, champion older mare, Grande Premio Major Suckow-G1, Grande Premio Onze de Julho-G2, Grande Premio Cordeiro da Graca-G2, Grande Premio Associacao de Criadores e Proprietarios de Cavalos de Corrida do Rio de Janeiro-G3, etc. SKYPILOT (2005 c., Tokatee). 4 wins at 2 in Brazil, champion 2-year-old colt, Grande Premio Juliano MartinsG1, Grande Premio Presidente Jose de Souza QueirozG2, Presidente Herculano de Freitas, 2nd Grande Premio Ipiranga-Brazilian Two Thousand Guineas-G1. NITIDO (2004 c., Roi Normand). 3 wins to 3 in Brazil, champion 2-year-old colt, Grande Premio Juliano MartinsG1, 3rd Grande Premio ABCPCC Matias Machline-G1. BLACK BAR SPIN (2003 c., Dixieland Band). 5 wins, 2 to 4, placed at 6, 2009, in Japan, CBC Sho H.-G3, 2nd Capital S., Perseus S., 3rd Hakodate Sprint S.-G3, etc. IN SUMMATION (2003 c., Dayjur). 12 wins, 2 to 6, 2009, $1,237,286, Bing Crosby H.-G1-ntr, 6 fur. in 1:11 , Palos Verdes H.-G2-ntr, 6 fur. in 1:06 3/5, El Conejo H.G3-ntr, 5 1/2 fur. in 1:01 1/5, El Conejo H.-G3, etc. 2010 Fee: $7,000 Live Foal Payable when foal stands and nurses

SMOKEY STOVER (2003 c., Jolie's Halo). 8 wins at 3 and 4, $568,725, Potrero Grande Breeders' Cup H.-G2, Bay Meadows Breeders' Cup Sprint H.-G3, etc. HIGH RESOLVE (2005 f., On to Glory). 7 wins, 2 to 4, 2009, $448,270, Hill 'n' Dale Sunshine Millions Filly & Mare Sprint S.-LR, Joe O'Farrell Juvenile Fillies S.-LR, etc. RICOCO (2004 c., Bright Again). 2 wins at 2 in Brazil, Grande Premio Presidente Augusto de Souza QueirozG3; 6 wins at 4 and 5, 2009, in Singapore, 2nd Queen Elizabeth II Cup-G2, Chairman's Trophy-G3. JESSICA IS BACK (2004 f., Jolie's Halo). 9 wins, 2 to 5, 2009, $382,085, Nancy's Glitter H., 2nd Elmer Heubeck Distaff H.-LR, U Can Do It H. HEY BYRN (2005 c., Skip Trial). 5 wins, 2 to 4, 2009, $317,600, Holy Bull S.-G3, 2nd Florida Stallion/ Affirmed S.-LR, 3rd Sumter S. BACKBACKBACKGONE (2006 c., Defrere). 5 wins at 2 and 3, 2009, $209,670, Jack Goodman S.-L, Willard L. Proctor Memorial S.-L, Golden Bear S.-L, Harry Henson S. OUR FRIEND HARVEY (2004 c., Out of Place). 4 wins, 2 to 5, 2009, $200,472, Lure S., Wolf Hill S., 2nd John McSorley S., 3rd Turf Dash S. PUT AWAY THE HALO (2003 f., Jolie's Halo). 9 wins, 2 to 5, $186,952, Pleasant Temper S. SECRETSOFTHEHEART (2004 f., Cutlass). 3 wins at 2 and 3, $166,270, Joe O'Farrell Juvenile Fillies S.-LR, 3rd Three Ring S.-L. PUT BACK THE SHU (2003 c., Katowice). 5 wins at 3 and 4, $151,692, Bergen County S., 2nd Select S., Great Falls S., Florida Thoroughbred Charities S.-R. DASH DOT DASH (2006 f., Jolie's Halo). 3 wins at 2, placed at 3, 2009, $129,422, Black Swan S., Bustles and Bows S., 2nd Chandler S., 3rd Flawlessly S.-L, Scottsdale H. RISING FEVER (BRZ) (2004 f., Tokatee). 6 wins at 3 and 4 in Brazil, Grande Premio Immensity-G2, Grande Premio Presidente Roberto Alves de Almeida-G2, Presidente Luiz Nazareno T. de Assumpcao; winner at 5, 2009, $65,064, in N.A., Manatee S., 2nd Minaret S., What a Summer S. PIRATE SAINT (2004 c., Saint Ballado). 7 wins, 2 to 4, placed at 5, 2009, $118,781, Shecky Greene S., 2nd Awad S., 3rd Come Summer S. SOL DE ANGRA (2005 c., Roi Normand). 4 wins in 6 starts, 2 to 4 in Brazil, Grande Premio Major SuckowG1, 3rd Grande Premio ABCPCC Velocidade-G3. RUBIA DEL RIO (2004 f., Falcon Jet (BRZ)). 3 wins at 3 in Brazil, Grande Premio Henrique Possolo-G1, Roger Guedon-G3, 2nd Imprensa-Taca Jose Carlos Araujo, etc.

BRIDLEWOOD FARM

Inquiries to: George G. Isaacs 8318 N.W. 90th Terrace, Ocala, Florida 34482 (352) 622-5319 • FAX (352) 622-2069 e-mail: bridlewood@att.net website: www.bridlewoodfarm.com

FOUR-CROSS PEDIGREE

MALE LINE PUT IT BACK is by HONOUR AND GLORY, stakes winner of $1,202,942, Metropolitan H.-G1, San Rafael S.G2, etc. Sire of 57 stakes winners, including-CARESSING. 5 wins at 2 and 3, $955,998, champion 2year-old filly, Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies-G1, Singapore Plate S.-G3, La Troienne S.-G3, etc. INDIO GLORIOSO. 3 wins at 2 and 3 in Argentina, champion 3-year-old colt, Jockey Club-G1, Dos Mil Guineas-G1, 2nd Polla de Potrillos-Argentine Two Thousand Guineas-G1, 3rd Estrellas Juvenile-G1. MACH GLORY (ARG). 2 wins at 2 in Argentina, champion 2-year-old colt, Estrellas Juvenile-G1, etc. WINNING LIMIT. 8 wins, 2 to 5, 2009, in Mexico, champion imported 2-year-old colt, VI Campeonato Juvenile, etc. ALL GLORY. 9 wins, 2 to 4 in Chile, champion older mare, Carlos Allende Navarro-G2, Constancio Silva Mandiola, 2nd Haras de Chile Mauricio Serrano Palma-G1, etc.

FEMALE LINE 1st dam MISS SHOPLIFTER, by Exuberant. 3 wins at 3 and 5, $102,540. Dam of 5 foals to race, 4 winners, including-PUT IT BACK. Subject stallion. Broodmare Sire EXUBERANT, 1976. Sire of 164 dams of 709 foals, 509 rnrs (72%), 347 wnrs (49%), 86 2yo wnrs (12%), 1.04 AEI, 1.28 CI, 27 stakes winners. 2nd dam ARTICULATE ROBBERY, by No Robbery. 6 wins at 3 and 4, $69,986, Seashore S., Straight Deal S.-R, etc. Halfsister to ELOQUENT MINISTER (hwt. filly at 3 on Irish Hand., 5 - 7 fur.), LUXURIANT MAN, Pictorial, Painters Palette, Artful Minister. Dam of-THE TENDER TRACK (g. by Topsider). 5 wins to 5 in France, Prix du Point du Jour, etc.; placed at 5 in Germany, 3rd Grosser Preis der Dortmunder WirtschaftG3; 6 wins, $430,202, in N.A., Inglewood H.-G2, etc. TOPSY ROBSY (g. by Topsider). 10 wins, 3 to 8, $351,674, Queens County H.-G3. Miswaki Bandit (c. by Miswaki). 5 wins, 3 to 5, $153,729, 3rd Presidents S. Sire. Butterbean. Unraced. Dam of EMAILIT (c. by Timeless Native, $431,104, Leland Stanford S.-L, etc., sire), Kaptnwice (g. by Katowice, $21,920). Granddam of STEW’S STONE (g. by Distinctive Cat, $154,125). Property of: A Partnership

Nominated to: Florida Stallion S., Breeders' Cup

Abbreviated race record and performance at stude of the sire of the advertised stallion SIRE FAMILY

A specially edited catalog-style pedigree of the female family of the advertised stallion FEMALE FAMILY

SINGLE-PAGE FORMAT

Published by

Entry deadline is October 4, 2010


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Singin’ Summer Best/COOKIE SERLETIC PHOTO

In the Rain t was raining. The sun was up but still very low in the sky, and although a double rainbow promised a beautiful day, it was really raining. Beverly and I stood inside the glass doors at the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company with our arms full of the morning’s news – custom data our team publishes chiefly for distribution at OBS and each local Thoroughbred sale. We make these rounds every morning during OBS auctions, but this particular weather caused us to take a tiny pause. “Well,” I finally said, tightening the laces on my mud boots. “It’s all about making memories.” We put on our hats, zipped up rain coats, tucked papers inside waterproof bags and jackets, and trekked into the downpour. There are 30 shed rows on the OBS grounds. Beverly volunteered to visit barns to the north and northeast; I did the same for the south and southeast. At each barn and with each consignor, we delivered complimentary issues of the daily WiretoWire.net to every buyer, manager, owner, groom and affiliate. And the rain kept coming. Our clothes were soaked. Our shoes squeaked. We ended up with bizarre hairdos. Yet despite the soggy weather, life in the barns carried on with a beautiful, nearperfect rhythm. Yearlings got baths, stalls got cleaned, manes got pulled. Workers carefully raked shed rows and spruced up tack room areas. In fact, perhaps thanks to the overall positive returns at the August sale, folks walked with a spring in their step and especially high spirits and optimism. The very next day, I rented a DVD of the 1952 musical, Singin’ in the Rain, if only to review the famous scene where Gene Kelly sings and dances through puddles on the sidewalk, in the street and in gutters. There’s a line I particularly enjoy: “Come on with the rain, there’s a smile on my face!” No kidding. You get the parallel. As we continue to trudge through a debilitating recession, battle innumerous issues and fight to stay above water, I’m going to sing in the rain. Maybe we can’t walk on sunshine every day, but we can take care of business wearing raincoats and donning umbrellas. We can smile and we can sing. And we will persevere.

I

It’s a privilege to journey with you. Summer Best P.S. My colleague Beverly Kalberkamp is the administrative assistant for Florida Equine Publications…and one of the most dedicated, wonderful people you’ll ever meet. Thank you, Beverly, for taking care of us and our family of magazines.

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Many horse owners are in the habit of deworming “religiously” on a set schedule. Unfortunately, most are unaware that this routine is based on out-dated recommendations, and can actually end up causing harm to the very horses they are trying to protect.

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Effective Parasite Control Demands a Different Approach By CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

here is a huge difference between treating horses with deworming products and having an effective parasite control program. Parasite resistance to anthelmintic (deworming) drugs is a serious issue, and new protocols are desperately needed. “You don’t treat a horse with antibiotics unless he’s sick, so it stands to reason we should approach deworming the same way and only use deworming products on an individual basis when a horse needs it,” says Faith Hughes, DVM, DACVS, who has been with Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital in Ocala since 1991. “Just as we’ve had antibiotic resistance, we are seeing resistance to deworming products. We have to change the way we’re thinking so we don’t return to a time like the 1940s when parasites were a major killer of horses,” Hughes says. “Most clients are still not aware of parasite resistance. When you talk to them about this, it makes them nervous to think about changing their practices, which have become very ingrained. But the long-term risks are much greater if we don’t change our practices.” Hughes mentions that some farms in the Ocala area are currently experiencing fairly high resistance problems.

T

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as macrocyclic lactones). With just three chemical classes available to do battle against the entire array of parasites, resistance is a real problem. Currently, the benzimidazoles have the most widespread resistance. Contrary to popular opinion, resistance doesn’t just develop from using the same product too often. It can CHANGING TIMES also occur when dewormers are given more often than The old protocol of deworming every two months, necessary. “Some very rare, individual worms have an innate which many people still follow, started 40 to 50 years ago and was based on cpmpletely different parasite capacity through different biochemical mechanisms, etc., to survive treatment with various anthelmintics,” problems than we currently face. “The strict adherence to outdated approaches has Reinemeyer says. “This trait is passed on genetically, produced a mentality of fear. Horse owners deworm fre- and it would remain rare unless those individuals enquently because they think they have to, and because joyed some type of advantage over the rest of the poputhey fear what might happen if they do not,” says Ray M. lation. After a dewormer is administered, all the Kaplan, DVM, PhD, DEVPC, Professor of Parasitology, susceptible worms die off. They won’t begin to reproDepartment of Infectious Diseases in the College of Vet- duce and lay eggs for anywhere from four to 12 weeks after dosing. erinary Medicine at the University of Georgia. “In the interim, the resistant individuals, which were “The true objective of a worm control program is to optimize the health of horses — NOT to kill all worms,” not killed, are able to reproduce in the absence of comexplains Kaplan. “Small numbers of small strongyle petition. Thus, the frequency of their genes increases worms cause little harm, and treating low-level infec- slowly but surely in the population. When the same tions can actually cause more harm to the horse than not drugs are used exclusively, or when treatments are adtreating. With this in mind, the real goal of the worm ministered with excessive frequency, the resistant worms control program for horses is preventing contamination are the only ones in the whole population that can still of the environment with the eggs of the target parasites. reproduce, so these two practices accelerate the rate of For small strongyles, the direct source of infection is lar- resistance development.” Reinemeyer explains that once the resistant worms vae on pasture, and those larvae develop from eggs demake up a significant part of the population, drugs aren’t posited by grazing horses.” “One of the biggest challenges is that we are down to effective in treating them. Rotating between different deworming products can three basic chemical classes of deworming products,” notes Craig Reinemeyer, DVM, PhD, president of East hide clinical effects caused by parasites when you are using an effective product, in The true objective of a worm control program is to optimize the health of conjunction with one that is ineffective. The responsible horses — NOT to kill all worms. Small numbers of small strongyle worms horse owner who has been cause little harm and treating low level infections can actually cause more deworming regularly can harm to the horse than not treating. —Dr. Ray Kaplan have a false sense of security. His/her horse may actuTennessee Clinical Research in Knoxville. Reinemeyer ally be at risk of serious parasite problems if the drugs earned his DVM and PhD in veterinary parasitology from used weren’t effective. Ohio State University, and he taught at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine from 1984 to FECAL EGG COUNT TESTING 1998. There are simple ways to determine if a deworming The three classes of deworming drugs are: 1) benz- product is doing its job, and when you need to treat imidazoles (fenbendazole – Safeguard®, Panacur®, ox- your horse. ibendazole – Anthelcide EQ®); 2) tetrahydropyrimidines Fecal egg counts (FEC) and fecal egg count reduc(pyrantel salts – Strongid®, others); and 3) aver- tion tests (FECRT) help determine if your horse needs to mectin/milbemycins (ivermectin — Eqvalan®, be dewormed, and which deworming products are efEquimetrin®, Zimectrin®, others; and moxidectin – fective. Although not foolproof, such testing is presently Quest® (Avermectin/milbemycins are also referred to the best way to identify parasite resistance, particularly

DEWORMING

“You can have two farms side-by-side and different management practices will result in different parasite populations and resistance issues,” she says. “If you have a transient horse population, it’s probably safe to say all those horses are at a higher risk for parasites because of coming and going.”

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in strongyles. Testing runs about $15 to $25 and requires a fresh manure sample. FECRT is performed by taking a fecal for a FEC at the time of deworming and again 10 to 14 days after deworming. The number of eggs per gram (EPG) of feces after deworming is compared with the EPG prior to treatment. If the drug is effective, there will be a 90% or greater reduction in EPG. Effectiveness of the drug is questionable if there is less than 90% reduction. When there is less than 80% reduction, this is a sign of parasite resistance to that specific drug class and the drug is no longer considered effective. “You want a lab that can give you an egg per gram (EPG) count, not just get a positive or negative. If you get a positive, you need to quantify it, meaning you want to have a number assigned to it,” explains Hughes. “For example, you want to know if you have 200 eggs per gram or 1000 eggs per gram, as this will help dictate your deworming strategy.” Hughes now encourages all her clients to utilize FECRT to determine if their horses need to be dewormed, and with what product. Fecal testing done three or four times within the first year will provide a fairly accurate profile of each horse’s parasite infestation. “You will see patterns emerge, especially if you run several tests over time. You will find some horses that will only need to be dewormed once or twice a year, and you probably won’t find any horses that need to be dewormed six times a year. In my own herd, I have two horses that always show zero parasites when tested, and I have two that need to be dewormed every four months,” says Hughes. “If I want a picture of what type of parasite load a horse tends to harbor, I do a fecal test right before I deworm. This helps me to know which horses to deworm frequently and which need to be dewormed infrequently. We should be treating them as individuals and deworming accordingly.” “If you’re not monitoring with egg count testing, you have no idea when your program starts to fail,” adds Kaplan. “Every time I’ve seen serious outbreaks of parasitic diseases on a farm, it’s not because they weren’t deworming. It’s because the drugs they were using weren’t effective.” Timing for FECRT is important because the EPG count might be low if evaluated too soon after the most recent, effective treatment. If your last deworming was with a benzimidazole or pyrantel, two months is long enough. But if you used ivermectin or moxidectin and it was fully effective, you need to wait until the drug effectiveness expires. So the appropriate interval for FECRT would be about 12 weeks after ivermectin and 16 weeks after moxidectin.

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Research has shown that about 25 to 50% of horses will have zero or very low egg counts, even if they haven’t been dewormed recently. These horses are referred to as low egg shedders. Only about 20 to 30% of horses will tend to have high egg counts (after the benefits of recent deworming have expired). These horses, termed high egg shedders, should be treated with the drugs that are most effective and this is determined through using FECRT. “The best way to design a parasite control program is to use egg counts to determine which horses have high egg counts and which have low counts,” notes Kaplan. “Develop a baseline program to cover those with low egg counts and use drugs that are effective. Then treat the high egg count horses additionally.” PARASITE TRANSMISSION

“The objective of control for nearly all types of parasites is to prevent contamination of the environment with potential infective stages, but only at times of the

Suggested Parasite Control Program for Adult Horses in Florida: Kaplan emphasizes that the following is just one of many possible programs and adds that there is room for differences of opinion among parasitologists and veterinarians. He recommends each horse owner consult with his/her veterinarian to develop a program tailored to the specific needs of the horses on that farm. As he points out, “There is no such thing as a ‘one-size-fits-all’ program, but all programs should be logically designed based on the types of information presented in this article.” OCTOBER 1: Perform FEC on all horses. •Based on this FEC you can categorize your horses as low (<200 EPG), moderate (200-500 EPG), and high worm egg shedders (>500 EPG). Treat all horses regardless of FEC. •Drug(s) of choice: ivermectin or moxidectin, may want to choose a product that contains praziquantel for tapeworms. If FEC are performed ahead of treatment, using moxidectin only in horses with FEC >500 or in horses known to have chronically high FEC (High Contaminators), and using ivermectin on the remainder would be a rational decision. DECEMBER 1: (Only if treated with Ivermectin in October. IF Moxidectin was used, wait until January 1 to treat again.) •Treat horses with FEC > 500 EPG on October fecal check, horses in the 200-500 range in October may be reasonably treated or can be left untreated. •Drug(s) of choice: Oxibendazole and/or pyrantel (if effective on your farm), or both together at same time. •Perform FEC only on the horses that are being considered for treatment (FEC >200 in October). If you haven’t performed FECRT previously for oxibendazole and/or pyrantel, FEC should be checked again 10-14 days after treatment.

JANUARY 1: Treat all horses regardless of FEC •Drug(s) of choice: ivermectin/praziquantel or moxidectin/praziquantel. (Tapeworm transmission likely peaks in autumn so treatment with praziquantel at this time will remove all the tapes acquired over the summer and autumn.) Perform FEC on all horses. •It is important to know if the horses with low FEC in October still have low FEC, and if you have been successful in keeping FEC low in the horses that had moderate and high FEC in September. APRIL 1: If moxidectin was administered in January, the only horses that likely will need to be treated are the high egg shedders. •Drug(s) of choice: Oxibendazole and/or pyrantel (if effective on your farm), or both together at same time. Though probably not needed unless tapeworms seem to be a problem, a double dose of pyrantel that will also kill tapes might be a reasonable choice. •Performing FEC not necessary at this time. MAY – SEPTEMBER: •No treatments are needed as it is too hot for transmission, so egg shedding is of no concern during this time. Save money and reduce the selection for drug resistance by not treating horses with anthelmintic during the summer months unless there is a specific clinical need for such treatment. THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 43


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year when those infective stages can develop and survive,” says Kaplan. Research has shown that virtually all horses turned out on pasture will be exposed to infective strongyle larvae. Conditions in stalls and dry lots are unfavorable for parasite survival, so horses kept in those environments have far less exposure. Female strongyles in the horse’s gut lay eggs, which then pass out with the manure. When the temperature reaches 45 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit, those eggs hatch and the emerging larvae develop within the fecal pat. Infective larvae crawl away from the manure and onto the forage where grazing horses ingest them and the cycle begins anew. Horses naturally will avoid grazing in the areas known as “roughs” where they defecate. Studies show these roughs contain 15 times more larvae than uncontaminated grazing portions of the field known as “lawns.” If pastures are overstocked or overgrazed, horses are forced to graze in the roughs, greatly increasing their odds of ingesting larvae. “In an ideal world, you would pick up all the manure in your field because that’s where the parasites come from, but I don’t find this practical for most people,” says Hughes. Harrowing (dragging) a pasture makes it look better, but it’s actually giving a huge boost to parasite transmission. “Even though it’s more unsightly, it’s really better to just leave the tall, rough areas with piles of manure because when you drag, it spreads the infective larvae all over the grass,” Hughes notes. “If you spread manure over the field, you are essentially giving the parasites the best chance to proliferate. If you must harrow, do it when manure is dried out and in the morning when the weather is hot so the sun can ‘cook’ it all day. The hotter and drier, the better!” “The only good time to drag a pasture is during hot, dry weather, and ideally horses should be kept off for two to four weeks,” agrees Reinemeyer. “In Florida you can drag pastures in the summer and most larvae would be

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dead in two weeks. If you drag a pasture in Ohio in October, it will have very little impact on the larvae. Once the eggs hatch and larvae reach the infective stage, they can survive all winter. The single greatest misconception about parasite transmission is that cold weather kills the larvae.” Reinemeyer explains that winter is actually helpful because existing larvae require less energy to survive in cold weather than in hot conditions. Infective larvae already on pasture when winter hits survive reasonably well and can still infect horses. However, eggs that are passed in manure during the winter are quickly killed by freezing temperatures, so no new larvae are added to the population until warmer weather arrives. For horses that travel to sales, training centers or the racetrack, Hughes recommends using caution to prevent unnecessary exposure to infective larvae. For starters,

About the Test Fecal Egg Count Testing & Processing Most equine veterinarians today offer Fecal Egg Count (FEC) testing as part of your horse’s routine wellness physical. The standard test used is the McMaster method, which is performed in a lab environment. The process is highly detailed and measured. Essentially, technicians mix fresh manure samples with a liquid flotation solution, and parasite eggs rise to the top of the mix. A tiny sample of the eggs and mixture are then piped onto a slide, where technicians study the quantity and exact type of eggs under a microscope. Results of the count enable veterinarians, owners and managers to plan the best possible deworming program for each horse. Cost of testing runs in the range of $20-$30 and should be available at any veterinary clinic with a lab.


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programs are best viewed as a yearly cycle starting at the time of year “whenWormwormcontrol transmission to horses changes from negligible to probable. In Florida, this is in late summer/early autumn as temperatures begin to drop ” —Dr. Ray Kaplan

always remove all bedding and manure from the previous horse when moving into a new stall. Although the stall is not an ideal environment for larvae and parasites to develop, your horse doesn’t need to be nosing around manure from the former stall resident. It’s common practice to graze horses around the barns at a sale or track, but these areas see a lot of horse traffic. “Don’t go to the heavily grazed areas by the barn,” Hughes advises. “You want to keep your horse away from other horses’ manure if at all possible. If there’s not a good, clean area, it’s just probably better not to graze the horse.” A BETTER WAY

Horse owners learning about the importance of FEC and FECRT often express concern that such testing is more expensive than just going ahead and deworming, whether the horse needs it or not. “A recent cost analysis performed by veterinary students at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that the cost of deworming every horse six times per year is about the same or more than treating based upon this schedule and performing the FEC as suggested,” notes Kaplan. “In addition, using this system you know whether your worm control program is working,” he emphasizes. “By treating blindly there is no way to tell, and we know that drug resistance is highly prevalent. Treating a horse with a drug that does not work because of resistance is very expensive – you waste the money spent on the drug and you risk failure of your worm control program. Treating a horse that does not need to be treated wastes money and promotes drug resistance, which will have future adverse consequences to the health of your horses.” Rather than routinely deworming every 30 to 60 days, Hughes, Kaplan and Reinemeyer strongly encourage horse owners to start thinking of parasite control as an annual cycle. Treatment should start at the time of year when transmission is likely. In the South, the parasite control cycle begins in late summer/early fall and continues through spring. In

northern states, the cycle begins late winter/early spring and goes through autumn. Florida horse owners who are used to a rigorous year-round deworming program may be surprised to learn that deworming in the Sunshine State during the summer is typically unnecessary. Intense heat during summer months all but eliminates significant transmission. In Florida, treatment is recommended primarily during the fall through March or April. If this routine is followed carefully, pastures will have minimal contamination of parasite eggs during these months, and once summer arrives, the hot weather will prevent development and/or survival. Given this information, what is a rational worm control program? “Worm control programs are best viewed as a yearly cycle starting at the time of year when worm transmission to horses changes from negligible to probable,” Kaplan says. “In Florida, this is in late summer/early autumn as temperatures begin to drop. Intestinal strongyles of horses simply do not survive

and develop on pasture to any significant level during the hot summers in the Florida (or elsewhere in the South for that matter). The goals of the program laid out here are to keep FEC low, thereby reducing future worm transmission, kill all important parasites at the correct time of the year, and reduce the development of drug resistance.” ■

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With friends and support the FTC Scholarship Program and Thoroughbred Horse Rescue!

Enjoy the day while participating for a good cause. Registration & Lunch at 11:00 a.m. Entry Fee: $80 per player 1:00 PM shotgun start

Prizes: 1st, 2nd, 3rd Longest Drive Friday, October 15, 2010 Hole In One Golden Hills Golf & Turf Club, Closest To Pin Raffle prizes after play Ocala Florida For more information on how to participate (team and sponsorships), Call Daren Robinson 352.629.7980


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FTBOA Equine Health/Management Lecture

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ing is the most-recommended protocol for prevention of all three diseases in horses. For EEEV and WNV, avoiding or repelling mosquitoes is critical. Long recommends Due to rising concerns over Eastern consistently cleaning water troughs, as well Equine Encephalitis virus, West Nile virus as turning over all buckets, unused tires, or and rabies, the Florida Thoroughbred Breed- any container that collects rainwater. Mosers’ and Owners’ Association produces a quito dunks containing Bt-1 are also useful special health session on Thursday, Aug. 19 (and safe) for any body of water, and can at the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company in be found at most feed stores or large farmsupply and home-imOcala. Speakers from provement stores. the University of Florida The noon event was College of Veterinary sponsored by FTBOA, Medicine covered the The Florida Horse, Wire topics within a one-hour to Wire, Horse Capital time slot, followed by Digest, the Ocala Q&A with attendees. Breeders’ Sales ComMaureen Long, Doctors Maureen Long (left) pany, the University of DVM, PhD, DACVIM, and Amanda House Florida College of Vetexplained the current recommended EEEV and WNV vaccinations, erinary Medicine and the Florida Department prevention and overall management, and of Agriculture and Consumer Services. PowerPoint presentations from the two Amanda House, DVM, DACVIM, covered speakers are available online at ftboa.com. parallel topics relating to rabies in horses. —Summer Best Appropriately and accurately vaccinat-

Florida Equine BMP Manual Rule Workshop to be held Thursday, Oct. 7, in Ocala The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, in cooperation with other agricultural industry stakeholders, has developed a Best Management Practices (BMP) manual for Florida equine operations. The Department will hold a rule development workshop to discuss the draft manual, draft rule to adopt the manual, and the implementation procedures associated with the manual. This is an important program, given the expectations for water quality in Florida. Producers are encouraged to make every effort to attend. The draft BMP manual can be viewed before the meeting at: http://www.floridaagwaterpolicy.com/BestManagementPractices.html The meeting will be located at 5 p.m., Oct. 7, at the Marion County Extension Office Auditorium: 2232 N.W. Jacksonville Rd.; Ocala, Fla., 34470. For more information, contact Bill Bartnick with the Florida Department of Agriculture (850) 617-1700.

FLORIDA EQUINE INSTITUTE AND ALLIED TRADE SHOW

Eleventh annual event will take place Thursday, Sept. 16, in Ocala For more than a decade, hundreds of industry professionals and enthusiasts have attended the Florida Equine Institute and Allied Trade Show – a full day of educational seminars, product reviews and demonstrations, lunch and Q&A time. The event, produced by the University of Florida’s extension arm/the Central Florida Livestock Agents’ Group, will be held this year on Thursday, Sept. 16, at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion: 2232 N.W. Jacksonville Rd.; Ocala, Fla., 34470.

Contact Mark Shuffitt for more information at (352) 671-8400, or view the institute’s brochure at http://cflag.ifas.ufl.edu/documents/201 0EqInstit.pdf THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 47


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The United States Dressage Federation (USDF) is pleased to welcome featured presenters Gary Rockwell and Lilo Fore to the 2010 Adequan/USDF National Symposium. The symposium will take place Dec. 4-5, 2010, at the Jacksonville Equestrian Center in Jacksonville, Fla. The theme for this year’s symposium will be “Cross the Bridge from Training to Showing” and will focus on learning to ride the new tests with the featured presenters. Lilo Fore is an FEI “I” Judge and began her judging career in 1974. In addition to judging, she owns a successful dressage training facility located in Santa Rosa, CA, and helped to develop the USDF Instructor Certification Program. As a member of the United States Equestrian Team, Gary Rockwell represented the US in competition throughout Europe. He and his Danish mare “Suna” won a Team Silver medal at CHIO Rotterdam in 1993 and a Team Bronze at the 1994 World Championships at The Hague, Netherlands. As a USEF judge for more than 25 years, he officiated at many regional finals and national championships. As an FEI judge, he officiated at North American Young Rider Championships, FEI Challenge Tours, World Cup Finals, European Championships, and the 2008 Olympic Games. Rockwell currently lives in Wellington, Fla., and travels to teach, train and judge. UPCOMING USDF YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP AND AWARDS

The United States Dressage Federation will offer three upcoming awards for USDF youth members. The USDF Youth Convention Scholarship provides financial support to young dressage enthusiasts to help defray the ex48 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

penses associated with attending the 2010 Adequan/USDF National Convention & Symposium in Jacksonville, Fla., from Dec. 1-5. Up to four scholarships of up to $1,000 will be awarded in 2010. The USDF Youth Volunteer of the Year Award, presented by The Paddock Saddlery, is a prestigious national award which recognizes a USDF youth member who has demonstrated exceptional volunteer effort. The recipient will be presented at the Adequan/USDF Annual Convention with a perpetual trophy that will be housed in the Roemer Foundation/USDF Hall of Fame and will receive a keeper trophy. The winner will also receive a $250 gift certificate from The Paddock Saddlery and a $500 stipend to attend the annual convention. USDF will also be selecting a national nominee for the USEF Youth Sportsman’s Award. The USDF national nominee will

be submitted as a candidate to USEF for consideration as the overall Youth Sportsman’s Awards winner as well as being nominated for the USEF Junior Equestrian of the Year Award. USDF seeks nominees who demonstrate an ongoing commitment and dedication to both USDF and USEF through their promotion of the horse. The USDF national nominee shall receive a complementary one-year USDF youth participating membership and shall be recognized by USEF with a six-day, all-expense paid career opportunity workshop at the USEF national headquarters in Lexington, Ky. Nominations should be submitted to USDF by October 1. Founded in 1973, the United States Dressage Federation is a nonprofit membership organization dedicated to education, recognition of achievement, and promotion of dressage. For more information about USDF membership or programs, visit www.usdf.org or call (859) 971-2277.

Robert Duvall Endorses 2010 FEI Awards Actor and director Robert Duvall has who, without asking for recognition, should given his support to the annual awards or- be thanked and acknowledged for their own ganized by the Fédération Equestre Inter- contribution to equestrian sport around the nationale (FEI), the governing body of world,” Duvall said. “As someone with a horse sport. The FEI launched the “Oscars passion for horses, I urge you to nominate of the equestrian world” last year to reward anyone you feel is worthy of the awards and outstanding dedication to horse sport in help them to walk the red carpet at the 2010 five categories. Calls for nominations for FEI Awards in Taiwan.” the 2010 awards opened on July 16. Duvall has been a keen horseman since Hollywood legend Duvall is his childhood, when he often visited his uncle’s ranch in best-known for his roles in The northern Montana. He has Apostle, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather and Tender Mercies. demonstrated his riding skills His performances have earned in several films, including him an Academy Award, a Broken Trail (2006), in which he plays gruff rancher Print BAFTA, two Emmys and four Ritter, and Lonesome Dove, Golden Globe Awards. the 1989 classic miniseries “The FEI Awards give you which saw him leading an the opportunity to nominate epic cattle drive. and celebrate those individuals Robert Duvall COURTESY CANADIAN PRESS/REX FEATURES

USDF ANNOUNCES 2010 ADEQUAN/USDF NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM FOCUSED ON RIDING NEW 2011 DRESSAGE TESTS


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UF Professor Honored by Epidemiology Group COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Paul Nicoletti, D.V.M., a professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, was presented with the 2010 Karl F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold Head Cane Award during the American Veterinary Medical Association’s annual meeting in Atlanta recently. The award is the highest honor given to a veterinarian by the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. The group selects the awardee on the basis of achievements in animal health that have significantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. A 1956 graduate of the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine, Nicoletti retired from the UF veterinary faculty in 2003. During his 25 years of service at UF, he taught courses in infectious diseases, epidemiology, public health and food safety. Nicoletti’s career began at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Missouri, with later duties in Wisconsin, New York, Mississippi and Florida. He served as an epizootiologist in Tehran, Iran, from 1968 to 1972 with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations prior to beginning his academic career at UF in 1978. An internationally recognized expert in brucellosis, Nicoletti has amassed many awards in his career, including Distinguished Service awards from both the University of Missouri and UF. As a tribute to Nicoletti’s professional contributions and service to the cattle industry, a private $1.3 million contribution was recently made to the UF College of Veterinary Medicine in his name.

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NEWS BITS UF COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE ANNOUNCES NAME CHANGE FOR HOSPITAL OPERATIONS

In an effort to better align public perception with its true function, the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine has changed the name of its hospital operation from the UF Veterinary Medical Center to UF Veterinary Hospitals. “As the result of ongoing efforts to better understand how we identify ourselves and how the public sees us, our hospital board approved this name change, effectively immediately,” said Glen Hoffsis, D.V.M., the college’s dean.

“Our research has shown us that the public was not entirely sure what the term ‘veterinary medical center’ meant, or how it might relate to them,” Hoffsis said. “We felt that we needed to simplify our name to reflect our core mission, which, as set forth in our strategic plan, puts the animal patient, the client and the referring veterinarian as our central focus.” UF Veterinary Hospitals include both the large and small animal hospitals. Both hospitals are staffed by board-certified veterinary specialists and provide wellness care, specialty care and 24/7 emergency services to horses, pets and food animals. Approxi-

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mately 18,700 animals from throughout the state of Florida and the Southeast receive care at UF each year. Since it graduated its first class in 1980, the UF College of Veterinary Medicine has expanded both its small and large animal hospital operations to maintain its accreditation in good standing with the American Veterinary Medical Association and to better accommodate clients who bring their horses and companion animals to Gainesville for veterinary care. The Alec P. and Louise H. Courtelis Equine Hospital opened in 1994. SWISS SUPREME COURT REJECTS NORWEGIAN OLYMPIC APPEAL

In early August, the Swiss Supreme Court rejected the appeal filed byTonyAndre Hansen (NOR) against his disqualification from the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. The Supreme Court has ordered Hansen to pay costs of CHF 5,000 and legal fees to the FEI of CHF 6,000. Hansen’s horse Camiro tested positive for the prohibited substance Capsaicin during the 2008 Olympic equestrian events in Hong

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Kong and the rider was provisionally suspended on August 21, 2008. The case was heard by a three-member panel of the FEI Tribunal, which issued its final decision on December 22, 2008. Hansen was suspended for four and a half months (135 days), and was also disqualified from all placings with Camiro at the 2008 Olympic Games. Hansen appealed the FEI Tribunal decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), based in Lausanne, Switzerland. On Dec. 4, 2009, CAS dismissed the appeal and

upheld the final decision of the FEI Tribunal. Hansen subsequently appealed the CAS decision to the Swiss Supreme Court, but that appeal was rejected in the Court’s decision of July 30, 2010. There is no appeal against a decision of the Supreme Court. As a result of the legal procedure, the Norwegians are stripped of the Jumping team bronze medal, which will be awarded to the Swiss team that originally finished in fourth place at the 2008 Olympic Games.

Purina Mills Launches Pink 50 Campaign Two Florida locations will host equine fundraising events to promote breast cancer awareness and education this fall. The Pink 50 Campaign was inspired by Purina’s Equine Senior Horse Tales Contest held every other year that encourages horse owners to share their heartfelt stories. Throughout the coming year, more than 50 locations throughout the nation will host Pink 50 events. “Several stories that we receive from horse owners describe how their horses offered an escape from cancer and other illnesses and how their horses provided comfort to family

members as they stood by and helped mothers, daughters, fathers and sons through treatment,” said Christy Goodwin, Marketing Manager, Land O’Lakes Purina Feed. Laura’s Pet and Horse Supply in Niceville will host a Friday Pink Night Out and Saturday Pink Fun Day on Oct. 1-2. Woodville Ace Hardware will host a Ladies Night Fashion Show and Fundraiser in Tallahassee on Nov. 7. For more information, visit purinamills.com/Pink50.


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HORSE COUNCIL NEWS

Unwanted Horse Coalition Materials Available The Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) continues its efforts to educate the industry about issues relating to unwanted horses and owning responsibly. The UHC has prepared and distributed a variety of materials that will educate horse owners on various topics. The materials describe the efforts of the coalition, offer alternatives for horse owners to consider for their horses when they can no longer care for them, and detail ways the horse community can get more involved. THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF MATERIALS CURRENTLY OFFERED BY THE UHC:

• The UHC brochure, The Problem of the Unwanted Horse, which explains the Coalition and its activities. The UHC handbook, Own Responsibly: Guidance for current and potential horse owners from the Unwanted Horse Coalition, which includes chapters on the responsibilities of horse ownership; options for owners with unwanted horses; programs that extend the useful lives of horses; questions to ask when trying to place a horse; and the tax ramifications of contributing your horses to a charitable organization. “Own Responsibly” flyers, which describe what it means to act responsibly regarding the long-term needs of your horse. The 2009 Unwanted Horses Survey, the results of a national survey taken by more than 27,000 horse owners, equine industry stakeholders, rescue and retirement facilities and non-horse owners regarding the issue of unwanted horses, its importance, causes, solutions and effects. The UHC handbook, Best Practices: HowYour Organization Can Help Unwanted Horses, which details initiatives and activities organizations can undertake to help re-

• •

duce the number of unwanted horses. Rehabilitating the Neglected Horse: A Caregivers’ Guide, a brochure covering basic care for rehabilitating a neglected horse. Subjects include nutrition, farrier care, vaccination and de-worming. “The UHC hopes that horse owners and breeders will use the materials offered to educate themselves and spread the word about unwanted horses to their colleagues. Once

educated about the issues facing unwanted horses, individuals and organizations can help to implement programs that assist horses in need,” said Ericka Caslin, Director of the UHC. All materials are available for download on the UHC website: www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org or they can be purchased in hard copy form. Contact Ericka Caslin at (202) 296-4031 for

Latest Round of Endorsements for the AHC’s Welfare Code of Practice The American Horse Council is pleased to announce the American Saddlebred Horse Association, Appaloosa Horse Club, Harness Horsemen International, Kentucky Horse Council, North American Trail Ride Conference, and the National Reined Cow Horse Association have recently endorsed the Welfare Code of Practice. “As demonstrated by this latest round of endorsements, the National Welfare Code of Practice embodies principles and practices that can and should be embraced by every aspect of the horse industry, regardless of breed, practice, or discipline,” said AHC President Jay Hickey. “This latest round of endorsements emphasizes the industry’s unified commitment to the welfare and safety of horses. We look forward to bringing in as many organizations as possible to further reinforce the industry’s commitment to safety, health, care and welfare of all horses.” The Welfare Code outlines in generic terms what it means for an organization to be committed to the responsible breeding, training, care, use, enjoyment, transport, and retirement of horses. Many associations have undertaken studies, reviews, and initiatives that show their commitment to the welfare of their horses. This generic code is simply a continuation of that effort. They join 18 other national groups that have already endorsed the Welfare Code. They include the: American Association of Equine Practitioners, American Endurance Ride Conference, American Paint Horse Association, American Quarter Horse Association, Arabian Horse Association, Florida Thoroughbred Breeder’s and Owner’s Association, Kentucky Thoroughbred Association, League of Agricultural and Equine Centers, Masters of Foxhounds Association, National Cutting Horse Association, National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Pinto Horse Association of America, the Pyramid Society, the Tennessee Walking Horse Breeder’s & Exhibitors Association, Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association, U.S. Dressage Federation, U.S. Equestrian Drill Team, U.S. Equestrian Federation, and U.S. Trotting Association. The Code is not intended to replace or pre-empt any activities, rules, or regulations specific to any segment of the industry. Rather it is another indication to the public, the media, federal and state officials, and the horse community that the equine industry “Puts the Horse First.” THE FLORIDA HORSE • AUGUST 2010 51


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Back Country Horsemen of America Supports USDA’s Public Access Program

AAEP Releases Recommendations for Protecting the Safety and Welfare of Standardbred Racehorses

By Sarah Wynne Jackson

Following the creation of veterinary guidelines to protect the safety and welfare of racing Thoroughbreds and Quarter Horses, the American Association of Equine Practitioners has adapted these recommendations for the harness racing industry. The white paper, “Putting the Horse First:Veterinary Recommendations for the Safety and Welfare of the Standardbred Racehorse,” provides breed-specific guidance on many issues impacting the horse in the current racing environment. “Standardbred racehorses typically race more often and experience longer careers than other racing breeds,” said Dr. Scott Palmer, the AAEP Racing Committee chairman. “And while the injury rate is low in Standardbred racing due to the horse’s unique style, we believe there are many enhancements that can be made to improve safety and overall horse care.” Recommendations within the white paper are focused in four key areas: the racing business model, the owner-trainer-veterinarian relationship, medication, and the public perception of racing. The paper was developed by the Standardbred Subcommittee of the AAEP’s Racing Committee, a group comprised of private racetrack practitioners, regulatory veterinarians and veterinary specialists. Dr. Palmer of Clarksburg, N.J., and Dr. Foster Northrop of Louisville, Ky., serve as chair and vice chair, respectively. The AAEP intends its white paper to provide guidance and support to those who working to bring meaningful change. “As an organization with the primary mission of protecting the health and welfare of the horse, the safety of the all breeds of racehorses is one of our highest priorities,” explained AAEP President Dr. Nathaniel White. “We are eager to assist in reforming or instituting practices that will put the horse first and benefit the Standardbred racing industry in the future.”

Back Country Horsemen of America, the leading organization in saving public lands trails for equestrian use, strongly supports the United States Department of Agriculture’s new program called “Open Fields” or Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program (VPA-HIP). AN INNOVATIVE STEP

USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack recently announced this effort to encourage own-

ers and operators of privately held farm, ranch, and forest land to voluntarily provide public access for recreation under programs implemented by state or tribal governments. Such access will offer new opportunities for enjoying open spaces through a variety of activities such as hunting, fishing, mountain biking, hiking, bird watching, and, of course, horseback riding. Open Fields is the first federal incentive program designed to encourage best management practices and sportsman access to undeveloped land. Instead of creating new federal programs, it relies upon existing and new state programs to protect landowners from liability and reward them for doing the right thing with their land. Back Country Horsemen of America realizes that the majority of the existing programs have limited scope and budgets, with most programs having an annual budget of under a million dollars. Open Fields will provide up to $50 million through fiscal year 2012. This funding will help states and tribal governments address many issues that can greatly increase access and recreational experiences. ABOUT BACK COUNTRY HORSEMEN OF AMERICA

BCHA is a non-profit corporation made up of state organizations, affiliates, and at large members. Their efforts have brought about positive changes in regards to the use of horses and stock in the wilderness and public lands. For more about Back Country Horsemen of America or to become a member, visit www.backcountryhorse.com. 52 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

For more information, contact Sally Baker, AAEP director of marketing and public rela-


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Friends, Rivals,

Champions Florida dressage trainers Stacy Parvey-Larsson and Alex Robertson, lifelong rivals and friends, topped the charts at the Markel/USEF National Young Horse Championships this past summer. By SUMMER BEST tacy Parvey-Larsson remembers the day, back in 1992, when she met Alex Robertson in Venice, Fla., at Fox Lea Farm. She was a tenacious 12year-old dressage rider competing at a United States Dressage Foundation Jr.Young Riders event for the dressage foundation’s Kimball Award. Robertson, just a few years older, was her biggest contender, and their scores seemed awfully close. In the end, fate would have it. “He was first. I came in second,” Parvey-Larsson said with a laugh. Looking back, that day was momentous – a day where iron begins to sharpen iron. In the 18 years since, these two premier riders have continued to compete, train and network as colleagues in the industry. Robertson thrives as an independent trainer throughout northwest Marion County, and Parvey-Larsson owns and operates Hidden Acres Dressage in Reddick, Fla. So when both Parvey-Larsson and Robertson qualified to compete with 6-year-old horses at the Markel/USEF National Young Horse Championships

PHOTOS BY FIREANDEARTHPHOTO.COM

S

Alex Robertson (above) and Stacy Parvey-Larsson (at left) who owns and operates Hidden Acres Dressage in Reddick, Fla.

Another Lil’ Champ in the Making Right in the middle of an already busy competition season, Stacy Parvey-Larsson and her husband, Olof Larsson – who is the stable manager for champion four-in-hand combined driver Chester Weber – realized they had a baby on the way.

“My doctor gave me the OK to continue riding until I’m uncomfortable, so I kept on training,” Parvey-Larsson said. “I’m still on a high [from the summer championships], but I have a lot of additional things to focus on now. I’m

working with a personal trainer to stay in shape to ride, and I’ve already set my schedule to be riding soon after the baby is born.” The couple expects their first son, Ashton Nils, to arrive around December 14. THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 53


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Parvey: Friends, Rivals, Champions

Qualifying for the Young Horse Dressage Program The Markel/USEF Young Horse Dressage Program (for 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old horses) promotes the importance of selective breeding and correct training of horses in the United States, and encourages participation of breeders, riders, and trainers of young horses in dressage competition. The purposes of this program are to encourage the properly structured development of young dressage prospects through the training scale; to identify and recognize outstanding talent and the training of international-caliber horses; and to prepare these horses for future careers at the FEI level and participation on U.S. High Performance teams. Rules: Horses must receive an average of 2 scores no less than 7.2 to qualify for the Championships. The top 15 horses qualified go on to compete at the National Championships held in Wayne, Illinois.

at Lamlight Equestrian Center in Wayne, Ill., this past July, they were in their element. Only the top 15 horses in the country in this division were invited to compete. Parvey-Larsson campaigned Benidetto, a Hanoverian by Belissimo M. out of Crispy Sweet by Cordoba, owned by Linda Woltz of Logan, Ohio. The stallion was imported to the U.S. in 2009 from Germany. Robertson competed Zefier, a Dutch warmblood by Sir Sinclair out of Lorienta by Damiro, owned by Fran Marino of Ocala. The gelding was imported in December 2009 from Holland by Belinda Nairn of Inspo in Ocala. “I was very humble coming into the competition, knowing there were 14 very talented 6-year-olds all competing for the No. 1 spot,” Parvey-Larsson said. “My goal was to make it there and ride my best and

present Benidetto the best way I knew how. Fortunately, we were on top of our game and put in two really good tests that weekend and the judges were impressed!” Benidetto and Parvey-Larsson scored 8.4 on the first day, which counts 40 percent towards the final score. Their score on day two was 8.16, counting 60 percent of the total, giving them a final score of 8.208 and a reserve national championship. “Not many 6-year-olds can do what these horses are doing. I could not have asked for a better outcome,” Parvey-Larsson said. “I am so thrilled with Benidetto. We worked so hard and I am very excited for next year as we go for Developing Young Horse Championships.” Robertson, meanwhile, trailed right behind ParveyLarsson, scoring a 7.76 on day one and a 8.2 on day two – finishing with a final score of 8.0 and third place. “I was thrilled with the end result at Lamlight,” Robertson said. “Zefier is so talented and proved he has tons of heart.” Robertson has been riding and teaching Fran Marino on her horses since 2003, however, his partnership with Zefier is fairly new – starting in March of 2010. With little time to prepare for the qualifying shows, the duo managed to pull it off by receiving impressive qualifying scores in just two shows. Robertson plans to continue on with Zefier and to compete at next year’s Developing Young Horse competition as well. ■

Florida Favorites As of Aug. 18, the following Florida riders and drivers had been nominated to compete in the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, held Sept. 25-Oct. 10 at the Kentucky Horse Park. Final competitors will be designated in the weeks just prior to the games. This year

Name

Alltech World Equestrian Games 54 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

Katherine Bateson, Chandler Todd Flettrich Lauren Hough Tucker Johnson Candice King Tina Konyot Cara Raether David Saunders Pierre St. Jacques Chester Weber

is the first year the world equestrian games have ever been held on U.S. soil. For ticket purchases or more information, visit alltech.com/games.

Event

Hometown

Dressage . . . . . . . . . .Wellington Dressage . . . . . . . . . .Royal Palm Beach Jumping . . . . . . . . . . .Wellington Combined Driving . . . .Hobe Sound Jumping . . . . . . . . . . .Wellington Dressage . . . . . . . . . .Palm City Jumping . . . . . . . . . . .North Palm Beach Combined Driving . . . .Morriston Dressage . . . . . . . . . .Anthony Combined Driving . . . .Ocala


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A preventative approach can help managers maintain a consistent training program

By DENISE STEFFANUS ucked shins used to be considered a threat to every young horse in training. About five or six weeks after beginning a conditioning program, 70% of young horses would experience sore and inflamed shins, and it was time to lay them off for up to six weeks, depending on the severity of the problem. This left the trainer back at square one when the horse returned to training. Old-timers used to say, “Just go ahead and buck ‘em and get it over with.” They put their young horses into training and went on with them until they bucked shins. The theory was that if losing training time and fitness were inevitable, it was better to get it out of the way early in the training program. The underlying cause of bucked shins are small, horizontal fractures in the lattice-like structure of new bone cells that form on the outside layer of the front of the cannon bone, the cortex. Simply put, the constant flexing of the immature cannon bone causes stress cracks at a rate greater than the horse’s ability to repair them. The first signs of a problem are slight heat, swelling, and shin pain caused by microfractures in the cortex. Typically, the periosteum, the membrane that covers the shin, will separate from the front of the cannon bone, and a hematoma will form between the membrane and the bone. The resulting pain and inflammation causes lameness and a stilted gait. A young horse’s training need not outstep its body’s ability to stay ahead of the stress that causes bucked shins. Modification of the horse’s training program and preventive stimulation of the periosteum may avert the problem.

B

MARYLAND SHIN PROGRAM

David Nunamaker, V.M.D., an orthopedic surgeon at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center, began investigating bucked shins in the late 1970s. Working together with John Fisher, D.V.M., a veterinarian and trainer based at Eastern Maryland’s Fair Hills Training Center, Nunamaker designed a training program to promote the development of bone density in the cannon bones of twoyear-olds by conditioning them through short, frequent

speed bursts. Nunamaker concluded that these small doses of high-speed exercise seemed highly protective against bucked shins, whereas long galloping exercise increased the risk for bucked shins. The concept is a simple one: bone density increases in response to stress, so the program’s aim was to stimulate the activity of the periosteum to strengthen the front cortex of the cannon bones. The program, which is similar to interval training, is begun when a young horse reaches the stage in training where it can easily gallop a mile. Long, slow gallops are interspersed with one-furlong, 15-second works. Over a 16week period, the length and intensity of the works are gradually increased until the horse is working a half-mile in 52 seconds every third day. Once the training reaches this peak performance level, the workouts are scheduled every five days, with conventional training in the interim days. After the shin program is completed, the horse needs to return to conventional training prior to racing. In follow-up studies, Nunamaker discovered that horses that do not develop bucked shins do not develop stress or saucer fractures in their shins. In turn, horses that do not develop stress or saucer fractures do not develop midshaft fractures of their cannon bones while training and racing. Nunamaker concluded: “Institution of an effective training program for young Thoroughbreds to significantly decrease the incidence of bucked shins will therefore significantly decrease the incidence of fatal musculoskeletal mid-cannon bone fractures during racing and training.”

COURTESY EQUINE MEDICAL CENTER OF OCALA/DR. JOHN PELOSO

Young Horses And Bucked Shins

A digital radiograph of the cannon bone of a horse with “bucked shins.” In the clear majority of cases, there is no evidence of disease identified on the radiograph. The red arrow identifies the dorsal cortex of the cannon bone, also known as the “shin.”

THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 55


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BUCKED SHINS STIMULATION

For bucked shins, stimulation of the periosteum increases the rate of remodeling of the cortex of the cannon bone by laying down new bone on its front surface. Eventually, the bone will gain strength and rigidity to prevent overflexion. One method of stimulation is shin scraping, which William Russell, D.V.M., a senior partner in Ocala’s Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital, uses to prevent shins from bucking. “It scars the periosteum down to the bone and irritates the bone enough to lay down more bone,” said Russell, whose focus is training and racehorse medicine. “So you are basically putting the horse through a stress cycle like you would if you were doing a breeze or two, and you’re strengthening the cannon bone that way.” Shin scraping must be done before any heat or swelling occurs, Russell said, or you have missed the window of opportunity. “A lot of people do it very early, usually right after the horse is broke,” he said. “Once the horse is broke and going to the track, they’ll scrape the shins and give the horse a couple of weeks off and then progress on with its training. It’s not 100% effective, but it’s significantly effective to prevent bucked shins.” A variation of shin scraping, the needle-scratch procedure, is a treatment—rather than a preventive—for bucked shins that has achieved good success. To perform the needle scratch procedure, the veterinarian clips and anesthetizes the shins. Then he sticks a 14gauge needle straight to the bone and scratches the periosteum. He does this about 100 times per shin in a pinfiring pattern. The veterinarian then applies an iodine (biozide) salve to the shins and covers them with gauze. The needle scratch procedure is unique in that the horse misses only five to seven days training, hardly enough time to lose significant conditioning, and aftercare is minimal because there is little soft tissue trauma. During the first five to seven days, the horse’s legs are rubbed with alcohol and bandaged. Exercise is limited to hand walking. Light training on the racetrack can resume with a gradual increase in intensity over the next three weeks. One month after the procedure, the horse is back up to speed. Continuing in training after bone stimulation is essential to encourage bone remodeling. Laying the horse off after the procedure defeats the purpose. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT

Unless bucked shins causes a saucer fracture of the cannon bone, most veterinarians take a conservative approach to treatment. “I don’t do anything special, really,” said John Peloso, D.V.M., M.S., a board-certified surgeon and partner in the Equine Medical Center of Ocala. “We give the horse a lit56 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

Page 56

tle Bute [phenylbutazone, an anti-inflammatory], tell the trainer not to go fast, but just to continue to gallop him for 30 days until the pain goes away. We feel like the training has gotten out of step with the bone’s ability to lay down more dense bone. We feel that if we slow down the training so that the remodeling process can catch up to the training, it [bucked shins] usually looks after itself.” Some owners and trainers might want to see the veterinarian doing more for the horse, but Peloso said intense treatment really is not necessary. “In the short term, when the horse is sore on day one, two, or three, I’m happy for him to be in a poultice, but the most important thing is the anti-inflammatory,” Peloso said. “I know that people push for us to do more, but I don’t think any more is necessary.” Peloso said serious cases of bucked shins that are associated with saucer fractures are rare. “If you had 100 horses that bucked their shins, I’d say saucer-fracture formation would be less than 5%, even if you continue to train them,” he said. Peloso said the most conservative approach is to take the horse out of training, but he believes that is the wrong approach. “We just slow down the training,” he said. “Keep galloping for 30 days, no speed work, and a little bit of Bute if they need it, and try again.” SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY

COURTESY EQUINE MEDICAL CENTER OF OCALA/DR. JOHN PELOSO

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One modern approach to bucked shins is shock-wave therapy. A very rapid pulse of pressure is focused on the shins to stimulate formation of new bone. Because shockwave therapy has an analgesic effect, it eases pain while encouraging healing. “If we treat them at the first sign of bucked shins, we might be able to prevent them from ever becoming sore,” said Scott McClure, D.V.M., Ph.D., head of equine surgery at Iowa State University who pioneered the use of shock-wave therapy in horses. “We lose too much time with a disease that is so well identified and well understood as bucked shins. Why are we still dealing with this problem in essentially every young horse that comes through training? With shockwave therapy, we wouldn’t have to lay all these horses off while they cripple along getting over bucked shins. “I think it is ideal for saucer fractures,” he commented. “It promotes healing across the fracture. The other way of treating saucer fractures is by drilling and screwing them, and there is a risk of cracking the cannon bone. With the shock-wave system, we‘re not worried about that.” With shock-wave therapy, McClure estimated layoff time still would be from two weeks for uncomplicated bucked shins to six weeks for more serious cases involving saucer fractures. ■

These scintigraphic images were collected using a gamma camera during a “bone scan.” The image at top identifies a normal cannon bone (shin), and the lower image identifies a horse with “bucked shins.” At the tip of the black arrow, there is a focal, moderate to intense increased radiopharmaceutical uptake, the trademark of “bucked shins.”


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FLORIDA HORSE PARK

Belief he first day of fall is just around the corner and with the new season, change of weather and shorter days, the anticipation for the remainder of the year at the Florida Horse Park is mounting. This quote from B.C. Forbes is fitting for the time: “Believe in yourself, your neighbors, your work, your ultimate attainment of more complete happiness. It is only the farmer who faithfully plants seeds in the Spring, who reaps a harvest in Autumn.” We believe here in the Florida Horse Park. We believe in the ultimate goal to have a world-class recreational equestrian facility to grow our community from the ground up. We believe in the people who support us and help us achieve that goal. We planted the seeds and we are beginning to reap our first harvest. Sure, we have had our growing pains, but it is the belief in the end result that has helped us to kick on for the positive result. We believe in our neighbors. Without them, we would not be where we are now. Partners of the Park brought us a great schooling show venue that worked hard through the summer months to bring us a new level of sustainability. Sept. 4 kicks off the Southern Gold Cup Series II a Rocking Horse Stables. The series developed to enhance grassroots eventing, will wrap up Nov. 28 with final awards at the Florida Horse Park. This month, Partners will unveil the updated cross-country course that is done through their work alone. We believe in them and greatly appreciate their belief in the park.

T

We believe in our work. This year we are holding a Farm Tour, Fall Fitness Fair and PeopleChase. All three of these activities are designed to educate and inform our local community about horses, health and how the Florida Horse Park fits into the community puzzle. By believing, these events will succeed and draw more people to the park who might not have been aware of it before. The Florida Horse Park has a clear set of priorities and we are working towards them. Our current priority is to raise money for the park in order to build out with permanent infrastructure to benefit our riders, competitive and recreational. Our second priority is to continue offering quality competition and recreation through qualified organizers. The proof is in the pudding when you stand at the Welcome Center construction site. Believing in our own ability has made it possible for us to stay on track, plant the seeds of progress and reap the first of our harvest. Be a part of that progress at the Florida Horse Park this fall. We believe in it. Happy trails!

Connie Duff Wise Chairman Florida Horse Park

THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 57


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basics and tips on maintaining the best, thickest forage possible for your animals

FARM MANAGEMENT

PastureTips ortunately for our Florida horse farms this summer, rainfall has been plentiful and has certainly helped to salvage our pastures. Maintaining strong pastures also helps protect our water quality because quality grass cover can help prevent nutrients such as Nitrogen from negby Jamie Cohen, atively affecting our springs and aquifer. Here’s a quick Farm Outreach primer on basics and tips needed to maintain the best, thickCoordinator est forage possible for your animals: Weed management should be one of our highest priorities this time of year to maintain a healthy pasture. Walk pastures routinely to identify prevalent and poisonous weeds. Most weeds are spread by seeds. Pulling weeds will help minimize seed spreading. Weed eating and judicious application of herbicide, when needed, can also help. Careful and appropriate fertilization will help give forage grasses any needed nutrients. Soil test results will indicate needed nutrients and whether lime or dolomite is necessary to raise soil pH. Try to use slow-release fertilizers or split up the applications, which can help slow leaching into our aquifer. Utilize frequent pasture rotation, and avoid overstocking pastures. The University of Florida recommends stocking rates of one horse per 1-2 ½ acres if the pasture is well-fertilized and maintained; 5 acres might be needed per horse if the pasture is not well-maintained, and differences of soil type, grazing amounts, grass type, etc. Careful management is critical here to maintain the grass

F • • • • • •

58 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

in your paddocks year-round. Larger paddocks can and should be broken up and horses moved from section to section, enticing horses to graze more uniformly. A good rule of thumb to follow is to not allow horses to graze on grass that is lower than 3 inches in height. This helps keep roots from being pulled out of the ground. Lastly, consider over-seeding with winter rye in the cooler months. Not only does it take up excess nitrogen, but it also gives horses year-round, quality grazing abilities. Winter rye can start coming up as early as October and continue as late as May. Over-seeding rye with a mechanical seeder and then lightly disking over the seeds is the ideal method. Disking helps get the seeds to make contact with the soil. This should take place from October to mid November to achieve best results. The Marion County extension office offers free soil test kits and it is only $7 to get soil analysis from University of Florida. We are also able to help you interpret the results of your test and offer recommendations. Call the office at 352671-8400 to get assistance. Keep up the good management practices!

Jamie A. Cohen Farm Outreach Coordinator UF IFAS/Marion County Extension Service 352-671-8792 • jamieacohen@ufl.edu


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Following are the “FTBOA Chase to the Championship ” Point Standings through August 25, 2010. Two-Year-Old Colt/Gelding Gourmet Dinner (Trippi) - 6 Western Mood (West Acre) - 4 Grande Shores (Black Mambo) - 2 Little Drama (Burning Roma) - 2 Madman Diaries (Bring the Heat) - 2 Manchurian High (The Daddy) - 2 Rough’n Royal (Pomeroy) - 2 Too Experience (Drewman) - 2

Breeder

Owner

Trainer

Ocala Stud & William J Terrill Gilbert G. Campbell Jacks or Better Farm Harold L Queen Wesley A Ward Greg Norman Flying H Enterprises Steve Tucker

Our Sugar Bear Stable “Jerry, George & Todaro Hollendorfer” Jacks or Better Farm Harold L Queen Wesley A Ward Bluegrass Empire Stables LLC Joyce & E G Frazee Move Horse Inc

Peter Gulyas Jerry Hollendorfer Stanley I Gold David Fawkes Wesley A Ward William Phipps J David Braddy Mark Passley

Jacks or Better Farm Inc Gilbert G Campbell Y-Lo Racing Stables LLC

Jacks or Better Farm Inc Gilbert G Campbell “Peter Moehrke, Rafter JR Ranch & STD Racing Stable”

Stanley I Gold Kathleen O’Connell Doug F O’Neill

Donald R Dizney Jacks or Better Farm Inc Harold J Plumley

Donald R Dizney Jacks or Better Farm Inc & Robert LaPenta Paul P Pompa Jr

Dale L Romans Nicholas P Zito Richard E Dutrow

Thorobeam Farm Lau-Mor Farms Kristine L Mitchell

IEAH Stables & Whizway Farms Al & Saundra S Kirkwood Robert D Hutton

Richard E Dutrow Kathy Walsh Dan L Hendricks

Harold L Queen “Alex & Joann Lieblong, M McMaster & David Fawkes” RNB Racing LLC

David Fawkes David Fawkes Terrel Gore

Farnsworth Stables LLC Martin Racing Stable LLC & Dan Morgan Live Oak Plantation

Martin D Wolfson W Bret Calhoun Seth Benzel

Two-Year-Old Filly Awesome Feather (Awesome of Course) - 8 Blue Eyed Sweetie (West Acre) - 4 Wickedly Perfect (Congrats) - 3

Three-Year-Old Colt/Gelding First Dude (Stephen Got Even) - 30 Jackson Bend (Hear No Evil) - 20 D’Funnybone (D’Wildcat) - 18

Three-Year-Old Filly Amen Hallelujah (Montbrook) - 23 All Due Respect (Value Plus) - 12 Tanda (Sweetsouthernsaint) - 11

Older Male (Four-Year-Olds and up Colt/Gelding) Big Drama (Montbrook) - 17 Duke of Mischief (Graeme Hall) - 12 Shadowbdancing (Montbrook) - 11

Harold L Queen Marilyn McMaster Ocala Stud Farm

Older Female (Four-Year-Olds and up Filly/Mare) Jessica Is Back (Put It Back) - 29 Dubai Majesty (Essence of Dubai) - 23 Dynaslew (Dynaformer) - 10

Larry Perkins Harold J Plumley Live Oak Stud

Sprint (Three-Year-Olds and up, male and female, race distances one mile and less) Dubai Majesty (Essence of Dubai) - 23 Jessica Is Back (Put It Back) - 22 Amen Hallelujah (Montbrook) - 20

Harold J Plumley Larry Perkins Thorobeam Farm

Martin Racing Stable LLC & Dan Morgan Farnsworth Stables LLC IEAH Stables & Whizway Farms

W Bret Calhoun Martin D Wolfson Richard E Dutrow

Live Oak Plantation Harvey A Clarke & Ron Winchell Robert Smithen Farnsworth Farm

Seth Benzel Kiaran P McLaughlin Brian A Lynch Martin D Wolfson

Turf (Three-Year-Olds and up, male and female, races run on the turf) Dynaslew (Dynaformer) - 10 Krypton (Rock Hard Ten) - 7 Bay to Bay (Sligo Bay) - 6 Jet Propulsion (Double Honor) - 6

Live Oak Stud Jacks or Better Farm Adena Springs Farnsworth Farm

■ Selection Criteria for Florida-bred champions Year-end divisional champions will be determined using the “FTBOA Chase to the Championship” point system, a ranking that awards points for success in stakes races. The “FTBOA Chase to the Championship” allocates points for stakes wins in graded races, open-company stakes and Florida’s signature racing days, with the number of points awarded based upon the classification of the race. International stakes race status is governed by the International Cataloguing Standards Committee. The first three finishers in all Group/Graded and listed races appearing in Part I of the International Cataloguing Standards and International Statistics Book printed by The Jockey Club receive “black-type” designation. Ten point bonus to be awarded to any 2-year-old colt or filly sweeping all three legs of the Florida Stallion Stakes in determining the Champion 2-year-old Florida-bred. The Florida-bred with the most points in each division on December 31 is deemed champion of that division. Horse of the Year, Broodmare of the Year and Breeder of the Year will be voted on by the FTBOA Board of Directors and announced at the FTBOA’s annual awards dinner. In the case of a year-end tie in points in any division, earnings will be used to decide the tiebreaker. — Points are assigned as follows:

■ World Thoroughbred Championship ■ Sunshine Millions (equivalent to a Grade 2 Stakes Race): Breeders’ Cup Race: Win: 20 points Place: 15 points Show: 10 points

■ Grade 1 Stakes Race: Win: 15 points Place: 10 points Show: 5 points

■ Grade 2 Stakes Race: Win: 5 points Place: 3 points Show: 2 points

■ Grade 3 Stakes Race: Win: 3 points Place: 2 points Show: 1 point

Win: 5 points Place: 3 points Show: 2 points

■ Other Florida-bred Signature Race Days (equivalent to a Grade 3 Stakes Race):

(The Florida Million, Florida Cup, Florida Stallion Stakes Series): Win: 3 points Place: 2 points Show: 1 point

■ Open-Company Stakes ($50,000 + Purse) Points for WIN ONLY: Win: 2 points THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010 59


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Leading Florida Sires The following list includes currently active, deceased, and pensioned stallions, with racing results updated through August 30, 2010. Statistics provided by The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc.

GRAEME HALL Farm Name

PUT IT BACK

WILDCAT HEIR NA Earnings

Stk Gr Strtrs Wnrs SW's Wins SW's

Name

Sire Name

Graeme Hall

Dehere

Winding Oaks

$2,932,604

130

72

5

7

Wildcat Heir

Forest Wildcat

Journeyman Stud

$2,531,632

111

57

3

4

Put It Back

Honour and Glory Bridlewood Farm

$2,013,207

128

62

4

7

Earnings

Leading Earner

Leading Earnings

Yrlg Sold

Yrlg 2yo Avg Sold

2yo Avg

2

$2,934,738

Duke of Mischief

$596,717

16

$7,430

8

$27,625

1

$2,532,894

Derwin's Star

$125,040

56

$20,423

26

$67,642

1

$2,142,663

Jessica Is Back

$395,380

11

$38,282

11

$23,818

D'wildcat

Forest Wildcat

Vinery

$1,881,600

95

48

3

6

1

$2,064,291

D' Funnybone

$380,000

13

$15,523

11

$68,045

Montbrook

Buckaroo

Ocala Stud

$2,049,792

101

39

4

10

3

$2,050,381

Shadowbdancing

$358,250

9

$10,856

13

$50,462

Chapel Royal

Montbrook

Signature Stallions $1,810,443

151

77

2

2

0

$1,986,194

Duomo

$58,871

43

$13,263

14

$22,500

Full Mandate

A.P. Indy

Hartley/De Renzo

$1,797,854

137

67

2

2

1

$1,800,025

Kissa Melissa

$88,500

8

$2,325

7

$6,957

Concerto

Chief's Crown

Ocala Stud

$1,465,192

94

53

3

4

0

$1,465,192

Deadly Dealer

$93,642

2

$4,750

9

$20,889

Concorde's Tune

Concorde Bound Ocala Stud

$1,396,993

90

47

2

2

0

$1,408,739

Shimmering Tina

$95,570

2

$23,600

5

$22,600

West Acre

Forty Niner

$1,243,279

49

28

2

3

1

$1,243,279

Speak Easy Gal

4

$24,750

Stonehedge Farm

$254,000

Leading Florida Juvenile Sires The following list includes currently active, deceased, and pensioned stallions, with racing results updated through August 30, 2010. Statistics provided by The Jockey Club Information Systems Inc.

CONGRATS Name

Sire Name

Farm Name

Congrats

A.P. Indy

Vinery

WILDCAT HEIR NA Stk Gr Earnings Strtrs Wnrs SW's Wins SW's $477,364

34

11

2

2

1

Earnings $477,364

GIBSON COUNTY Leading Earner Wickedly Perfect

Leading Earnings

Yrlg Sold

Yrlg 2yo Avg Sold

$114,600

38

$23,047

33

2yo Avg $49,636

Wildcat Heir

Forest Wildcat

Journeyman Stud

$395,616

31

10

1

1

0

$396,878

She'll Heir

$77,580

56

$20,423

26

$67,642

Gibson County

In Excess (IRE)

deceased

$345,541

21

10

1

1

0

$345,541

Ayoumilove

$112,367

8

$3,725

17

$12,676

$109,050

West Acre

Forty Niner

Stonehedge Farm

$316,365

8

6

1

1

0

$316,365

Blue Eyed Sweetie

4

$24,750

Chapel Royal

Montbrook

Signature Stallions $273,936

26

11

1

1

0

$275,212

Mr. Instigator

$43,938

43

$13,263

14

$22,500

Pomeroy

Boundary

Vinery

$238,001

26

10

0

0

0

$238,001

Rough'n Royal

$45,117

57

$25,372

36

$24,881

With Distinction

Storm Cat

Hartley/De Renzo

$234,597

28

9

0

0

0

$237,045

Decisive Moment

$37,170

47

$21,591

38

$47,874

Bring the Heat

In Excess (IRE)

Ward Ranch

$195,027

4

2

1

1

0

$195,027

Madman Diaries

$157,822

1

$1,000

Mass Media

Touch Gold

Journeyman Stud

$194,388

13

6

1

1

0

$194,388

Beso Grande

$39,087

13

$5,008

8

$13,000

Bwana Charlie

Indian Charlie

Journeyman Stud

$165,188

12

4

0

0

0

$165,188

Tristanme

$59,690

4

$7,600

10

$19,650

60 THE FLORIDA HORSE â&#x20AC;˘ SEPTEMBER 2010


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Most Unlikely of Dramas ’m here to gallop Lisa’s Booby Trap,” said Janice Blake on a perfect August Sunday morning outside a restaurant near the stable gate at Saratoga. “I’ve been here about 15 minutes. You’re the second person I’ve seen who I know.” Blake is a jockey, wife of the legendary Braulio Baeza, and was summering at Finger Lakes Racetrack, where the most unlikely feel-good story racing has seen in many years began. “I should be riding this horse,” she said. “I was galloping her but had a double call when she was entered for the first time. “One guy had about 10 horses. This guy’s shirt was hanging out of the back of his pants and he had one. So … ” By the time Blake arrived, Lisa’s Booby Trap was already the toast of Saratoga, where she won the Loudonville Stakes, a minor event to be sure but a stakes victory at the Spa nevertheless. Tim Snyder, the owner, trainer, Runyonesque character and muse behind the clubfooted 3-year-old filly, had been visited by scores of reporters, Dateline NBC and a screenwriter since Lisa’s Booby Trap rallied from last to famous on that otherwise unremarkable afternoon at the Spa. His shirt still hung out from the back of his jeans as he trailed his exercise rider to the restaurant door, but almost everything else in the life of Tim Snyder was different. His big horse, however far-fetched this tale, had arrived. “Been a helluva few weeks,” Snyder said. “And fun.” The families that once dominated American breeding and racing, people prominent in the history and legend of Saratoga, are all but vanished. Nowadays, the industry is dominated internationally by Middle Eastern juggernauts that buy what they want whenever they wish, wherever it may be found and deeply resourced, dualhemisphere operations that shuttle stallions and purchase yearlings with awesome vigor. At the spectrum’s other extreme are people who

by Paul Moran

Tim Snyder and Florida-bred Lisaʼs Booby Trap

62 THE FLORIDA HORSE • SEPTEMBER 2010

COGLIANESE PHOTO

“I

travel perpetually uphill, swim against the current, accept long odds; people who know the waning value of a buck, who dream the same dream they dream in Dubai and Ballydoyle but in less lavish surroundings and outgunned most of the time – people like Tim Snyder. Between the extremes, patrons of the turf are in the main a sampling of the American socioeconomic tapestry. The allure for all is the singular quest that has brought Tim Snyder into the public eye, a principal in the most unlikely of dramas, a horse like Lisa’s Bobby Trap. Every so often, a horse comes along from nowhere– a horse with a sweet story that reminds everyone why it is that we do this, pursue the nearly impossible with unreasonable zeal. The right horse, whatever the origin, can change your life. She is by Drewman, bred in Florida at Ocala Stud, blind in the left eye and given away as hopeless. Eventually, Snyder, who had found his way back to racing after a few years a spent at odd jobs in California that followed the death of his wife, Lisa, made a $2,000 payment – every cent he had to his name—on the still-unnamed filly, taking the money from his boot and promising the balance—if she ever won a race. Having taken ownership of a filly that had left only the impression a being hopelessly slow with anyone she had ever encountered brought pause. “After I bought this horse, I really thought I had made a big mistake. I took a big gamble,” Snyder said. Three Finger Lakes laughers later, Lisa’s Booby Trap had become a small-track celebrity and was on her way to the bright lights of Saratoga. By then, newspaper accounts told the far-fetched story of the filly that Snyder believes is propelled by the spirit of his late wife, who had expressed a wish to be reincarnated as a racehorse. The filly is partially her namesake, partially named for a club near Calder Race Course of which Snyder is fond. She promptly won the Loudonville Stakes by six lengths, going away to an appreciative ovation usually reserved for a Grade 1 champion. There is a turf course for training at the Spa and shortly after her first stakes win Snyder sent Lisa’s Booby Trap for a work over the weeds with an eye on race over that surface in early September. By now, she will likely have encountered her first defeat or the ascent of her unlikely rising star will have steepened. Either way, stay tuned. ■


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TheFloridaHorseSept.2010  

The Florida Horse September Issue 2010

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