Page 1

STUDENTS COMBAT THE FLU LIFE 1B

Feb. 7, 2013

Volume 81, Issue 19

www.FlorAla.net

Student newspaper p p of the University of North Alabama

STEP SING 2013

ALPHA GAM TAKES TOP PRIZE

Faculty, staff make suprise performance KALI DANIEL

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Alpha Gamma Delta won overall in show and first place in the women’s division in the 2013 Step Sing show Feb. 2 and 3. “When they called our name, I really couldn’t control my reaction,” said Courtney Geiger, a UNA freshman and sister of Alpha Gamm Delta. “I just started screaming. During our practices, we all were really crazy and sometimes we would get off course, so there was a thought that we might have goofed off too much and weren’t going to pull off the win. “We had a legacy to uphold, and none of us wanted to be the class to end the winning streak. It was a really good time for me to bond with my sisters, and it was a ton of fun getting on that stage.” The Student Government Association’s University Programming Council hosted the annual Step Sing competition with proceeds benefiting United Way. The seven fraternities and sororities and Honors Program groups who competed in the event performed self-written song and dance routines pertaining to this

year’s theme, “Adventures in Wonderland.” The Honors Program won first place in the co-ed division, Phi Gamma Delta placed first in the men’s division and Alpha Delta Pi took second in the women’s division to Alpha Gamma Delta.

WE HAD A LEGACY TO UPHOLD, AND NONE

OF US WANTED TO BE THE CLASS TO END THE WINNING STREAK.

COURTNEY GEIGER Students from each participating organization lined the hallways with buckets to collect money for United Way both evenings. The money from each organization was counted the final evening to determine the group that collected the most. Zeta Tau Alpha collected

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photo by MICHAEL REDDING I Staff Photographer

Members of Alpha Gamma Delta perform duing Step Sing 2013 in Norton Auditorium Feb. 2.

ADMINISTRATION

Board of trustees spot sits vacant after Robbinsʼ death

Officials to begin search for replacement soon JOSH SKAGGS

-`MK]\Q^M-LQ\WZ R[SIOO[(]VIML] With the death of UNA trustee Harvey Robbins, officials now have the task of replacing Robbins as an active trustee. University spokesman Josh Woods

INSIDE

this week’s paper

said UNA President Bill Cale has been in discussions with Alabama Governor Robert Bentley’s office to find a replacement. “It’s a fairly simple process, basically, anyone can nominate individuals for a board appointment or one can

NEWS................2A IMAGES..............4A VIEWPOINTS.........7A

LIFE...............1B SPORTS...........5B EXTRA.............8B

ROBBINS

apply themselves through the governor’s office,” Woods said. In Alabama, the governor appoints trustees and seeks approval from the legislature, he said. “Obviously with him being a current

board member, we would want the process to move forward quickly, but ultimately that power is within the governor’s office,” Woods said. Last week, the Shoals and UNA communities mourned the loss of Robbins. Robbins, 80, died Jan. 30. He

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MORE IMAGES FROM STEP SING... 4A&5A


2A NEWS

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

CRIME

Police investigate recent robbery PACE HOLDBROOKS

Local police are investigating a recent robbery at Grandview Apartments. Arrest warrants have been posted for two suspects involved in the armed robbery of UNA students. “Two white male subjects entered into a house over there on the premise that there was a party going on, and we don’t know if there was a party or not,” said Bob Pastula, UNA police chief. “They knocked on the door, got in the house. One man had brass knuckles and one had a pistol to rob the gentlemen.” Pastula said the crime appears to have been premeditated and that officials are

unsure of how the robbers selected the victims. He said crimes like this one have happened before, referring to incidents in which students were walking home before encountering armed robbers. “In one instance a girl walking back from class was approached by an armed robber and taken to an ATM,” he said. “We also had a group of international students robbed by the Applebee clusters while walking home one night. These students were doing what we told them by walking together, but they were attacked by a group.” Pastula said that in these cases the victims were at a disadvantage, although campus crime can be avoided if students take certain precautions.

SGA

WOMEN

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“The girl that was robbed at the ATM was going back to classes in broad daylight,” he said. “It’s important for students to always be aware of what’s around them and try to not walk alone. If you live off campus, try not to do things to bring attention to yourself like having parties and letting random people in.” The most recent crimes at UNA involve a series of bike thefts, with four incidents of campus crime being reported, according to the UNA police department’s crime logs. Pastula said campus crime has begun to decrease in the past few months. “We caught the guys (who were stealing bikes from racks) and the bikes have been recovered,” he said. “A lot of these

ITʼS IMPORTANT FOR STUDENTS TO ALWAYS BE AWARE OF WHATʼS AROUND THEM AND TRY NOT TO WALK ALONE. IF YOU LIVE OFF CAMPUS,

TRY NOT TO DO THINGS THAT DRAW ATTENTION TO YOURSELF.

BOB PASTULA recent crimes are crimes of opportunity, so we’re trying to keep an eye on that stuff. We’ve increased the Lion Alerts on campus to make everyone pay attention

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Handbook Campus wears denim for rape awareness change fails in Senate HALEY WRIGHT

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SGA Senate voted in opposition to a resolution regarding grading practices in the faculty handbook Jan. 31. “Any time there is a change to the handbook, it must pass in the form of a resolution through all three senates: faculty, staff and student,” said Will Riley, SGA president. Student senators were confused during the meeting due to certain words and phrases used in the presented document. Riley searched for clarification on certain words in the amendments to help fuel the discussion. “Does ‘re-evaluate’ mean ‘recompute’ or ‘reconsider?’” Riley said. “I was told they mean ‘recompute.’” After clarification, senators Tyree Fletcher and Mary-Francis Wilson voiced opinions against it because they had newer versions of the document. Wilson said the document had been amended twice since the previous week’s meeting. “We can pass it with revision,” Riley said. “We can pass it with our suggestions with what we think.” Senate will vote on the document later this week once Riley receives an updated copy from faculty senate, Riley said. Senate also met to discuss extended holiday breaks. SGA has been working to lengthen the breaks for the past year, but the proposal had been turned down by faculty senate due to conflicts with night classes. Susan Sharp, guest speaker from the registrar’s office, was present to discuss plans for an extended fall or Thanksgiving break. “If you add two extra days to one of the breaks you have to be willing to give up two days somewhere else,” Sharp said.

photo by KAYLA SLOAN I Chief Photographer

Mary Francis Wilson donates money at the Jeans for Justice table in the GUC with Jean Ann Willis and Genna Bradley. Jeans for Justice at UNA raised $161 this year to donate to Rape Response of the Shoals.

ELISE COFIELD

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A number of UNA students and faculty dressed in denim Jan. 29 in support of Jeans for Justice, an annual, nationwide event promoted by the Center for Women’s Studies. Emily Kelley, coordinator of the Center for Women’s Studies, said Jeans for Justice is an event that spreads awareness about sexual violence. Jeans for Justice began in the early 2000s as a national outcry about a 1999 Italian Supreme Court decision that overturned a rape conviction because the girl was wearing jeans. The case was overturned on the premise that it would have been impossible for

an assailant to remove her jeans without her consent. “Rape Response is hoping people will use this time to talk about harmful attitudes — not just that ridiculous, total lack of reasoning that went into the Supreme Court decision,” Kelley said. She also said anyone could participate by wearing jeans or donating $1 or more to support Rape Response of the Shoals. The Women’s Center was stationed at a table in the GUC from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. accepting donations and handing out flyers about sexual violence awareness. The proceeds, which totaled $161, were donated to Rape Response to help victims of rape, Kelley said. “For the most part, we had a steady stream of people coming to the table,”

said Jean Ann Willis, a UNA senior and one of five volunteers running the table. “We had several that stopped by and wanted to know what we were doing.” Willis, a survivor of domestic violence, said it was incredible to be able to share her story and hear others do the same. “I think that just being there and being able to listen and provide information is empowering,” she said. Kelley said the main goal was to combat a general lack of awareness about sexual assault and rape. “People have been very generous,” she said. “We tell people they can give $1 or more, and a lot of people have given more. As far as I know, the amount we have raised has risen each year.”


FEATURE 3A

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

SGA

WHAT WE SEE, WHAT THEY DO

photos by KAYLA SLOAN I Chief Photographer

(Above) Senate meets last semester in one of its weekly meetings. (Below) Students participate in last semester’s voter rally, an SGA-sponsored event.

Senate explains process of campus change BLYTHE STEELMAN 7VTQVM-LQ\WZ J[\MMTUIV(]VIML]

Every Thursday afternoon a small group of students meets to discuss legislation, plan for campus events and try to create change on UNA’s campus.

These students constitute the legislative branch of SGA, known as the Senate. The group is divided into five committees: Budget Oversight, Legislative Affairs, Rules and Regulations, Student Welfare, and Elections and Recruitment. Each committee oversees a different

aspect of Senate, working toward different goals that the group sets at the start of each year. SGA President Will Riley said Senate gets things done through two processes. “The first (process) is internal, which covers things like amendments or changes to the code of laws,” Riley said. “The second process, for university policy changes, is a little more complicated. If there’s something in the university policy we want to change, we have to submit it to the Shared Governance Committee.” Riley said there are three senates — faculty, staff and SGA — and any university policy changes must pass in all three before going back to Shared Governance. “Once every senate group has the yea or nay, the Shared Governance committee will then take it to the higher powers or constituent groups,” Riley said. “The entire process takes at least a month, if not longer.” Passing university policy changes takes at least a month because not all senates meet weekly, Riley said. One of the resolutions Senate worked to pass last fall was a university policy change for Thanksgiving break. The resolution would increase the break from three to five days and eliminate fall break, Riley said. “It was kind of like we sat down and played chess with the academic calendar,” he said. “We couldn’t just take away days, so we had to see what we could work with.”

MOST STUDENTS DONʼT REALIZE THAT A LOT

OF THE THINGS WE WORK ON ARE THINGS THAT WEʼRE PLANNING FOR AT LEAST A YEAR AHEAD.

WILL RILEY The resolution passed in two senates but failed in the third, so it did not make it back to Shared Governance, Riley said. “Most students don’t realize that a lot of the things we work on are things that we’re planning for at least a year ahead,” he said. “We have the goals, the tangible things for students to see that we do, but then there are many other things that SGA does that seem abstract.” SGA Treasurer Laura Giles created and oversees the budgets for both the University Program Council (UPC) and Senate. She said the financial side of achieving goals is a little bit easier. “No matter what we’re doing or pulling money for, it comes from the same budget,” Giles said. While the business office prefers that requests be made at least two weeks in advance, Giles said she typically requires three weeks’ notice for requesting money. “The process is fairly quick,” she said. “A request can go through in just a few days. (The business office) handles it after I fill out the request form. We’ve never had a request for funds denied.”

Students cite sense of disconnection from Senate ” TEENA PATEL

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Students spoke their minds on SGA’s performance this year. Some students said they feel a sense of disconnection from the campus SGA. Tahirih Erisson, UNA sophomore, said SGA needs to advertise and communicate more with the student body. “There aren’t really clear ways of participating,” Erisson said. “I’d be more likely to participate if I knew more of the day-to-day stuff.” Erisson said SGA should advertise open meetings and keep social media sites updated. She also said she would like to see a UNA.edu webpage for SGA instead of one just on OrgSync. “I want a list of who’s representing me,” she said. Jacob Ezell, another UNA sophomore, said he feels similarly toward the SGA Senate. While Ezell said he appreciates University Program Council (UPC) events that include cultural programs and speakers that students can connect to, he feels there is a lack of communication from the SGA Senate. “I feel like we don’t see the Senate as much as UPC,” Ezell said. “I would like to know more of their direct impact.” While he said SGA does a good job of reaching out to the international community, SGA should team up more with the Women’s Center and also bring out events for racial minority groups and the LGBTQ community. Ezell said he would like to hear more directly from SGA, rather than just getting updates from The Flor-Ala. SGA

I FEEL LIKE WE DONʼT SEE THE SENATE AS MUCH AS UPC. I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE OF THEIR DIRECT IMPACT.

JACOB EZELL could advertise their accomplishments better, he said. However, some UNA students believe students might not be doing their part to meet SGA halfway. “As far as I know, SGA put in a lot of effort to reach the students,” said Olivia Brady, a UNA freshman. Brady said she feels like SGA cannot reach the whole student body. “I do feel like they’re reaching out,” Erisson said. “I have noticed that students aren’t responsive.” Ezell said students have a responsibility to actively communicate to SGA. He said students have a fault in that they give very little feedback to SGA. “I only know about SGA through emails, but that’s on me,” Brady said. Brady said she thinks the SGA could seek out more attention, however, and get more information to students. Erisson, a part-time student who lives off campus, said moving SGA events up to earlier times in the day could go a long way. Ezell, a 2013 SOAR counselor, agreed. He thinks SGA could do a better job of recruiting older students. He said he sees SGA actively recruiting freshmen at the SOAR sessions but neglecting the older students who are more mature.


4A IMAGES

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

STEP SANGINʼ by Staff Photographer Michael Redding

I always like a good show but don’t always get a chance to see one. With a hectic class schedule, plenty of “art major”-related homework and an almost3-year-old kid at home, my dance card is perpetually filled for me. Fortunately, I sometimes get some pretty fun photo assignments. Last Saturday, for example, I had the pleasure of photographing the 2013 Step Sing competition. I shot the Step Show last semester and eagerly awaited pho-

tographing Step Sing. It did not disappoint! There are many creative students on this campus who put a lot of time and effort towards creating costumes, applying makeup, and learning their lines and dance routines. The costumes, makeup and choreography may not have been on Broadway, but the students who participated certainly did a good job and looked like they had a great time! So did I!


NEWS 5A

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

SHOW: Steppers raise money for United Way, new groups perform ;07?KWV\QV]MLNZWU XIOM)

photo by KAYLA SLOAN I Chief Photographer

(Above) Honors Program students perform during Step Sing. (Below) Administrative Assistant Juliette Butler performs during the surprise faculty/staff performance. (Below Right) History Professor Larry Nelson performs with his colleagues.

:7**16;KWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM) served on the board since February 2004 and donated to the university regularly. Most recently, Robbins donated $1 million to an endowed scholarship for students who graduate from his alma mater, Deshler High School in Tus-

cumbia. “We are very saddened, but we are very proud that he was such a close part of our university family,” Woods said. “(We are just) very saddened of his passing and our thoughts are with his family and many friends.” Officials would not speculate on a timeline for replacing Robbins but said the governor’s office will handle finding Robbins’ replacement.

$379.33, winning the People’s Choice Award for their collection. The girls of Alpha Gamma Delta performed their “Ginger Wonderland” as gingerbread women with gumdrop buttons declaring they were “sweet” in songs such as “Our House” and “Candyshop.” “I think (Alpha Gamma Delta) had the best choreography,” said Amber Miller, an audience member and student from Athens State University. “They also had the best stage presence; however, I really liked the Honors Program the most. They had the most current music, and I was surprised at the creativity because, well, they’re honors students.” The Honors Program sang to an adventure theme following Pixar’s film “Up.” Song choices included “Gangnam Style” and “Headstrong.” “I think we did as much as was reasonable,” said Michael Thaxton, member of the Honors Program. “Alpha Gamma Delta was extremely clean, and they deserved their win after the time and effort they put into it. I also think Alpha Tau Omega had a fantastic show. But performing alongside those awesome honors folks was definitely a fantastic experience.” Some students said UNA President Bill Cale, Vice President of Student Affairs David Shields and other UNA faculty and staff stole the show when they performed “Call Me Maybe.”


6A NEWS

MONEY

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

PRACTICE SAFE TAX

photo illustration by CHRISTINA COVINGTON I Staff Photographer

Many students question whether or not they should file taxes in college. Financial officials say it is a good idea to file taxes regardless of requirements in order to be eligible for a tax refund when employers withhold taxes from paychecks.

Officials emphasize keeping good records for paying taxes in college KAYLA SLOAN

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Whether you are filing for the first time or you are a seasoned tax pro, filing taxes can be intimidating. The first step in tackling your taxes is determining whether you are required to or should file taxes. According to the guidelines of the Internal Revenue Service, when your standard deduction amount and the exemption amount for dependents claimed equals less than your income, you are required to file taxes. You might want to file even if you are not required to. If your employer has been withholding taxes, you may be owed a tax refund.

UNA student Nicole DeVaney chose to file taxes on her own for the first time this tax season. DeVaney, a self-employed photographer, decided to file taxes independently because of a major increase in her income. “It’s been easy,” she said. “You just have to be responsible and keep up with everything. I save my receipts for everything I spend for school.” H&R Block Agent Roz Wilson emphasized keeping good records to get good returns. “If a student is claiming themselves on their taxes, then they can take their tuition fees and books, and some of that might get them a credit,” Wilson said. DeVaney plans to take her tax return

FIVE TAX TIPS FOR STUDENTS 1. EVERY DAY IS TAX DAY: KEEP GOOD RECORDS OF YOUR EXPENSES AND STAY ORGANIZED. 2. FILE, FILE, FILE: EVEN IF YOUR INCOME IS NOT HIGH ENOUGH TO REQUIRE YOU TO FILE, IF YOU HAD TAXES DEDUCTED FROM YOUR PAYCHECK, YOU MUST FILE TO GET THOSE TAXES BACK.

3. DONʼT AUTOMATICALLY DO THE EZ THING: CHECK TAX FORMS TO SEE WHICH ONE WILL ALLOW YOU TO CLAIM THE MOST IN DEDUCTIONS AND CREDITS.

4. FIND FREE HELP: THE IRS HAS MANY LOCAL VOLUNTEER SITES AS WELL AS FREE E-FILING IF YOU QUALIFY.

5. TAKE THE EXTRA CREDIT: THERE ARE MANY CREDITS COLLEGE STUDENTS CAN CLAIM ON THEIR TAXES SUCH AS THE HIGHER ED EXPENSE DEDUCTION.

FROM GOODFINANCIALCENTS.COM

and put it back into her schooling. Some students may not feel up to filing by themselves and wish to seek help from a professional. Thankfully, services are available online and locally to aid in the process. “Right now H&R Block is doing a free 1040EZ, which is the real simple tax return, until Feb. 15,” Wilson said. TurboTax and the IRS also offer Free File software online for those earning $57,000 or less. UNA student Anthony Leggett decided to file with help from professionals. “I think it is easier to file with someone than by yourself,” he said. “That way you don’t make any mistakes.” Leggett found the filing process simple with the help of a tax agent.

”I

F A STUDENT IS CLAIMING THEMSELVES

ON THEIR TAXES, THEN THEY CAN TAKE THEIR

TUITION FEES AND BOOKS, AND SOME OF THAT MIGHT GET THEM A CREDIT.

ROZ WILSON “My return is all going to my housing bills to help out my mom,” he said. Most tax services advise getting an early start on preparing your taxes to minimize stress during the process. The IRS tax filing deadline is April 15.


VIEWPOINTS 7A

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

OUR VIEW When it comes to retention...

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF UNIVERSITY OF NORTH ALABAMA

THE

JOSH SKAGGS EXECUTIVE EDITOR ALEX LINDLEY NEWS/MANAGING EDITOR ANN HARKEY LIFE EDITOR MALISA MCCLURE SPORTS EDITOR JARED MCCOY COPY/OPINION EDITOR BLYTHE STEELMAN ONLINE EDITOR LAURA IVIE BUSINESS MANAGER CORTNEY OLIVER GRAPHIC DESIGNER ALEX GOUIN AD REPRESENTATIVE MATTHEW WILSON CIRCULATION MANAGER KAYLA SLOAN CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER CHRISTINA COVINGTON MICHAEL REDDING ALLI OWNBY STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS REBECCA WALKER ADVISER

CHANGE DIRECTIONS

Letters Policy The Flor-Ala welcomes and encourages Letters to the Editor. • The deadline for submitting letters is 10 a.m. Monday, the week of publication. • Letters must not exceed 400 words. • Letters must be accompanied by the writerʼs name, mailing address, phone number and email. • The Flor-Ala prefers to publish your letters exactly as written, but reserves the right to reject slanderous or libelous material. • The publication of any letter is left to the discretion of the Editorial Board. • Priority is given to letters critical of The Flor-Ala, or written in direct response to an editorial, a column, or a news story. • When the editors deem it necessary for ease of understanding or to clarify facts, an Editorʼs Note may accompany a letter. • Address correspondence to The Flor-Ala. UNA Box 5300, Florence, AL 35632. Email: florala@una.edu. • Phone: 256-765-4364 Copyright © 2013 The Flor-Ala All rights reserved. First copy free. Additional copies $1 each.

photo by MICHAEL REDDING I Staff Photographer

The Academic Commons Building is constructed on the south side of campus.

Officials should focus less on academics in retention issues In recent weeks, university officials have unveiled their tentative plan to improve the university’s retention rates. Administrative leaders have discussed improving campus-wide academic support offerings during open forums and in meetings with the board of trustees. The problem with retention starts at the beginning of the academic career—at the admissions process. Leaders should focus on tightening standards for admission to UNA. Students who are not ready for the academic rigor of the university should not be admitted. The university should be seen as a tough academic environment from the beginning to prospective students. Sure, UNA admits students who are ready for school or can handle the stresses of a collegiate environment, but some students who just can’t handle it slip through the cracks. If the issue is academic, then it’s a flat-out refusal by students to utilize the resources already available to them. The Center for Academic Advising and Retention Services offers one-on-one tutoring in any subject. And has anyone heard complaints that CAARS needs a bigger building to work effectively? For that matter, has anyone complained that the Center for Writing Excellence needs better facilities to effectively help students with their papers? No, of course not. And both CAARS and the Writing Center appear to be going strong. So, what exactly are we spending all this money on? A shiny, new building and programs we don’t need. This issue is not academic. Students won’t receive better academic assistance just because the assistants are housed in a bigger building or under a new program. The bigger issue is financial.

More than 75 percent of students leaving UNA each year are in good standing when they get to UNA as freshmen, according to research done by administrators. According to the data, the issue can’t be academics; it must have to deal with money or other obstacles. For the most part, the officials in charge of aiding students and improving the retention rate at UNA should keep tuition at a manageable rate and offer the best financial aid possible. Interim Director of CAARS Kenda Rusevlyan said during an open forum last week that students typically leave school because factors other than academics. “A lot of it is life got in the way,” she told attendees. Rusevlyan said many students have to leave school because of their kids, jobs or family dynamics at the time. UNA isn’t affordable anymore for students and has lost its cost advantage to other schools in Alabama. Tuition has been going up for years sometimes 5-10 percent. Compared to other schools in the state, UNA’s tuition is very close in price, according to tuition data from Alabama universities. Administrators took a step in the right direction by placing all of the academic services in the same building that their financial aid offices will be in, but more should be done. Tuition needs to be controlled and students need more support financially, before we support programs that are already working. Sure, UNA is a business and needs to stay afloat, but businesses don’t spend money on programs and services they don’t need. The views expressed in this staff editorial are the collective opinions of The Flor-Ala’s editorial board.

Students should feel pride

BLYTHE STEELMAN 7VTQVM-LQ\WZ J[\MMTUIV(]VIML]

I regret not going to Step Sing before this year. The competition, coupled with the camaraderie of the audience and participants, made for an exciting performance by some of UNA’s most talented student organizations (and faculty and staff members!). More than that, though, I was overwhelmed by the sense of pride and appreciation I have to attend a university such as UNA. When you get right down to it, we have the privilege of attending what is, in my opinion, an amazing university. When I came to UNA, I was taken aback by the faculty and staff. I have never seen a group of professors and administrators more dedicated to student success. I don’t know of many universities where students regularly interact with the administration or can stop by a professor’s office and just chat for an hour about what’s going on in their lives. I also am continually impressed with the tight-knit community at UNA. While last weekend was a competition, all eight participating student organizations came together for one central cause. Yes, we’re divided daily on a number of different things — age, major, organizations — but past that, we’re just +7,000 students who have (or should have) a deep love for UNA and our fellow Lions. There is no better time to be a UNA student than right now: we’re in the midst of transitioning to bigger and better athletics programs, our faculty and staff members are working endlessly to strengthen our academic programs and RSOs all across campus are continually doing something for the greater good of this community. You don’t have to be in every organization on campus. We’re more than the academic departments we find ourselves spending four years in. We’re UNA students and we should feel a sense of pride in that. So, my challenge to you is this: be proud of UNA and the fact that you’re a student here. We have a great support system in the faculty and staff, as well as fellow students. Stand united and remember that even through our differences, we’re all part of the pride.


8A NEWS

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

COMMUNITY

Student studies volunteer patterns

photo courtesy of JACINDA BYROM

Jacinda Byrom holds Eve, one of the cats from the Corinth-Alcorn Animal Shelter in Corinth, Miss.

CORINNE BECKINGER ;\INN?ZQ\MZ KJMKSQVOMZ(]VIML]

Psychology students at UNA are working to learn what truly motivates a volunteer in a study led and conducted by graduate student Jacinda Byrom. Her study “Art for the Shelter” will focus on high school students’ involvement and work with animal shelters in Florence and in Corinth, Miss. “It started as an independent study last semester,” Byrom said. “I rotated weekly between the two shelters and got to know the directors very well. We asked them what they needed.” After discussing her ideas with her adviser, assistant professor of psycholo-

gy Gabriela Carrasco, Byrom decided to create a contest that would occur among high school students at the AlcornCorinth Animal Shelter. Byrom and Carrasco noticed a cycle that occurs in volunteers in which volunteers begin feeling excited initially about their involvement but gradually become bitter and defeated, resulting in the curtailment of their volunteerism. Byrom hopes to study the cycle and find a solution to a volunteer’s lack of motivation through the contest. “We found an article that said when someone is volunteering using their talents and skills, they become more committed,” she said. Byrom developed the “Art for the Shelter” program to observe the students’ motivation levels while they volunteered in hopes that the shelters would benefit from the interaction with the younger group while allowing the high school students to show off their creativity. “(The high school students) are more energetic with more ideas,” Byrom said. “They have a lot of ways to motivate others.” Over an eight-week period, students will have an opportunity to plan and design necessary changes they want to see in the Alcorn-Corinth Animal Shelter. The winning designers will have the opportunity to make their designs a reality during their spring break the final week of March. Professors from UNA will help judge the designs March 2.

WE FOUND AN ARTICLE THAT SAID WHEN

SOMEONE IS VOLUNTEERING USING THEIR TALENTS AND SKILLS, THEY BECOME MORE COMMITTED.

JACINDA BYROM Students will also compete against one another for scholarship money in which the first-place winner will receive a $100 scholarship and the second-place winner will receive a $50 scholarship. Carrasco said she was unsurprised with Byrom’s enthusiasm for project. “I just let her go,” Carrasco said. “We meet to discuss the research aspect. It’s really just research dialogue.” Although the Corinth shelter is currently receiving the most attention, Byrom and Carrasco are optimistic about the aid for the Florence shelter. “Both things are constantly evolving,” Carrasco said. Both women are asking for donations from the community to help the students make their designs come alive. “We need food, cash, gently used cabinets and supplies,” Byrom said. “We aren’t going to turn down additional scholarships either.” To provide help or to learn more about the contest, visit Art for the Shelter’s blog at artfortheshelter.weebly.com or contact Byrom at artfortheshelter@gmail.com.

:7**-:AKWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM) to what goes on around them.” In comparison to the 2011-2012 school year, the crime logs indicate that fewer incidents have taken place this school year. Pastula said he believes Lion Alerts contribute to greater student awareness, which may have a favorable effect on future crime rates. “If (a local crime) seems relevant, if it poses a threat to students, we’ll send out an alert,” he said. “There really is no set rule for how we do the alerts. We are just required to send them out within a reasonable time.” Tim LeVan, a junior majoring in criminal justice and political science, said crimes in Florence get more coverage because they don’t happen as often as in other cities. “I think if people don’t feel safe, they should take advantage of the (Student Nighttime Auxillary Patrol) team,” he said. “If they feel that something is about to go down, they should call the police. (Call) the SNAP team, especially for girls, or get guy friends to escort you, even if you’re not scared.” Carrie Bailey, a junior at UNA, said that although her tires were slashed last year, she feels safer living on campus. She said many of her friends who live off campus are now taking more precaution. “I’ve actually always felt safe on campus; I just don’t know if my car is safe on campus,” she said. “I think (UNA police) do a good job, and I do feel like they are trying to make progress to do a better job.”


LIFE

SECTION B

Feb. 7, 2013• The Flor-Ala • Life Editor: Ann Fartkey 256-765-5233

Fear the flu Students take precautions to prevent catching norovirus HALEY WRIGHT

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A student in western Ohio recently died after a battle with influenza, commonly known as the flu. This event has drawn attention to the severity of catching this virus. The student died from influenza A virus, which university health systems nurse practitioner Melissa Ward said is the common strand of the flu this year. “That was probably just a more severe case, but there are multiple deaths every year from the flu,” she said. Although there have been multiple cases of the flu on UNA’s campus this year, Ward said there has been a decline in numbers since winter break.

UNA students are aware of the high chances of catching flu and are taking necessary precautions. Junior Allison Stover said she has had the flu shot and takes a vitamin C supplement daily. “I keep hand sanitizer with me at all times, and my parents are in the health care profession, so we are always sanitizing everything at my house,” she said. Junior Avy Stansbury also said she takes vitamin C constantly. “I wash my hands like crazy,” Stansbury said via Twitter. “Also, at work we Lysol and Clorox everything daily.” While good hand washing and vita-

mins are beneficial, the best way to prevent the flu is to get the vaccine, Ward said. “It’s not too late to get the flu vaccine,” she said. “It takes two weeks to gain immunity.” The symptoms of the flu include a high fever of 100 degrees or more, cough, sore throat and body aches. To decrease the severity of the illness, someone with these symptoms should see a health care provider within 48 hours, Ward said. Besides the flu, there is another virus prevalent in the UNA community that students should be concerned with. There have been multiple people diagnosed with Norovirus, formerly known

as Norwalk virus. This virus caused schools in Muscle Shoals to close last year because of the extreme amount of students absent due to the virus. Using the same tactics to prevent the flu can prevent Norovirus; however, the virus differs in symptoms. Diarrhea and vomiting are associated with the Norovirus but not the body aches or fever, Ward said. “Norovirus can last anywhere from two to five days,” she said. “Drink clear liquids for 24 to 48 hours unless you become dehydrated; then you should be seen.”

SEXUAL HEALTH

Condom vending machines not likely at UNA LYNN ECCELSTON

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Imagine your finger slips as you punch C-4 into the vending machine after class, and instead of the Peanut M&M’s you were craving, a gleaming new pack of condoms pops out. If you attend Vanderbilt University or the University of New Hampshire, this could be your reality. These

schools are among the universities that sell condoms in vending machines to offer more convenient access for students. While UNA provides students with an unlimited amount of free condoms from both the University Health Services and the Center for Women’s Studies, as well as selling condoms in the convenience store located next to Towers Dining Room, the university does not sell condoms in vending machines.

Director of Residence Life Kevin Jacques said that while he personally has nothing against it, from a business standpoint, he does not know if placing condoms in vending machines would be worth doing when students can go to Health Services. “We’ve had feminine hygiene vending machines that didn’t get used at all,” he said. When the machines were removed, some 10-year-old products were found

inside. Emily Kelley, Coordinator for Women’s Studies, said UNA receives free condoms (most come from the Lauderdale County Health Department), so there is no reason for the university to charge. “I don’t think the school wants to make money off of people’s sexual habits,” Kelley said. “I think the school

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2B LIFE

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

RELATIONSHIPS

Sleeping with significant other may lead to relationship problems ences. “These problems center around different things and sleeping together could definitely be one of them.” Without angrily pulling out the kindergarten cot or pitching the tent in the backyard, Paulk gives tips on how to bring up the subject of your sleeping partner’s bad habits lightly. She said sleeping is as much a physical experience as it is an emotional and mental one. “Communication is key,” she said. “Come up with some options.” Many couples are facing a simple dilemma: ignore it or address the problem directly? “96% of the time, the way a conversation starts is the way it will end,” Paulk said. She suggests a calm, “sandwich” approach to structure a difficult conversation. The first slice of bread — a positive statement about how you’re so lucky to have Mr./Ms. Right in your life — should set the tone for the conversation. The meat and cheese — pointing out the problem at hand — should still be calm but very direct. The final piece of bread — another positive reassurance that your partner is the greatest — should be lighthearted and sincere. Fight the urge to channel your angry inner Bruce Lee by tying on an imaginary apron and making a sandwich. It may not be tasty or satisfying, but it will be healthy for you and your relationship. UNA marketing major Kayla

photo illustration by KAYLA SLOAN I Chief Photographer

According to the Mayo Clinic Online, adults should receive seven to nine hours of sleep each night to be healthy.

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After a few jabs at the ribs and countless kicks in the side, when is it time to tell your boxer-of-a-partner enough is enough? Catching z’s with your significant other may have become a cultural norm,

but it may not have the fairytale effect people are looking for. Snoring, sleep-walking, sprawling and sleep-talking are all common subconscious habits that may drive sleeping partners out of the bed and into straitjackets. “The amount of sleep you need depends on various factors, especially your age,” said Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler

from the Mayo Clinic Online. In order to be deemed “healthy,” adults should receive seven to nine hours of sleep each night. With your partner’s sleeping techniques punching, prodding, and poking at your nerves, how is sleep even in the cards? “69 percent of all couples’ problems are unsolvable,” said Amber Paulk, UNA professor of human environmental sci-

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LIFE 3B

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

ACADEMIC

LOCAL TALENT

Learning languages helps with career opportunities

Music in the Shoals

ELISE COFIELD

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English is the official language of the business world, according to an article released last May by Harvard Business Review. The same article reported that 1.75 billion people worldwide (about one in four) speak English on some level. Some Americans hear these statistics and become complacent by thinking English is the only important language, said Dillon Green, a UNA senior double majoring in French and Spanish. “We’re not forced to learn another language in America,” he said. “You can go from Maine to California and be just fine speaking only English.”

WHEN IʼM SPEAKING ANOTHER LANGUAGE, I FEEL LIKE ANOTHER ME.

DILLON GREEN Claudia Vance, chair of the department of foreign languages at UNA, said that, while English has been the global language of business for several decades, it is not (and probably will never be) the official language outside of business. In fact, the most widely spoken language in the world is not English but Chinese, she said. For this reason, it is imperative that English speakers take the time to learn a second language, she said. “Think about how much more valuable your business transactions would be if you meet halfway instead of forcing (others) to speak your language,” Vance said. “That bridging the gap is as important as anything when you do business.” Jinsol Kim, an exchange student at UNA from South Korea, has been learning to speak English since age 7, in addition to speaking Korean and Japanese. She said a basic requirement for a job in Korea is the ability to read and write English. “Koreans are crazy about learning English,” she said. “When I go back to Korea, they will envy that I can communicate with Americans.” Kim recalled a time while attending church in the Florence area when she heard an American recite scripture in Korean. That was the first time she had heard an American speaking her language. “I’m so thankful for him,” she said. Students at UNA also see personal advantages to learning another language. Green said that by learning French and Spanish, he has become more openminded — not just about other cultures but also about his own capabilities. “When I’m speaking another lan-

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photo by CHRISTINA COVINGTON I Staff Photographer

Local band Belial plays at the end. theater, located on Pine Street in downtown Florence.

Local artists embrace musical resurgence in Shoals BRYAN BAKER

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Ever since talk about the Swampers died out, people have wondered when the Muscle Shoals music scene would make a comeback. Local artists are anticipating and embracing resurgence in the sound of the Shoals. The “Open Mic Night” approach that Flo-Bama takes on Wednesday nights gives local artists the opportunity to showcase their talents in front of a live audience. Since its starting last semester there has been a growth in the downtown scene, according to local artists. “I’ve been waiting on this for a long time,” said Justin Holder of Drumb and Drumber and also the Local Saints. “I moved away because the music wasn’t here, but I’m glad to see it coming back around.”UNA has begun using outlets for showcasing the talent at the university. Last fall’s MEISA Showcase consist-

ed of the top 13 acts on campus. Showcase winner Rachel Wammack won free studio time at Noiseblock, a local recording studio. Local venues such as the end. theater and Pegasus Records are helping local artists be heard. Audiences are looking for sounds outside the bar scene, and these venues give musicians the opportunity for their expressions of originality. “We’re open for any style of genre to play our venue,” said Cameron Kelly-Johnson, employee at the end. theater. “We have anything from metal to spoken word poetry, but we just want people to have a chance to play.” The growth of the music scene expands past the blues, rock and roll, and soul influences and runs over into the electronic area. Since the closing of The Sandbar, the Shoals’ only nightclub, local DJs are finding and booking new venues to display their music style.

“As far as resurgence of the music scene goes, seeing the DJs book their own venues speaks for itself,” said Hunter Jackson, KISS FM personality. “The DJs are influencing the crowd to bring the energy.” Since the recording of the Black Keys album “Brothers” in 2009, there has been more and more talk about the sound of Muscle Shoals. Artist such as Tim McGraw, Gary Allen, John Paul White, Jason Isbell and Alicia Keys have recorded in the Shoals in the past two years. Earlier this year, Greg Camalier submitted his documentary “Muscle Shoals” at Sundance Film Festival. The film displays the musical history that the shoals possessed. The documentary has commentary and interviews from artist such as Bono, the Rolling Stones, Gregg Allman and Alicia Keys. The documentary is to be released in its entirety later this year.


4B LIFE

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala UNA student Zeke Nichols said he would not buy condoms from vending machines at UNA. “I don’t have sex, but if I did, I wouldn’t buy them because they would charge about three times the price, or professors or people I might know would see me buying them,â€? he said. “The only people I can see buying them are people that don’t have transportation to get them.â€? If UNA did sell condoms in vending machines, the best place to put them would be in the GUC because it is the center of campus — but off to the sides

by the bathrooms, not by the food, Nichols said. UNA student Joey Wright said he would not buy condoms from vending machines at UNA because a public university is not the place to buy condoms. It is different when the health clinic gives them away because nobody is benefitting other than the person who receives them and they are not advertising at all, he said. “If they were to be sold, it would almost be like a subliminal message to encourage promiscuity,� he said. One benefit of making condoms

;4--8KWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM*

4)6/=)/-KWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM*

Stinnett believes in the exact opposite. “Sleeping together is a piece of cake as long as I’m comfortable with them,� she said. “The part I hate is when they don’t leave. We’re going to have a problem if I get up, go to class, come back and you’re still sleeping.� Sophomore Emily Davidson is making amends for the future. “Sleeping in the same bed is so easy to do, now that I’ve done it before,� she said. “I’m changing my habits so when I meet the one guy I want to spend the rest of my life with, he won’t judge me based on my past.� Stressful situations arise in our daily lives frequently, yet those seven to nine hours we set aside for our bodies to recuperate should be tranquil. Use the sandwich approach to civilly present the problem to your sleeping partner, or else your subconscious might beat you to the punch, literally.

guage, I feel like another me,� he said. “There’s a French me and a Spanish me and an English me, and who I am now is a sum of those parts. “If you speak another language, it’s another way of thinking.� The foreign language department at UNA offers French, German and Spanish as major or minor options. In addition, courses are available by demand in critical languages such as Japanese, Arabic, Swahili and Portuguese, among others. The language in highest demand in America right now is Spanish, Vance said. “I think that, in this side of the hemisphere, we have a lot of trade that goes on with Latin America,� she said. “That’s a major factor. Also, (America has) a large population of Hispanics. For that reason, many people see it as a value to learn that language in order to open up another market that they could tap into.� Vance said picking a language to

learn is a matter of personal preference, but students should first know how they plan to use the language they choose. “I can’t see any field where it wouldn’t be an advantage to have another language,� Vance said. “No one can escape the fact that we are one big global community.�

+76,75;KWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM* really wants to encourage responsible sexual activity.� Along with the condoms, both the Women’s Center and University Health Services at Bennett Infirmary provide pamphlets explaining condom usage for safe sex. Condoms are placed in a basket just inside both the Women’s Center and the infirmary so that students can take them.

LANGUAGE COURSES UNA

• SPANISH • FRENCH • GERMAN • JAPANESE • ARABIC • SWAHILI • PORTUGUESE

available in vending machines is that both students and nonstudents would have access on weekends and evenings, Kelley said. The UNA Health Center is open Monday through Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and on Thursday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Center for Women’s Studies is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Smart Market Convenience Store is open Sunday through Thursday from 6 p.m. to 12 a.m.

AT

photo by CHRISTINA COVINGTON I Staff Photographer

Spanish is the language in highest demand in America currently, said Claudia Vance, department of foreign languages.


SPORTS 5B

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

Key Players

BASEBALL

JOSH CARPENTER SHORTSTOP ALL-GSC

JOSH CYR FIRST BASE ALL-GSC

Swingin’ for postseason photo by ALLI OWNBY I Staff Photographer

Josh Carpenter practices batting during the team’s preaseason practice on Jan. 29 at the UNA Baseball field.

Team focuses on game style, GSC regionls BLYTHE STEELMAN

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JOSH DOYLE OUTFIELD ALL-GSC

CHAD BOUGHNER PITCHER ALL-GSC photos courtesy of Sports Information

The UNA baseball team is set to begin its 2013 season at home in a doubleheader against LeMoyne-Owen College Feb. 12 at 2 p.m. Following their 39-18 season in 2012, Head Coach Mike Keehn said he is looking forward to this season. “We have lots of experience and some experienced players coming back,” Keehn said. “We have some players who were on the team last year that will have more responsibility this year, too.” Keehn said the team has about 12 returning players, and half are returning pitchers. There is about an equal amount of new players this season, he said. “Some of our new players will have significant roles out on the field,” he said. Sophomore Ben Seabrook is a returning closing pitcher for the Lions, and he said he’s excited about the season ahead. “We have a good pitching staff this

year,” he said. “And we’ve been doing well in the scrimmages. We also have a pretty solid defense.” The Lions have all four all-GSC players returning this season with Josh Cyr at first base, Josh Carpenter playing shortstop, Josh Doyle playing in the outfield and Chad Boughner taking the mound again in pitching. “We should have a pretty good year this year,” Seabrook said. Keehn said that in order to win games, he and Assistant Coach Matt Hancock will be focusing on game execution this season. “We’re concentrating on game style,” Keehn said. “Things like throwing strikes, consistent defenses and quality pitching — those things will translate into winning.” He said one of his big goals for the upcoming season is the same as any other school: to play a good season and make it into postseason play. “I think every team really has the

same goal,” he said. “We want to play well enough to play in the Gulf South Conference (GSC) regionals and even the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) games.” Seabrook echoed these goals. “I think we (returning players) all just want another shot at regionals,” Seabrook said. “We got there last year and then it didn’t work out, so we want redemption at that this year.” The team reached the NCAA South Regional Tournament last season but fell to Lynn University in Saint Leo, Fla. The Lions are currently slated to finish third in the 2013 GSC race after a poll was conducted among a league of head coaches, according to RoarLions.com. UNA falls just behind No. 1 Delta State University and No. 2 West Florida University. The Collegiate Baseball Newspaper’s Top 40 Preseason Poll has UNA (tied with Missouri-St. Louis) ranked for spot 30.

WANT THE LATEST ON TUESDAY’S GAME? Check out our website at www.florala.net.


6B SPORTS

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

BASKETBALL

SPORTS BRIEFS

D-I bound teams continue D-II success JAMES DUBUISSON ;\INN?ZQ\MZ RL]J]Q[[WV(]VIML]

While UNA continues to pursue D-I athletics, the UNA basketball teams are focusing on futhering their already successful D-II programs. Having a successful basketball program is an important part of being successful in D-1, said Mark Linder in an earlier interview. “As far as Division I and success there, it is really driven by basketball,” he said. The head coaches of the men’s and women’s teams have opposing views about the move to D-I and what part D-II success plays. “Hopefully we continue to get better,” said Terry Fowler, women’s coach. “As the net gets better as far as recruiting and as you move to D-I, you get more scholarships, which means you get an opportunity to get more talent.” Men’s head coach Bobby Champagne seems to have his focus on D-II success instead of on the D-I move. This season, both teams have seen success on the court. The men’s team won both games in the longest road trip of the year as they traveled to West Florida and Valdosta State last week. They are tied atop the Gulf South Conference with a 16-3, 9-2 record. As of Feb. 5, the men are ranked No. 22 in the National Basketball Coaches Association D-II top 25 poll. The women did not fare as well as the men, splitting the two games of the road trip. They defeated West Florida but fell to Valdosta State. After the loss, the women’s team fell behind Union and Delta State in the GSC, compiling a 14-7, 7-4 record. The women’s basketball team appears to be meshing well with good chemistry. “It is a great team; we love this team,” Fowler said. “They get along fine. We have won ballgames, but it has been fun being around this group because they are constantly trying to get better and they really like each other.” The relationships the team creates are key to the women’s team. “Our kids really like to be around each other,” Fowler said. “We have team dinners and try to have a good time. It helps build relationships, and we try to room players with different players so they can learn each other.” Coach Bobby Champagne said the men’s team chemistry was built on the early season road trips, but sometimes they are on the road and they have the mindset of “Let’s get this road trip over with and come home.” “The focus has been on being the best Division II team we can be,” Champagne said. “I haven’t really put too much focus on the Division I thing. Until it happens, I think that is when we will change gears.” With D-I schools like Samford, Jacksonville State, Austin Peay and Belmont recruiting in the same area as UNA, the recruiting trail can be difficult when competing against D-I institutions. Champagne said getting D-I talent is key to being successful in D-II. “We do compete with those guys because we are trying to get the Division I talent,” Champagne said. “That is what it takes to be successful. It makes a difference.” When it comes to a recruiting strategy,

Keepinʼ up with the Lions This weekʼs UNA scores, stats and other tidbits MENʼS BASKETBALL UNA - 74 VSU - 73 The menʼs team won a tough game at Valdosta State Feb. 2, with a basket from DeAndre Hersey with 17 seconds left and the Lions blocking VSUʼs two final scoring attmeps. WOMENʼS BASKETBALL VSU - 57 UNA - 56 After overcoming a 15-point deficit at Valdosta State Feb. 2, the womenʼs team came up one point short against the Blazers. MENʼS TENNIS (0-1) UTC - 7 UNA - 0 The menʼs team opened their season at Tennessee-Chattanooga Feb. 3, losing 7-0. WOMENʼS TENNIS (1-0) UNA - 8 UWA - 1 The womenʼs tennis team won five of six single matches to defeat West Georgia on the road Feb. 4.

photo by MALISA MCCLURE I Sports Editor

Sophomore guard Nathan Spehr makes a leap for the basket in the Jan. 19 game at UA-Huntsville.

both coaches seem to worry only about UNA and what the university has to offer. “Right now, while we are Division II, we feel like we always have a chance to get to the NCAA tournament, and we really try to sell that,” Fowler said. He also said that having the campus in the Shoals area is a great selling point for the athletic program. “We really try to sell that our program is about people, and our program is about developing relationships and developing the whole person for our team — academically, athletically and socially,” Fowler said. “We try to get kids that that is what they want to do, along with play basketball. It just kind of takes care of itself.” Champagne focuses on the players who are interested in the UNA product. “For us, we just sell our program and we don’t worry about the other programs,” Champagne said. “It is what it is. We have a product and it is either you like it or you don’t.” Both coaches see the state of the programs as a process as they nearly echo each other on what the teams need to improve on. As far as the two coaches’ futures with UNA go, Linder is positive they are the right fit for each program.

If and when UNA goes D-I, Champagne will make the changes necessary to be successful. “I don’t think that there is any correlation between Division II success and Division I success,” Linder said. “They are two different animals. We will have to change the way we do a couple of things if we do make the move.”

TRACK Kenley Crouch finished second in the womenʼs 800 meter dash at the Sewanee Tiger Indoor Track & Field Invitational Feb. 2. UNA competed against host Sewanee, Birmingham-Southern, Carson-Newman, Bethel, Millsaps, Oglethorpe and Tennessee Tech in the Lionsʼ second meet of the season.


SPORTS 7B

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

SRC

Student Recreation fee goes to gym floor, equipment CORINNE BECKINGER ;\INN?ZQ\MZ KJMKSQVOMZ(]VIML]

Students may have noticed the newly furnished floor in the Student Recreational Center (SRC) which was fully covered by the $1 student recreation fee SGA passed in spring 2012. “We allocated an extra dollar to go into the overall budget of the SRC, which produces approximately $ 134,000,” said Will Riley, SGA president.

The total cost of the new equipment and floor was $120,000. To break it down, the TRX machine with the additional equipment required for its assembly was $9,935, the Outdoor Adventure Center equipment cost $4,100 and the gym floor refurbishment cost $26, 613. Remaining funds went toward some club sports, like the newly formed UNA rugby team. “I wouldn’t have been able to do all this with the money we would have usu-

ally received,” Eubanks said. Despite former SGA President Ralph Akalonu’s support, the student recreational fee was questioned by many delegates of UPC and Senate last spring. Delegates were concerned the money could have been put to better use in other areas of campus. “I am happy to see that the previously passed bill has provided the SRC with renovating opportunities; however, I still feel that the money could have been bet-

ter allocated in other areas on campus,” said Mary-Francis Wilson, student senator. Student recreational users, intramural athletes and student staff at the SRC seem as pleased as Eubanks with the new additions, however. “I think it was worth it,” said UNA student Johnathan Newsome. “It didn’t affect the students much financially, and the sight of new equipment also creates slightly more incentive to go the SRC.”

EVERYTHING WE DO OVER HERE COMES FROM THAT (STUDENT RECREATION) FEE.

JIM EUBANKS The gym floor is refurnished annually, but the process took longer this year because a deep refurbishment was required as the gym hit its 10th year of operation. The floor was installed over a two-week period during the winter holidays with the acquired funds from the student recreational fee. “Everything we do over here comes from that fee,” said Jim Eubanks, SRC director. In addition to installing the new floor, Eubanks also ordered a TRX suspension training machine with the rubber flooring and training rope required for the machine on the second floor to be installed later in February. All of the equipment for the Outdoor Adventure Center was also replaced. “Mr. Eubanks was tasked to give the SGA a report at the end of every academic year to see where our additional dollar has been used,” Riley said. “I trust Mr. Eubanks and his staff to strategically utilize the additional funds to enhance the appearance at the Rec Center.”

IN

photo by CHRISTINA COVINGTON I Staff Photographer

Students work out and play ball in the gym portion of the SRC, where the floor has just been redone Feb. 5. The $1 student recreation fee payed for the new floor as well as new equipment for the SRC and OAC.

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8B EXTRA

Tweets of the week

Feb. 7, 2013 • The Flor-Ala DISCLAIMER: The tweets below are public tweets found on Twitter by searching hashtags and keywords involving UNA, Florence, Shoals and other university-related topics. Want to see yours on here? Be sure to hashtag UNA and Shoals in your tweets.

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