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The Voice of Agriculture in Florida

FloridAgriculture VOLUME 79, NO. 8 • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

ANNUAL MEETING PHOTO GALLERY TRACING BEEF A SPECIAL FRUIT STAND THE RED TIDE CHALLENGE

www.floridagriculture.org | www.FloridaFarmBureau.org


OFFICERS

President Vice President Secretary Treasurer

John L. Hoblick Brantley Schirard Jr. Steve Johnson Rod Land DIRECTORS

District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9 District 10 District 11 District 12 District 13 District 14 District 15 District 16 District 17 District 18 District 19

Jerry Davis Jeff Pittman Henry McCrone Michael Dooner Rod Land Jon Deas Thomas Ford Ed Shadd Brad Etheridge Jeb Smith Kelly Rice J. Daniel Peterson Mark Byrd Steve Johnson Dan West Ken Harrison Mark Sodders Jacob Larson Mark Wilson

STATE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP COMMITTEE

Chair Vice Chair

Danielle Daum Victoria Register

STATE YF&R LEADERSHIP GROUP

President Immed. Past Pres.

Ryan Armstrong Adam Cook STAFF

Editor G.B. Crawford Communications Mgr. Rachael Smith Communications Coord. Amanda Overstreet FLORIDAGRICULTURE (ISSN 0015-3869) is published Jan.-Feb., March, April-May, June, July, Aug.-Sept., Oct. and Nov.-Dec. for $3 per year in member dues by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation, 5700 S.W. 34th Street. Periodical postage paid at Gainesville, FL and additional mailing offices. It was established in 1943. Copyright 2019 by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation. Main telephone number: (352) 378-8100. Printed by Panaprint - Macon, GA. POSTMASTER Send address changes to: FloridAgriculture, P.O. Box 147030 Gainesville, FL 32614-7030 For advertising questions, contact our Communications Coordinator by telephone at (352) 374-1535, by e-mail at amanda.overstreet@ffbf.org or by hard copy: FloridAgriculture Amanda Overstreet P.O. Box 147030 Gainesville, FL 32614-7030

CONTENTS 6

OUR NATIONAL HERDS

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RED TIDE SCIENCE

10 ROBERT IS REALLY THERE 13 A TOP FARMER 15 TALLAHASSEE REPORT

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16 RECOGNIZING ACHIEVEMENT 19 WASHINGTON REPORT 20 PASTURE TO PLATE 28 CLASSIFIED ADS 29 CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Nov. 20-27 Farm-City Week. For events in your area, contact your local county Farm Bureau. For contact information, visit https://www.floridafarmbureau.org/county-farm-bureaus/. Dec. 10 Florida Farm Bureau Day, Tallahassee. To register, visit https://floridafarmbureau.formstack.com/forms/2019_farm_bureau_day. Jan. 17-22 American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, Austin, Texas. For more information, send email to debra.jones@ffbf.org. Cover: Wishing you a joyous holiday season!

Non-member subscriptions are not available.

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

A THEME OF SERVICE AND ACCOMPLISHMENT FLORIDA FARM BUREAU VOLUNTEERS have once

again demonstrated that they are the Voice of Agriculture in our state, continuing to live an outstanding Legacy of success. The awards and applause they received at the Florida Farm Bureau Annual Meeting were heartfelt expressions of appreciation for their hard work, dedication and talents by members who share a common purpose. That purpose has guided us in reaching much success during the past year. Our county Farm Bureaus have set a record with their programs and activities. Fifty-three of them have earned Awards of Excellence in all five categories of operation evaluated. Volunteers in these counties are Living the Legacy of our organization as they serve as our grassroots Voice. Our Farm Bureau members have assumed effective leadership roles as advocates on behalf of farm families. They have been the Voice of Farm Bureau. They informed the general public and elected

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officials about such matters as irrigation techniques and innovative crop production techniques, both of which have substantially reduced farm water use. They also addressed myths about red tide and algal blooms in South Florida. Farm Bureau volunteers have traveled to Tallahassee so they could visit with lawmakers and executive agency staff members. They helped secure a state sales tax exemption as well as an emergency bridge loan program for farm families recovering from Hurricane Michael. Our volunteers also influenced federal policy by connecting with the Florida Congressional delegation. The group effort influenced the Congress to provide a major disaster assistance program that will assist Panhandle families still recovering from the hurricane. In Living the Farm Bureau Legacy, members of our Young Farmers and Ranchers and Women’s programs have led outstanding community activities and charitable projects. Our Young Farmers

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

John L. Hoblick, Florida Farm Bureau President

and Ranchers won top national awards from the American Farm Bureau Federation for their food bank donations. Florida Farm Bureau Women organized major donations to charities such as Ronald McDonald House facilities and Seamark Ranch. Their leadership raised more than $175,000 for farm families suffering losses due to Hurricane Michael. Such records of excellence have inspired us to organize our activities in the new year around the theme of Be the Voice, Live the Legacy. This theme will be a central beacon as we work together through our Farm Bureau agenda. May each one of us Be the Voice and Live the Legacy.


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National Herd By Amanda Overstreet, Communications Coordinator

THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA) has initiated a transition from the current cattle identification system, a metal NUES or Brite tag, to an electronic identification technology system, more commonly known as RadioFrequency Identification or a RFID tag. Electronic cattle traceability is a tool that will help producers manage their livestock and assist animal health officials in tracking rare foreign animal diseases in the event of an outbreak. Florida has a large exposure to disease due its millions of visitors each year and multiple international airports and seaports. Although the electronic system will not prevent an animal from getting sick, it will help producers identify the problem and regionalize it more efficiently and accurately. Ken Griner, Florida Cattle Ranchers

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Ken Griner is a past president of the Florida Cattleman’s Association and a current member of the Florida Cattle Ranchers, a group of Florida ranchers who share the same passion for protecting Florida’s greenspace and family ranches, producing the best quality Florida-grown beef and building a sustainable Florida. “As long as we keep our animals on the farm, they’re our business,” Griner said. “But as soon as we sell them, they go into commerce and they are on their way to becoming food. As producers, I feel we need to be responsible for what we are raising.” Florida is a cow/calf state which sets it apart from other large cattle producing states in the Midwest which is filled with feed yards and packing plants.

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“We look at the industry with a different set of glasses,” Griner said. “It is important for us to pursue this change and have a voice in cattle traceability.” The biggest role that industry leaders can play in this process is education. With support from the UF/IFAS Extension service, educators have created a unified message that helps producers during this change. In the event of an outbreak, the problems go far beyond losing cattle and it is critical that producers understand the value and the risks of this implementation. Florida is moving forward in its transition to the RFID system and is currently testing two types of electronics – a low frequency more passive system as well as a high frequency system. Both have different rates of readability. “The decisions we are making in cattle traceability are mostly going to be impacting our livestock markets,” Griner mentioned. “We need to make sure we keep things as simple as possible for their benefit.”

PHOTO BY CARL MCKETTRICK, JR.

SAFEGUARDING OUR


and eradicate high consequence diseases of animals. “Disease traceability really helps us mitigate potential outbreaks in tracking cattle that have or have been exposed to disease at a much higher rate,” Short stated. A quick response to animal disease will help an individual producer avoid losses as well as boosts confidence in other states that Florida has the capability to properly manage the issue and continue to ship cattle across state lines. “This keeps our interstate trade channels open,” Short said. Short’s office has been working with McKettrick and his software vendor along with the USDA’s systems and explained that so far they have received high read rates and everything has been running smoothly. Florida is one of the few states that currently has an intrastate rule on cattle identification. “Our rules and our agency are ready for any change from the federal level regarding animal identification,” Short said. Traceability exercises from the USDA prepare states in the event of an outbreak. Because of our

intrastate identification system, Florida is able to track down the origin of disease much quicker than other states. “Ultimately we need to move animal disease traceability into the 21st century,” Griner said. “You need to look no further than Asia fighting African swine fever to understand how critical this improvement is.” Effective Dec. 31, 2019, Florida cattle producers will no longer receive the free metal tags previously provided by the USDA. Beginning Jan. 1, 2020, Florida cattle owners may purchase official identification tags and tag their cattle themselves or have their cattle tagged at an approved tagging site. By Jan. 1, 2021, NUES or Brite tags will no longer be accepted as official identification and by January 2023, only RFID tags will be considered official identification for cattle in commerce. For more information on cattle traceability or obtaining an official ID, visit https://www.fdacs.gov/ Agriculture-Industry/Livestock/ Cattle-Bovine/Florida-LivestockIdentification. *As of press time, the USDA has suspended the timeline for conversion to RFID tags, pending further public comment.

PHOTO BY CARL MCKETTRICK, JR.

Carl McKettrick, Jr. has been on the forefront of the electronic cattle traceability movement and is the manager and co-owner of the Arcadia Stockyard in DeSoto County where he is currently testing low frequency electronic identification in his barn. “Cattle are read prior to coming into the ring and that data is or can be used for producer information as well as information provided to the state officials for movement documents,” McKettrick said. “The electronic tags tell us who the seller of the animal is, that the animal was sited healthy (if not the state would pull the animal from the sale at the Arcadia Stockyard) and who purchased the animal,” he said. In addition to traceability and disease control, data management is a benefit to the producer that allows them to track an animal’s genetics, vaccinations and feed records if they wish. Some producers even use the electronic identification tag to track the animal beyond the market (while retaining ownership) to the processing plant to evaluate the meat quality and use that data to better market their cattle. Cattle traceability starts on the ranch and if ranchers want to participate, they can establish a connection with state animal health officials or McKettrick at the Arcadia Stockyard who will assure they obtain their RFID tags before coming to the market, although this is not necessary nor a requirement just yet. Dr. Mike Short is the State Veterinarian and Director of Animal Industry with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. His office’s primary role is to prevent, control

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Red Tide Bloom AN OCEAN-BASED SCOURGE By G.B. Crawford, Director of Public Relations

THE AWFUL SCENE is familiar to residents on Southwest Florida’s coast. A reddish-tinted sea washes rotting fish and other creatures along the shore. “All the forms of sea life died as though stricken with a plague fatal alike to all,” one observer wrote, emitting “a pestilential stench.” According to another witness lamenting the same blight, “the stench was so bad that it was impossible to go on the beach.” These accounts documented an 1880 episode, not a recent experience, and were published by the U.S. Department of the Interior a year later. It is one of many red tide fish kills that have been periodically reported in the region since the Spanish colonial era. Floridians have complained about an increase in the frequency and scope of such events in recent years. Some contemporary critics blame land-based pollution as the

Laboratory analysis is a basic part of red tide research.

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key reason for the change. A 2018 event was the worst for Florida in a decade, fouling waters in three different locations, including the Southwest Gulf Coast. Public officials issued repeated warnings about the threat of respiratory illness due to airborne toxins released from the sea. Scientists have identified Florida red tide as the bloom of Karenia brevis, a single cell organism that occurs naturally offshore in the Gulf of Mexico and can be transported to other ocean waters. A member of an algae group, the organism can grow into great concentrations during late summer or early fall and is brought ashore by wind and currents. Cynthia Heil, director of the Red Tide Institute at the Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, said Karenia brevis has an unusually effective feeding capacity. It can draw nutrients – including nitrogen and phosphorus – from 13 different sources.

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One of those sources is another ocean-borne organism (also part of an algae group) that absorbs nitrogen from the atmosphere and excretes it, fueling growth in red tide blooms. Karenia brevis exists in and around a Loop Current of warm water that flows from the Gulf of Mexico around the Florida Keys into the Atlantic Ocean. In some years, the position of the current moves closer to the relatively shallow Gulf shelf along Southwest Florida, stirring up nutrients. As a result, the organism grows into a “monster bloom.” “There are millions of these cells per liter of water in a bloom,” Heil explained.” That’s when we have problems.” The phenomenon poses many unanswered questions. “For red tide, there are not simple answers,” Heil said. “It is a complicated ecological subject to study. We do know that you can’t point a finger at a single nutrient source for this.” Heil and her fellow researchers have utilized a number of instruments and techniques in their investigations, from laboratory examinations of samples to underwater devices that measure currents deep in the Gulf.


(PHOTOS COURTESY OF FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION)

Red tide testing equipment is raised from the ocean.

Scientists at various other institutions and agencies are also busy studying what causes the blooms to expand. Robert Weisberg, a physical oceanographer at the University of South Florida, agrees that ocean currents are the controlling force behind red tide blooms. Weisberg and his team deployed an underwater glider to examine and pinpoint the initiation zone of the 2018 bloom 30 to 50 miles off the coast from Sarasota Bay to Tampa Bay. They also utilized ocean circulation models in their study. The results indicate that although pollutants from shore can help feed a red tide bloom, they do not create it. “We can account for the most severe red tides or the lack of red tide on the basis of the ocean circulation,” Weisberg said. Current patterns are “determining the nutrient levels at mid-shelf (in the Gulf of Mexico) where most red tides initiate and also for the

transport to the shoreline.” Continued study of the phenomenon will give a better perspective on its origins and spread, he added. “The majority of events are of offshore origin, but there is more to learn about the more anomalous years and the potential for bloom exacerbation.” Quay Dortch, a scientist at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration’s Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, counseled that mitigation remains a challenge. “People would like a magic pill that you drop into the water and everything disappears,” Dortch said. “But a magic pill that has no environmental consequences is unlikely to be developed.” The agency has funded investigations of various harmful algal blooms (HABs), including red tide. “As a result of NOAA’s investment in HAB research, we have a better understanding of what causes Florida red tide,”

Dortch explained. “Detection and early warning for Florida red tide and its toxins have become more accurate, faster and lower in cost.” A new state grant program administered by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission should boost the quest for control and mitigation. Heil emphasized that all scientists involved are closely following the lesson learned from trial uses of copper sulfate in attempts to eliminate red tide in the 1950s. “First, do no further harm than the red tide is doing itself,” she said. FOR MORE ABOUT RED TIDE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration • https://www.whoi.edu/ redtide/ • https://coastalscience. noaa.gov/research/ stressor-impactsmitigation/ Mote Marine Laboratory • https://mote.org/redtide

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A farm family legacy.

Ambassador FOR FARMING AND THE COMMUNITY By Rachael Smith, Communications Manager

THE FARM FAMILY OF THE YEAR Award recognizes generational excellence in agriculture in Dade County. On Oct. 1, Dade County Farm Bureau past-president Erick Tietig bestowed this award upon Robert Moehling and his family, owners of Robert Is Here Fruit Stand and Farm, a local Homestead landmark. “It is important to recognize farm families like the Moehlings, because they exemplify a legacy of Farm Bureau tradition through service to the industry, advocacy, and a passion for preserving it for future generations,” said Tietig, vice president, Pine Island Nursery in Miami. Robert’s story in itself is a legacy. He was six years old when his father set him on the corner of S.W. 344 Street and S.W. 192 Ave., to sell cucumbers to help supplement the family income. 10

No one stopped. Robert’s parents could not understand how no one stopped to see this small child sitting on the side of the road. The next morning, Robert sat at the same corner with a hurricane shutter spray painted with the words, “Robert is Here” to bring attention to the little boy sitting and a table of veggies. It worked. Robert immediately sold out of his produce. He began working after school and during holiday breaks with his sister, Rose, gathering produce from local farmers to

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sell. And so began the start of the Moehling family legacy. Sixty years later, Robert is still Here. The fruit stand has evolved into a world-renowned travel destination, providing jobs for nearly 50 employees. A million travelers pass the iconic stand en route to the Everglades National Park annually. Tourists are drawn to the unique market to sample locally grown exotic tropical fruit or enjoy a tasty key lime or mango homemade milk shake – or any other fruitful combination.


Florida Farm Bureau District Field Representative Eva Webb says that Robert is Here is a must-see stop for any out-oftown visitors. She said that the tropical fruit stand has some of the most delicious and unusual fruit around, including jackfruit, guanabana and dragonfruit. “It’s Old Florida,” said Webb. “Everyone is so friendly and Robert is right here working behind the counter, greeting customers with a smile. It’s agriculture at its best.” Moehling credits his mom for teaching him about good savings habits at a young age. She helped him start his first savings account and he quickly began building up his rainy day fund. By age fourteen he saved up enough money to buy his first piece of property consisting of 10 acres, a home, car and lawnmower. It was on these acres that Moehling planted his first

avocado tree and his love for agriculture and his community began. “I’ve always believed in giving back,” said Moehling. “Our family used local vendors for all of our supplies – the local hardware store, electrical, plumbing or lumber store. It’s about building relationships. These are the people I know and I want to support.” In 1992, when Hurricane Andrew struck, his community and life got turned upside down. Not only did Moehling lose his home, fruit market and farmland, his mother was tragically murdered in her home just days before the hurricane. He rebuilt with the help of his family and community. “The support of the community was overwhelming,” said Moehling. “If you are loyal and faithful to your community, it does pay pack 100 percent.”

Robert built a rustic Florida back porch so that tourists could snap a keepsake photo of “Old Florida."

Moehling has four children who are involved and interested in continuing the family legacy. In 40 years, his youngest son will be at the age Robert is now, making it very likely for the Robert is Here Fruit Stand and Farm to celebrate 100 years. “My home has always been right here, looking at my agriculture community,” stated Moehling. “I’m right where I want to be.”

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Showcasing Exemplary Careers SUNBELT EXPO FARMER AWARD PROGRAM By G.B. Crawford, Director of Public Relations

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or 30 years, the Sunbelt Ag Expo has celebrated outstanding farmers with an impressive awards program. Part of the largest farm show in North America, the program annually honors a Farmer of the Year recipient from each of 10 states, including Florida. The state awardees are also considered for the title of Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year. All state winners are introduced at a special luncheon held in October during the Expo event. Charles “Chuck” Obern, Florida’s 2019 Farmer of the Year, produces an impressive array of vegetables and herbs, including organic green beans, bok choy, radishes and cabbage. Along with his sons, Charles (“Boots”) and Michael, he supplies crops and packs them according to requests from customers located throughout the nation’s Atlantic coast. A Hendry County grower, Obern expressed appreciation for his experience at the Expo and the organization of the Farmer of the Year program. He said the Moultrie, Ga. event was unusual for an agriculturist. “I am not accustomed to this kind of thing,” Obern explained. “It was done with such honor. All of the contestants were honored individually and as a group.”

Florida Farmer of the Year Charles “Chuck” Obern, center left, was accompanied by his family and friends at the Sunbelt Ag Expo.

“Most of us farmers are not accustomed to being in the limelight,” he added. “I was out of my element. The psyche of most people who produce is to produce. But that was all alleviated by the organization and planning at the Expo.” Obern highly recommends the Farmer of the Year program to other Floridians. “I think it is a valuable program and I think it is good that individual stories about farmers get out to the public,” he said. By highlighting the careers of the state winners, Florida Farm Bureau and the Expo may motivate more young people to pursue agricultural careers, Obern added. “The sacrifices that are incurred might be scary, but they should realize that it can be done successfully.” During the awards luncheon

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue told the audience of more than 1,000 guests that farm families make this nation the “superpower of food.” “People in this room and like you across the country are the life of the nation,” said Perdue. “You give us the assurance of having food on our table without dependence on anyone else.” He also hinted that trade relations with foreign nations will be improving. More than 1,200 exhibitors welcomed crowds to the 2019 Expo, Oct. 15-17. The farm show also offered a busy schedule of demonstrations, seminars and field trials. For more information about the event and the Farmer of the Year program, visit https://sunbeltexpo.com/.

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TA L L A H A S S E E R E P O R T

Blue-Green Algae Task Force Recommendations Prompt Governor’s Water Proposal By Adam Basford, Director of State Legislative Affairs

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n Oct. 16, Governor Ron DeSantis released the outline of a proposal based on the recommendations of the Blue-Green Algae Task Force he established when he was first elected. Although as of press time, we do not yet have all of the fine details of this proposal, we do know that it seeks to take a comprehensive, science-based approach to improve water quality in the state. The proposal will seek to address wastewater discharges, septic tanks, storm water and agriculture. Clearly, Florida Farm Bureau is very interested in how agriculture will be affected by any proposal like this, and we are committed to work to ensure that it builds upon the good work that agriculture has been doing through the Best Management Practices program. From what we can tell, that is the direction the Governor’s proposal is taking. By incorporating new research from the University of Florida’s Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences,

it looks to improve the Best Management Practices (BMPS) that have had such a positive impact in the past. It also would seek to increase enrollment in BMPs and help verify that these practices are being applied. We believe this approach could help lend credibility to an important program that has been effective in the past. Frankly, there are many critics of the BMP program that would prefer it to be changed into a command and control regulatory program. By committing to a steady improvement of the BMP program and helping to verify its adoption, we believe this program can continue to be a successful tool that ensures that agriculture is part of the solution to Florida’s water quality challenges. Florida Farm Bureau is part of a large coalition of agricultural interests in Tallahassee that are focused on this issue and working to make sure that agriculture’s voice is heard. We hope that you will help us continue to have a strong

We believe this program can continue to be a successful tool that ensures that agriculture is part of the solution to Florida’s water quality challenges. voice by joining us for Farm Bureau Day in Tallahassee on Dec. 10. We will have hundreds of Farm Bureau members from across the state in the Capitol talking about this and other important issues with their elected officials. We will also be joining with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to host the Taste of Florida Agriculture Reception that evening. This is the premier legislative reception in Tallahassee and we would love for you to join us. You can find all the details and register at https:// floridafarmbureau.formstack. com/forms/2019_farm_ bureau_day.

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Bright lights and applause were in order throughout the agenda at the 2019 Florida Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, held in Orlando, Oct. 30Nov.1. Participants cheered the many Farm Bureau volunteers who have contributed to the organization’s success in the past year. The Young Farmers and Ranchers competitions were also a key focus of the meeting. Jake and Tiffany Sache of Levy County brought home the

Achievement in Agriculture Award, while Kyle and Alisha Patterson of St. Lucie County received the Excellence in Agriculture Award. Pete Dola of Levy County won the Discussion Meet. This year’s meeting included a Farm Bureau Member Benefits Showcase, breakout sessions, a Farm Bureau Women’s Annual Meeting, an AgEnvronmental Leadership Awards Breakfast, the adoption of policies by Farm Bureau member delegates, an address by American Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall and recognition of Florida Farm Bureau’s Legislator of the Year Award recipients. The theme of the annual meeting – Be the Voice, Live the legacy – will guide Florida Farm Bureau’s activities and programs until the next annual meeting, planned for Oct. 21-23, 2020.

For more annual meeting photos, visit bit.ly/32hg8Bi.

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1 FFB President John L. Hoblick, left, and FFB Insurance President Steve Murray, right, presented the 2019 Young Farmers and Ranchers Achievement in Agriculture Award to Jake and Tiffany Sache of Levy County. 2 Imogene Yarborough of Seminole County received Florida Farm Bureau’s highest honor – the Distinguished Service Award. 3 Kyle and Alisha Patterson of St. Lucie County claimed the Young Farmers and Ranchers Excellence in Agriculture Award. 4 Pete Dola, left, of Levy County, Tyler Pittman of Alachua County, Sydney Armstrong of Highlands County, and Kevin Korus of Alachua County held a spirited Discussion Meet. Pete Dola was the eventual state winner.

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5 Florida Farm Bureau recognized the late Dennis Emerson with the Pat Cockrell Lifetime Achievement Award for his outstanding work as an employee. His daughter-in-law, Trina, his son, Justin, and his grandson, Cody, accepted the award. 6 Gene McAvoy, right, received FFB’s 2019 Extension Professional of the Year award. His wife, Donna, joined him for the presentation. 7 For her tireless work as an advocate and as a spokesperson on behalf of agriculture, Brittany Lee of Alachua County earned the Volunteer Communicator of the Year award. 8 These future Farm Bureau leaders had their own activities at the annual meeting. 9 Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried presented Danny Johns of Blue Sky Farms with the Commissioner’s Ag-Environmental Award for exceptional resource conservation. 10 The Florida Farm Bureau State Women’s Leadership Committee recognized outstanding volunteers during a special awards presentation.

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11 A previous FFB CARES award recipient, James Marshall, center, received the Commissioner’s Ag-Environmental Award along with his son, Nick, and grandson, Landen. 12 President Hoblick, left, and Richard Royal, right, of the Florida Certified Crop Advisers Program, welcomed Wes Roan with the 2019 Excellence in Crop Advising Award. 13 Ed Pines, center, and his son, Ed, accepted the Commissioner’s Ag-Environmental Award for careful water use in their Citrus Under Protective Screen operation. 14 State Sen. George Gainer received Florida Farm Bureau’s Legislator of the Year Award for his support of farm families. 15 Putnam/St. Johns County Farm Bureau recruited the largest number of members over its annual quota compared to county Farm Bureaus across the state in the past year. PSJCFB President Bryan Jones accepted a plaque affirming the local organization’s success. 16 President Hoblick presented the Legislator of the Year Award to state Rep. James “J.W.” Grant.

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WA S H I N G TO N R E P O RT

Impeachment Inquiry Alters FFBF Strategy By JohnWalt Boatright, Director of National Affairs

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o one can truly escape the impeachment whirlwind in which we now find ourselves. If the news channels do not fill their schedules with expansive commentary, someone will surely raise it in conversation. Terms like “quid pro quo” and “high crimes and misdemeanors” are now common fodder in coffee shops and break rooms around the world. Some commentators claim this flurry of rhetoric is the prelude to a constitutional process. To continue beyond the fact-finding stage, the U.S. House of Representatives would need to consider articles of impeachment, and if passed, the Senate would conduct a trial overseen by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Only two instances in history followed a complete process. A third was halted abruptly by resignation. In every instance, Washington and the nation were transfixed.

While I was in Washington, D.C. in mid-October for meetings, there was a notable shift in the climate. Though the comfortable fall weather was welcomed, I am referring to the political climate. Heightened security surrounded the Capitol building as depositions were conducted. Trump supporters lined the corridors and flooded elevators in Congressional office buildings. In several meetings, our delegation acknowledged that the current inquiry would reflect the mood beyond the walls and soon consume the full attention of Congress. And instead of slowly grinding to a halt as one might expect, several FFBF priorities are picking up speed. First, the House Democratic working group is inching closer to an agreement with the Trump administration on consideration of the United States-MexicoCanada Agreement (USMCA). Only two U.S. Presidents have been impeached: Andrew Johnson in 1868, and Bill Clinton in 1998. Both were ultimately acquitted.

Photo of Andrew Johnson by Mathew Brady, retouched by Mmxx [Public domain]; photo of Bill Clinton by Bob McNeely, The White House (public domain), via Wikimedia Commons.

Therefore, our window of opportunity to enact positive change in this pact for our farmers is shrinking. Additionally, our biennial ritual to consider labor reform legislation will likely be underway by the time you read this. The House Judiciary Committee will consider such a proposal – the same committee that traditionally surfaces articles of impeachment. If anything is to happen, now is the chance. Such timing signifies Congress’s own mindfulness of its ability to conduct the people’s business in the wake of fulfilling its constitutional obligations. Against the backdrop of the ongoing investigation, Florida Farm Bureau still maintains its laser focus on the policy objectives tasked to us by our membership, especially with trade and labor. The next couple of months will be consequential on numerous fronts. Members often ask us for our latest predictions. Under these conditions, we refer to the timeless words of a seasoned political operative – Forrest Gump. Like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re going to get.

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CELEBRATING COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS By Shelby Martin, Public Relations Intern

FARM-CITY WEEK is a prime opportunity for Farm Bureau members around the state to promote awareness of the significance of Florida agriculture and where our food comes from. This year, Farm-City Week will be celebrated Nov. 20-27, 2019. The most important part of this week is the opportunity to interact with the community. For Alachua County Farm Bureau members, it is an opportunity to communicate with various school classrooms, local and state elected officials and non-farm families. For many years, Alachua County Farm Bureau, in partnership with the Kiwanis

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Club of Gainesville, has hosted a luncheon to connect elected officials with agricultural advocates. Volunteers also tie in an Agricultural Literacy Day, inviting Farm Bureau and 4-H members and Farm Credit of Florida employees, as well as other participants, to read to students in grades K-3 in the public school system.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

“It’s a way to not only promote Farm-City Week, but also 4-H and the things we do in Extension,” said Cindy Sanders, Alachua County Extension Director. “We usually have kids under eight years-old join as cloverbuds by the end of the reading day.” A new event being added to the schedule is a food truck rally at the Cade Museum in Gainesville, organized by the Alachua County Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Group. The group has invited a variety of food trucks to participate. Different commodity growers and organizations will set up tables with information about Florida-grown products. This free event is open to the public. The museum is waiving admission for the day and will feature food science exhibits. Partnership is an important aspect of any successful event. Caitlin Bainum, the UF/IFAS Livestock Extension Agent for Marion County and member of the Marion County Young Farmers and Ranchers Leadership Group, has used her connections with both organizations to plan a Marion County Agricultural Bus Tour.

An Okaloosa Farm Bureau member helps special needs students pick out sweet potatoes to take home for Thanksgiving.


The tour includes three farm stops and a lunch. Since it is a pilot year for this project, Bainum said they hope to have at least 50 participants. “A lot of people who are removed from agriculture are retiring or moving to the area, so we would like to spark an interest in that group particularly,” said Bainum. “Our goal is to strike an interest in people, get boots on the ground and let the farms speak for themselves.” In addition to the farm tour, Marion County Farm Bureau will have educational displays at the local farmer’s market and a photo contest. The winning photo will be featured as a cover for a local equine publication. For some county Farm Bureaus, educating the community is not just limited to one week. Tom Rieder, Dade County Farm Bureau president, said their biggest community event is a barbeque fundraiser every spring. Tickets are sold by Farm Bureau members and directors to families, bankers, attorneys, local and state elected officials and more. The money raised through ticket and raffle sales is given back to the community through toy and turkey giveaways during the holidays and other local events throughout the year. The barbecue attracts guests from Miami to the Florida Keys. This year, more than 1,000 were in attendance. The menu consists of juicy beef brisket, fresh corn, beans and other locally-sourced commodities, freshly cooked by the farmers that grew them.

The Alachua County Farm Bureau and the Kiwanis Club of Gainesville have been sponsors of the Alachua County Farm-City Week Luncheon for many years.

“We are the oldest and largest county Farm Bureau in the state,” said Rieder. “This is an opportunity for a large group of people with a common interest to exchange ideas in a friendly atmosphere.” In the Panhandle, Okaloosa County is also focusing on using locally-grown foods to educate their community. Area farmers parade down Main Street in their tractors with trailers full of fresh vegetables and jars of peanut butter collected by the Extension office. Their first stop is a special needs school where they let students pick out their own sweet potato and check out the tractors. They take the rest of the food to a local church food pantry to pass out to families in need. In addition to the fresh crops, Molly Huffman, the Okaloosa County Farm Bureau administrative assistant, said they hand out helpful cookbooks. Volunteers teach participants how to wash, prepare, cook and store the food they are receiving.

The crops typically provided are fresh greens, sweet potatoes, grits, cornmeal and cabbage. Although this year has been harder than others because of recent weather conditions in the Panhandle, Huffman said they are being creative and reaching out to other organizations and farms to help. “Don’t be afraid to ask other counties for help,” said Huffman. “That is what we are here for – to help each other. We all have the same goal.”

2019 FARM-CITY WEEK For helpful information and our communications toolkit, visit floridafarmbureau.org/ farm-city-week/. Share your Farm-City Week celebration! Email photos of your special week and a brief write-up to rachael.smith@ ffbf.org. Use #FarmCityWeek on social media when talking about your Farm-City Week events!

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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ANOTHER YEAR OF SUCCESS

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By Cacee Hilliard, CARES Coordinator

am fortunate to be able to travel throughout our state and meet incredible people, such as our very own members, CARES recipients and consumers. Whether I am in the field learning about a producer’s Best Management Practices (BMP) program or speaking to a local county commission about the importance of recognizing agriculture’s contribution to environmental protection, I am often a supporting voice of agriculture, specifically the voice of agricultural environmental stewardship. In many moments over this past year, I have spoken on behalf of the families who not only produce our food, fiber and fuel but also protect our precious natural resources. I do not ever take this role lightly and when often jokingly asked, “Cacee, do you care?” I most certainly do! The new year kicked off with a brand-new website design. As a result, www.ThisFarmCARES.org now serves as a hub of resources for producers, the general public and even teachers. My vision for this site is that no matter who you

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Adrian Land, Lafayette County

Traders Hill Farm, Nassau County

are or what your background is in agriculture, you can easily access information relevant to you. The heart of the CARES program continues to be the recognition of farmers and ranchers who demonstrate exemplary environmental stewardship efforts. This year, Florida Farm Bureau recognized 37 producers statewide whose farms are located from Escambia County all the way down to Hendry County. Individual features of each recipient can be found on the CARES website and will also be highlighted through social media. By traveling the state all year long, I have been able to capture each of their stories firsthand. I have witnessed that our producers care

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

deeply and are committed to work daily to ensure our environment is protected and preserved for future generations. As the voice of agriculture, it is critical that our organization and its programs continue to educate consumers about the positive contributions made by farming and ranching families to protect our environment. It is especially important that we make time to interact with the public regularly and tell the story of agriculture. On countless farm tours this year with our county Farm Bureaus I have met individuals who constantly challenge production methods. But, by the end of the tour, these same individuals, after having


Brant Schirard, St. Lucie County

Heath Ward, Escambia County

spent time connecting with real producers and learning about the many practices implemented to grow/ raise a sustainable product, become advocates for agriculture. These meaningful moments are what we should all strive for when educating others about our way of life. Through our CARES program videos, social media and advertisement campaigns, producers are consistently highlighted, shining a spotlight on their efforts to protect our environment to tens of thousands of people at a time. As a result, the CARES program has seen tremendous growth this year. For me, 2019 has been all about building momentum for the years ahead. Research has shown that people, from all walks of life, view the CARES program as a positive, credible program. As I continue to work on behalf of our organization, I am constantly reminded of how blessed I am to play such an important role. Most importantly, I am proud to be a Farm Bureau staff member who CARES.

Justin and Jessica Howard, Union County

2019 CARES AWARD RECIPIENTS Brett & Heath Ward Escambia County

Jon Revels St. Johns County

Don Hall DeSoto County

Richard Hendricks Santa Rosa County

Lars Hagstrom Volusia County

Cliff Starling Suwannee County

Shannon Nixon Okaloosa County

Dale McClellan Citrus/ Hernando County

Justin and Jessica Howard Union County

Nate & Anna Jameson Sumter County

Buck Carpenter Madison County

Shedrick McGriff Jackson County Todd Mason Jackson County John, Mike and Steve Jordan Jackson County David Oglesby Calhoun County Lawson Taylor Gadsden County Reza Karimipour Leon County Gary Crum Wakulla County Tracy Nazzaro Nassau County J. Daniel Doran Putnam County Tommy Miller Flagler County

Michelle Stagner Polk County Jose Cruz Hillsborough County Rob Last Manatee County Gary Knipe Lee County Brant Schirard St. Lucie County Charles Obern Hendry County Devon Robinson Levy County Tiffany Bailey Sarasota County

Andy Jackson Taylor County Ben White Jefferson County Adrian Land Lafayette County Eugene McGehee Alachua County Mark Bishop Gilchrist County Andrew Strickland Bradford County Troy Moseley Columbia County Ryan McCulley Hamilton County

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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Growing Membership

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Abby Godwin, left, and Melissa Bass have been instrumental in Jefferson County Farm Bureau’s membership growth this year.

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(PHOTO COURTESY OF EMERALD GREENE PARSONS)

arm Bureau has enjoyed an upward trend in membership in recent years. This trend has been possible because of successful work in local communities. In the past year, for example, Jefferson County Farm Bureau achieved a growth of nearly 3% in its ranks. Abby Godwin, Farm Bureau Insurance Agent in the county office, said, “Service is really the key. That’s how we market membership. Good service to our members is also what keeps our retention.” Increasing the awareness of Farm Bureau’s benefits has also helped attract interest in the local organization. Godwin and Administrative Assistant Melissa Bass regularly use the county Farm Bureau’s Facebook page and other social media channels to promote benefits. They highlight member activities on these platforms to show

the community service provided by Farm Bureau families. Board members and other volunteers engage young people by participating in school-based activities. They provide food samples with a variety of activities and information. Partnerships with the Extension office and foresters give students a view of the diversity of agricultural production while introducing them to Farm Bureau. The influence of such educational events has lasting effects. “It’s just another way of increasing youth awareness of agriculture,” Godwin noted. “Their families also become more aware of it.” Bass tracks records of delinquent memberships and follows up with telephone calls, encouraging families to renew each year. Jefferson County Farm Bureau President Ernest Fulford described Bass and Godwin as “rock stars” in marketing memberships. “They have been able to do much more than we can do because we are on the farm most of the time,” Fulford explained. “We try to have our presence shown in the community by hosting farm tours and taking part in farm tours and Ag in the Classroom activities,” he said. “Just being visible helps a lot.”

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

Outreach by volunteers introduces young people to local farm families.

Scrutiny of the county’s Greenbelt property list has also helped the county organization add to its grassroots numbers by identifying and contacting agricultural property owners who are not yet Farm Bureau members. Fulford said he encourages Jefferson County Farm Bureau board members to talk about Farm Bureau with people in the community. “We know our neighbors and we know who is a member and who is not. We need to talk about it.” The basic message for potential recruits is: “If you like to eat, you need to be a member. We are an advocate for you.” The activism behind membership recruitment in the county will be even stronger in the next year, Fulford promised. “We are always looking for something new, something that will work even better.”


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FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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DIRECTIONS:

SAVOR THE SEASON Florida Beef Tenderloin SERVINGS: 1

INGREDIENTS:

• Florida beef tenderloin, 4 each (4-6 ounces) • 2 Florida zucchinis, sliced • 2 Florida yellow squash, sliced • 12 Florida grape tomatoes • 4-6 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, finely chopped • 1 teaspoon citrus zest, finely chopped • 1 tablespoon seasoning blend (your favorite) • 1 tablespoon olive oil • Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

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FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

• Preheat a charcoal or gas grill to medium-high. • In a small bowl combine the butter, chopped rosemary and citrus zest. Lightly season with salt and pepper and stir to combine. • Place the mix on a sheet of wax paper and evenly roll it up to form a tube, and place in the refrigerator to harden. When it is firm, slice into discs. • Add the sliced vegetables to a mixing bowl, drizzle with olive oil and seasoning blend and stir to coat. Season each side of the beef tenderloin with salt and pepper. Carefully place the seasoned vegetables and tenderloins on the hot grill. The vegetables will cook quickly, but will still be crisp-tender when cooked. Grill the tenderloins for two to four minutes on each side. • When the desired doneness is reached, remove all food from the grill. Serve warm and garnish with the sliced herb-citrus butter. (Courtesy of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services)


HOLIDAY TREAT Chocolate Caramel Pie • 1 package (15 ounces) pie crust Filling:

• 24 caramels, unwrapped • 1/3 cup water • 2/3 cup brown sugar • 2/3 cup sour cream • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract • 2 eggs, beaten • 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped • 1/3 cup grated sweet baking chocolate, divided

• Cool 15 minutes. Sprinkle 3/4 cup grated chocolate over pie. Refrigerate two hours. • To make the topping: In a small glass bowl, combine white chocolate morsels and milk. Melt in the microwave, stirring frequently. Set aside. • In a small bowl, beat whipping cream until peaks form. Fold in the melted white chocolate mixture. Spread

over the cooled filling. Sprinkle with the remaining grated chocolate.

• Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Find more dessert recipes at Culinary.net. (Courtesy of Family Features)

Topping:

• 1 cup white chocolate chip morsels • 1/4 cup milk • 1 cup whipping cream • 2 tablespoons grated sweet baking chocolate DIRECTIONS:

• Heat the oven to 450 F. Prepare the pie crust in a nine-inch glass pie dish. Bake eight to nine minutes, or until lightly brown. • To make the filling: In a medium bowl, combine caramels and water. Melt in the microwave, stirring frequently. Stir in brown sugar, sour cream, vanilla extract, eggs and walnuts. • Reduce the oven to temperature to 350 F. Pour the filling into a cooled pie shell. Return to the oven. Bake 30-40 minutes, or until the edges of the filling are set. FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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CLASSIFIEDS BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

EQUIPMENT

GOOD THINGS TO EAT

PLANTS & SEEDS

BAMBOO FARMERS WANTED Farmers, growers, investors One time crop purchase One time planting 80-100 years life span 6 month plant guarantee 10 year crop buy back contract $15k-$25k per acre annual profits

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FARM BUREAU BUYER'S CLUB Don't forget to check out FAMA's Buyer's Club Christmas sale on the back of the magazine! We have all of your Christmas Dinner essentials! We're offering Honey and Brown Sugar Hams, Smoked Turkeys and more! Just call your local county Farm Bureau for more information!

Alternative Fruit Crops All of the latest and greatest varieties of avocado, dragon fruit, guava, longan, lychee, macadamia nut, mango, peach, pomegranate, and more. Call Pine Island Nursery (305)233-5501. www.PineIslandNursery.com

Contact us today Onlymoso USA corp 954.530.3385 info@onlymososales.com

COLLECTIBLES Coins, currency, sterling silver flatware, gold/silver jewelry, and more. We are #1 on Angie's List, NATIONWIDE! Visit us at www.CoinAppraisal.org or contact us directly at 727.488.7899

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE John Deere Chisel Plows 16ft $2000 and 20ft $3000 Lockwood/Renke Center Pivot $8000 Call/Text 904-509-2589 BLUEBERRY FARM EQUIPMENT ABD SUPPLIES ARBOR 400 air blast sprayer, 105 gallons for 3 pt hitch Automatic drip equipment, never used Chemical tanks 1000 gals and 500 gals, 1 each Various PVC fittings from 1" to 3" 4000 Blueberry picking-grading lugs 18x23 2 sets of scales with printers and power converters 5 ft finish mower, 3 pt hitch 2 cannons for birds Krestol 3000 hand held weather meters 2 Stihl berry bush trimmers Contact Judy Pauley 352-266-1717 or jpauley@embarqmail.com Marion County, Florida 5 V-crimp GalvaLume Roofing & Accessories For Farms & Ranches. Cypress Feed Trough & Mineral Boxes Call: 772-473-1714 tripsonmt@aol.com Ask for Mark.

LABOR HOUSING ATTENTION GROWERS Labor Housing for H2A and/or Domestic Workers available… EXCELLENT LOCATION (Western Palm Beach County) Approx. 1 hr. drive to Boynton/Delray, Vero/Ft. Pierce and Devils Garden Full Kitchen and Mess Hall Permitted and ready for immediate occupancy Capacity: Up to 1,000 persons Contact: Chuck Royal (561) 996-6581 Ext. 113 Also additional location in Moore Haven Glades County. Call for details.

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WANTED FARM TRACTORS PLUS FARM EQUIPMENT. RUNNING OR NOT. MORE CASH PAID. CALL 813-626-4554. FEEDER WAGON, 3-ton and 6-ton, creep feeder available on 3-ton. Call 813-626-4554. $$$ WANTED $$$ Tractors, Mowers, Farm Equipment and Related Parts Any Condition. Call 813-626-2609.

FEED & HAY PANGOLA HORSE HAY Under cover and up off the ground 4 x 5 rolls, $50, fertilized, herbicided, Polk County, John Day,407-448-5608 Call or text PREMIUM HAY & SPRIGGING SERVICE: Jiggs, Tifton85, Perennial Peanut, Coastal. Horse-quality square bales (limited rolls), fertilized & irrigated fields. Feed stores welcome. Clean digging stock. Call Haystack Farms at 386-963-3505 or 855-326-8873. www.haystackfarms.com. COASTAL BERMUDA HAY Barn stored-$50, Field kept-$40 Irrigated and fertilized. Frank Quincey Levy County 352-538-7077 or 352-463-2953

FISHERIES FLORIDA FISH FARMS Bass, Bluegill, Catfish, Grass Carp (Permit Req.) & Koi (Ornamental Carp) Contact: Florida Fish Farms, 9684 CR 705, Center Hill, FL 33514. 352-793-4224. Visit our website: www.floridafishfarms.com. PONDSTOCKER Bass, Bream, Catfish, Tilapia, Koi, Grass Carp, Shinners and Gambusea Minnows. Pond Supplies. Licensed and experienced. Call today! Cal Trotter. 1-321-952-9176. Palm Bay, FL. SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA Native Fish Stocking - Grass Carp - Tilapia Fountain & Aeration Systems Complete Lake Management ALLSTATE FISH & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 1-800-270-6558 www.allstatemanagement.com SHONGALOO FISHERIES Channel catfish, certified Florida bass, bluegill, grass carp, shellcrackers, warmouth, koi, and gambusia for stocking. See complete list at www. shongaloofisheriesinc.com. Hampton, FL. 352-468-1251.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

LEGAL SERVICES Charles F. Woodhouse, Esq. MBA, JD, MS Food Safety Graduate Certificates in Food Law and Packaging Attorney Specializing in Agriculture and Food Law Food Safety Modernization Act Compliance PACA and Florida Broker/Dealer Complaints Crop Insurance and Risk Management Programs Representation before County Committees, State Committee, and National Appeals Division Matters Woodhouse Shanahan PA Agribusiness Industry Regulatory Compliance Washington, DC & Cedar Key, FL E-mail: cfw@regulatory-food-science.com www.seafood-and-produce-law.com Blog: www.food-label-compliance.com Tel Cedar Key, FL 352-278-1110 Tel Washington, DC 202-293-0033 FAX 202-478-0851 Michael Martin Martin Law Office Agricultural & Environmental litigation Defective products and seeds Crop insurance All litigation issues state or federal 863-686-6700 Lakeland, FL Representing four generations of farm and ranch families. Email: Mike@martinpa.com Website: www.martinpa.com

LIVESTOCK Registered Angus Cattle For Sale Ohana Farms Bull Calfs, Cows, Heifers, Pairs 386-212-1006 REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BULLS for sale bull calf 6 + months $1,000.00 Solid Performance Bloodlines 813-713-6345 8 Wangus F1 cross heifers exposed to Fullblood/Reg. Wagyu Bull. 4 calves born. Call/text 904-351-8118

MISCELLANEOUS AKC REGISTERED BEAGLE PUPPIES FOR SALE in NW Florida. Call 850-554-1062 or email Allenmanning59@gmail.com. www.thebeagleman.com

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES Potted Red Cedars & AZ Cypress. 1-30g, 1-10'; $5-$75. Kettle Corn popped on-site 4-Sale! Open Sat. & Sun., 11/29 thru 12/22, 10-6PM. Free pecans & sugar cane w/ purchase. 20926 NW 75 St., Alachua, FL 386-462-2060 or 352-474-1885. www.BKCedars.com

REAL ESTATE Southern Pine Plantations North and Northwest Florida 377 Acres, Jackson Co, 148 acres Cultivated farm land, Irrigated, 15,400 sq. ft. packing shed, 2,400 Sq. ft. Cooler. $2,950/acre 484 Acres, Lafayette Co, The area is well known for its fantastic hunting and fishing, Pave Road, Pines and Hardwoods. $1,350/acre. 7,611 acres managed commercial timberland, Planted Pine, Hardwood Bottoms, Excellent Hunting. $1,200/acre. Call Pat Duane at 352-867-8018 Southern Pine Plantations of Fla. Owns the property it sells. Country Living with City Convenience! 4/2 ccb home, 9.3 acres on paved CR 241 in Alachua. Huge pole barn, fenced & X-fenced. $319,900. Call Jean Calderwood, Realtor, Watson Realty-Tioga. 386-588-4309. LONGLEAF LAND COMPANY Land for sale in Northwest Florida and South Alabama Contact Jody Jones 334.493.0123 longleaf@longleafland.com www.longleafland.com


November 2019

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER CROSSWORD

REAL ESTATE Central Florida Properties For Sale 30 acres - $299,000 • Located north of the City of Bushnell, FL • 3 parcels being sold together • Pasture lands, wooded areas, and abundant wildlife 20 acres - $330,000 • Improved pasture located in Sumter County, FL • Includes electric service and well • 130 adjoining acres also available for sale 40 acres - $330,000 • Large Parcel with Native FL Landscapes • Oak Hammock w/Mature Grandfather Live Oak Trees • Easy Access to I-75 and FL Turnpike 120 acres - $478,800 • Priced at $3,990 Per Acre • Grandfather Oaks & Cypress Heads • Deer & Turkey 71 +/- acres - $921,060 • Improved pasture land • Fenced, stocked fish pond, and road frontage • Located in Sumter County, FL 110 acres - $1,056,000 • Beautiful Improved Ranchland w/road frontage • Perimeter Fence, Cross Fencing, Pond & Corral • Currently Used As Cattle Ranch 150 acres - $1,199,000 • City limits of Bushnell, FL • Neighborhood mixed use @ 4 units per acre • Hardwoods, natural ponds w/drainage, and improved pasture 277 acres - $4,432,000 • Primarily improved pasture • Native landscapes including mature live oaks • Abuts operating limerock mine Kelly Rice, Broker (352) 793-6911 Century 21, Prime Property Resources Inc 1034 W. C-48 Bushnell, FL 33513

Crossword

by Margie E. Burke

1 2 3 4 5 ACROSS 1 Tapering 14 hairstyles 17 6 Donations for the poor 20 10 Track assignment 24 14 Bungling 26 27 28 15 Cut the crop 16 One more time 31 17 Heart chambers 37 38 18 Reid of "American Pie" 41 42 19 "___ la France!" 45 20 Antique photo 22 Scam artist 48 49 50 24 Icy coating 25 Eavesdroppers, 53 say 58 26 In _____ (not 62 present) 30 Moral misstep 65 31 Tuckered out 32 Sun. sermonizer 33 Minor quake 37 Polish off 62 Shakespeare, 38 Bitty bouquet the Bard of ___ 40 She played Jan 63 Math course, on a 60's sitcom briefly 41 Bone-boring tool 64 Cake topping 43 Decompose 65 Canvas cover 44 Film spool 66 Pantyhose flaw 45 Classifieds 67 Golf attendant 46 Deodorant or shampoo, e.g. DOWN 48 Three1 Italy-based car dimensional company 52 "General 2 "Nay" sayer Hospital", e.g. 3 "Jurassic Park" 53 Flat grassland actress 54 Hemmed-in 4 "The Terrible" territory for Ivan, e.g. 58 Folk stories 5 Decide not to 59 Church center quit 61 Ready for a nap 6 Vital vessels

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Copyright 2019 by The Puzzle Syndicate

7 Grazing spot 8 Alligator's haunt 9 Skylab was the first U.S. one 10 Penny played her on TV 11 Japanese cartoons 12 Now or _____ 13 Decorative pitchers 21 St. Jude and St. Joseph, et. al. 23 Like Sasquatch 26 Assist, in a way 27 Kodiak, for one 28 Fill to excess 29 Turn away 34 Place for a hurdle

35 36 38 39 42 44 47 48 49 50 51 55 56 57 60

____ the edge Count (on) Lowest point Zero on the scoreboard Role for a "Grey's Anatomy" extra Model plane, e.g. Milk-related Comic strip sound Put to the test Hank of baseball Find out Dry-as-dust Peddle Nervously irritable By way of

Solution available online at FloridAgriculture.org or in next issue.

OCTOBER SOLUTION Solution to Crossword:

C A N T

O D O R

S T A F F

A U G U R

S N A P

H O P E

R O V E

G R A M

I N S O F S H A T O R O G R O E E B H A I O R T U N S E E R

F L C O L O A R Y S O T D I O R R L Y E U S L S E

E E S A M E T I A T W M A A T T N E E H E R U M T N T E A T R T H A O E E R

L E S O S V E E N R L V E E A R A P N A D R A D

A C C O R D I O N S

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Catch Our Facebook Buzz www.facebook.com/ FlaFarmBureau

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

Suwannee County

CHARLOTTE COUNTY- PUNTA GORDA, FL- 650 Irrigated Acres... $3,390,000 This Charlotte County agricultural tract is a former citrus grove with expensive irrigation infrastructure. Much of the grove has been removed and burned, allowing for quick transition to other crops, if desired. https:// crosbydirt.com/property/650-irrigatedacres-multiple-uses

CENTER HILL BLUEBERRY FARM Sumter County 20± Acres - ORGANIC CERTIFIED BLUEBERRY FARM AVAILABLE FOR SALE! A turn-key ready blueberry farm to add to your portfolio. Farm equipment available for sale too! See production information. This highly productive blueberry farm is located in Sumter County, FL, just east of I-75. Good inter-connectivity for sending fruit to packing house as well as easy access to farm. ASKING PRICE: $450,000

is mostly improved pasture and boasts gorgeous elevation changes throughout the property. This property is a working cattle ranch but would double nicely as a sod operation. THIS WON'T LAST! NOW: $5,584,500 or $4,500/acre WAS: $6,205,000 or $5,000/acre

80 Acre farm with food grade processing facility - $559,000. Contact Kellie Shirah, 386-208-3847. 18230 115TH RD MCALPIN. A beautiful square 10 acres, heavily wooded for a very private home site.96 single wide needs TLC. $59,900 David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#105555 Pick from 18, 33 acres or all 51 acres, asking $2650 per acre. Lots of Deer, turkey, this parcel will make a great hunting track and or home site. All natural wooded, dry creek. Paved road frontage. David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#104456 35 acres off 192nd St. Beautiful, diverse parcel with granddaddy oaks, some in pasture, some in natural hard woods. Paved road frontage. $147,000 David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#103994 20-acre poultry farm in North Florida $195,000 Kellie Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#101721 3/2 site-built home on 5 acres, cleared, "TBD by survey", RV barn with concrete floor. Second site on property with septic and power for easy set-up of second dwelling $199,900 David Mincey 386-590-0157 MLS#105579 42 ACRES on the Suwannee River with 400ft of river frontage. Complete with custom built 5/3, 2 story home. Windows galore, multiple porches and decks. Adjoining mother in-law suite with its own full kitchen. Additional well and septic already in place. $435,000 Mindy Wilkison, 386-209-7658 MLS#105019 160 ACRES property has some merchantable timber. Property also has gentle roll with good elevations. Build your home overlooking Crawford Lake and enjoy the views of the water and the surrounding farmland. Deer and turkey are plentiful. $3,602.50 per acre. Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175 MLS#96691 164 ACRES in Madison - 2800' paved road frontage. Rolling hills. Pasture with several water features. Built in 1991 w/1,700+ sq.ft. 3/2 and a guest home with 1 bedroom, 1 bath. $749,000 Mindy Wilkison, 386-209-7658, MLS#103738 POOLE REALTY, INC 127 HOWARD STREET LIVE OAK, FL 32064 Office: 800-557-7478 141.48 ACRES Holmes County. Over 1900ft frontage on Ten Mile Creek. Great hunt camp or homestead for the peace and quiet. Includes 3/2 1388sf block home. Abundance of wildlife. Mostly in mixed hardwood virgin timber. Located in the Florida Panhandle North of Panama City Beach. MLS 689885 $455,000. Call, Text Debbie Roney Smith 850-209-8039 debson1999@gmail.com American Gold Realty 4420 Lafayette St Marianna, 32446. For property searches http://realtordrs.com/ CROSBY & ASSOCIATES, INC. Real Estate Brokerage 863-293-5600 * www.crosbydirt.com Continued on next column ...

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POLK COUNTY - LAKE WALES, FL 10± Acres Ranchette/grove... $94,999 On a quiet country road east of town sits the opportunity to purchase 10 acres in total or either one of the 5 acre parcels that make up the property. A former citrus grove that has been cleared, the site is equipped with a working 8" permitted agricultural well. This site would make a lovely homesite, mini-farm, equestrian facility, or investment. https://crosbydirt.com/property/10±-acresranchette-grove LAKE COUNTY- UMATILLA, FL 54± Greenhouse/Nursery...$1,529,000 This high quality greenhouse operation for sale includes grow houses, soil machines, ventilation fans, natural gas heat, rolling beds, and the irrigation is supplied by a 4-inch well. An 8 inch natural gas supply line runs along the south boundary of property. There is potential capacity for significant increase in gas supply if required by any new operation. https://crosbydirt.com/ property/54±-ac-greenhouse-nursery Maury L. Carter & Associates, Inc. Licensed Real Estate Broker CONTACT Daryl Carter or John Evans 407-422-3144 - www.maurycarter.com HOG BAY FARM FARM & SOLAR OPPORTUNITY! UNDER CONTRACT - DeSoto County 1,387± Acres - This property is 1,387± gross acres and 1,300± net acres of tillable land. Although formerly used for an organic citrus operation, this property has been used for the farming of alternative crops. This property can offer potential income streams from various uses: tomatoes, watermelons, citrus, cattle, hay, sod and many other varieties of row crops. Solar companies take notice! There is a high tension transmission line that runs the northern boundary of the property. Given the amount of usable acreage, the subject site would work nicely as a solar farm. ASKING PRICE: $7,351,100 or $5,300/acre. AUNT ZELMAS BLUEBERRY FARM Alachua County 26± Acres - Active commercial and U-Pick Florida blueberry farm for sale! 22 net growing acres. Varieties include Farthing, Scentilla, Star, Prima Donna, Sweet Crisp, and Windsor. All bushes planted in 2011. This property boasts both commercial harvesting and U-Pick. However, the U-Pick operation is robust and brings customers from all over the state. The property has a small store on site to accommodate customers that come for U-Pick season. For more details information on the farm, please visit: www. auntzelmasblueberries.com. ASKING PRICE: $650,000. Continued on next column ...

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

HAW CREEK RANCH & TIMBERLAND, PRICE REDUCED - Flagler County-1200± Acres - Located in Flagler County, Florida, Middle Haw Creek Ranch and Timberland offers a variety of uses. Whether you are an avid outdoor enthusiast, a hunter, a cattle rancher, or a timber investor, this property offers it all. The property is located near large metropolitan areas and Florida's east coast, making it easily accessible. The land can be described as "Old Florida" Pine Flatwoods with scattered cypress heads, oak hammocks and palmetto stands. This property is teeming with wildlife. Deer, turkey, hogs, and other Florida wildlife species call this property home. Hunting, fishing, camping, and other outdoor activities are readily available and ideal for this site. BRING OFFERS!!! NOW $4200/acre or $5,040,000 WAS $5,880,000 or $4,900/acre SPRINGWATER RANCH PRICE REDUCED! Lake County 1,241± Acres - This property offers the comforts of the country with proximity to major cities. Springwater Ranch is located roughly an hour northwest of Downtown Orlando and is just a short twenty minute drive north of Mount Dora, FL. The ranch Continued on next column ...

FOR SALE BY OWNER, 28 ACRES LOCATED ON GA HIGHWAY 221 BETWEEN KITE AND WADLEY., 6054 US Highway 221 North, Bartow Ga, 30413. GREAT HUNTING,FOOD PLOTS, SEPTIC,WELL, ELECTRIC, 5TH WHEEL TRAILER UNDER A POLE BARN. BEAUTIFUL HARDWOOD CREEK BOTTOM, FRONTAGE ON 2 ROADS. $ 110,00.00 CALL OR EMAIL JIM HUCK 772 201 1759 EMAIL HUCKS18505@AOL.COM.

120 Acres in Webster, Florida $478,800 / $3990 per acre Zoned A10C

This property is beautiful! 120+/- vacant acres located just south of Webster off CR 776. Comprised of grandfather oaks, cypress heads, open areas, and home to an abundance of deer and turkey. Property is surrounded by large tracts. Priced at $3,990/acre. Call today for details on this special property. G4849431 K-2630

Century 21 Prime Property Resources Inc. 352.793.6911


Agriculture is also important to urban residents in Florida due to the stream of amenity values associated with the agricultural use of land. Positive aspects of agricultural land uses include open space in and near urban areas, wildlife habitat protection and the protection of aquifer recharge areas. —Governor’s Task Force Report on the Future of Agriculture in Florida (1986)

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019

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