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STOP AT NOTHING. Flagstaff Region Investment Guide

www.StopAtNothing.ca


WELCOME TO THE FLAGSTAFF REGION Located two hours southeast of Edmonton, the Flagstaff Region and the 10 communities within it (population 8,361) thrive on their strong energy and agriculture sectors. The centrepiece of the Region’s energy sector is the Hardisty Hub, where much of Alberta’s oil production converges for transportation to North American energy markets. More than a million acres of cultivated cropland drive agricultural productivity in the Region. A vast groundwater aquifer offers potential to expand both of these industries. Quality of life is increased by a variety of recreation facilities and 130 kilometres of natural, undeveloped river valley. The Flagstaff Region offers affordable housing options, an overall lower cost of living, and lower business costs compared to larger urban centres. A skilled workforce drives enterprise productivity, with 38 percent of workers possessing a post-secondary trade or university certificate, diploma, or degree. The average calculation of residential

taxes on a $100,000 assessment is approximately $1,362, while the average commercial tax on a $100,000 assessment is approximately $2,537. The average household income for the Region is lower than the provincial average, but is offset by a lower cost of living. When combined with affordable housing options, this leaves more disposable income in the hands of residents — supporting dynamic, vibrant retail and business services sectors. The Flagstaff Region allows room to grow your business or invest, with undeveloped, affordable commercial and industrial lands that offer abundant highway and rail access. Our legacy of prosperity comes from our classic Albertan roots, meaning connections made in the Flagstaff Region are as significant as the lands are wide. We are resilient, proud, friendly, and entrepreneurial, working together to nurture new and innovative economic horizons, and pursue a salt-of-the-earth way of life.

WHY FLAGSTAFF REGION Stop At Nothing. That is the Flagstaff Region mantra for our relentless pursuit of entrepreneurial spirit. Flagstaff envisions a day when Alberta’s food processing brand is world-renowned. The Flagstaff Region is an agricultural leader, with a million acres of farmland producing a wide variety of crops that have the potential to be processed locally in a low-cost business environment. There are opportunities in greenhouses, meat snacks, pulse foods, ready-made meals, agricultural services, and craft valueadded production. A well-established regional supply chain includes Viterra, Great Northern Grain, and Paterson Grain. Easy market access is available via the Battle River Railway, CN short-line partner and innovator of the Composite Blending Program. The Region believes in an Alberta that is Canada’s energy leader, achieving a balance between conventional and renewable sources, tapping the talented, entrepreneurial soul of its people. The Flagstaff Region is a provincial distribution hub for the North American oil and gas sector via the

presence of the Hardisty Energy Hub. There are opportunities in bio energy, metal fabrication supporting local and oil sands energy development, and solar/wind power. Available low cost industrial land and an established industry support network are supporting thriving freight trucking, management consulting, machinery and equipment repair, and metal fabrication enterprises that reward entrepreneurial initiatives. Potential for industry is high in the Flagstaff Region, much in thanks to access to a vast underground aquifer and bulk water stations, competitive wages for skilled labour, very affordable housing, openness to consider industry development proposals, and competitive business costs. More deeply, the Flagstaff Region is classic Alberta, rooted in values as stable as bedrock for those who want to pursue a life more authentically lived. To further explore opportunities, contact Flagstaff County - Economic Development 780-384-4100 www.flagstaff.ab.ca/county-services/economic-development

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QUICK FACTS POPULATION (2016): 8,361 RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES (2014): 3,770 HOUSING STARTS (2015): 32 CONSTRUCTION VALUE (2015): $54.8 Million AVERAGE RESALE SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSE PRICE (2016): $156,820 VALUE OF DEVELOPMENT PERMITS (2015): $54.8 million NUMBER OF REGISTERED BUSINESSES (2016): 508

BATTLE RIVER ALLIANCE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Source: Statistics Canada

The Region is within easy driving distance from major centres such as Camrose, Edmonton, and Red Deer. Whether it is connecting to Alberta’s abundant natural resources to the north or linking to major markets to the east, west, and south, the Flagstaff Region is within reach. • • • • • • • •

75 kilometres east of Camrose 115 kilometres west of Wainwright 150 kilometres southeast of Edmonton 200 kilometres northeast of Red Deer 325 kilometres northeast of Calgary 160 kilometres from Saskatchewan border 440 kilometres north of United States border 550 kilometres south of Fort McMurray

MAJOR ROADWAYS: • Convenient access to the Eastern Alberta Trade Corridor (EATC), linking northern Alberta to Mexico • Highway 36 (part of EATC and the high load corridor north and south) • Highway 53 (east/west trade corridor) • Highway 13 (east/west trade corridor) AIRPORTS: • Municipal Airports: Flagstaff Regional Airport and Hardisty Airport • Edmonton International Airport, 150 kilometres away

FORT MCMURRAY

MAJOR HIGHWAYS HIGH LOAD CORRIDORS EASTERN ALBERTA TRADE CORRIDOR

EDMONTON

FLAGSTAFF REGION

CALGARY

RAIL: • Canadian Pacific Railway • Battle River Railway Short-line (previously Canadian National line) COURIER: • Full courier services INTERNET: • High-speed Internet commonly available www.stopatnothing.ca

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THE FLAGSTAFF REGION AT A GLANCE VILLAGE OF ALLIANCE

VILLAGE OF HEISLER

VILLAGE OF LOUGHEED

(POPULATION 154)

(POPULATION 160)

(POPULATION 256)

Situated just off Highway 36 on Secondary Highway 602, the Village of Alliance is a quaint yet vibrant community that perches atop the hills near the scenic Battle River Valley. This community has a long-standing economic base in agriculture and has been a major rail shipping point for grain to world markets. With oil and gas discovery in the early 1990s, the energy industry has added substantially to the area’s economic diversity. This picturesque Village is ideal for families, retirees, artists, and tourists. The Village is the starting point of the Battle River Railway.

The Village of Heisler is situated on Secondary Highway 855 between Highways 13 and 53, along the Battle River Railway between Forestburg and Camrose. Although a small community, Heisler has a lot to offer; a sustainable industrial base, amenities for seniors, and recreational opportunities for residents and visitors. Heisler is ideal for families, retirees, sport enthusiasts, and entrepreneurs. The Village offers a favourable incentive package for development with a signed agreement to develop a lot within 2 years. It is a great place to set up shop and put down roots.

The Village of Lougheed is located on Highway 13 between Sedgewick and Hardisty, along the Canadian Pacific Railway. Lougheed has a long-standing economic base in agriculture along with strong retail and energy sector support services. This growing community has a good mix of retail and agribusinesses offering products and services to Village and area residents. Lougheed is also home to the largest population of Mexican Mennonites in the Flagstaff Region. To accommodate this population as they deal with their new Canadian home, the citizens of Lougheed have initiated unique and ground-breaking events and enterprises to ensure a smooth transition to the Region.

VILLAGE OF FORESTBURG

(POPULATION 875)

The Village of Forestburg is located at the junction of Highway 53 and Secondary Highway 856, along the Battle River Railway. The scenic Battle River Valley is only 20 kilometres south and offers both a unique, natural setting and varied recreational opportunities. Forestburg has a healthy business sector that includes agribusiness, trades, energy sector support services, healthcare, professional services, and a strong retail sector that provides products and services to Village residents and nearby communities. The Village is just 15 kilometres northeast of the Diplomat Mine Interpretive Site, Canada’s only surface coal mining museum.

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THE FLAGSTAFF REGION AT A GLANCE TOWN OF KILLAM (POPULATION 989) The Town of Killam is a thriving and vibrant community, located at the intersection of Highways 36 and 13, along the Canadian Pacific Railway. Killam is an exceptionally clean, quiet municipality with welcoming residents that are committed to their community. Agriculture and the energy industries form the economic base for Killam. These industries are complemented by a robust business mix that includes agribusiness, trades, energy sector support services, healthcare, professional services, and a strong retail sector. The Town operates its own natural gas service (operated jointly with the Town of Sedgewick) providing residents and businesses in the community with competitive natural gas rates.

TOWN OF DAYSLAND

TOWN OF HARDISTY

(POPULATION 824)

(POPULATION 554)

The Town of Daysland is located on Highway 13, along the Canadian Pacific Railway midway between Killam and Camrose. Daysland was and is an agricultural community. Agriculture and related support services, retail, health services, and recreation are the basis of Daysland’s economy. A vibrant business mix provides products and services to Daysland and many surrounding communities. Daysland is proud to be home to the Daysland Medical Centre and Paterson Grain.

The Town of Hardisty is located along Highway 13 and the Canadian Pacific Railway on Secondary Highway 881. The Hardisty Tank Complex is home to Gibson Energy, Enbridge Pipelines, Flint Hills Resources, Interpipeline, Spectra Energy, Husky Energy, Plains Marketing, Canadian Natural Resources, and TransCanada. The Town is also home to the USD and Railserve offloading site, which is transporting crude oil by rail. Hardisty offers a strong and dynamic business sector, which includes automotive service and supplies, energy sector services, trades, hotel/motel accommodations, healthcare, professional services, and a strong retail mix that provides goods and services to residents and neighbouring communities.

TOWN OF SEDGEWICK

(POPULATION 811)

The Town of Sedgewick is located midway between Killam and Lougheed, along Highway 13, Secondary Highway 869, and the Canadian Pacific Railway. The economic base of Sedgewick is agriculture, the energy sector, and related support services. Sedgewick is one of several municipalities in the province to operate its own natural gas service (operated jointly with the Town of Killam) providing residents and businesses in the community with competitive natural gas rates.

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES AGRICULTURE SECTOR

OIL & GAS SECTOR

Approximately 1 million acres of high quality farmland

Strong and growing oil storage capacity at the Hardisty Energy Hub

Available industrial lands

FABRICATED METAL Existing industry and micro-business specialization

Access to vast groundwater aquifer and multiple bulk water stations throughout the Region

Established regional supply chain

High concentration of labour in the mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector Existing industry support network for business attraction and expansion

TOURISM & HOSPITALITY

Dedicated Battle River Railway short-line to service the local agriculture sector

Innovative Composite Blending Program supports the agricultural supply chain

Two hours from Edmonton with access to quality rural amenities Access to skilled and unskilled labour Competitively priced commercial lands

Supporting a strong oil and gas and agriculture sector

Ample availability of campgrounds and RV parks

Part of a larger regional fabricated metal sector

Numerous heritage museums

Four golf courses throughout the Region

Quality hotel and motel accommodations available

FEATURES COMMON TO ALL SECTORS •

Highways 13 and 36 connect the Flagstaff Region to national and international markets via the Eastern Alberta Trade Corridor (EATC) Part of a strong economic region with consistently low unemployment rates

Competitive wages for skilled labour

Superb quality of life in rural and small town settings

Plentiful access to healthcare services

Lower housing costs compared to larger urban centres

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FLAGSTAFF REGION FACT SHEET TRADE AREA The population and primary trading area of the Region is comprised of 8,361 people, which encompasses the boundary of Flagstaff County, and extends to a radius of 40 kilometres. The secondary trading area of 56,102 people extends to a radius of 80 kilometres. This greater trading area encompasses portions of neighbouring municipalities, which include Camrose County, Beaver County, County of Paintearth, M.D. of Provost, Stettler County, and M.D. of Wainwright, as well as the City of Camrose, Towns of Provost, Stettler, and Wainwright, and the smaller towns and villages within an 80-kilometre radius. The Region has a steady transient population that increases the total trading area to 59,102 people. EMPLOYMENT BASE The employment base in the Region is vastly made up of jobs from the agriculture, oil and gas, retail, construction, and healthcare sectors. MAJOR EMPLOYERS Arnett & Burgess Oilfield Construction (350) GCS Energy Services (200) Battle River School Division (150) Killam Health Care Centre, Covenant Health (124) Daysland Medical Centre (100) INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL LANDS There are roughly 70 acres in assorted industrial and commercial lands available in the Flagstaff Region, which provides a competitve advantage for companies considering location or expansion. These are both public and private lands. A listing of available land is on the Flagstaff Region Investment website www.StopAtNothing.ca. Contact Flagstaff for more information at 780-384-4100 and ask for Economic Development. UTILITIES Electricity and natural gas are deregulated in Alberta. The Alberta Government provides a website to assist consumers with choosing an appropriate provider for their residence or business. To learn more about electrical or natural gas providers, visit: www.ucahelps.gov.ab.ca. MUNICIPAL An average monthly water/sewer/garbage utility bill in the Flagstaff Region communities is $133*. Enterprise investments in the County operate on independent water/septic services, and commercial garbage pick-up.

POPULATION 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000

8,969

8,803

8,304

8,361

2001

2006

2011

2016

20-44

0-19

2,000

0

AGE STRUCTURE 1,500 1,200

Female Male

900 600 300 0

65+

45-64

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $100,000 $80,000 $60,000 $40,000

$67,805

$80,271

$65,500

$20,000 0

Flagstaff

Alberta

Canada

*Assumes 19 cubic metres average Alberta household consumption per month Src: http://www.calgary.ca/ docgallery/BU/environmental_management/Climate_ Change_and_You/Watertap.pdf

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FLAGSTAFF REGION FACT SHEET

HOUSE PRICE COMPARISON

EDUCATION Approximately 300 students are enrolled in high school annually from the Flagstaff Region with the Battle River School Division. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Number of businesses (2016): 508 RESIDENTIAL HOUSING STARTS Housing starts for Flagstaff Region (2015): 32 HOUSING Housing prices are comparable to neighbouring counties, and up to 50 percent lower than average pricing in Edmonton. Residential and Commercial real estate listings – www.realtor.ca. Search by each of the community names in the Flagstaff Region.

HOME OWNERSHIP

RENTERS 214

CONSTRUCTION VALUES Total construction value in millions (includes all residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional activity) for Flagstaff Region (2015): $55.1 million. TAX RATES Flagstaff County offers competitive tax rates. To view the current mill rates, please visit http://www.flagstaff.ab.ca/county-services/taxation.

OWNERS 1,352

CORPORATE TAXES

GENERAL

MANUFACTURING AND PROCESSING

INVESTMENT

SMALL BUSINESS

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LABOUR FORCE PROFILE

EDUCATION PROFILE

The Flagstaff Region is part of the larger Camrose–Drumheller Economic Region that makes up 5.4 percent of the province’s population. The Flagstaff Region is a place of employment. The Region has a skilled workforce with 38 percent possessing some form of post-secondary, trade, or university certificate, diploma, or degree. Source: Statistics Canada (Labour Force Survey, November 2016)

6.8

%

4.1%

FLAGSTAFF REGION BY INDUSTRY

12.7%

12.1

%

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, FISHING, HUNTING

FINANCE, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE

MINING, QUARRYING, OIL & GAS EXTRACTION

PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL SERVICES

CONSTRUCTION & UTILITIES

ADMINISTRATION, WASTE MANAGEMENT, REMEDIATION

MANUFACTURING

24.4%

3.4%

RETAIL AND WHOLESALE TRADE

4.2%

TRANSPORTATION / WAREHOUSING

EDUCATION, HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE OTHER SERVICES PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

10.1% 21.1% 1

4.1%

%

ARTS & SPORTS

BUSINESS & FINANCE

SALES & SERVICE

SCIENCES

TRADES & TRANSPORT

HEALTH

NATURAL RESOURCES

EDUCATION, LAW & GOVERNMENT

MANUFACTURING & UTILITIES

16.6%

13.4%

FLAGSTAFF REGION BY OCCUPATION MANAGEMENT

3.9%

10.7% 1.8 1.1% %

2.5% 3.5%

7.8%

10.6% 1%

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QUALITY OF LIFE AMENITIES RECREATION & CULTURE The Flagstaff Region offers many great recreational and cultural activities and opportunities for visitors and residents of all ages to enjoy. ARENAS There are nine arenas in the Region with both natural and artificial ice surfaces where you can enjoy public skating, learn figure skating, or take part in a local hockey game. • • • • • • • • •

Alliance Daysland Forestburg Galahad (outdoor) Hardisty Heisler Killam Lougheed Sedgewick

CURLING RINKS There are six curling rinks in the Region. • • • • • •

Daysland Hardisty Forestburg Lougheed Sedgewick Strome

GOLF COURSES The Flagstaff Region boasts four 9-hole golf courses, where golfers of all levels can enjoy a game. • • • •

Daysland Forestburg Hardisty Sedgewick

SWIMMING POOLS There are both indoor and outdoor swimming pools in the Flagstaff Region. • • •

Forestburg (outdoor) Killam (indoor) Sedgewick (wading pool)

GYM/FIELDHOUSE • Daysland (gym) • Forestburg (gym) • Killam (gym) • Lougheed (gym/fieldhouse) TENNIS COURTS There are public tennis courts in the Region. • • •

Daysland Forestburg Killam

BALL DIAMONDS If baseball or softball is your game of choice, enjoy any of the ball diamonds within the Region. • • • • • • • • •

Alliance Daysland Forestburg Hardisty Heisler Killam Lougheed Sedgewick Strome

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QUALITY OF LIFE AMENITIES BOWLING ALLEY For the bowlers, you can improve your game here. • • •

Galahad Heisler Sedgewick

SENIORS’ CENTRES There are seniors’ centres in most communities in the Flagstaff Region. • • • • • • • • •

Daysland Galahad Forestburg Hardisty Heisler Killam Lougheed Sedgewick Strome

THEATRES There are theatres in Daysland and Killam, where movies, plays, and community arts and cultural programs run. SKI HILL The Valley Ski Hill is located in the Battle River Valley near Alliance. The ski hill has a full-service lodge, rental shop, and a ski school.

ARTS & CULTURAL GROUPS There are several groups that offer arts and cultural events, activities, and programs in the Region. • • • • • • •

Battle River Art Club, Sedgewick Big Owl Music Studio & Café, Killam Communities in Bloom, Forestburg Concert Series, Forestburg Curtain Call Community Theatre, Forestburg Daysarts, Daysland Flagstaff Players, Sedgewick

LIBRARIES Public libraries are in most communities in the Flagstaff Region. We are part of the Parkland Regional Library system, which is a network of over 50 public libraries connecting over 200,000 residents in central Alberta. You can visit their website and find out more about the Parkland Regional Library or check out an e-book or magazine at www.prl.ab.ca. COMMUNITY BUS Flagstaff County has a 33 passenger community bus available for rent at competitive rates. For full details and bus availability, please visit http://www.flagstaff.ab.ca/county-services/communitybus.

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TOURISM INFRASTRUCTURE

BATTLE RIVER TRAIN EXCURSIONS Enjoy an exciting new opportunity riding the rails. Take a ride in a vintage passenger car through the communities in the southern part of the Region, where you can enjoy the spectacular scenery around Alliance, the ‘medieval hamlet’ of Galahad, beautiful gardens and communities in bloom in Forestburg, and Canada’s Largest Baseball Glove in Heisler. Catch the train for corporate or family events, or enjoy one of the year-round themed train rides. For more information or to book tickets, visit friendsofbrr.com.

DIPLOMAT MINE INTERPRETIVE SITE Experience the rich history at Canada’s only surface coal mining museum, or take a step back in time at any of the five other museums in the Region. • • • • •

Sodbusters Archives Museum in Strome Sedgewick Archives Gallery and Museum Lougheed Iron Creek Museum Forestburg Historical Society Museum Alliance and District Museum

GOLF The Flagstaff Region has four courses. Take part in one of the many seasonal golf tournaments like the Battle River cash scramble at Forestburg Golf Club or the mixed scramble at Sedgewick Centennial Golf Club. • • • •

Sedgewick Centennial Golf Club, www.sedgewickgolf.ca Daysland Golf Club, www.dayslandgolf.com Hardisty Lakeview Golf Club, www.hardistygolf.com Forestburg Golf Club, www.forestburggolfclub.com

CAMPING Take pleasure in fishing, hiking, boating, or camping at any of our 18 campgrounds. See flagstaff.ab.ca/tourism/where-to-stay/campgrounds-and-parks

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BUSINESS RESOURCES LOCAL GOVERNMENT Flagstaff County 780-384-4100 www.flagstaff.ab.ca Toll Free: 877-387-4100 TOWNS AND VILLAGES For business licenses, development permits, utilities, and taxes in the local communities, contact the town or village offices directly. Alliance Daysland Forestburg Hardisty Heisler Killam Lougheed Sedgewick

780-879-3911 780-374-3767 780-582-3668 780-888-3623 780-889-3774 780-385-3977 780-386-3970 780-384-3504

www.villageofalliance.ca www.daysland.com www.forestburg.ca www.hardisty.ca www.villageofheisler.ca www.town.killam.ab.ca www.villageoflougheed.com www.sedgewick.ca

REGION Battle River Alliance for Economic Development (BRAED) http://www.braedalberta.ca/ One-stop information resource about business and economic development in east central Alberta. Community Futures East Central Alberta http://eastcentralalberta.albertacf.com/ Business and economic development services for the Flagstaff Region. Central Alberta Realtors Association http://www.carassociation.ca/ Real estate statistics.

ALBERTA/CANADA Alberta Small Business Resources www.smallbusiness.alberta.ca Directory of business resources for new and established entrepreneurs. Alberta Enterprise and Advanced Education www.albertacanada.com Investment, competitive advantage, and statistical information. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development www.agric.gov.ab.ca Business and marketing information for agriculture and food processors. Travel Alberta www.travelalberta.com Tourism information. Business Link www.canadabusiness.ab.ca Government information service for businesses. Information for federal and provincial government services, programs, and regulatory requirements for business. Business Development Bank of Canada (Edmonton) https://www.bdc.ca/en/business-centres/alberta/pages/ edmonton.aspx?source=directory Financial, investment and consulting services to Canadian small and medium-sized businesses. The Government of Alberta http://occinfo.alis.alberta.ca/occinfopreview/info/browsewages.html This database is searchable by region; The Flagstaff Region is located in the Camrose-Drumheller region.

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STOP AT NOTHING.

Remember the simple, invincible days of your youth...when any imagined horizon was achievable... when obstacles were easy to leapfrog? Stop at nothing in your quest for entrepreneurial greatness...dare we say immortality. Call 780-384-4100 to explore your next business idea and great life adventure.

Profile for Flagstaff County

2017 Flagstaff Region Investment Guide  

2017 Flagstaff Region Investment Guide  

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