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( GO ELECTRIC 19 ) evfleetworld.co.uk

FOR HYBRID, PLUG-IN AND FUEL-CELL FLEETS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH


PLUG INTO SOMETHING BOLD. THE BMW i3.

One bold decision leads to another. Like ambitious design for a range of up to 193 miles. Horsepower from a factory line running on wind power. A car that’s 85% recyclable and 100% electric. All in a lightweight body, made to command corners and attention. Now, with zero driving emissions and BIK rates starting at 13% for 2018/2019, there’s only one decision left.

Fuel economy and CO2 results for the BMW i3 range: mpg N/A. CO2 emissions: 0 g/km. Electric Range: 193 miles. Electric energy the starting charge of the battery, accessories fitted (post registration), variations in weather, driving styles and vehicle load. They were obtained after the battery had been fully charged. (WLTP). Only compare fuel consumption, CO2 and electric range figures with other cars tested to the same technical procedure.

JOB NO:

392032

CLIENT:

FCBInferno

CAMPAIGN:

BMW – i3

PROOF NO:

01

PUBLICATION:

Fleet World

INSERTION DATE:

13/03/2019

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The Ultimate Driving Machine

BMW Fleet & Business Sales

consumption: 16.5 – 11.1 kWh/100 km. These figures are for comparison purposes and may not reflect real life driving results which depend on a number of factors including The BMW i3 range are battery electric vehicles requiring mains electricity for charging. The electric range and the electric energy consumption were determined according to a new test


CONTENTS_GE_2019.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 17:37 Page 1

GO ELECTRIC 19

MARTYN COLLINS EDITOR

INSIDE

A

THE TIPPING POINT? mongst all the doom and gloom from February’s Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders sales figures, was further evidence of buyers’ increased sense of awareness about alternatively-fuelled vehicles. Why? Well, according to these figures, demand surged by 34%, making February the 22nd month of consecutive growth for this sector, with these cutting-edge models attracting the most buyers into showrooms – even though they still only account for less than 1% of the market. In the fleet sector, this awareness has come about remarkably quickly, probably as a result of a number of factors; increased awareness of air quality, plus the upcoming Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ), which comes into effect from April 2019; electric vehicles capable of matching conventional fuel ranges; and finally, the continued demonisation of the fleet-favourite fuel – diesel. Are we at a tipping point yet? Not quite, but what was just niche appeal for fleets is now more mainstream and easier for fleets to get behind. This is a fast-changing area and it will be interesting to see where we’ll be in 12 months’ time.

( GO ELECTRIC 19 )

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GENEVA 2019: What EVs could be on your fleet in the near future

12-18

MAKE THE SWITCH: Want an electrified vehicle? We outline what’s available.

20-22

93% COMPANIES WITH 50+ VEHICLES SAY SUSTAINABILITY IS IMPORTANT OR VERY IMPORTANT TO THEIR BUSINESS

evfleetworld.co.uk

FOR HYBRID, PLUG-IN AND FUEL-CELL FLEETS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Published by Stag Publications Ltd, 18 Alban Park, Hatfield Road, St Albans, Herts, AL4 0JJ tel +44 (0)1727 739160 fax +44 (0)1727 739169 email info@fleetworldgroup.co.uk web evfleetworld.co.uk

26-29

CHARGING 2.0: How new technology is shaping the UK’s charging network.

30-31

HYDROGEN HUB: How fuel cell vehicles could work on fleets.

INTERVIEW: Grahame Neagus of Renault Trucks talks LCV electromobility.

24

32-34

IN NUMBERS: Latest survey from the urban logistics sector.

ELECTRIC BIKES: Why they might be the gateway to an EV-led fleet.


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GENEVA

GENEVA_GE_2019.qxp 08/03/2019 17:46 Page 1

FUTURE FLEET STARS

SOME KEY MANUFACTURERS WERE MISSING, BUT THE 2019 GENEVA MOTOR SHOW WAS SIGNIFICANT FOR THE SHEER NUMBER OF ELECTRIC MODEL DEBUTS. MARTYN COLLINS OUTLINES THE MOST IMPORTANT NEWCOMERS.

IMAGINE BY KIA

HONDA E PROTOTYPE

SEAT EL-BORN

The Imagine by Kia concept might not look it, but it previews a future four-door electric Kia model. Outside, one of the key design highlights has to be the reworking of the ‘tiger nose’ grille, which now becomes an illuminated ‘tiger mask’ that winds round the edge of the LED headlamp units. Other interesting design details include the suicide doors and single piece windscreen extending over the roof. The inside is equally mad with 21 angled touchscreens on the dashboard. No range or idea of charging has been given.

Remember the charming EV Concept that won general respect at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show? The E Prototype is the follow up, which Honda claims is still a prototype, but looks almost production-ready. Outside, the ‘E’ has received an extra pair of doors for more practicality, although the rest of the retro styling remains largely untouched. Inside, there’s two huge 12-inch touchscreen displays dominating the dashboard. The E Prototype has a range of 124 miles, but Honda say the battery can be recharged from zero to 80% in 30 minutes.

This concept previews SEAT’s first all-electric family car, that will go on sale next year. The first all-electric Volkswagen Group car to be built on the MEB platform, SEAT claims the battery pack can be recharged in just 47 minutes, with a range totalling 260 miles on the WLTP cycle, and can accelerate to 60mph in just 7.5 seconds. Named after one of the most iconic neighbourhoods of Barcelona, el-Born also features state-of-theart technologies such as autonomous functionality and connectivity innovations to enhance the driving experience.

CITROËN AMI ONE CONCEPT The name might hark back to a 60s 2CV predecessor, but that’s about the only bit of Citroën heritage on this concept, despite the double chevron brand celebrating its 100th birthday this year. In fact, this electricpowered, almost cube shaped car is billed as Citroën’s new vision of urban mobility, although it’s probably more about the company looking at endto-end mobility solutions. As such, on top of leasing options, the Ami One could be booked via an app for single trips. The concept has a top speed of just 28mph and the range is only 60 miles.

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ADVERT_Bynx_Ensto_GE_Feb19.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 10:51 Page 1

Innovative solutions for an electrified fleet Helping you manage the introduction of EVs into fleets Bynx is a global company providing the market-leading platform for managing the lifecycle of vehicles, whether EVs or standard powertrains, for: Vehicle Leasing & Finance Fleet Management/Fleet-management-as-a-service Short term Rental Passenger Transport Services Mobility-as-a-Service (also known as MaaS or TaaS) To find out how we can help in your quest to introduce EVs into your fleet, while saving costs and increasing efficiency and customer satisfaction, get in touch.

Ours is one of the more robust and proven solutions available, having been established since 1989, it now manages over 1 million assets worldwide. We support single and multi-brand operations, plus fleets with different types of vehicles and powertrains. As increasingly more fleets introduce EVs into the mix, Bynx is ready to support them. Bynx is a single solution comprised of modules and applications for managing all processes and transactions associated with fleet operation. Branded web portals can be created to add value for clients, dealers and brokers. The solution also supports the needs of multinational fleets. The company provides project management, managed infrastructure, outsourcing, training and broader fleet consultancy. E:sales@bynx.com W:bynx.com T +44 (0) 1789 471600 Bynx HQ - Lowes Lane Business Park, Lowes Lane, Wellesbourne, CV35 9RB

Smart electric vehicle charging solutions The Ensto EV Charging product range includes our attractive, modular, high performance Electric Vehicle Charging Stations. We are market leading experts in designing, developing and manufacturing high quality charging products and services for electric vehicles.

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CHOICE LIST_GE_2019.qxp 08/03/2019 18:52 Page 1

TIME TO MAKE

THE SWITCH

SO YOU’VE DECIDED THAT HYBRID OR ELECTRIC POWER SUITS, BUT WHICH MODEL SHOULD YOU CHOOSE? MARTYN COLLINS LOOKS AT WHAT’S AVAILABLE NOW...

Audi e-tron Designed to fit in between the conventional Q5 and Q7 SUVs size-wise, the e-tron impresses with its up to 248 miles WLTP range, plus clever technology, such as the cameras instead of wing mirrors. Although it is expensive with prices starting at £71,490.

BMW i3 The i3 might be in its mid-life, but its attractive, forward-looking design still looks fresh. Also, the i3 drives like a proper BMW, with sharp steering and keen handling – yet it’s still capable of 186 miles on the NEDC cycle. It is priced from £35,180.

BMW 225xe Active Tourer The 225xe Active Tourer looks the same as the standard 2-Series Active Tourer, but the mixture of a 1.5-litre, three-cylinder petrol, battery and electric motor equals up to 91.1mpg on the Combined WLTP consumption cycle – prices starting at £35,195.

BMW 530e iPerformance Drives like a standard 530d, but switchable modes mean a mix of electric and petrol power. Electric power equals 122.8mpg WLTP consumption figures and CO2 as low as 49g/km; it is priced from £46,700.

BMW 745e/Le iPerformance Despite the added battery pack and electric motor, the 745e with its mixture of 258bhp petrol engine and 112bhp electric motor, has a WLTP combined consumption figure of 141.2 mpg and NEDC emissions of 50-48 g/km with prices starting at £76,815.

BMW i8/i8 Roadster The butterfly doors and hunkered stance suggest supercar, but the mixture of a midengined 1.5-litre three-cylinder petrol, plus electric motor mean 128.4mpg combined WLTP consumption, and just 42g/km emissions, all from £114,985.

Citroën C-Zero This Citroën, like its sister car the Peugeot iOn, is powered by a 66bhp electric motor, fed by lithium-ion batteries, which equal an 80mph top speed. Priced from £19,765, the C-Zero’s range is around 93 miles.

Citroën Berlingo Electric Despite the electric power, because the batteries are fitted below the load floor, the Berlingo L2 version boasts a 552kg payload and a load volume of 4.1 cubic metres. Plus, two charging points; the Berlingo Electric is priced from £15,617.

Ford Mondeo Hybrid Ford’s first European hybrid used to be saloon only, but Ford recently added an estate. An Atkinson-cycle 2.0-litre petrol is at the front, with a battery pack in the back. The result is 36.2mpg combined WLTP consumption and 150g/km NEDC emission figures, priced from £21,495.

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Honda CR-V Hybrid Featuring a 2.0-litre i-VTEC Atkinson cycle petrol engine, battery and single-speed reduction gear in place of the transmission. This CR-V can smoothly switch between petrol, electric or hybrid modes. With a 40.9mpg WLTP Combined consumption figure and 120 g/km NEDC CO2 emissions, and prices starting from £29,105.

Hyundai Kona Electric The bigger 64kWh version is capable of up to 279 miles between charges (or 180 miles for the smaller 39.2kWh version), and this is the first EV with a petrol-rivalling range. No wonder it won our Best Green Fleet Car Award at the Great British Fleet Awards. It is priced from £24,995.

Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Hyundai’s distinctive hatch in hybrid flavour is powered by 1.6-litre GDI petrol engine, mated to a 42PS electric motor and lithium ion battery. The result is a 78.5mpg WLTP consumption figure and NEDC emissions of 84g/km, all with prices starting at £21,640.

Hyundai Ioniq PHEV This Ioniq is powered by a 1.6 petrol engine mated to a chargeable electric motor. It can drive up to 32 miles in full electric mode, or when combined with the petrol equals a range of up to 660 miles, all with NEDC emissions of just 26g/km and prices starting at £28,340.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric Ioniq Electric is Hyundai’s alternative to the popular Nissan Leaf, and is priced from £30,190. Powered by a 28 kilowatt battery, along with the 118bhp electric motor, equals an NEDC range of 174 miles.

Jaguar i-Pace Car Of The Year 2019, the i-Pace is multitalented, with its 292 mile WLTP range, a spacious interior plus a keen drive. The i-Pace is priced at £58,995.

Kia Soul EV Replaced soon, the outgoing Soul Electric still looks modern and funky, and offers up to 132 miles NEDC range. The Soul EV is priced at £30,495.

Kia Niro The standard Niro is a hybrid, adding an electric motor and battery pack to the standard 1.6litre GDi petrol engine, equalling a 76.3mpg WLTP emissions figure and 86g/km NEDC emissions.

Kia Niro PHEV The PHEV version of the Niro has a larger capacity battery and mains charging. It can drive up to 32 miles in full electric mode, or a combined WLTP consumption of the petrol, equalling a range of up to 217.3 miles, and emissions of just 29g/km CO2 on the NEDC cycle. Prices starting at £36,495.

Kia e-Niro Think e-Niro, think Hyundai Kona Electric’s more conventionally styled and spacious brother. Just the one 64kWh/201bhp ‘First Edition’ version is available, priced at £32,995 after the £3,500 Government Plug-in Car Grant. It is capable of an impressive 282 mile WLTP range.

Kia Optima SW Plug-in Hybrid Plug-in hybrid version of the Kia’s refined and comfortable Optima SW estate. Mated with the 2.0-litre GDi petrol, is a 48bhp electrical motor, equaling 38 miles of electric only range, 188.3 mpg WLTP consumption and emissions of just 33g/km. It is priced from £34,995.

Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV The P400e PHEV version combines a 296bhp version of the Ingenium petrol engine with a 105kW electric engine. It can do up to 30 miles in full EV mode and has WLTP emissions of just 71g/km. Prices start from £72,185 for the HSE spec.

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Land Rover Range Rover PHEV The Range Rover is powered by a 296bhp version of the Ingenium petrol engine, combined with a 105kW electric engine. This Range Rover can do up to 30 miles in full EV mode, has WLTP emissions of just 72g/km. Prices start at £83,655.

Lexus CT The CT is powered by a 1.8-litre petrol, combined with an electric motor, giving CO2 emissions as low as 101g/km, with WLTP fuel consumption up to 54.3mpg and priced from £25,150.

Lexus UX The new baby SUV from Lexus is an alternative to the SUV establishment, with official WLTP combined fuel economy a reasonable 53.2mpg, and CO2 emissions of just 94g/km. It is priced from £29,900

Lexus IS The IS saloon is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 2.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 109g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 50mpg. It is priced from £31,895.

Lexus NX The NX SUV is powered by a combination of a six-cylinder 3.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 135g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 37.1mpg. It is priced from £35,950.

Lexus ES The ES saloon is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 2.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 100g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 53.2mpg. It is priced from £35,150.

Lexus RC The sporty RC Coupe is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 2.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 114g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 45.5mpg. It is priced from £38,800.

Lexus RX/L The RX and RXL SUVs are powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 2.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 132g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 37.1mpg. They are priced from £49,700.

Lexus LC The LC is Lexus’ range-topping Coupe and the hybrid version is powered by a combination of a 3.5-litre V8 engine with an electric motor. This result in 135g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 37.1mpg. It is priced from £35,950.

Lexus LS The LS is powered by a combination of a sixcylinder 3.5-litre engine and a Lithium Ion battery, equaling 150g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 34.8mpg. It is priced from £76.595.

Mercedes-Benz E300e EQ Power The E300e is Mercedes’ hybrid version of the current E-Class and is powered by a 211bhp 2.0-litre petrol, combined with an 122bhp electric motor. The result is WLTP fuel consumption up to 134.5mpg and emissions as low as 46g/km. It is priced from £47,700.

Mercedes-Benz S560e L EQ Power The Hybrid S-Class combines the 3.0-litre petrol with a 122bhp electric motor. This means WLTP consumption up to 128.4mpg and emissions as low as 57g/km. Prices start at £97,480.

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Plug in to the future of fleet. Interested in making the switch? acvm.com/electric-vehicles

In partnership with

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CHOICE LIST_GE_2019.qxp 08/03/2019 18:45 Page 4

MINI Countryman Cooper SE Hybrid The Countryman Cooper SE combines the 1.5litre, there-cylinder turbo petrol with a rearmounted battery and motor. This equals WLTP consumption up to 97.4 mpg and just 55g/km emissions — prices start at £31,995.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV The UK’s best-selling PHEV was heavily updated last year. It features electric motors at each axle offering battery-only AWD for 28 miles, augmented by a new 2.4-litre petrol engine. Emissions range from 40g/km.

Nissan Leaf The current Leaf is well-equipped, good to drive, but only offers a 168 mile WLTP range, due to the smaller battery combined with the 80kWh motor. It is priced from £26,990. New e+ version with a bigger battery confirmed at Geneva

Nissan e-NV200 Combi/Van Like the Leaf, the e-NV200 is very easy and fun to drive in the city. It also has a flat loadspace, totalling 4.2 cubic metres and a 770kg payload. With up to 187miles WLTP range from the 40kWh motor. It is priced from £20,005.

Peugeot Partner Sister van to the Berlingo Electric, the Partner is easy to drive and can be recharged from zero to 80% in 30 minutes, via a D/C rapid charger, although it has just a 106 mile WLTP range. It is priced from £15,081.

Porsche Panamera Turbo E Hybrid The turbo engine produces 542bhp and 136bhp electric engine. Despite the performance, it offers up to 80.5mpg WLTP consumption and NEDC emissions of 74g/km. It’s priced from £138,723.

Porsche Panamera/Panamera Sport Turismo 4 E Hybrid Powered by a 330bhp 2.9-litre V6 biturbo engine, and 136bhp electric motor. Despite the performance, it offers up to 85.6mpg WLTP consumption and NEDC emissions of 62g/km. Prices start at £83,718.

Renault Zoe The Zoe is Renault’s still futuristic-looking allelectric supermini. The latest 41kWh battery equals a competitive 186 mile WLTP range, and it’s priced from £21,220 (plus battery leasing).

Renault Kangoo Z.E. The Renault Kangoo Z.E. boasts an NEDC range of 170 miles from a ZE33 33kWh battery and 44kWh motor. It is priced from £23,232.

Smart FourTwo and FourFour EV Both the FourTwo and FourFour follow the same formula with a 82bhp electric motor, with a WLTP range up to 70 miles and zero emissions.

Tesla Model S The Model S has a NEDC range of up to 393 miles for the 100D version, plus impressive interior technology and all models have fourwheel drive. Prices start at £70,678.

Tesla Model X Model X boasts a WLTP range of up to 330 miles for the 100D, plus the same impressive interior technology, standard four-wheel drive and this gull-wing rear doors. It’s priced from £80,200

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Want to get better MPG from your petrol and diesel fleet? Is range anxiety limiting your EV uptake? Hybrids delivering poor fuel economy?

New for 2019

r Extended course fo s er iv EV and hybrid dr

Equip your drivers with the knowledge and skills to maximise the efficiency of their vehicles with Eco-Driving training. Available as a standalone 75-minute course subsidised by the Energy Saving Trust, or as an element of our flagship Driving for Work course, Eco-Driving training has been proven to produce significant reductions in fleet costs through improved fuel efficiency, as well as improving driver safety through enhanced observational skills. • Typical long-term fuel savings of over 6%* for petrol and diesel drivers • Optimised battery performance from EVs and hybrids • Reduced incidence of collisions: efficient drivers are safer drivers!

MPG Marathon training sponsor “When driven using our ‘eco-safe’ techniques the new Kona EV beat its own NEDC figures by over 30%, which goes to show that the course is just as good for tackling range anxiety as it is for saving fuel”

Contact us for more information

0870 120 2910 business@iam.org.uk

Richard Gladman, Head of Driving and Riding Standards, IAM RoadSmart

iamroadsmart.com/business

*Energy Saving Trust, Smarter Driving Field Trials 2014 – average 6.2% improvement in the 12 months following eco-driving course. 500+ drivers.

0418_Eco-driving ad in FleetWorld V03.indd 1

28/02/2019 15:11


CHOICE LIST_GE_2019.qxp 08/03/2019 18:46 Page 5

Toyota Yaris Hybrid The Yaris supermini is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 1.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 84 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 58.8mpg. It is priced from £15,995.

Toyota Corolla The latest Corolla is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 1.8-litre engine with an electric motor. This results in 76 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 62.7mpg. It is priced from £23,750.

Toyota C-HR The C-HR crossover is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 1.8-litre engine with an electric motor. This results in 86 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 57.6mpg. It is priced from £24,500.

Toyota RAV4 The new RAV4 is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 2.5-litre engine with an electric motor. This equals 102 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 50.4 mpg. It is priced from £29,635.

Toyota Prius The original hybrid, powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 1.8-litre engine with an electric motor. This is equals 75 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 61.4mpg. It is priced from £24,245.

Toyota Prius Plug-in Plug-in version is powered by a combination of a four-cylinder 1.8-litre engine with an chargeable electric motor. This equals 28 g/km CO2 emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption of up to 235.4mpg. It is priced from £31,695

Toyota Prius+ MPV version of the Prius, is powered by a fourcylinder 1.8 petrol with an electric motor. This results in 106 g/km emissions, with WLTP fuel consumption up to 48.7mpg.

Volkswagen e-Golf/Golf GTE/Passat GTE Powered by a 134 electric motor, the e-Golf is capable of a WLTP range of 144 miles and is priced from £29,740. Golf GTE and Passta GTE are currently unavailable due to supply issues.

Volvo S90/V90 T8 The hybrid version of the V90 has the same 2.0-litre four-cylinder supercharged and turbocharged petrol, plus electric motor but just 49g/km CO2 and 141mpg on the NEDC cycle with prices starting at £57,805.

INCOMING MODELS DUE IN 2019 INCLUDE :

n Kia Soul EV, new look and powered by the same 64kW/h as the bigger Niro Volvo XC60 T8 The hybrid version of the XC60 means a 2.0litre four-cylinder supercharged and turbocharged petrol, plus electric motor and just 51g/km CO2 and 134.5 mpg on the NEDC cycle with prices starting at £54,770.

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Volvo XC90 T8 The hybrid version of the XC90 is fitted with the same 2.0-litre four-cylinder supercharged and turbocharged petrol, plus electric motor but just 59g/km CO2 and 141mpg on the NEDC cycle with prices starting at £67,495.

n Mercedes EQC, the first of Mercedes’ EQ range will take on the Tesla Model X n MINI Cooper SE, the first all-electric MINI, could be the first EV hot hatch n Tesla Model 3, smallest Tesla is expected to boast a 338 WLTP certified range


FEATURE_Hydrogen Hub_GE_Mar19.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 16:37 Page 1

( HYDROGEN HUB )

A HOME FOR HYDROGEN?

A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT IN SWINDON IS TASKING HYDROGEN FUEL CELL CARS WITH THE RIGOURS OF A LIFE ON FLEET. ALEX GRANT DROPPED IN TO FIND OUT HOW IT ALL WORKS.

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FEATURE_Hydrogen Hub_GE_Mar19.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 16:38 Page 2

AS a technology for shifting consumers away from fossil fuels, hydrogen fuel cells have long seemed like a panacea. These offer the short refuelling times and long range most drivers are used to, but without the noise and air quality issues of a petrol or diesel engine. And yet, despite decades of concept cars and prototypes, it’s consistently seemed around ten years away from being commonplace. Perhaps until now. In Swindon, a consortium of 30 companies is aiming to narrow the gap between concept and reality. The Hydrogen Hub, launched by energy consulting company Ecuity three years ago, has been putting the technology to the test with end-users – not just in cars, but with its sights on forklifts, buses, and even heat and power applications. Half way along the M4 corridor, next-generation technology is already part of daily life. Cars make up one of the four work streams, overseen by Arval. And for SME development manager, Paul Marchment, the tipping point is looming ever closer: “We’re probably at about ground minus three [years] in terms of this technology really taking off,” he says. “In three years’ time, when we have more stations, there’s more product and people are more aware of the usage, that’s when this will really fly.” For Marchment, the Hub is a logical progression after 12 years working with alternative fuels. His involvement started around two years ago, just ahead of the leasing and fleet management specialist deploying its own Toyota Mirai fuel cell car. It has since helped fund other fleets adopting vehicles, with a view to getting a head start understanding how it works for businesses. “We’re agnostic about the technology, we just want to make sure it gets deployed and used in the right place, by the right end-users. And if you can’t do it in Swindon, where are you able to do it? There’s a real opportunity to build a fleet around here and demonstrate that this can be done at a reasonable scale,” he explains. Seven of the planned 15 cars have already been deployed. End-users are diverse; Arval’s own demonstrator, pool cars for Nationwide building society and

the National Trust, and a multi-use vehicle for the nearby Science Museum storage facility. Johnson Matthey, which develops fuel cell components for OEMs a stone throw from Arval HQ, has one too. Early vehicles are finance leased, backed by OLEV funding, and Marchment says all are used as regular fleet cars. Participants have been keen to get as many employees behind the wheel as possible, and manufacturers have been supportive – for example, Toyota ensures local dealers are trained to service Mirais if cars are deployed locally. “A lot of new technology gets to market through fleets, because leasing a vehicle is risk-free. To get this technology into the second and third-hand market, we rely on [fleet]. If we can understand the technology, the maintenance, the running costs, then that helps us to have grown-up conversations both internally and with the end-user.” Information is key with unfamiliar technologies. So, behind the project, the participants are part of a working group which shares best practice and reports back to OLEV. Arval has worked on driver training and brought in 50 of its largest corporate customers to explain the concept. Familiarisation helps, but Marchment believes the UK’s nascent refuelling network is the biggest hurdle – because of the long range, Johnson Matthey believes only 80 hydrogen stations would be needed for nationwide coverage. Of course, it’s a proverbial ‘chicken and egg’ situation, and that’s where the project helps, as Hydrogen Hub manager, Clare Jackson, explains: “Because of the way the funding works, the vehicles and stations go down in the same project - each station will have funding for a certain number of vehicles, they’re looking for a base load. The stations are most reliable when they are used regularly, so having those things together – the station has to go in before the cars – is really important for the technology working,” she says. Marchment agrees: “You need someone like an oil company to back the technology, as they’ve got the real estate to deploy it. We’ve seen Beaconsfield and Cobham, where Shell has put it next to the unleaded and diesel pumps. From a public

CASE STUDY

JOHNSON MATTHEY ALMOST next door to Arval headquarters, Johnson Matthey’s Swindon factory was constructed in 2002 and produces fuel cell membranes for OEMs based on 20 years of research and development. For the last four years, the company has had its own Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell on fleet, and commercial director Mike Petch sees the technology having a widespread role next to electric cars. “It’s great technology,” he says. “We see it as very complementary to battery cars. If you know you need your car every minute of the day, or if you’ve got long-mileage sales guys then it’s much better than batteries. As you move to heavy-duty vehicles, fuel cells offer an even bigger advantage. In a truck you won’t do 700 miles on a battery, but you could easily deploy a fuel cell system that could do that.” Since September, Johnson Matthey has also hosted a publicly accessible hydrogen filling station – this makes enough fuel for 16 full tanks per day, or up to five back-to-back limited by the compressor. And, as modular technology, it can be scaled up to meet the needs of local fleets and drivers. “We’re keen to see infrastructure in this country, as that will mean there’s cars being sold here, which increases the probability of building some of the cars here,” Petch adds. “But they’ll only send them here if people want to buy them, and they’ll only buy them if they think they can refuel them.”

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FEATURE_Hydrogen Hub_GE_Mar19.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 16:55 Page 3

( HYDROGEN HUB )

“A LOT OF NEW TECHNOLOGY GETS TO MARKET THROUGH FLEETS, BECAUSE LEASING A VEHICLE IS RISK FREE.” perception, they’re all in the same place now, which will help with the transition going forward.” From a fleet perspective, vehicle choice is just as important. Arval is already discussing commercial vehicles with manufacturers – a market where fuel cells could power refrigerators and other equipment, and offer long-range driving without the need for electric last-mile vehicles. The possibilities might be even greater than for cars. “I think everybody is in agreement that where this technology will come into its own is the bigger stuff – trucks, buses, trains, light commercial vehicles. A lot of OEMs have struggled to electrify their vehicles without compromising on range and cargo area. The range is uncompromised with this technology, so it sits really well in that area,” explains Marchment. For now, well-placed infrastructure can support the early adopters. The project opened a second publicly accessible refuelling station in September, a larger-capacity unit outside Johnson Matthey’s factory, which cures some of the reliability issues early users had experienced beforehand. And the focus now is on phase two of the Hub, targeting another 10 fleet vehicles (with new and existing users) to make the most of it. Arval is also on the cusp of having a leasing model in place for FCEVs – straightforward ordering is vital when the UK is competing with other countries to get its share of the limited global vehicle stock. “Because we have OLEV funding it removes a significant amount of the risk for us, so the pricing and risk teams we’re working with are a lot more relaxed,” says Marchment. “To be sustainable and make sure we can facilitate more of these vehicles, we need that contract hire model, and we’re making good strides towards

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that now. People who were sat on the fence are more thinking they can make it work. We’ve got those [ten] vehicles secured, so we’re finding homes and I’m in advanced conversations with two or three end-users.” Meanwhile, a second Hydrogen Hub is now running in Oxford, and there are opportunities for the two projects to complement each other. Indeed, Oxford might be set to get ahead of Swindon on some work streams – particularly buses, driven by a planned zero emission zone in Oxford and the right conditions being in place for deployment. “[Oxford is] a double-deck city, and battery double-deckers ruin the roads, so the technology future there is hydrogen,” says Jackson. “It’ll probably happen before Swindon, and there’s a nice little bus route between [the two cities] which might be a good start. Then Swindon will start taking buses as well.” In Swindon, the expertise generated so far is also being put to wider use. Arval recently hosted an event in Lydiard Park, targeting businesses in the morning and consumers in the afternoon, with a view to answering questions about the technology. It proved so successful that six more are being planned for 2019. And, with the GCSE Chemistry syllabus now including fuel cells, the company has also created a lesson for teachers to download, explaining how hydrogen can play a role in the wider energy system. Marchment sees engagement with the next generation as a vital step for establishing the technology in the UK. So, while there are unquestionably hurdles to overcome, the Hydrogen Hub is showing how what seems like tomorrow’s technology can already be a versatile solution today. And, as ever, fleets are playing a fundamental role in bringing it to market.

CASE STUDY

SCIENCE MUSEUM IT’S a little-known fact that the Science Museum operates a large storage area just outside Swindon – some 500 acres, with six miles of perimeter roads, and a regular need to transport staff and objects between there and London. For head of national collections, Matt Moore, adopting FCEVs ties in neatly with inventory which includes the world’s first hydrogenpowered car - 1956 Daff 44. The company now has two Toyota Mirais on fleet, picked because they were available (unlike the Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell) in right-hand drive. Each has done around 10,000 miles, used for runs into London but also as pool cars and for security teams on site – replacing diesels which had frequent filter problems due to frequent short journeys.

By comparison, the Toyotas have been faultless. In fact, Moore adds, the biggest issue has been the compromise in load space – the Mirai isn’t designed for hauling large museum pieces – and the risk of scratching high-end interior materials with bulky loads. “I don’t think we knew what to expect, because there wasn’t much information about how it would perform. So we always viewed it as an experiment, and our mission was to talk to other organisations and get them to come and have a go in it. We’ve used it in the way you would expect to be able to use any car, which is the highest accolade you can give it.”


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( IN NUMBERS )

THE FUTURE OF URBAN LOGISTICS

T THE URBAN LOGISTICS SECTOR IS EXPERIENCING AN UNPRECEDENTED GLOBAL BOOM, CHANGING THE WAY WE ALL WORK AND LIVE. A NEW SURVEY FROM THE RENAULT-NISSAN-MITSUBISHI LCV BUSINESS NOW GIVES US GREATER INSIGHT INTO THE IMPACTS THIS WILL HAVE ON SMALL BUSINESSES AROUND THE WORLD, REVEALING BOTH THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES THEY FACE.

ELECTRIFICATION & AUTONOMY When do businesses believe fleets will be fully electric?

20%

50%

66%

14%

38%

55%

When do businesses believe fleets will be fully autonomous?

DRIVING TOWARDS A DRIVERLESS FUTURE

CONNEC TIVIT Y & TECHNOLOGY

C

71% BUSINESSES THAT SEE AT LEAST ONE KEY BENEFIT OF CONNECTIVITY

49%

Top benefits reported are:

OF BUSINESSES WITH FLEETS OF 31-100 VEHICLES ENVISION DRIVERLESS DELIVERIES IN THE FUTURE

3

30%

THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH DELIVERY CUSTOMERS

29%

THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE BETWEEN VEHICLES WITHIN FLEETS

21%

THE ABILITY TO USE THE VEHICLE AS A THIRD SCREEN

SUSTAINABILIT Y

E- COMMERCE & CHALLENGES The bigger the fleet, the bigger the challenge

40%

ARE READY B BUSINESSES THAT HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO MEET INCREASING DEMANDS FOR E-COMMERCE

17% WITH FLEETS OF LESS THAN 5 VEHICLES

45% WITH FLEETS OF 51-100 VEHICLES

COMPANIES THAT DESCRIBE GROWTH OF E-COMMERCE AS THEIR BIGGEST CHALLENGE

93%

AS BUSINESSES BECOME BIGGER, SO DOES THE IMPORTANCE OF SUSTAINABILITY 48% of businesses with a turnover of $100m or more ranked sustainability as ‘very important’

COMPANIES WITH 50+ VEHICLES SAY SUSTAINABILITY IS IMPORTANT OR VERY IMPORTANT TO THEIR BUSINESS

Only 25% of businesses with turnover $100k – $10m said the same

CREATING ACCESS TO AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Who do businesses say is responsible?

3

46%

CAR MANUFACTURERS

24

evfleetworld.co.uk

37%

GOVERNMENTS


YOUR COMPANY LOOKS TO THE FUTURE. LOOK NO FURTHER

CR-V HYBRID CR-V 2.0 I-MMD HYBRID SR 2WD

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Contract mileage 10,000 miles per annum Contract term 36 months Excess mileage charge 4.7p per mile +VAT

Call us on 0800 294 0358 or email admin@honda-corporate.co.uk Fuel Consumption figures for the 2019 CR-V Hybrid range in mpg (l/100km): Combined 37.7 - 40.9 (7.5 – 6.9), CO2 emissions (g/km)**: 126 – 120. Figures shown are for comparability purposes. Only compare fuel consumption and CO2 figures with other cars tested to the same technical procedures. These figures may not reflect real life driving results, which will depend upon a number of factors including the accessories fitted (post-registration), variations in weather, driving styles and vehicle load. Important information: *Contract Hire available to Business Users only, subject to status. Information correct at January 2019. Vehicles must be ordered between 1st January 2019 and 31st March 2019 with registration and delivery by 30th June 2019. Rentals exclude optional maintenance. Excess mileage and other charges may apply dependent on the mileage and return condition of the vehicle at the end of the contract. Contract Hire is provided by Arval UK Limited trading as Honda Contract Hire, Whitehill House, Windmill Hill, Swindon, SN5 6PE. For further information please contact your local Honda Dealer. **There is a new test for fuel consumption and CO2 figures (WLTP). Figures shown however are based on the outgoing test cycle and will be used to calculate vehicle tax on first registration. You can find out more about the changes brought in by WLTP at http://wltpfacts.eu/


FEATURE_Kona Rally Charging_GE_Mar19.qxp 08/03/2019 16:51 Page 1

( EV CHARGING )

CHARGING 2.0

NEXT STEPS FOR THE UK’S CHARGING NETWORK WITH THE FIRST LONG-RANGE, MASS-MARKET ELECTRIC CARS COMING TO MARKET AND PLUGIN SALES CONTINUING TO GROW, ALEX GRANT LOOKS AT HOW NEW TECHNOLOGY COULD RE-SHAPE THE UK’S CHARGING NETWORK AND THE CHALLENGES AHEAD FOR OPERATORS.

THE AFFORDABLE LONG-RANGE EV EMERGES… The tipping point for widespread EV adoption is usually said to be an anxiety-free 200 miles between short charging stops. That’s already achievable – the Tesla Model S has offered this since 2014 – but it’s what’s going on behind the slew of high-profile premiumbrand electric SUV launches this year that’s perhaps most significant. Four years ago, the starting point for a car with that sort of range was over £60,000. The Hyundai Kona Electric almost halves that, with a P11d price of £33,940. That’s still pricier than a petrol or diesel car, but, with a WLTP range of 300 miles, the Kona Electric is feasible as the only car in the household for a large crosssection of UK motorists. And, with near hot

26

hatch performance, it doesn’t have to be a wholly rational choice, either. To illustrate this, Hyundai UK tasked a small group of motoring journalists with finding the car’s limits. Not to hypermile, but to plot a 12-hour route visiting as many checkpoints as possible between Skegness and Swansea, with points awarded for the furthest-flung locations. Its confidence is wellplaced – with the use of Eco Mode and the variable regenerative braking to keep the Kona rolling at motorway speeds, range settled at 280-300 miles to a full charge even when tasked with the Brecon

Beacons and long highway stretches. It’s a new era for EVs, so how is the supporting technology keeping up?


FEATURE_Kona Rally Charging_GE_Mar19.qxp 08/03/2019 16:57 Page 2

BIGGER ‘TANKS’, FASTER ‘PUMPS’… Widespread infrastructure already exists. The UK has one of Europe’s most advanced charging networks, comprising 20,000 connectors on some 11,000 units, according to March Zap-Map figures. Once predominantly city-based, the network has now expanded onto highways; drivers now have the option to extend the range using short top-ups en route on motorways and ‘A’ roads – typically restoring 80% of the range in around half an hour – augmenting low-powered domestic, workplace or inner-city chargers for longer stops. Zap-Map live data suggests reliability is improving, too – units with one connector inoperable had declined from 14.8% in July 2017, to 8.5% in August 2018, the company said. It’s adequate for most EVs, but the latest models might be about to change that. The key to the Kona’s long range is a battery with a 64kWh capacity – almost

three times the capacity of an early Nissan Leaf (24kWh) or Renault Zoe (22kWh), which the networks had been built for. Hyundai claims 80% of the range can be restored in 54 minutes, but that’s using a 100kW charger. The UK’s rapid charging network typically offers up to 50kW, extending that waiting time to 75 minutes for drivers who are really stretching the range. Given that 100-150kW is becoming the norm for long-range EVs, there’s a growing need to ramp up the speed of the charging network. Ecotricity, which has at least one rapid charger at every motorway service area, will begin rolling out 350kW chargers in 2019. Chargemaster’s Polar network will also get high-powered chargers within months, its 150kW units adding 100 miles per 10 minutes plugged in and set to be installed at new sites – the company said 50kW chargers

have a long-standing role to play. It’s a view shared by Pod Point, which will also have 150kW at new sites in the near future. Fast charging also suits forecourts. Shell has begun hosting 350kW sites in Germany, as part of the manufacturer-backed Ionity ultra-fast network, and selected UK forecourts will be part of the 80-site network from the start of 2019. Likewise, ChargePoint Services is going beyond 50kW ‘pumps’ and prioritising forecourt locations for the next phase of its network.

With models such as Hyundai’s Kona offering almost 300 miles of range, plug-in vehicles will get more popular.

AVOIDING BOTTLENECKS… Power output is only one half the battle for network operators. Consumer demand is growing, with Department for Transport figures showing the number of Plug-in Car Grant-eligible vehicles in the UK has more than doubled in the last two years, to 157,181 cars at the end of Q3 2018. Not only is there a growing need for faster charging, but for additional points too. Future-proofing has been considered. For example, InstaVolt’s rapid chargers are built on a platform with ‘power blocks’ which it says can be scaled up to provide up to 500kW either through a single unit (if the charging cables are swapped for water-cooled items) or split across several. The idea is to enable

operators to scale up their charging provision at busy sites, but this is just as dependent on the supply from the grid itself. The National Grid has identified 54 sites, alongside motorway routes, which could be upgraded to have direct connections to the transmission network to enable ultra-fast charging for passing travellers. This, the company says, would put 99% of the English and Welsh population within 50 miles of such sites. However, according to UK public affairs and policy senior manager, Peter Abson, it can be problematic making a case for that direct connection. “The market-led approach will lead to unequal distribution [of charging points]

across the UK, and many rural areas without ultra-fast rapid chargers,” he says. “It means those communities facing inadequate mobile and broadband coverage will also be underserved by electric vehicle infrastructure, resulting in government intervention at a later stage and more cost.” Ultimately, though, one of the big advances over the last four years has been choice. Ecotricity’s Electric Highway points are still closest to the motorway, and usually busy too (the company says it is addressing bottlenecks as it upgrades the network). But drivers prepared to seek out other networks can typically find another rapid charger not far off the beaten track.

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FEATURE_Kona Rally Charging_GE_Mar19.qxp 08/03/2019 16:51 Page 3

( EV CHARGING )

“THE FEWER PIECES OF RFID CARD PEOPLE NEED TO CARRY, THE MORE THEY CAN FUNNEL ALL OF THAT INTO A SINGLE APP, THE BETTER IT IS FOR DRIVER EXPERIENCE.” MORE MILES, FEWER CARDS…

Developed from local schemes designed around short-range electric cars, the user experience for early EV drivers is a reliance on numerous smartphone apps, accounts and access cards. But this is changing – since November 2017, all newly-installed charging points have been required to offer ad hoc access, and operators have had a year to make their networks compliant. In theory, charging ought to be as straightforward as paying for fuel.

However, most networks still see advantages to membership. For example, Chargemaster offers both pay-as-you-go and subscription-based access to its Polar points, and last year launched a corporate solution enabling fleets to put all drivers on a single bill. It’s a little more like a fuel card. Erik Fairbairn, CEO of Pod Point, agrees: “EV drivers always have their phone on them – it may take more forward planning to arrange to have an RFID card posted to them. We thus see

mobile phones as the predominate authentication method, with contactless payment additionally available on our DC rapid network.” ChargePoint also says its users tend to prefer apps, despite offering payment via contactless credit cards and Apple Pay on its InstaVolt units. Mark Kerstens, the company’s vice president of strategic accounts, says: “The fewer pieces of RFID card people need to carry, the more they can funnel all of that into a single app the better it is for the driver experience.” For those who prefer an account, Zap Map will soon launch a service enabling access to multiple networks under one membership. Zap Pay will log energy costs, usage and VAT, and offer dynamic route planning based on charging speeds, following the company’s own research showing customer satisfaction was based on easy access and frictionless payment. Dr Ben Lane, CTO at Zap-Map, explains: “Zap-Pay will effectively make the UK networks interoperable, an issue of key concern to most EV drivers who have to carry multiple RFID cards and use several apps to charge their EVs across the UK. While new standards and payment methods, such as contactless, are simplifying payments to an extent, Zap-Pay is able to communicate with both legacy and new pay-as-you-go charging units which are used across local, national and international charging networks.”

DRIVER DIARY

MARTYN COLLINS Although I love the idea of alternative fuelled cars, I’ll admit to having very little experience of travelling long distance in them. In fact, prior to the Kona Rally, the longest distance I’d been in an electric car was a trip from St Albans to Cardiff last year in the latest Volkswagen e-Golf with my co-driver for the rally, Alex Grant. With just one stop at Membury Services and an hour on a fast charger, the 150-mile range proved more than enough to get to Wales. Proof to me that, with a little planning, big distance isn’t scary in an electric car - I was impressed. The Kona moves the electric car game on even more, with our range-topping Premium SE boasting the bigger 64kWh battery and

28

300-mile range. Considering some of its odd-looking rivals, I’m pleasantly surprised at how normal the Kona SUV looks. Convention carries on in the Hyundai’s interior, the only oddity being the pushbutton transmission. It is a tidy and easy drive too, plus with 204hp, it’s hot-hatch quick — although that’s not the point here. What I learnt over 12 hours more than 400 miles is that range isn’t the issue to making electric cars the first choice over petrol and diesel for fleet. It is the hit-and-miss charging structure. It isn’t just the lack of fast chargers, but frustrating compatibility issues with some of the chargers we experienced. Sadly, until then, I’m going to be forced to stick with the pumps.


FEATURE_Kona Rally Charging_GE_Mar19.qxp 08/03/2019 16:52 Page 4

DRIVER DIARY

CRAIG THOMAS Since taking delivery of my Volkswagen e-Golf long-term test car last May, I’ve experienced life on the nascent electric highway. It’s certainly been interesting. Living in London, and working from home, most of my journeys are short and local, so an EV is absolutely perfect. The quietness is also a definite advantage and it has a surprisingly calming effect: you undoubtedly find yourself being more relaxed about getting around. I don’t have off-street parking, but there are now charge points near my house that are almost always unused. It’s not the cheapest way to charge – it can be four times the cost of doing it at

home – but it’s still cheaper than petrol and diesel, mile for mile. Of course, range anxiety is the big issue. In addition to the Hyundai Kona drive, for which we covered nearly 500 miles, I’ve also undertaken a 400-mile round trip in the e-Golf. Planning where to charge is key to overcoming any anxiety, but the infrastructure isn’t totally reliable as yet, so you always need a backup plan – and don’t wait until your battery is almost empty before charging. The Kona’s near 300-mile range is the way forward and will eliminate most issues, but cheaper and more reliable public chargers will also help the uptake of EVs in the coming years.

Most EVs only support AC charging at up to 7kW – including the Kona – which then steps up to much faster DC rapid charging

WALKING FIRST, RUNNING SECOND… It seems many of the hurdles of long-distance EV driving are disappearing – better batteries are enabling greater range, faster charging stations are on the way, and access is becoming easier. But, despite an emphasis on ever-faster DC rapid charging, the norm for most EVs will be slower AC top-ups at home, work or during longer stopovers. So, what’s happening here? At present, most EVs only support AC charging at up to 7kW – including the Kona, which then steps up to much faster DC rapid charging. But, as battery ranges increase, ChargePoint’s Mark Kerstens says there will be a need for units at closer to 22kW output for fleets. “We are strongly supporting expanding AC charging at workplaces and retail locations, as that’s where a lot of charging is happening,” he says. “DC charging is critically important, but it’s not going to address the needs of most drivers.” The UK’s charging infrastructure has changed radically in the last decade. But, from the slowest units to the most cutting-edge rapid charging equipment, the quickest changes might still be on the way.

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IVIEW_GNeagus_GE_2019.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 15:36 Page 1

( ELECTRIC VANS )

C

an you explain what the Renault Trucks electromobility strategy is? The strategy is simply to be able to provide our customers here in the UK and Europe with a range of 100% electric heavy duty, factory developed commercial vehicles that will allow us as a manufacturer to help society in reducing the effects of emissions and thus the air quality of our cities and towns. Alternative fuels are obviously a huge area of consideration in our industry and ever since 1924, we at Renault Trucks have been at the forefront of electric and hybrid technology, testing and railing new concepts. So now in 2019, it’s no surprise that we come to market with the ZE range of vehicles that start at 3.1tonnes and go up to 26 tonnes GVW, the first for a heavy truck OEM. What does the range look like today and how might this change in the future? Today here in the UK we have the full range of the new Renault Trucks Master ZE Van and platform derivatives that are at the smaller end of our ZE family range which goes through 16tonne rigids and out to 26 tonne rigid trucks too. The D and D Wide range of trucks are currently in operation in Europe with many large names and we expect the RHD versions starting to come to the UK late 2019 for full scale availability in 2020. In terms of application, our moto of “Not Just Parcels” is key in explaining to people that electric motive power is not just ideally suited for parcel and last mile logistics operators but also a wide range of other users such as Access platforms, chillers and minibuses to name a few which we have created. This model line up in our world is, I’m sure, the

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start of something a lot more far reaching as the future develops and shapes, but certainly we offer the widest electric range in the heavy LCV and truck sector and with our vast experience, especially over the last 14 years since the Maxity Electric in 2004 and all various incarnations since then, we believe we are ideally placed to serve our customers and the ever growing requirement in electric motive power across a wide weight range. What weight range does that cover? Currently we start at 3,100kg GVW, offering around 1,100kg payload with the Renault Trucks Master SWB L1H1 Van and rising within the Truck range out to 26 tonnes GVW. There is often a raised eyebrow as to why 3,100kg but from our perspective we know that over 86% of conventional 3,500kg products run a 75% or less of total payload and with a traditional 3.5t van offering around 1,350kg payload, 75% is approximately 1,000kg so with our Master ZE we are able to address around 86% of the market today. How will Renault Trucks differentiate themselves from the competition both now and in the future? The main differentiator from Renault Trucks is our expertise in not only all aspects of our vehicles but the electromobility philosophy and the HGV aftersales back up we offer, which for any LCV operator is just a complete breath of fresh air and totally client centric. The ZE electric truck range is a unique proposition for an operator here in the UK and Europe and so this really helps us stand out in this market place and many other OEMs are talking about it, or have products in development, but ours is here now and because of this and our high

evfleetworld.co.uk

levels of expertise, we believe that for those wishing to make a positive impact now, with a reputable brand, backed up by a class leading franchise network working 24 hours a day, then the Renault Trucks proposition is one that shines really bright. We are offering on ZE not only the complete choice of conversions, but also our Truck based telematics system VanTelligence as well as completely tailored finance and repair and maintenance contracts. It really is an end-to-end solution and certainly those who are keen on looking at electric vehicles as being a proper solution for their business, then the discussions we are having now and the orders we are taking now, are true testament to our strategy. How was the launch of ZE Master back in November? In a word – excellent. We had over 100 clients come to Warwick and also again to the first public showing in London and frankly were overwhelmed with the response. This is really the start of a new world with commercial operators venturing into the world of electromobility. The mix of people was also great to see as its not just local authorities or multi national brands, it is also your medium sized, regional based operators keen to build on this and become future-proofed against ever increasing legislation and for many these next purchases into electric ZE are the commencement of a new strategy within their own businesses too. How has the new Renault Trucks Master ZE order intake been? We gained our first orders just before Christmas and since then its been a steady stream. We expect to sell in excess of 100 during 2019 with


IVIEW_GNeagus_GE_2019.qxp_Layout 1 08/03/2019 15:36 Page 2

( ELECTRIC VANS )

LCV ELECTROMOBILITY & THE FUTURE EV FLEET WORLD CAUGHT UP WITH GRAHAME NEAGUS, HEAD OF LCV AT RENAULT TRUCKS, TO SEE HOW THE FUTURE LOOKS FOR ELECTRIFIED LIGHT COMMERCIAL VEHICLES. an accelerated increase in 2020 and beyond, especially as many of the people taking them in 2019 are clients who have double digit requirements in 2020 and are using 2019 as a proving ground for their clients and operations. Do you see an increase in the uptake and interest with reference to the recently announced scrappage incentive programme for SMEs in moving into cleaner vehicles? The scrappage scheme recently announced is very much focused around the micro businesses and this is not generally an end of the market we have focused on as our client base has tended to be more regional and large fleet. However, we are always open to any enquiry. Do you see Electric as the only route forward in the future of clean transportation? As far as LCVs are concerned and the lower mileage (up to 300km per day) HGV’s are concerned, electric is the best route forward in terms of being silent in operation and emission free at the point of tailpipe. Within the HGV range we do offer in addition to the ultra clean Euro 6 step D engine technology a Gas variant too in certain models but our focus is really in electric because of its inherent advantages from a clean air perspective. Where can clients view the latest products? Our new ZE Master demonstrators are hitting the road in April and we will be exhibiting at a variety of shows in 2019 too. We will have one on display at CV Show 2019 as well but in essence, as we move through 2019, both ourselves centrally at Warwick Head Office and our Dealers will be suit-

ably resourced for clients to see and discuss the product and its benefits. Can a client try a new ZE vehicle? Certainly, our demonstrators, both Van and Platform Cab with low Luton bodies are available. What about finance and repair and maintenance contracts? Are they available now? Yes we offer full finance packages out to 6 years through Renault Trucks Financial Services and our own in-house tailored Repair and maintenance contracts too. Do you see this as purely a parcel / last mile logisitics need within society? Not at all. Many of the clients we are talking to and have sold to are in other urban industries including chilled distribution, minibus provision and elevated working platforms for working at height

operations, so no we firmly believe that our Ready for Business product and our tailored offers are equally at home with the ZE electric vehicle range, regardless of whether it’s one of the vans or the platform cabs. There are a mix of SWB, MWD and LWB vans with different roof heights as well as two versions of our famous platform cab. And finally, what is dealer backup like? Our 68 Dealers are 24/7 and are being trained up to be fully appointed ZE Dealers with our main focus initially on the main cities and towns where our clients are being based and then across all locations. The investments required are seen as future proofing the brand and the Dealers as when we have an even more expansive range there will be even greater need to have more technicians fully trained. However, today we are more than able to support the clients and their vehicles in the locations they are operating in.

“THIS IS REALLY THE START OF A NEW WORLD WITH LCV OPERATORS VENTURING INTO ELECTROMOBILITY”

Renault Trucks Master ZE

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( ELECTRIC BIKES )

ZERO TO HERO ELECTRIC BIKES MAY PAVE THE PATH TO YOUR NEXT ELECTRIC VEHICLE, WHETHER IT’S ON TWO OR FOUR WHEELS, FINDS JONATHAN MUSK.

CHANCES are, your next fleet vehicle probably won’t have just two wheels. But the four-wheeled fleet chariot you do end up with has likely learnt a thing or two from the two-wheel world. For years, engine innovations have been pioneered on two, not four wheels. Forget what the chaps at Formula One will have you believe – that they’ve developed a new piston engine technology – as the reality is the motorbike lot had probably already done it, or even sold the technology to F1 in the first place. Objectively, this is hardly surprising considering a superbike’s weight has to be kept to the absolute minimum, yet from a meagre 1.3-litre cubic capacity, around

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200bhp is achievable and all in a package that weighs just 250kg. That’s a power to weight ratio of 1,000bhp/tonne. Impressive, then. Enter the electric bike The bike on these pages isn’t petrol powered. It’s the latest Zero SR/F – an electric bike made by an American company that’s only been around for a decade. Why then, should fleets pay attention to this when instead, you could look towards Tesla’s four-wheeled EVs? In the same way that petrol powered motorbikes have pioneered internal combustion engine innovation, electric bikes are doing the same for the EV

scene. There has, however, been more investment in electric cars than bikes to date, but e-motorbikes have still played an important role in the uptake of electric cars and the development of electric powertrains and efficiency enhancements. The TT Zero race, which has been running since 2010 for instance, annually sets new standards for electrification of two wheels, with ever-faster lap times. To offer a little perspective, it took petrol power some 42 years to increase the average lap MPH from 96 to 121 average around the 37-mile course, whereas it took electric bikes just eight years to achieve the same level of development.

In the same way that petrol powered motorbikes have pioneered internal combustion engine innovation, electric bikes are doing the same for the EV scene.


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( ELECTRIC BIKES )

Disruptive While most early electric motorbikes tried not to disrupt the status quo amongst a largely hobbyist group, for example by keeping design acutely similar to petrol-powered bikes, the new Zero SR/F has made a departure from any effort to remain mainstream. The new bike proudly shows off its motor in a copper/bronze paint; the battery is clearly visible and there’s a distinct absence of fake petrol engine decals. It’s clearly still a motorbike, but is definitely electric. The ‘fuel tank’ is a storage box and the fairing is cut to show off the electrics beneath. Consequently, it’s a purer example of a very real alternative to a petrol-powered bike. And it’s innovative too – being the world’s first “smart” connected bike, as well as integrating the latest Bosch Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC). Chief specs are an impressive 161-200mile range from its 14.4kWh lithium-ion battery (depending on spec), a 124mph top speed and 190Nm torque to ensure blistering acceleration. The 60-minute recharge time on a 12kW charger enables the SR/F to be used for more than just inner-city travel too. However, the urban area is the likely habitat for most electric bikes. They’re proving an ideal alternative to petrol power and particularly where fleets are concerned with entering urbanisations that are due to, or thinking about, introducing Ultra-Low Emission zones or Clean Air Zones. And then there’s the congestion argument too, Dave Luscombe from the Electric Motorcycle Industry Association (eMCIA) told the Energy Saving Trust that traffic is often glossed over, “A lot of economic value is lost from being stuck in traffic jams. The advantage that electric motorbikes have over electric cars is that they don't contribute to that. It's the perfect solution for the urban commuter. Essentially, short distances, electric motorcycle, way to go.”

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To that end, SR/F aside, Zero offers a range of fleet-friendly bikes including the popular DSRP model that’s been especially designed for enforcement use and has already undergone trials with London and Ohio Police forces – and are gaining traction for scenarios where electric power can offer benefits above that of a petrol-powered bike. Zero options? Zero aren’t the only ones at it either. Established household names BMW and KTM each have electric bike offerings, and there’s a multitude of up-and-coming brands including SuperSoco and Lightning that provide opposite ends of the power spectrum, from a 30mph city electric scooter to the [claimed] world’s fastest production motorbike (of any powertrain). And these are just the tip of the iceberg with many more

SPEC Zero SR/F Premium TOP SPEED RANGE

CHARGE TIME

124mph

200-mile

1-hour

TORQUE

190Nm

BATTERY

14.4kWh lithium-ion

POWE R PRICE

110hp

£18,490 (from) inc. Plug-in Motorcycle Grant (PIMG) NB. Lower spec Standard model available from £16,490 inc. PIMG

marques jumping on the bandwagon to offer two-wheeled electric models. Government steps in Although it took a long while for the UK government to come good on its promise, a Plug-in Motorcycle Grant (PIMG) is now available for qualifying electric motorbikes, following ministers’ recognition of their importance – particularly for urban use. The grant will pay 20% of the purchase price, up to a maximum of £1,500. The PIMG also ensures a bike is fit for purpose, with qualifying machines requiring a minimal charge distance of 30km (18 miles) for electric scooters and 50km (31 miles) for electric motorbikes. Likewise, warrantys must be offered on bikes including a two-year unlimited mileage and three-year/30,000km (18,640 miles) battery warranty, helping ensure a certain level of peace of mind.


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For all your fleet electric vehicle needs and to stay up to date with the latest news and developments, visit

evfleetworld.co.uk @EVFleetWorld

EV Fleet World


It’s time for your fleet to go green. With government targets poised to cut carbon emissions across the United Kingdom, now is the time for fleets to embrace electrification. Helping you with the transition, Geotab’s electric vehicle product suite leverages your existing telematics data to help choose the right electric vehicles for your fleet - ultimately ensuring a return on investment. To learn more about transitioning to an electric vehicle powered fleet, read our white paper “Going electric: What you need to know about EV fleet management” at www.geotab.co.uk.

www.geotab.co.uk © 2019 Geotab Inc. All rights reserved.

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GO ELECTRIC March 2019  

GO ELECTRIC March 2019  

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