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CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS LOOKING GOOD SPORTS 6B

Aug. 29, 2013

Volume 82, Issue 2

www.FlorAla.net

Student newspaper of the University of North Alabama

FOOTBALL

ACADEMICS

Program provides suspension alternative

A Returning Legend

ANNA GRACE USERY 7VTQVM-LQ\WZ WVTQVM(NTWZITIVM\

The UNA Council of Deans has enacted the Active Suspension Program to provide an alternative to traditional suspension. The program was created two years ago after seeing a pattern of one too many cases of student mismanagement and gives students the chance to develop critical habits and skills in a structured environment, said Active Suspension Program Coordinator Robert Koch. “If students are suspended and sent home, what are they learning?” Koch said. “The goal of this program is to promote persistence to graduation. This is the first the larger picture we are working on in Advising Services to develop more programs to help students.” The program is open to students who are currently going through Suspension 1, active suspension. The program also allows students to take an active role within his or her suspension to work harder, learn new skills and habits and immediately renew dedication to academic success, according to UNA’s website. Students will receive a letter stating his or her suspension and application to the Active Suspension Program in May

IF STUDENTS ARE SUSPENDED AND SENT HOME, WHAT ARE THEY LEARNING?

ROBERT KOCH or August. Suspension is issued to students who have not maintained a minimum grade point average of 1.60 for 0-31 hours, 1.85 for 32-63 hours, 1.95 for 64-95 hours and 2.00 for 96-128 hours, according to the University Success Center’s website.

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INSIDE

this week’s paper

Photo courtsey of UNA Sports Information

Ron McKinnon (44) closes in on Pittsburg State running back LeVone Madden in the 1995 NCAA Divsion II National Championship Game. McKinnon will return to UNA Sept. 5 as the defensive linebacker coach for Miles College.

Former Lions, NFL player returns to Braly Stadium SARAH MYRICK

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With his upcoming return to Braly Stadium Sept. 5 as the defensive linebacker coach for Miles College, former UNA Defensive Lineman Ronald McKinnon said he is ready to be back on his home turf to do what he knows and loves most: football. The alumnus said he recalls memories of what it’s like to give it all on the field and come out on top. McKinnon grew up in Elba, Ala., a small town on the other side of Troy University. Growing up the youngest in a household of older brothers meant sports, especially football, were no scarcity, he said. “All my brothers played,” he said. “I was into football as a kid, but you know what? I thought I was a better basketball

NEWS................2A IMAGES..............4A VIEWPOINTS.........7A

LIFE...............1B SPORTS...........5B EXTRA.............8B

player than I was a football player. But I didn’t get any taller so I’d reckoned I’d better stick to football.” McKinnon started all four years at UNA as a defensive lineman. As a freshman, he was on the line with all-star seniors. His first game as a Lion was against Central Missouri University in 1992, and even though he was only a freshman, he said his team was counting on him during the game. That season the Lions made it to the second round of the playoffs, but lost by two points to Jacksonville State University. “After that game, we made a commitment as a football team that we were good players and a good team, and to make sure not to let that happen again,” he said. “We stayed up there during the summer, and made sure everybody had their schoolwork, passed grades and stuff

like that.” And the dedication paid off, he said. The following season, in 1993, the Lions won their first of three consecutive NCAA Division II Championship titles. Leaving UNA, McKinnon said he had a slew of awards and records on his resume. He, along with a few other UNA players, entered into the NFL draft that same year. He became a free agent and was picked up by the Arizona Cardinals, he said. He played nine seasons with the Cardinals, and one season with the New Orleans Saints, for a total of 157 games, he said. Shifting into the NFL was not as bad for McKinnon as others claimed it was for them, he said. “They are just like me and you, ex-

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Please recycle your paper.


2A NEWS

RSO

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

TECHNOLOGY

New student Email system receives mixed reviews organization desires to build leaders NICHOLE MORRIS

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The National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS) is the newest leadership organization to find its way onto campus. Led by student Kayla Stinnett and advised by Jerome Gafford of the College of Business and Bethany Oliver of the Office of Student Engagement, NSLS utilizes online and global resources and local, monthly chapter meetings to help college students develop and strengthen their leadership skills. “We want to be a credible organization that students can be a part of without feeling like they have to change a certain aspect of themselves,” Stinnett said. “We encourage students not only to learn from the speaker content and material that we provide but from each other as well.” The organization’s officers believe that a diverse group of members will be the key to developing quality leaders, Stinnett said. “(The group’s) motto is to “build leaders who make a better world,” said Matt Jones, vice president of the organization. “We as an executive council of UNA’s chapter of the national society of leadership and success are very excited to bring this to campus. I feel as if the students will benefit greatly with what all this national society has to offer.”

WE WANT TO BE A CREDIBLE OGRANIZATION THAT STUDENTS CAN BE A PART OF WITHOUT FEEL-

ING LIKE THEY HAVE TO CHANGE A CERTAIN ASPECT OF THEMSELVES.

KAYLA STINNETT

Membership in NSLS is all-inclusive, and students only need to have a 2.0 to qualify for membership, Stinnett said. Membership benefits include job-interview tips, scholarships and award notifications and an online job bank. Members of NSLS are also exposed to success networking teams and previous online broadcasts contributed to by various leaders. Past online speakers include Stephen Covey, author of “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” Lou Holtz, ESPN analyst and Bill Press, former cohost of CNN’s Crossfire. “You are able to get leadership input and mentoring from big name people in the business industry without the cost,” said Gafford. The group uses online resources, as well as interactions with other chapters through conferences and seminars members may attend. Other benefits membership in the organization brings include resume enhancement and the option to receive letters of recommendation for

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photo illustration by ALLI OWNBY I Chief Photographer

The new Office 365 email system has been met with mixed reviews since the university’s system upgrade during the summer break. While some students find the new system confusing, many students feel that it is simpler than the former system.

MATT WILSON

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University email recently upgraded to the Office 365 client for all faculty, staff and students. The upgrade, instated over the summer, features some changes in the way students will use the new system. Microsoft’s Office 365 is an online software service built around the Microsoft Office software platform. It includes software that is most familiar to students, such as Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint, said Sarah Huntley, system services manager. The change had been out for a while and UNA decided to make the upgrade

over the summer to try and limit the amount of students and faculty it affected, Huntley said. Huntley said the move to Office 365 will make access to email and other features easier. “This platform is more compatible for tablets and smartphones, and since email is an official means of communication at UNA, it will be good for students to have that instant access,” Huntley said. One problem students may run into is in order to access Office 365, the user must access it with the newest version of Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox. It is not compatible with Google’s Chrome browser.

“I hate it,” said Tyrie Fletcher, a junior at UNA. “It has just been difficult, because I use different browsers. If I’m in the library I use Mozilla, but if I’m in the GUC I’m on Internet Explorer.” Fletcher said he has also lost the contact information of several people from other universities when the system switched over. Anna Higdon, a nursing student at UNA, said she prefers the new system, since it is more compatible for her phone. “I like this new email system a lot better than the other one,” Higdon said.

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CONSTRUCTION

Wesleyan renovations surprise students TEENA PATEL

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Although Wesleyan hall still maintains a fortified exterior, many returning students and faculty are surprised at how different the newly renovated building looks on the inside. “Every time I walk into Wesleyan, I think I’m in the wrong building,” said Marcela Villagrana, a UNA junior. “The renovations will definitely take some getting used to.” The renovations took place during the summer and include new carpet, hardwood flooring, paint and ceiling tiles. “I like the (new renovations),” said Katie Lindsay, a UNA sophomore. “It

needed to be done. It was kind of a shock when I first walked in. I was like, ‘Oh, hey, something’s different about this.’” Lindsay said before the renovations were done, the building felt old and slightly ancient. She said the most needed renovation was the new ceiling tiles, which replaced ones that were waterdamaged and molded. “(After the renovations) I just thought how beautiful a building Wesleyan Hall really is,” said Keith Lindley, UNA associate professor of foreign languages. “It was kind of hard to tell before when it was not in the best state. Now, it just looks fantastic. (The renovations) have brought Wesleyan Hall to life.” Lindley said that, prior to the renova-

tions, there were weak spots in the floor and mold in some rooms. He said there was a musty smell that lingered in the hall, which has since been alleviated with the renovations. “When I walked into the building, the first thing I noticed was the purple patterns on the carpet,” Villagrana said. “I didn’t even realize the walls had been painted, because I was so surprised to see the carpets. I liked that I could see everything better, but the gray walls haven’t grown on me yet.” Villagrana, who has had classes in Wesleyan Hall for at least three years, said she had hoped university officials would not change the building too much.

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NEWS 3A

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

INTERNATIONAL

Campus community discusses political upheaval in Egypt

photo by KHALIL HAMRA I AP Photo

Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans during a protest in Giza Square, in Cairo’s sister city of Giza, Egypt, Friday, Aug. 23. Hundreds of supporters of Mohammed Morsi took to the streets Friday, holding scattered rallies across the city to test the ousted president’s allies pressure on the government.

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Although political riots in Egypt are taking place thousands of miles away from Florence, Ala., some students and faculty at UNA believe it is important for members of the campus community to be

aware of international news. “In terms of peace, the situation is changing, and it could be for the better or it could be changing for the worse,” said Leah Graham, professor of political science and adviser to the Model United Nations student group at UNA. “Egypt is a powerhouse and students should be concerned about what goes on

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in Egypt, because Egypt can influence the rest of the world. The rest of the world is directly connected to our economic political and ideological power.” Currently Egypt is in a state of turmoil, due to political uprisings and rapid changes in the holding political power, such as the removal of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi from office on July 3,

Graham said. Protests that have occurred throughout the summer are largely due to the current instability in Egypt’s government and infrastructure, which has put members of different political parties against each other. In order to deal with the protests, many political leaders, like some of those of the Muslim Brotherhood, have been imprisoned, Graham said. “People were put in jail in Egypt for being in alternative parties,” Graham said on the reasons behind the protests. “This is not religion and non-religion, like the news often portrays; this is leftistauthoritarian parties versus more conservative parties. You can’t really compare it to democrat and republican, but (these parties) are very different (from each other).” Graham said that although the situation in Egypt has begun to calm down, it is important for students to be aware of how international issues impact the rest of the world. Egypt should also be important to students because it is the setting of a number of human-rights atrocities, Graham said. “(Egyptian military) shooting down civilian protesters, putting people in jail for their political beliefs -- any of those things are human rights violations,” Graham said. Josh Smith, a junior, said he believes the situation in Egypt is to a point that warrants U.S. military involvement.

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4A IMAGES

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

A collection of vampires sits on a Film Festival chair in Cynthia Burkhead’s office.

Cynthia Burkhead’s office is lined with figurines from many movies and TV shows, including this one from the movie ‘The Exorcism.’

Beth Garfrerick’s office is tiny, but it holds things like this note on “graphorrhea.”

Solar-powered figurines of Queen Elizabeth inhabit Jeff Bibbee’s England-themed office.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS

by Chief Photographer Alli Ownby To celebrate the start of a new semester with new classes and professors, I set out on a mission: Find the coolest office on campus. My first stop was Beth Garfrerick’s office in the Communication Building. Her office is small, but cozy. She explained the room had previously been a storage closet. She has many cool artifacts from the world of journalism, including a wall of political cartoons and a humorous clock that says, “I’m on Deadline!” My journey continued to Willingham Hall, where I visited Jeff Bibbee. Walking into his office is like walking into a different country – almost everything in the room is centered around England. A tall red phone booth stands in the corner.

He also has an antique cast-iron sign from a British business and solar-powered figurines of Queen Elizabeth. I also visited Cynthia Burkhead. She has toys, figurines or posters from almost every movie, TV show and comic book imaginable! As a huge “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” fan, I was intrigued by her extensive Buffy collection, including replica Spike and Angel puppets. She also has a life-size cutout of Han Solo, a target that she shot with an actor from “The Walking Dead.” It was impossible for me to choose the coolest office, but I’ll definitely be visiting more professors this semester. Who knows what other awesome treasures I could find?

Political cartoons taken from local newspapers are thumbtacked to the bulletin board beside the door to Beth Garfrericks’s office in the Communication Building.


NEWS 5A

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

MCKINNONʼS ACHIEVEMENTS AT A GLANCE • THREE DIVISION II CHAMPIONSHIP TITLES • THREE TIME ALL AMERICAN DEFENSIVE LINEMAN • 29 CAREER TACKLES FOR LOSS, 7 SACKS, 11 INTERCEPTIONS

AND

5

FUMBLES RECOVERED

• 621 STOPS, 407 OF WHICH WERE PRIMARY STOPS, WHICH IS THE MOST IN UNA AND GULF SOUTH CONFERENCE HISTORY • NAMED TO GULF SOUTH CONFERENCE “TEAM OF THE QUARTER CENTURY” FOR 1971-1995 • SELECTED THE GULF SOUTH CONFERENCE “DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE QUARTER CENTURY” FOR 1971-1995 • NAMED TO THE NCAA DIVISION II “TEAM OF THE QUARTER CENTURY” FOR 1973-1997 • SELECTED FOR THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY UNA FOOTBALL TEAM FOR 1949-1998 • WON THE HARLON HILL TROPHY IN 1995 AND IS STILL THE FIRST AND ONLY DEFENSIVE PLAYER TO WIN THE AWARD. 5+316676KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM) cept they are a little bit bigger and they might be a little bit taller,” he said. “But it’s football. You’re always going to have someone to run the ball, and you’re always going to have someone to make the tackle. But the biggest transition was that now this is a job. You’ve got to be on time. You can’t miss anything. It’s become a competition each and every day, because once you get into the NFL, you’ve got people constantly coming in trying to get your job. That puts so much pressure on you. But when you go up against guys bigger and faster, you will get bigger and faster.” He ended his professional career with

photo courtesy of UNA Sports Information over 1,000 tackles, 12 sacks and 10 pass McKinnon started for four years at UNA during the early 90s. He will return to Braly interceptions, he said. Stadium Sept. 5 as the defensive linebacker coach for Miles College in the first In 2008, he was inducted into the Col- home game of the season. lege Football Hall of Fame, and in 2010, he said he was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. Now, McKinnon said he is a family man who is settled back in Alabama. He is currently a coach for the Miles College Sponsor The Flor-Ala crossword for as little as $40 a week. Golden Bears, and said he will be accompanying them to Florence Sept. 5 for Find out how: businessteam@florala.net or 256-765-4427 UNA’s opening season game. “We are coming to win next week,” McKinnon said. “I don’t believe I’ve ever lost a game at Braly Stadium.”

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)+<1>-;=;8-6;176KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM) Students under the Active Suspension Program are limited to 13 hours, including a one-hour UNA 105 Strategies for College Success course taught partly by Associate Professor of History Jeffrey Bibbee. “The program explores primarily the root causes of why students have difficulty succeeding at UNA from personal management issues to academic problems,” Bibbee said. “We try to help students develop their own solutions, and most importantly, to understand the delicate balance between home, work and school that it takes to be successful as a college student. “The real success, though, is in seeing students change their bad habits for good ones that will help them not just at UNA, but for years to come.” The council overseeing the program is comprised of Deans Vagn Hansen, Donna Lefort, Gregory Carnes and Birdie Bailey, from the colleges of Arts and Sciences,

Education, Business and Nursing and Allied Health, as well as Director of Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment Andrew Luna, Associate Vice President for Academic Support Thomas Calhoun, Director of Library Services Melvin Davis and Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost John Thornell. Koch said of the 100 students who have enrolled in the program over the past two years, 44 have completed it. “The program has presented a 44 percent success rate, and we will be conducting a longitudinal study to determine the program’s full success rate,” Koch said. Calhoun said it is the goal and vision of this program to make sure every student at UNA reaches his or her goals to be successful and earn their degree. “This is not the type of program we want to grow,” he said. “In this case, growth and improvement would mean fewer students enrolled in the program.”

Your campus. Your news. www.florala.net Follow us on Twitter: @unaflorala @floralasports


6A NEWS

Aug. 29, 2013 â&#x20AC;¢ The Flor-Ala

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VIEWPOINTS 7A

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF UNIVERSITY OF NORTH ALABAMA

THE

CORINNE BECKINGER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF BLYTHE STEELMAN MANAGING EDITOR PACE HOLDBROOKS NEWS EDITOR KALI DANIEL LIFE EDITOR JAMES DUBUISSON SPORTS EDITOR ANNA GRACE USERY ONLINE EDITOR LAURA IVIE BUSINESS MANAGER KEVEN RIVERA-ORTIZ GRAPHIC DESIGNER LELA AARON-VICENTE CIRCULATION MANAGER WILEY BELEW WALTER HARTLEY KAYLA STINNETT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ALLI OWNBY CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER SARAH HOLLIDAY DALLAS MOORE ROGER WANG STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS REBECCA WALKER ADVISER

Letters Policy The Flor-Ala welcomes and encourages Letters to the Editor. • The deadline for submitting letters is 10 a.m. Monday, the week of publication. • Letters must not exceed 400 words. • Letters must be accompanied by the writerʼs name, mailing address, phone number and email. • The Flor-Ala prefers to publish your letters exactly as written, but reserves the right to reject slanderous or libelous material. • The publication of any letter is left to the discretion of the Editorial Board. • Priority is given to letters critical of The Flor-Ala, or written in direct response to an editorial, a column, or a news story. • When the editors deem it necessary for ease of understanding or to clarify facts, an Editorʼs Note may accompany a letter. • Address correspondence to The Flor-Ala. UNA Box 5300, Florence, AL 35632. Email: florala@una.edu. • Phone: 256-765-4364 Copyright © 2013 The Flor-Ala All rights reserved. First copy free. Additional copies $1 each.

Cherish the moments spent with loved ones

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When I was a child, my gracious, feeble grandmother cooked for our whole family – including those she didn’t care too much for. An example of her spread would consist of at least three different meats, a plethora of fried, homegrown vegetables, pies and cakes fit for a king and, of course, pucker-me-perfect lemonade. Her celebratory dinners were possibly the happiest I have ever been in my life. Sitting around the table conversing with family, facing plates piled high with delectable concoctions, grandmother

never failed to utter her wisest idiosyncrasy to our motley crew. “Ya’ll eat if’n ya can,” she would say. Her statement resonated with me through adolescence and into adulthood. Later on I understood her ultimate meaning behind that heavily-branded Southern vernacular. But before I realized what her message truly meant, my father was diagnosed with cancer. I am both thankful and resentful of this disgusting, vile disease imposed upon my father. God heard from me every day about how this was the worst thing He could have ever done to my family and how I didn’t think I could ever understand it. I was completely ignorant to the fact God had a plan in mind for my family, me in particular. The good news was the cancer was curable. Just like the quote in the movie “Fried Green Tomatoes – “Face it girls, I’m older and have more

insurance” – my dad responded to questions about his cancer by saying “Well, we got good insurance.” Needless to say, mom, dad and I were in high spirits. Until one day, when the tables turned. After several chemotherapy treatments, radiation sessions and endless trips to the emergency room, the doctors threw up their hands in defeat. The man who held me for the first time, my emotional rock and worldly salvation, was going to die. Instead of commencing an endless-bawling session, I took a minute to think about what my grandmother said. Her quirky phrase had a literal meaning to basically ‘stuff’ my face if there was any way possible, but for the first time I realized her true meaning. She was telling me to enjoy every bite, every joke and every story told around our dinner table. When I began to assess the situation surrounding my father’s circumstances, I real-

ized his cancer not only brought our family closer, but it allowed me to connect with him in a way that I was able to enjoy every second of love and every instance of camaraderie up until recently, when he became nonverbal. I learned a very hard lesson by wading through pools of tears, climbing Mt. Depression and separating church and Anna Grace: Do not take life for granted. It may sound cliché to “live every second like it’s your last,” but I’ve learned it to be true. Our seconds are dwindling. Even if you “got good insurance,” it may not be enough. Spend the last dollar to your name, stay up late chatting with friends and building strong relationships and let your family get on your nerves by asking a million questions about your first day of college. In the end, those aren’t things you can take with you when you’re gone.

Engage ESL students for lasting friendships KALI DANIEL

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Now that we’re in college, it seems juvenile to harp on friendship. This isn’t kindergarten. Most of us have learned how to make friends and if we don’t, it’s usually by choice. There is, however, a type of student who has a significantly harder time making friends, and that is the international students. This summer I studied abroad in China. While there, I was fine not knowing anybody.

I got to my classes just fine and to outside destinations in an adequate amount of time. The second week there, I met three native Chinese students who spoke to me and made me feel welcome. Furthermore, they made me feel at home. If I hadn’t met those three girls, I would have still had a fun time in China, but my experience would have been significantly less exciting, and honestly, less cultural. It’s the same situation for our international students here. They’re here to learn and they’re eager. If they weren’t eager to learn, they wouldn’t have traveled so far to be here. It’s important for students to engage with them - that can be anything from eating lunch with them, to inviting them to a party, to just studying together. They want to hang out with

you. Last spring, a girl from South Korea came to study culinary arts here at the university. The way dates fell, she started in America in January, but didn’t graduate from her high school until February. She had left her high school and everyone she knew to come and study in an unknown territory. She was heartbroken. We threw her a surprise graduation party with Korean food, gifts, cake and an ungodly amount of dancing. She cried and thanked all of us. Her name is Dayeon and to this day, she is my best friend. If I hadn’t stepped out of my comfort zone to introduce myself, I never would have known her. It blows my mind to think that there are people on campus who haven’t talked to an international student.

We have students from China, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Taiwan, Togo and so many other countries. Having these students on our campus allows us to travel the world while staying at home, and it is our duty to make them feel as at home as we are. So, next time you see an international student eating alone or working out alone or playing video games alone, introduce yourself. Walk over to Powers Hall and sign up for the Language Partner Program. Accept the invitations to international events on Facebook and via email. It is one of the best decisions you can make while you attend college, and when you leave that foundation of friendship will follow you into your profession.


8A NEWS

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She said the elevator was in need of an update and the lights were a bit dim, but she had been fine with the building otherwise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kind of wondered what they would find in here after so many years,â&#x20AC;? Lindley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had bats in the French room before. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve actually been in there with a bat hanging from the ceiling. We used to have honey bees that inhabited the walls

4-),-:;KWV\QV]ML NZWUXIOM) acceptance into graduate school, Gafford said. In a recent survey conducted and posted on the NSLS website, 92 percent of the societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s members who were transitioning into careers landed the job of their choice upon graduating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always think it is awesome when new organizations come on campus, because it gives new opportunities to the students,â&#x20AC;? said junior Hailey Boeck, pres-

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I usually check my email through my phone, and this new system works a lot better. Nursing school is always sending things, and with the old email it seemed like it took hours before I would get them.â&#x20AC;? The new platform offers many features besides email, including instant messaging and online meetings, web conferencing and online storage based on the cloud technology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each user has access to 25 gigabytes of storage for their email,â&#x20AC;? Huntley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the cloud-based storage allows for that because we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to provide that much storage with servers here on campus.â&#x20AC;? Huntley pointed out that using all of the services provided by Office 365 can be done so by using one account login for their UNA email.

-/A8<KWV\QV]MLNZWU XIOM) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have the unpopular opinion that U.S. military should intervene; however it is very unlikely that would happen,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have followed the events in Egypt for the last two years. To see this political unrest in a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;democraticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; government is very troublesome.â&#x20AC;? Smith said he believes familiarity with international issues should be a priority for college students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very often the discussion of international affairs brings puzzled looks to college studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faces,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe the apathetic or ignorant mindset is plaguing our youth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This (ignorance) will in turn create a generation of politicians, law enforcement, military personnel and general population who do not know how to properly respond to foreign civil unrest or simply turn a blind eye to it.â&#x20AC;? Muath AlJandal, a Saudi Arabian student at UNA, said although he has friends in Egypt who have had to leave Cairo for safety in recent times, he understands why many students at UNA are unfamiliar with international issues.

Aug. 29, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ The Flor-Ala â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lots of them. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what kind of animals they might find living in here, but, as far as I know, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find anything.â&#x20AC;? Lindley said he has been teaching in Wesleyan Hall for more than 10 years. He said the recent renovations of Wesleyan Hall are the best heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They made the building more attractive, especially, I feel, to the newer students,â&#x20AC;? Villagrana said â&#x20AC;&#x153;For those of us used to the old Wesleyan though, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take a while to get accustomed to the changes.â&#x20AC;? ident of the Honors Student Organization. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It seems like it will nationalize our campus through networking.â&#x20AC;? For more information on the UNA chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success, students can view the chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/thesocietyuna, or by emailing the chapter at UNANSLS@gmail.com. Editors note: Kayla Stinnett works in the UNA Student Publication office as an advertisement saleswoman. News Editor Pace Holdbrooks contributed to the reporting of this story.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You no longer have to go through UNA Portal to get to your email account,â&#x20AC;? Huntley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can go straight to outlook.com/una.edu and sign in from there.â&#x20AC;? Katie Cunningham, a recent transfer student from the University of Alabama, said she prefers Office 365 to the system that was used at her old school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first time I went in I was a little confused but I think it was just because it was so simple,â&#x20AC;? Cunningham said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is run through Google mail so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not totally familiar with working so regularly with Outlook but I think it is more user friendly. It helps me because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not super computer or technology savvy.â&#x20AC;? Other students feel that the new system is more complicated than the old one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kind of wish that it were a bit simpler,â&#x20AC;? said Natalie Wilson, also a student at UNA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have had trouble trying to delete multiple threads of email at a time. Other than that, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it depends if you like politics or (not),â&#x20AC;? AlJandal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The United States is a huge country and (it is hard enough) to catch up with news inside (of America). The world is not small, and (news) can make you sick when you think about these horrible things happening in the world.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;?

ITĘźS EASY FOR ALL THE DISTRACTIONS

AROUND US TO MAKE US JUST NOT CARE ABOUT WHAT ELSE IS GOING ON.

BRITNEY MCCAIG However, students should still be concerned with international news because of how connected people have become through technological advances in communication, AlJandal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy for all the distractions around us to make us just not care about what else is going on,â&#x20AC;? said Brittney Mccaig, a senior at UNA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People may feel that (there is) too much to worry about here. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about Egypt because I barely know about America, and I live here.â&#x20AC;?

photo by DALLAS MOORE I Staff Photographer

Hardwood flooring, fresh carpet, painted walls and new ceiling tiles adorn the hallways of the newly renovated Wesleyan Hall. The building houses classrooms for geography, psychololgy, foreign languages, history and poltical science, as well as office space for a number of departments on campus.


LIFE

SECTION B

Aug. 29, 2013• The Flor-Ala • Life Editor: Kali Daniel 256-765-5233

ENTERTAINMENT

International Love

photo by ROGER WANG I Staff Photographer

Students gathered for free t-shirts, food and entertainment for both on and off-campus residents. The Office of Diversity and Institutional Equality hosted the event at Memorial Amphitheatre and hosted student performers to encourage students to get involved with the various organizations the campus has to offer.

Culture Fest encourages involvement, diversity events KALI DANIEL

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Monday at Memorial Amphitheatre students gathered for the Office of Diversity and Institutional Equality’s (ODIE) first Culture Fest. “It’s really cool to be able to just chill with people from other countries,” said student Joe Aldossari. “On our campus there are students from China, Japan, Africa and more. They’re all here.” Though ODIE has been active on campus since 2009, Director Joan Williams said the mission for this particular event was different than that of those prior to it. “Before, our mission was to welcome

IN THIS SECTION

multicultural students and their organizations,” Williams said. “Now, we’re extending that welcome to everybody. The event was really designed to increase awareness of diversity. It’s to welcome freshman and advance diversity, which is why we have different genres, foods and cultural competence. It’s the beginning of education initiatives.” To encourage students to get involved, many cultural organizations, such as the Hispanic Culture Organization, had booths set up around the amphitheatre grounds. Bianca Hernandez said she plans to join the HCO this year and felt the event was a cultural success. “The food is the best part,” Hernandez said. “It shows that this is really a culture fest because there’s food from all

Where do you get your music? See page 3B

these different countries. The lines are long, but it’s a great way to meet new people.” Entertainment continued all night, including a Japanese performance, singing by Madeleine Frankford, an interactive Spanish Flamenco, music by J. Forgiven and a closing by DJ Hunter Jackson. “Just being an Entertainment Industry major, I love hearing the different style of live music,” said student John Newsome. “The live arrangements of peoples CDs are my favorite part of this.” Though there were many cultures represented, some students didn’t see their own. One student in particular, international student Jonglun Kang, hopes to see that change in the future.

“Many [South Korean] students here are either transfers from Soongsil University or go through the Magellan program,” Kang said. “Because of these programs, it’s kind of hard for us to maintain any kind of club when we’re coming and going so often.” Yuji Yasaka, a resident of Florence, native of Japan and father of two UNA students, thought the Culture Fest set a strong precedent for future diversity events. “There was a good turnout with a lot of students from different countries and good entertainment,” Yasaka said. “The university should host this kind of event more often. Many people in Florence are not familiar with other cultures

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Sochi Olympics affect athletes

MLBʼs replay expansion

Cross Country preview

See page 3B

See page 5B

See page 6B


2B LIFE

Aug. 29, 2013• The Flor-Ala

SAFETY

Males encouraged to stand up against sexual violence JACOB EZELL

;\]LMV\?ZQ\MZ R_ITTIKM(]VIML] ]

Students, faculty members and community organizers believe thatt everyone ing sexual has a role to play in preventing violence. ate profesCynthia Burkhead, associate he believes sor of English at UNA, said she der to preculture must be changed in order vent sexual violence and rape. “There is a culture that needs id. to be changed,” Burkhead said. ety y “Implementation of new safety se features such as self-defense classes is good. We need to do these things, but without a ill change in the culture, we will ore only need to do these things more and more.” Kathy Connolly, executive director of Rape Response, also believes that social change is needed in culture to make people safer. Connolly said this change in culture ecause stuis especially needed at UNA because dents on college campuses aree at higher he general risk for sexual violence than the population. “The key to making people safer from h students sexual violence is working with ors,” Conto change attitudes and behaviors,” nolly said. “Positive changes that need

to be put into practice include not victim blaming, putting the focus on what rape is, why not to do it, and being an active bystander.” Rape Response is an organization that offers services to victims of sexual violence and rape, including a 24/7 crisis hotline, 256-767-1100. Burkhead said she agrees that victim blaming is never the answer. “There is never a circumstance in w wh ich rape is which

This includes a situation in which thee victim was under the influence off alcohol at the time of the assault. Burkhead said blaming a female victim who has consumed alcohol implies that males havee more freedom, creating a double standard between genders. Burkhead said that menn have a key role to playy inn preventing sexual violen nce. violence.

;MM>174-6+-XIOM*

not a crime; it is never the victim’s fault,” she said. photo illustration by ALLI OWNBY I Chief Photographer

MUSIC REVIEW

Student band releases first album, emphasize creativity DERRICK FLYNN

;\]LMV\?ZQ\MZ LNTaVV(]VIML]

This year’s Back to School Bash welcomed a variety of local bands from the Shoals area, including local band SCM Electrix. A local experimental rock band from Florence, the group is one with an unorthodox sound. The band has been together for six years and is composed of bassist Lacey Smith, guitarist Ivannoel Gonzalez, drummer Taylor Jones and guitarist Payton Pruitt. These four individuals come together to form a project that produces a mix of light and heavy rock with a steady pace between each drumbeat. Lead singer Gonzalez tips the band off with a gritty, low-leveled voice that mellows out, leaving listeners in a comatoselike state. Each guitar packs a punch that quickly picks up the tempo and compliments the meticulous trashing of drums that knows how to move the entire crowd through their flow of their strong melodies and erratic breakdowns. SCM Electrix has performed multiple shows at events on the UNA campus, as well as the SXSW showcase in Austin, Texas. When it comes to booking events and setting up shows, members said that’s left to the band’s manager, UNA alumna Maggie Mitchell. “Lately it’s been more on the artistic side,” said Mitchell. “With SCM we’ve been doing a lot of album art and getting everything ready for their album release.” SCM Electrix’s first full-length album, “Alabaster,” will be released Sept. 6. The

album follows up on the band’s previously released EP, Endless Psychedelia. Gonzalez, Smith and Jones all went to Lexington High School and said they have been playing together since they were 15 years old. Pruitt is a new addition to the group and met Smith at The Well, a local ministry in Florence that reaches out to the community and the UNA campus. Band members said their influences

WEʼRE ALL LITTLE CREATORS SOMEHOW.

JUST CREATE WHAT YOU HEAR OR WHATEVER YOU HAVE IN YOUR BODY AND TAKE IT OUT AND SEND IT OUT TO THE WORLD.

IVANNOEL GONZALEZ range from Latin and classical music to Christian, as well as well-known artists like Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and even John Coltrane. “I try to definitely take every aspect of everything I liked and try to incorporate it in my music, because that’s a way you can express yourself,” Gonzalez said. “We’re all little creators somehow. Just create what you hear or whatever you have in your body and take it out and send it out to the world. That’s exactly what you’re doing with an instrument.” SCM Electrix members said what

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LOCAL

BANDS TO CHECK OUT AT THE END

• • • • • • •

THE LOCAL SAINTS THE BEAR CHEAP THRILL DEVILLE THE BEAR AND THE BRIDE THE PYLES THE POLLIES ST. PAUL AND THE BROKEN BONES


LIFE 3B

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

INTERNATIONAL

The 2014 Winter Olympics are to be held in Sochi, Russia. The country’s laws forbid the discussion of homosexuality, threatening the imprisonment of anyone speaking of gay rights. Gay athletes seem apprehensive to participate, while most say they will fulfill their Olympian status.

Winter Olympics affect LGBT athletes worldwide KALI DANIEL

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The 2014 Winter Olympics will be held in Sochi, Russia, a country that not only bans gay marriage, but also bans any discussion thereof. Though the Deputy Prime Minister has said all gay athletes will be welcome, there is still an air of uncertainty about whether or not speaking about gay rights will lead to imprisonment. “In the 2012 Summer Olympics, over 20 participating athletes were openly gay or lesbian, and to move from that to the Winter Olympics with Russia’s anti-LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual) policies is just a step in the wrong direction,” said Jessica Collingwood, treasurer of the Student Alliance

for Equality. “So much progress is being made around the world regarding LGBT rights, but a stigma still exists regarding being an open-LGBT athlete. I fear this recent policy in Russia will only make it worse.” Closer to home, gay rights in Alabama are still shaky. While same-sex activity is legal, civil union and legal recognition is not. The question is whether or not a world power’s attitude toward the subject will affect other countries, territories and states. “[This] translates to something so much larger than how it affects LGBT athletes,” Collingwood said. “It’s how it can and will affect LGBT youth in Russia and around the world. Children and youth view athletes as role models and what better inspiration than an Olympian? If these heroes and role models can’t

be themselves, what message does that send our children?” For Olympians, training is often a lifelong process. For those who are gay, sacrificing their spot in the Winter Olympics will prove detrimental to not only their namesake, but their pocketbooks. “I was in band in high school, and that in itself consumed so much of my time,” said Victoria Sparks, president of the Student Alliance for Equality. “That being said, I cannot even imagine having dedicated almost my entire life to training and practice like Olympians have. I have read articles where people talk about boycotting the Winter Olympics because of the laws in Russia, and though it is dangerous and scary, I think that not boycotting could really plant a seed of change and show Russia how unified and dedicated the athletes are.”

Johnny Weir, a figure skater and Winter Olympian from Pennsylvania, has shown little concern about the Sochi Olympics, claiming his sexuality has nothing to do with his profession. Weir is married to Victor Voronov, a native Russian. “We are just under one year away from the Opening Ceremonies and I couldn’t be more excited,” Weir said on his ESPN blog. “I watched a special ceremony and performance on Russia’s Channel 1 when it was officially 365 days away – I couldn’t help but smile while listening to president Vladimir Putin speak about making dreams come true in Sochi. The Olympics are a blessed event, and I dream every day I’ll be competing in my third come February.”

STUDENT OPINION

Man on the Street: Where do you get your music? LILY

DAICHI

SHIGEMATSU

I DONʼT BUY MUSIC; I JUST STREAM IT FROM YOUTUBE.

WALLACE

I DONʼT BUY MUSIC. I USE FREE SERVICES LIKE PANDORA.

MARKARI JOHNSON THE RADIO. MY FAVORITE STATION IS 103.1.

ELLEN KILPATRICK

I USE SPOTIFY WITH MY ROOMMATE.

ERIKA BAXTER I USED TO DOWNLOAD

MUSIC BUT MY COMPUTER GOT VIRUSES. NOW I USE ITUNES.

Information gathered by ANNA KATE TIPPETT I Student Writer photos by ALLI OWNBY I Chief Photographer


4B LIFE

Aug. 29, 2013• The Flor-Ala

+=4<=:-KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM* from different parts of the world, so events like this will give opportunities for people to learn about these cultures.” Kang agreed that the cultural expression and diversity cannot only keep people informed but build relationships. “At UNA there are so many people from various countries,” Kang said. “We can’t learn and can’t understand until we talk to them and they share.”

The first Culture Fest was deemed a success by Williams, who said she has already begn planning future events. “In the spring we’re planning a campus-wide Diversity Week,” Williams said. “We also have the Diversity Student Ambassadors who will be trained to facilitate dialogue and advocate diversity. Our Excel program is partnered with alumni affairs and Career Planning and

Development as a sort of three-pronged mentor program.” With multiple goals for the future and ODIE’s first integrative event completed, Williams sees the takeaway as being one of participation. “We handed out this information about recruitment and inclusion not only to get our name out, but to show that we want to work with the entire campus,”

Williams said. “We want students to read the information on how to begin to think of diversity. People think the term means only a couple of things. We want people to come to these events and leave thinking, ‘I want to be a part of that.’”

hardest actions for a victim to take, but not reporting a crime can lead to others being hurt as well. “Just like any other crime, sexual violence does not have a place on our campus,” Bibbee said. “My biggest concern for sexual safety on campus is silence.” Freshman Kadie Long agrees that students must do their part in preventing sexual violence by taking advantage of the resources offered. She said she feels that UNA is taking the safety of students

seriously and feels that UNA should continue safety patrols and preventative measures. “I have noticed that right after a situation happens, I feel like I see them patrolling more, but maybe a month after, I don’t see them patrolling anymore,” she said.

shirts as well.” Smith has studied Family and Consumer Science at UNA and said she constantly uses her education to go hand-inhand with her music as well. “It helps me talk to people more and convey what I’m trying to say,” she said. “It’s creativity and communication built

in one.” Go to the band’s Facebook page to see photos, future performances, updates on the album and songs from their EP, available for purchase through Reverbnation.

>174-6+-KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM* “If male voices are saying it is never OK, other men will begin to identify with those voices,” Burkhead said. Chase Wise, a UNA junior, agrees that men can make a difference. Wise is a member of 1in4, a student organization on campus seeking to raise sexual violence awareness. “If we change the culture, we can stop rape now,” he said. “We have to stand up for our friends and family and become a voice for the broken.”

Jeffrey Bibbee, associate professor of history and political science, said it is important to remember that anyone can be a victim of sexual violence. He is a part of Not on Our Watch (NOW), a collaboration between UNA faculty, university officials and university police committed to making the campus safe. Bibbee said that UNA police are working hard, but it is the responsibility of everyone to stand against crime. He said coming forward can be one of the

-4-+<:1@KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM* makes them unique as a band is their sense of well-being and communication as a group. They said they feel like a family, more than a local art project trying to be the next big thing. “Instead of worrying about putting money in your pocket and it being your job to come and play and what not, it’s

like a communion effort,” Gonzalez said. While Smith may play bass guitar for the band, she said she has other qualities that make her a powerhouse for success as well. “I like to write a lot of backbone riff for the music,” she said. “I make a lot of artwork with my major and design t-


SPORTS 5B MLB expands replay for 2014 playoffs Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

NATIONAL

AUSTIN PEACOCK

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After much debate and speculation, Major League Baseball (MLB) officials announced plans to expand the instantreplay process for the 2014 postseason. MLB commissioner Bud Selig made the announcement Aug. 15 after meeting with representatives from all 30 MLB teams. The proposal will be voted on by the owners after the season concludes in November. “I’m proud of them,” Selig said during the press conference. “It’s worked out remarkably well. It’s historic. There’s no question about it.” For the proposal to pass, 75 percent of the owners will need to approve the proposal. Also, the players’ association and umpires will have to agree to any and all changes to the current instant replay system in place. The biggest change to the instant replay system will be the introduction of a “manager’s challenge.” Similar to the coaches’ challenge in college football and the NFL, managers will be allowed one challenge over the first six innings of a game, and two from the seventh inning until the end of the game. Challenged calls will be reviewed by a crew located inside the MLB headquarters in New York City. A manager who sees a call he feels is incorrect has the right to challenge by filing a challenge with the home plate umpire or crew chief. UNA Head Baseball Coach Mike Keehn discussed the changes and gave his point of view on the matter. Q: What are your thoughts on the expansion of replay in Major League Baseball? A: “I think it’s a good thing, especially when you look at how many calls are missed throughout a baseball game. I think if you do it the right way it won’t disrupt the flow of the game.”

Q: What would you do to help better the flow of the game if you were in charge? A: “What I look at in a normal game is that there are going to be calls that I am going to argue. When you go out to argue, it stops the game. So, what I suggest is that instead of arguing, you give each manager three challenges to use throughout the game. Instead of arguing, I’d talk to the umpire and say, ‘Hey, let’s get a replay on that call.’ That’s the way I would do it.” Q: The new rule changes say that any reviewable play can be challenged, yet Major League Baseball has yet to define what a reviewable play is. What would you deem a reviewable play? A: “Obviously home runs. Balls and strikes are not reviewable, so go ahead and throw that out of the equation. I’d say any play that involves a play at a base, safe or out, whether a guy made a catch or not. All of those I consider reviewable plays.” Q: Do you think this expansion will help or hurt the integrity of the game? A: “I think it will definitely help the game, and it will really show us how good those umpires are. MLB umpires very seldom miss a call. I don’t think it will cause as much damage as they think.” Q: If you could think of one situation in baseball history where replay could have been used, what situation was it? A: “I can think of one off the top of my head. Game 6 of the 1985 World Series between the Cardinals and Royals. The umpire said the runner beat the throw when the throw clearly beat the runner. If we would have had replay back then, the Cardinals would probably be World Series champs that year.” Q: Do you think we will ever see replay at the Division II level? A: “No. No way. It’ll never happen. We just don’t have the technology at the DII level.”

photo courtesy of HYOSUB SHIN | The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla argues a call with crew chief Gary Darling during a game at Turner Field in Atlanta. Major League Baseball has announced expansion plans to the instant replay process for the 2014 postseason.

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Lovelace brings experience to new role CORINNE BECKINGER -LQ\WZQV+PQMN MLQ\WZ(NTWZITIVM\

Shortly before classes began, the athletic department welcomed a new face to their staff. Megan Lovelace, an Auburn alumnus and Florence native, began work as the new athletic development officer Aug. 19 and hopes to continue the success the department has had with fundraising. “We’ve seen so much excitement in the athletic department build up in the last few years and the community has gotten behind that and supported it, and I really just want to continue that,” she said. “I want (the community) to see that the money they are donating to the athletic department is making a difference and is helping us to compete on a more

competitive level.” As athletic development officer, Lovelace will plan fundraising for the athletic department and will maintain interaction with the athletics staff and all donors, said Mark Linder, director of athletics. “I’m over all the fundraising, specifically for athletics, and any of the income that comes in for scholarships and Division I is my responsibility,” she said. She will also be responsible for thanking donors for the contributions they have made to the department, Lovelace said. The position is not a new role for her, though. After graduating from Auburn University in 2010, Lovelace returned to the Shoals area to work with the American Cancer Society as a community representative for three years.

“When you have a local office all the money that you raise stays local so it was just really getting out into the community and making them of aware of the need that we had for their donations,” she said. Raising awareness within the community is an objective Lovelace is especially familiar with. During her time with the American Cancer Society, she helped to raise $4-500,000 a year for the organization. Lovelace believes her experience with the American Cancer Society and her familiarity with the Shoals will help her in her new role in the athletic department. “It got me the fundraising experience that I need and it got me out in the community—meeting people and just

;MM47>-4)+-XIOM*

photo by SARAH HOLLIDAY|Staff Photographer

Megan Lovelace working in her new office on Aug. 23.


6B SPORTS Cross country teams lean on new additions

Aug. 29, 2013• The Flor-Ala

PREVIEW

JAMES DUBUISSON ;XWZ\[-LQ\WZ [XWZ\[(NTWZITIVM\

The men and women’s cross-country teams struggled during the 2012 season on the field, but not in the classroom. “In the fall, we were an All-American Academic team with a 3.66 grade point average,” said Head Coach Scott Trimble, who is returning for his tenth season with the Lions. Trimble said he was proud of the academic success last season. “That is just a tribute to the kind of people we have in the program,” he said. “They do what they are supposed to. They go to class; they are just great young people and I am very fortunate to be surrounded by a group of great young people.” The men’s team lost three runners last season, but brought in five guys to fill out the roster. As for the women, the team only lost one player after last season. “We got three really good girls coming on this year,” Trimble said. Trimble said the team is ready to go. Their first practice was held Aug. 16, and he said the team is excited for the season. “It is going good and we are looking forward to getting started,” he said. The first meet will be on Sept. 14 in Huntsville at the Fleet Feet Sports/Earl Jacoby Memorial Invitational. “I am excited about it, it is going to be a great season —a great fall,” Trimble

photo courtesy of UNA Sports Information

Katherine Steinman runing in the Fleet Feet/Earl Jacoby Memorial Invitational last season in Huntsville. The men’s and women’s cross country teams will once again start their seasons there on Sept. 14.

said. “I am looking for really great things this season.” He said he is most looking forward

to the meet in Montevallo Oct. 12 and the Gulf South Conference championships in Birmingham Oct. 26

“We usually run well at Montevallo; the GSC championships are, of course, what we hang our hat on,” he said.

2013 CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE 9/14 9/28 10/4 10/12 10/26 11/9

Fleet Feet/Earl Jacoby Memorial Invitational Rhodes College Invitational Watson Ford Invitational Falcon Classic Gulf South Conference Championship NCAA Division II South Regional

2013 Menʼs Cross Country Roster*

-------

Huntsville, Ala. Memphis, Tenn. Clinton, Miss. Montevallo, Ala. Birmingham, Ala. Tampa, Fla.

2013 Womenʼs Cross Country Roster*

Adam Benefield

Freshman

Victoria Acocella

Senior

Fabian Cortez

Junior

Haley Altonji

Freshman

Madison Cross

Freshman

Olivia Brady

Sophomore

Roger Good

Senior

Anna Brown

Freshman

Reid Harrison

Freshman

Erin Covington

Junior

Skip Martin

Freshman

Lealand Flanagan

Junior

Autumn Hensley

Sophomore

Lori Anna Lovelace

Sophomore

Savannah Roland

Freshman

Stephanie Simpson

Sophomore

MarLah Stancil

Sophomore

Justus Montgomery Freshman Clay Oden

Sophomore

Katherine Steinman Junior

*Rosters and schedule according to UNA Maggie Thompson Sports Information.

Sophomore

47>-4)+-KWV\QV]MLNZWUXIOM* learning how to get out there and fundraise for your organization and making people see the need for your nonprofit,” Lovelace said. Lovelace, however, is a self-professed “bleacher creature” and is excited to begin her work with the university. “I’ve always had an athletic family so

I guess that’s kind of where my love for sports has come in,” she said. “My grandfather played football for Auburn, and he also did the UNA radio broadcasts back in the 90s when we had the Division II championship games. I was a bleacher creature, and I always loved UNA.”

Copy Editor and Account Executives

Copy Editor position? send your resume and a cover letter to Rebecca Walker at rlwalker@una.edu Account Executive position? send a resume and cover letter to Laura Ivie at businessteam@florala.net

Writers Meetings Sundays at 4 p.m. all interested are encouraged to attend.


SPORTS 7B

Aug. 29, 2013 • The Flor-Ala

PREVIEW

Young team expected to perform JAMES DUBUISSON ;XWZ\[-LQ\WZ [XWZ\[(NTWZITIVM\

The UNA soccer team has been practicing for a couple of weeks and is preparing for their first game against Montevallo University —an exhibition game on Aug. 31 in Montevallo. The Lions finished the 2012 season 13-6-1, finishing second in the Gulf South Conference (GSC) in both the regular season and conference tournament. The team made it to the NCAA Division II Regionals after the GSC tournament. Former Lee University assistant Chris Walker took over the UNA women’s soccer team in January AFTER Graham Winkworth left UNA to coach for the University of South Alabama. The team has seven returning starters, including senior Jennifer Osmond. Osmond started all 20 games last season and scored 30 points on 58 shots with eight assists and 11 goals. “I got here in January and there were 13 returning players,” Walker said. He said it was tough to come in and recruit the nine players needed to fill the roster. “I am pleased with who we have, and we have a great core group,” he said. “The only downside was coming in in January and having to recruit to get to 22 players.” Walker said he feels the team is ready for the next season. “We’ve put together, in the shortest amount of time we got, a competitive team for this year,” he said. Despite the fact the Lions have lost nine players from last season, Walker said he does not expect his team to struggle too much with growing pains. However, the team still needs players to take on new roles.

file photo by MALISA MCCLURE I Senior Staff Photographer

Melanie Leonida lines up a kick in the Sept. 9, 2012 soccer match at Alabama-Huntsville. Leonida is one of 13 players returning this season for the Lions.

“We aren’t rebuilding, but we got some players that need to step up into leadership positions,” he said The Lions will look to freshman forward Stacey Webber, who was a member

of the Whales’ National team, to be one of those players who steps up, Walker said. The Lions’ ability to come together, and play together, is important for their

success, Walker said. He said he believes the team has the talent to compete. “I think we’ve got some talent returning and we have some good talent coming in,” he said.

2013 SOCCER ROSTER*

2013 SOCCER SCHEDULE* Tusculum Tournament

Morgan Grace

Sophomore

Eleanor Costello

Freshman

Neutral

Schyler Arnold

Sophomore

Emily Black

Senior

7:00 p.m.

Home

Ellis Hillman

Junior

Alyssa Bova

Freshman

Kayla Hunt

Freshman

Gabriella Madrigal Junior

9/7

v. Saginaw Valley State

10:00 a.m.

Neutral

9/8

@Tusculum

12:30 p.m.

9/10

v. West Alabama CSU Collegiate Invitational

9/13

v. Nova Southeastern

3:30 p.m.

Neutral

9/15

@Columbus State

2:00 p.m.

Neutral

Suan Lang

Freshman

Abby Fannin

Senior

9/18

v. Lee

7:00 p.m.

Home

Julia Osmond

Senior

Tiffany Evans

Freshman

9/22

v. Alabama-Huntsville

2:00 p.m.

Home

9/25

@Union

4:30 p.m.

Away

Melanie Leonida

Sophomore

Rachel Beninati

Junior

9/28

v. Christian Brothers

3:00 p.m.

Home

Danielle Scanlon

Junior

Aleigha Edwards

Freshman

10/2

v. Delta State

7:00 p.m.

Home

Jennifer Osmond

Senior

Abbey Hellem

Junior

10/5

@West Florida

1:00 p.m.

Away

10/8

@West Alabama

7:00 p.m.

Away

Stacey Webber

Freshman

Heather Farmer

Junior

Chloe Richards

Sophomore

Chelsea Rial

Junior

10/16 v. West Georgia

7:00 p.m.

Home

10/24 @Shorter

5:00 p.m.

Away

10/27 @Valdosta State

1:00 p.m.

Away

10/30 @Alabama-Huntsville

7:00 p.m.

Away

11/3

1:00 p.m.

Away

@Christian Brothers GSC Tournament November 7-10 in Pensacola, Fla.

*Roster and schedule according to UNA Sports Information.


8B EXTRA

Tweets of the week

Aug. 29, 2013â&#x20AC;˘ The Flor-Ala DISCLAIMER: The tweets below are public tweets found on Twitter by searching hashtags and keywords involving UNA, Florence, Shoals and other university-related topics. Want to see yours on here? Be sure to hashtag UNA and Shoals in your tweets.


Aug. 29 Issue