Issuu on Google+

ANNUAL HISTORY

197TH FIRES BRIGADE NEW HAMPSHIRE NATIONAL GUARD

1 OCTOBER 2010 – 30 SEPTEMBER 2011


197TH FIRES BRIGADE ANNUAL HISTORICAL SUMMARY (RCS CSHIS–6(R4)) 1 OCTOBER 2010 – 30 SEPTEMBER 2011 CW2 Thomas E. Graham II Historical Officer


COMMANDER’S SUMMARY


Commander’s Summary of the 197th Fires Brigade Deployment

The 197th Fires Brigade, consisting of units from New Hampshire, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Michigan, arrived at Ft. McCoy Wisconsin over an eight day period beginning on 14 September 2010. Units arrived in their MTOE configurations and completed three days of initial administrative inprocessing in those formations. On the fourth day Soldiers were reassigned to the Deployment Manning Document (DMD) formations where they would remain for the duration of the deployment to include redeployment and return to home station. This shuffling of personnel created new command and working relationships across the entire formation with the exception of the brigade headquarters. Once in the DMD configuration units experienced the typical “storming and norming” that comes with creation of new relationships but quickly settled into a battle rhythm as the activities and requirements of post-mobilization training got underway. By the conclusion of 60 plus days at Ft. McCoy all DMD formations were functioning well, completed all required training, and were ready to assume their assigned missions in Kuwait. The brigade flowed into Kuwait over a ten day period in mid November 2010 and set about conducting a Relief in Place (RIP) with the 53rd IBCT (Infantry Brigade Combat Team) from the Florida Army National Guard. The RIP process was well planned by the 53rd and the process went very smoothly. All formations readily assumed their new duties with no issues. The Transfer of Authority ceremonies began with the Camp Command Cells in early December and concluded with the brigade HQs on 15 December 2010. Within the first week of assuming the mission the ARCENT commander, LTG William Webster, revealed his intent to separate the brigade’s subordinate units and reassign them to either the 1st Support Command (Theater) or Area Support Group – Kuwait. Personnel in the brigade headquarters would likely be split up and parceled out to various other


headquarters. The stated intent was to simplify the support provided to ASG-KU by the Camp Command Cells and Area/Quick Reaction Forces and to the 1st Sustainment Brigade by the convoy escort battalions. After several lower level staff meetings and a final meeting with LTG Webster just after the New Year, the decision was made to leave the brigade in its original configuration and work to streamline lines of communication. It was realized that future changes could be made if the required support was inadequate or inefficient. In January the brigade was visited by newly elected Senator Kelly Ayotte from NH. She and other freshmen senators were on their way to Pakistan and Afghanistan for an orientation visit. The senator’s travels included a brief overnight in Kuwait City. She took advantage of this brief stop to visit the brigade. She had dinner on Camp Arifjan with some of the brigade’s Soldiers, viewed a Caimen MRAP (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected) vehicle, and received an unclassified mission brief covering the brigade’s total operation. Also in January the brigade was tasked to provide Soldier augmentation to the contract work force at the Defense Reutilization and Management Office (DRMO) on Camp Arifjan. Initially 30 Soldiers from 1-201st assisted with the reduction of a large backlog of material that accumulated as a result of the initial phase of the Iraq Drawdown which took place in the later months of 2010. This requirement shrank to 12 Soldiers after a few weeks and endured for several months until the backlog was alleviated. In late February the brigade welcomed the arrival of Echo Battery (TAB), 1101st FA (Massachusetts Army National Guard) which deployed three months later than the rest of the brigade on a separate Request for Forces (RFF) in order to operate Counter Fire radars at multiple bases across Iraq. Like all units destined for Iraq, the battery spent approximately ten days at Camp Buehring conducting weapons familiarization and other required tasks. Echo Battery (TAB), 1-101st FA, is the brigade’s organic Target Acquisition Battery but was deployed for a separate mission concurrently with the brigade. The TAB’s arrival in theater marked the deployment of


the entire 197th Fires brigade at the same time and in the same general Area of Operations. Also about this time the brigade was tasked to send 12 personnel to Afghanistan to assist with the management and accountability of shipping containers. This mission endured for four months during which time the brigade’s Soldiers reestablished accountability for thousands of containers and returned millions of dollars worth of equipment and spare parts to Army control. At the same time the brigade was tasked to send 12 personnel to assist CSTC-A (Combined Security Transition Command – Afghanistan) with the accountability of the vehicles and equipment that had been issued to the Afghan National Police and Afghan National Army. Both of these missions were highly successful and the Soldiers were lauded by the senior leadership in Afghanistan to include some praise from the commanding general, David Petraeus. February brought two significant events to the brigade. The first being the formation and training of a Tactical Combat Force (TCF) and the second being support to the Kuwaiti 50/20 celebration. The TCF was born out of the establishment of a Joint Security Area (JSA) under the new Joint doctrine. The TCF was formed to provide a mobile force capable of deploying on short notice anywhere in the JSA to respond to a wide range of contingencies. TF 3-197 was designated to fulfill the TCF requirement due to the current low volume of convoys. The task force developed a 21day training model which included basic infantry techniques up to the platoon level. They also performed several days of riot control and nonlethal weapons training and a day of airmobile training. This culminated with a platoon level Emergency Readiness and Deployment Exercise (EDRE) conducted at Ali Al Salem Airbase. The EDRE enabled the battalion and brigade to identify gaps and take corrective measures in order to be better prepared for a real event. As popular uprisings occurred across the Middle East the brigade was tasked to keep two companies on short notice to deploy. The most likely deployment locations were Bahrain and Yemen. Neither occurred, and after several weeks of heightened readiness the task force returned to steady state operations.


Late in February the brigade performed the task of coordinating the ground elements for the US, French, and British participation in the Kuwaiti 50/20 Celebration Parade. The event marked the 50th year of the Kuwait’s independence from Britain and the 20th year of Kuwait’s liberation from Iraq. Kuwaiti officials organized a massive parade consisting of marchers and hundreds of military vehicles from the US and other Gulf states that participated in Desert Shield/Desert Storm. The brigade was given command of Task Force Parade and the responsibility of organizing and coordinating the movement of ground personnel and equipment participating in the parade. Additionally, various subordinate elements from the brigade drove pieces of equipment in the parade itself to include M109A6 Paladin Howitzers, M1151 up-armored HMMWVs (Humvees) and Caimen MRAPs. In March two events occurred that required adjustments to both Force Protection North (FP-N) and Force Protection South (FP-S) formations. At the Seaport of Debarkation (SPOD), Port of Shuaiba, the US Navy unilaterally executed a permanent reduction in force creating a manning shortage for the force protection requirements there. FP-S did not have surplus manning to cover this required increase to the DMD. As a result a platoon minus was reassigned from FP-N to FP-S for the duration of the deployment. These Soldiers were relocated from Camp Buehring to Camp Patriot. This move created a very diverse formation for FP-S which now contained Soldiers from five different states. At about the same time it was determined that the Life Support Area (LSA) at Ali Al Salem Airbase needed its own Quick Reaction Force (QRF) to fill a significant force protection gap. FP-N adjusted their DMD to create a platoon sized QRF and permanently relocated Soldiers from Camp Buehring to the LSA for this purpose. The LSA QRF remained assigned to FP-N but in Direct Support of the LSA Camp Command Cell. March also marked the visit by leadership of the 1/34 HBCT (Heavy Brigade Combat Team) for their Pre-Deployment Site Survey (PDSS). Led by the brigade commander and CSM and accompanied by a representative


from 1st US Army and the 75th Training Support Brigade (USAR) the team spent ten days touring the entire formation. They also participated in a sustainment convoy between Kuwait and Camp Adder in Iraq. In late April the Brigade was visited by the Adjutants General (TAG) and State CSMs of all states represented in the brigade. This included NH, RI, MI, and WV. The TAG from KS was also present for part of the visit. Over a three day period each states’ leadership toured and visited with their respective formations. April also saw a brigade initiative to move 300+ MaxxPro variant MRAPs to Joint Base Balad in Iraq by driving them there. This alleviated a problem created by the vehicle’s excess height when placed on a flatbed for transport. What appeared to be a simple solution to a difficult problem turned out to be extremely complex. The refurbished vehicles developed numerous mechanical issues from having sat idle for a very long period of time and the return of drivers and assistant drivers from Iraq via military aircraft was an arduous and long process. Ultimately, all the additional effort was worth the trouble as fewer Soldiers were placed at risk in the process of transporting the vehicles north and as a result of the brigade’s maintenance efforts the using unit in Iraq received road tested and fully mission capable vehicles. May brought the initial fielding of Caimen Plus MRAPs with MEAP (MRAP Expedient Armor Program) armor to the brigade. In December of 2010 the brigade submitted an Operational Needs Statement for improved armor protection for the convoy escort teams. All MRAPs in Iraq were equipped with MEAP armor yet somehow the convoy escort units based in Kuwait were overlooked when the improved armor was fielded. The brigade continued to field additional numbers of the upgraded variants as they became available from the MRAP Support Facility located in Kuwait. The goal was to replace all Caimen basic MRAPs in the brigade with the newer Caimen Plus but that would not occur until sometime in September 2011 due to the production schedule.


During the month of June approximately 40 brigade Subject Matter Experts (SME) from across the formation traveled to Ft. McCoy to assist the 1/34 HBCT with their post-deployment training. The SMEs acted as advisors to both trainers and trained during the 1/34’s culminating training event. This enabled the 1/34 to be better prepared to assume the mission upon their arrival in Kuwait and prevented them from training on inaccurate or unrealistic scenarios. Late June brought an unexpected surprise with the assignment to the brigade of 1-160th FA (Field Artillery) and 1-180th CAV (Cavalry) from the Oklahoma Army National Guard. These two battalions are part of the 45th IBCT and had been training with the rest of the brigade for two years for deployment to Afghanistan. The battalions were redirected to Kuwait at the last minute as the political decision was made to begin a reduction of US forces in Afghanistan. The decision to bring them to Kuwait was based on ARCENT’s plans to eventually station a HBCT in Kuwait for purposes of a fully capable TCF (Tactical Combat Force) and to participate in Theater Security Cooperation Activities. Unfortunately this unplanned arrival of some 800 troops and their equipment created significant resource challenges for everything from office and billeting space to telephones, rolling stock, and computers. Also, they did not deploy in the proper formation and with all the equipment required for their new missions in Kuwait. The 1-180th CAV was assigned the mission of TCF for the Joint Security Area while the 1-160th FA assumed Camp Command of Camp Buehring, the Gateway Escort mission, and some QRF missions in FP-N. The latter missions created significant challenges for the 1-201st FA which now had to conduct a partial Relief in Place (RIP) prior to the arrival of the 1/34’s main formation. Mid-July brought the initial elements of the 1/34 HBCT into theater and saw the final departure preparations of the 197th. By the end of July the 197th started to flow forces out of theater as the 1/34 had fully arrived. The brigade’s advanced elements established a forward Tactical Command Post (TAC) at Ft. McCoy to receive arriving elements and provide command and control for their demobilization processing and transportation


to home station. The TAC also coordinated the actions of the redeployment support cells sent to McCoy by NH, WV, RI, and MI. The brigade Deputy Commanding Officer (DCO) provided oversight and command authority for this operation. In August all elements of the brigade were fully engaged with the 1/34 counterparts for the RIP while the 197th began to send forces out of theater every 3-4 days in groups of two to three hundred. The middle of the month was punctuated with the Transfer of Authority (TOA) ceremonies culminating with the Brigade HQs on 19 Aug. The last brigade elements departed Kuwait on 23 Aug and the brigade TAC departed Ft. McCoy on 29 Aug. The last few brigade personnel departed Ft. McCoy on 2 September 2011 marking an end to the brigade’s deployment operations. As a final commentary, during the course of the deployment Soldiers assigned and attached to the 197th conducted operations in 12 countries in the CENTCOM (Central Command ) area of responsibility. In addition to our core missions of force protection, convoy security, and camp commands, the brigade supervised and coordinated the US, French, and British participation in the ground parade of the Kuwaiti 50/20 celebration, provided manpower to the DRMO (Defense Reutilization Management Office) and W2N (the facility designation) equipment processing facilities on Camp Arifjan, sent several teams to Afghanistan in support of container management and property accountability, supported the destruction of hundreds of thousands of pounds of Kuwaiti and US unserviceable munitions, supported Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) and Army Dive Team operations in many countries throughout CENTCOM, trained and readied a Tactical Combat Force to deploy on short notice anywhere in JSA Georgia, participated in site security analysis of all US Patriot Missile sites in the gulf states, drove more than 300 Maxx Pro plus MRAPs to the warfighter in Iraq, assisted with locating and recovering the remains of both Iraqi and Kuwaiti Soldiers killed during the First Gulf War, and integrated two battalions of the Oklahoma Army National Guard (OKARNG) into the formation growing our ranks to more than 3,200. These events coupled with the millions of escort miles safely driven, tons of supplies securely


delivered, and hundreds of thousands of Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen effectively protected contributed to a complete sense of fulfillment and accomplishment across the brigade formation. Additionally, under the watch of the 197th two critical functions affecting the final troop withdrawal from Iraq were established. Facilities for the command and control of this huge operation were established at Camp Buhering by refurbishing some existing buildings with all necessary connectivity (radio, telephone, and secure internet) for fully networked capability. Camp Virginia became home to the Redeployment / Redistribution Property Assistance Team (R-PAT) yard. This area would facilitate a continuous flow of retrograde units to turn in their vehicles, equipment, and munitions in a controlled and efficient manner. The deployed mission of the 197th FIB was generally a support mission rather than a combat mission. Nevertheless, by the end of the deployment, 109 members of this brigade were faced with enemy action of IED or weapons fire, earning the Combat Action Badge (29 more approvals are still pending) and 6 of these earned the Purple Heart for injuries sustained. Despite never having fired a rocket or round of artillery, the 197th Fires Brigade performed missions that were meaningful both to the theater and to the nation. The organization and its people grew tremendously in both professional capability and competence. The brigade departed the battlefield a highly skilled and synchronized combat formation.

PETER L. COREY COL, FA COMMANDING


PREFACE


Preface In response to the FRAGO 1051 to 1st TSC OPORD 10-001 (dated 8 October 2010) regarding the 1st Theater Sustainment Command's (1st TSC) historical requirements, the Brigade Historian began setting up an historical program to meet the requirements of the FRAGO as well as to provide historical reports for the additional following customers: The unit's home state National Guard Historian The Center of Military History (CMH) the NGB Historical Office Carlisle Barracks There was no previous historical program or template to follow – No one in our predecessor unit had done anything with a historical program, nor did they know anything about its requirements. Thus, the Brigade Historian began researching and setting up what became an evolving process throughout the deployment, for both NIPR (Unclassified) and SIPR (Secret) data collection. After the drafting and dissemination of an internal FRAGO 41, at the end of December, 2010, it soon became apparent that none of our subordinate units were familiar with any kind of historical program either, and it became a very difficult process to initiate and gain any momentum. In keeping with FRAGO 1051, FRAGO 41 required commanders to send a monthly commander's historical report to the Brigade, using a template drafted by the Brigade Historian. A few were thorough and well done, but others were mediocre, and most required numerous email reminders to get them in. Consequently the monthly requirement of the 1st TSC FRAGO 1051 (and FRAGO 41) was dropped in lieu of requiring units to complete as full an Annual Report as possible. Further, the historian’s job of screening and colleting important documents to send to CMH was dropped for lack of time, and we ultimately just burned the Brigade’s entire S-3 (operations) file to DVDs which we would get to CMH at a later time.


The Historical Program

A lot was learned throughout this deployment about taking the historical program from something theoretical to something that was real, and userfriendly and “do-able”. In response to, “What things do you want?” I drafted an initial FRAGO 41 which turned out to be useless. Further, the guidance from CMH and NGB for capturing historically significant data, was based on maps and overlays, journals, letters, meeting notes, and other pre-digital data. (When I asked the S-3 shop (operations section) for these, they looked at me like I had 2 heads.) I gradually learned the up-to-date (digital) versions of this data – storyboards, SIGACTS (significant acts), meeting PowerPoints, and Command Post of the Future (CPOF) data. Unfortunately, the historian’s job of screening and compiling this important data to send to CMH was dropped for lack of time, and we ultimately just burned the Brigade’s entire S-3 (operations) file to DVDs which we plan to get to CMH at a later time. To further assist commanders in writing their monthly reports, I drafted a template which would ensure a consistent format of information that would facilitate the writing the Brigade’s Annual History. Though not useless, this template went through numerous changes as with each commander’s submission, I learned which parts of the template needed further clarification. I ultimately broke it into two parts, the first being a single report to capture the larger unchanging information about the unit, its mission, equipment, etc., with part II being a much shorter monthly report detailing any changes/issues as well as the major achievement or significant event for that month, some photos, soldier articles, and any promotions, awards, etc. (Of note, several units put out a monthly newsletter which adequately met most of the monthly requirements.) Putting everything I learned into a “Continuity Binder” I have posted it on AKO under forms (search “historical program”) and soon hope to have it posted on the NH National Guard commercial (- .com) website.


197TH FIRES BRIGADE ANNUAL HISTORICAL SUMMARY Table of Contents TAB 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Topics Kuwait – Geography and History 3rd Army Structure Pre-Mobilization – Process and Activities 197th Fires Brigade – Unit History TF 1-103rd Rhode Island (Camp Virginia) th TF 1-119 Michigan (Camp Virginia) nd TF 1-182 Michigan (Camp Patriot – KNB) th 1207 QRF Rhode Island (Camp Arifjan) TF 3-197th New Hampshire (Camp Buehring) th HHB 197 New Hampshire (Camp Arifjan) st TF 1-201 West Virginia (Camp Buehring) rd TF 3643 BSB New Hampshire (Camp LSA) BSB – North New Hampshire (Camp Buehring) CCC Arifjan New Hampshire (Camp Arifjan) 319th EOD Washington State (Camp Arifjan) th 44 CBRN Fort Hood Texas (Camp Arifjan) th th Engineer Dive Teams (511 & 7 ) (Camp Patriot – KNB) CTG 56.5 Navy & Coast Guard (Camp Patriot – KNB) st E-101 TAB Massachusetts (Iraq) th TF 1-160 Oklahoma (Camps Buehring & Virginia) th TF 1-180 Oklahoma (Camp Buehring) th 197 DMD (mid deployment) Orders APPENDIX (Miscellaneous & Human Interest documents) Historical Program templates


The Land of Kuwait Eons ago, Kuwait was a shallow ocean floor, giving habitat to coral reefs and other marine life. Through time, this underwater topography eventually became dry land at the end of Persian/Arabian Gulf. The massive calcium deposits left by the corals, became the bedrock for the current surface mixture of silt, sand, and gravel. In some areas, calcrete soil develops a few feet below the surface, which has high strength and low permeability. And while a sand based desert can cool relatively quickly, the solid surface of much of Kuwait cannot release its heat through nighttime radiational cooling, resulting in one of the hottest climates in the world. The Jal Az-Zor ridge (inset) located along the northern shore of Kuwait Bay, is one of the major natural land forms in Kuwait and provides a record of several historical shorelines. Kuwait's arid climate of today doesn't lend itself to surface water in any form. However, beneath the relatively flat, hard surface, are hundreds of meters of sedimentary rock layers covering much of the country. Within these are Kuwait's only two aquifers: the deep Damman Limestone Aquifer, and the relatively shallow Dibdibba Aquifer in the North. Both are salinated, but the Dibdibba Aquifer is brackish as well, and must be treated before being sold as Rawdatain bottled water. Climactically, Kuwait's location at 29 ½ degrees North Latitude is just above the dry Tropic of Cancer (23 degrees North) which produces some of the world's biggest deserts. When the prevailing wind comes from the Northwest, sweeping through Iraq and Saudi Arabia, it gathers up sand (silica), dust, and clay silt, to produces the dust and sand storms experienced throughout Kuwait. The blown in clay produces the slippery mud when wet, and the hardened surface when dry. Yet, despite its extreme desert climate, drought hearty trees and small scrub plants are able to grow, and given enough time, they would cover much of the Kuwait's landscape.

References: Mr. Nathan W. Smith, Registered Geologist www.megeuae.com/SharhanPDFpubs


History of Kuwait Archaeological finds on Failaka, the largest of Kuwait’s nine islands, suggests it was a trading post at the time of the ancient Sumerians. . . and was known to the ancient Greeks. Kuwait's modern history began in the 18th century with the founding of the city of Kuwait by the Uteiba . . . who are believed to have traveled north from Qatar. Threatened in the 19th century by the Ottoman Turks . . . Kuwait sought the same treaty relationship Britain had already signed with the Trucial States (UAE) and Bahrain. In January 1899, the ruler Sheikh Mubarak Al Sabah --"the Great"-- signed an agreement with the British Government that pledged . . . neither to cede any territory nor to receive [foreign] representatives . . . without the British Government's consent, in exchange for protection and an annual subsidy. When Mubarak died in 1915, the population of . . . 35,000 was heavily dependent on shipbuilding (using wood imported from India) and pearl diving. Sheikh Ahmed al-Jabir Al Sabah ruled Kuwait from 1921 until his death in 1950, a period in which oil was discovered. . . Kuwait achieved independence from the British under Sheikh Ahmed’s successor. . . On June 19, 1961, Kuwait became fully independent following an exchange of notes with the United Kingdom. Kuwait enjoyed an unprecedented period of prosperity under Amir Sabah al-Salim Al Sabah, who died in 1977 after ruling for 12 years. Under his rule . . . The country was transformed into a highly developed welfare state with a free market economy. In August 1990, Iraq attacked and invaded Kuwait. . . . arguing that Kuwait had been part of the Ottoman Empire subject to Iraqi suzerainty. . . . Following several weeks of aerial bombardment, a UN-mandated coalition led by the United States began a ground assault in February 1991 that liberated Kuwait. In November 1994, Iraq formally accepted the UN-demarcated border with Kuwait, [but] Subsequent violations by Iraq of these agreements led directly to the Second Persian Gulf War in the early 21st century. During the 2002-03 build up to and execution of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), Kuwait was a vital coalition partner, reserving a full 60% of its total land mass for use by coalition forces and donating upward of $350 million in assistance in kind (primarily fuel) to the effort. In the aftermath of OIF, Kuwait has been consistently involved in reconstruction efforts in Iraq. . .

References: All material (including flag image) is quoted and condensed from http://www.historyofnations.net/asia/kuwait.html (c) 2004. All rights reserved Used with permission


Pre – Mobilization Plans and Actions 197th Fires Brigade 2008 – 2010 Transposed from an interview with Major David Fink, Executive Officer (XO) of the Zone 6 Camp Command Cell, Camp Arifjan, Kuwait The process to get the 197th Fires Brigade (FIB) deployed was a multi-year task which was complicated both by the politics of the troop draw-down as well as by the unit restructuring inherent with the New Hampshire Army National Guard’s (NHARNG) Transformation that took place on September 8, 2007. The transformation brought about new unit configurations, including the addition of four new battalions from other states falling under the Aligned for Training (AFT) relationship of the 197th FIB during deployments. It further set in motion the upgrading of all the Field Artillery (FA) cannons from the old M198, 155 millimeter Howitzers, used since the late 1970s, to a range of new and higher tech Field Artillery equipment for the battalions: M777 towed howitzer (155 mm) – the replacement for the M198 M109 Paladin self-propelled howitzer (155 mm) High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) Along with the new equipment came new Military Occupational Specialties (MOS’s), and technical training on the new Army Battle Command Systems. This training along with fielding their new equipment, would allow the battalions to effectively employ their new high-tech, computer driven artillery systems. The Army's Force Generation (ARFORGEN) model puts units on a six year cycle for deployments. The 197th Brigade had previously deployed in 20032004 making its next deployment in the 2010-2011 time frame. Thus, within a year of the 2007 Transformation, the 197th FIB began preparing for its next overseas deployment. This preparation would involve two separate but parallel lines of effort. The first of these would be the staffing of the battalions and units to adequately handle all the facets of the overall


mission. The second would involve the logistics of training 2375 soldiers in individual soldier skills and collective tasks (from map reading or putting on a protective mask, to the teamwork of a convoy reacting to an ambush). Typically, Forces Command and National Guard Bureau (NGB) use the Reserves and National Guard for Combat Service (CS) and Combat Service Support (CSS) Missions. This doctrine allows the Department of Defense (DoD) to place more of their Active Duty units into combat situations, supported by the reserve units. Thus, the 197th FIB would be distributing its units throughout Kuwait where they would be taking over for the following non-standard and supporting missions:  Common-User Land Transport (CULT) involved short and long haul Convoy Escort Teams (CETs) for movement of military supplies  Force protection in and around the U.S. Military camps throughout Kuwait  Gateway mission involved all manner of troop movement around Kuwait – travelling from camp to camp, going on Rest and Relaxation (R&R) leave, etc.  Camp Command Cells were responsible for safety and general functioning of the U.S. Camps in Kuwait  Operational control of four other units already in theater: o Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) o Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) o Engineer Dive unit o Commander's Task Group (CTG) 56.5 (Navy & Coast Guard) In the process of staffing these missions, the 197th leadership contacted the 45th FIB for advice and insight. (The 45th was the unit in theater directing these missions from approximately July, 2009 to Apr 2010.) Armed with this real-life and up to date information, the 197th began breaking down their brigades, companies and platoons to fill the initial Deployment Manning Document (DMD). Historically, deploying units were authorized to leave at 110 percent strength to provide continuity of mission in the event of attrition (illness or injury, family emergency, going on leave, etc.). However, host nation relationships and troop level sensitivities became a factor requiring the 197th to deploy at only 100 percent strength. To reduce their numbers, the 237th Military Police (MP) Company, which was slated to take the Force Protection mission, was cut from the DMD. The rationale was two-fold, first, the majority of the MP unit members had previously been deployed, and secondly, the state leadership was requiring some


members of the Joint Force Headquarters to deploy (JFHQ is the state headquarters – a non-deployable unit). Thus, the staffing process started all over again, and with only 100 percent strength, COL Corey instituted prohibitions such as no organized sports, to help prevent losses due to injury. In rewriting the DMD for the 100 percent strength, it was found that no battalion had enough soldiers to meet all the mission requirements assigned to it. The leadership team tried to keep unit integrity, by continually refining the DMD, but it finally became evident that some units needed to be split up. The 1-201st from West Virginia and New Hampshire's 3643rd were chosen to fill these gaps. The command also took into consideration the expertise of the various units in regards both to mission placement, and to the pre-deployment training requirements. Ultimately, the completed DMD required a huge amount of energy and took over a year and a half to complete. No unit was left completely intact, and with six monthsleft before the units would deploy to Fort McCoy for training, this "finished" DMD would continue to undergo minor adjustments throughout that time. At the same time that the staffing process was going on, the simultaneous process of the units fielding their new equipment was also occurring. While the Battalions had new FA systems to master, the Brigade Headquarters had their own new equipment to be trained up on, such as the Standardized Integrated Command Post System (SICPS), and the Command Post of the Future (CPOF). The Signal Company received new satellite dishes and digital communications equipment. The training requirements for all this new equipment across the Brigade, in conjunction with the deployment training, caused some degree of hardship with the traditional Guardsmen (the one weekend a month troops) and their employers due to their more than usual time off work. The year 2009 proved to be an extremely busy year for all the brigade soldiers. Soldiers were training for their new MOS's, Senior Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs are the sergeants) and Officers were going off to schools for their new equipment training while also working with the battalions to continue to refine the DMD. Additionally, two Annual Training (AT) periods (an AT period is two weeks) were conducted to accommodate all the New Equipment Fielding, as well as the pre-mobilization warfighter training required for the deployment (identify IEDs, Combat Lifesaver course, cultural awareness, etc.).


Part of the HIMARS training for New Hampshire’s 3rd Battalion of the 197th FA Regiment (3-197th) also included a site visit by engineers and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from General Dynamics Corporation to facilitate the teamwork inherent with the new equipment, as well as to evaluate the Brigade’s level of operational preparedness through New Equipment Training (NET), and a variety of warfighting exercises including use of the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP), drills with the Army Battle Command System (ABCS), etc. Through these, the 3rd Battalion and the other Aligned for Training units were trained, exercised, assessed, and critiqued in order to confirm the FIB’s overall capability to be operational in their traditional war fighting role. (Two of the Aligned for Training battalions elected to defer this activity until after the deployment to Kuwait.) With new equipment and training complete, New Hampshire's Third Battalion conducted a culminating event during the summer of 2009 which involved a live fire exercise of their HIMARS equipment at Fort Drum, New York. This rocket firing was also a first for Ft Drum, and a lot of range preparation had to be performed prior to the exercise. With State officials and reporters present, the 3rd Battalion men demonstrated their newly acquired proficiency while upholding up the grand tradition of the 3rd Battalion and its FA prowess. Prior to deploying to Fort McCoy, a one inch thick South West Asia (SWA) Training Guide became available to the 197th. It went into great detail about the mission, what the training regulations were, which trainings were to be completed prior to mobilization, and which were to be accomplished at Ft McCoy, etc. Included was a list of duty-specific training to fill some required positions; Equal Opportunity (EO) leader, Deployable Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (DSARC), Contracting Officer Representative (COR), and Safety and Environmental Officers, to name a few. The list also contained the required “low density” MOSs – those for which only a very few would be needed. In previous years, the Army requirement consisted of Mobilization (MOB) training prior to a 12 month Boots-on-Ground (BOG) deployment. Considering the hardships to the National Guard troops, the Secretary of Defense mandated that their deployments be shortened to 12 months, in which the mobilization training cut into the BOG time (in theater). This shortened the total deployment time for National Guard troops from 15 months to one year. Because of this, the Army began pushing the National Guard to complete more of their mobilization training at their units prior to mobilizing to shorten the training time at the MOB station.


Additionally, the Army has established four categories of training to prepare soldiers for the degree of combat they would be likely to encounter, based on their mission. Category (CAT) 1 represents the least degree of training for units whose mission doesn’t require them to leave the base camp. The combat skills required by maneuver units expecting to be in contact with hostile forces is Category 4 training which may last up to 75 days. Within the 197th FIB, the Camp Command Cells (CCCs) and other administrative detachments fit the CAT 1 training, while the Convoy Escort Teams (CETs) and the Force Protection units – the only ones expected to have enemy contact – would require CAT 4 training. Nevertheless, the 197th Commander mandated that all Brigade troops would receive CAT 4 training, which included such scenarios as the use of a combat Identification camera, reaction to an Improvised Explosive Device (IED), clearing a building, and manning a camp perimeter tower. To accomplish this CAT 4 training, the Brigade Staff constructed a training matrix listing every training requirement on a spreadsheet along with a list of every soldier who would need those trainings. By this "train by exception" method, only those needing each specific training would receive it. Group trainings at home station provided most of the instruction. After that, the matrix provided the names of everyone who had missed certain trainings, and these individuals were then sent to make-up classes at various locations. (Due to circumstances, some soldiers needed to complete these required deployment classes after arriving at Fort McCoy.) With all Pre-MOB training generally complete by July, the troops had the month of August off, to encourage family vacations, and to take care of any unfinished personal business. The date of September 11 is permanently seared into most American’s minds, but it was about to have a secondary meaning to New Hampshire’s 197th Fires Brigade and its two battalions. Saturday, September 11, 2010 marked the beginning of the deployment for New Hampshire’s 700 troops, and within days, they began heading to their MOB Station at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, joined by their additional battalions from Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Michigan. For a dissertation on Pre-Deployment training, see the Strategy Research Project titled, “Maximizing Pre-Mobilization Training at Home Station,” by COLONEL MICHAEL R. ABERLE, Of the North Dakota Army National Guard: http://www.dtic.mil/cgibin/GetTRDoc?Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf&AD=ADA498015


Unit History of the 197th Fires Brigade in support of

Operation New Dawn, Kuwait COL Peter Corey, Commander August 2011

COL Peter Corey 197th FIB Commander

LTC Mark W. Leahey 197th FIB Deputy Commander

CSM Thomas Considine 197th FIB Sergeant Major

LTC Daniel T. Wilson 197th FIB Executive Officer


Introduction:

On September 8, 2007, the New Hampshire Army National Guard underwent a transformation in structure to better represent the needs of the Army. Army transformation consolidated the 1-172nd Field Artillery (FA) Battalion and the 2-197th FA Battalion into a single Field Artillery Battalion designated the 3-197th FA Battalion. A second battalion, the 3643rd Brigade Support Battalion (BSB) was formed from elements of the 3643d Maintenance Company and the 744th Transportation Company. Upon transformation completion the organic units of the 197th Fires Brigade consisted of: HQ, 197th Fires Brigade (New Hampshire Army National Guard - NHARNG) 3-197th FA Battalion (NHARNG) 3643d Brigade Support Battalion (NHARNG) 372nd Signal Support Company (NHARNG) E Btry (Target Acquisition - TA), 101st FA (MAARNG) As part of Army Transformation separate FA Battalions were also Aligned for Training (AFT) with the 197th Fires Brigade. These battalions included: 1-103rd FA Battalion (RIARNG) 1-201st FA Battalion (WVARNG) 1-119th FA Battalion (MIARNG) 1-182nd FA Battalion (MIARNG) The 197th Fires Brigade was notified that they were being sourced for a deployment to support operations in the Middle East on 23 October 2008.


Their formal Department of the Army Alert Order 1629-09 was received on 23 July 2009. The Department of the Army Mobilization order 1692-10 was received on 01 April 2010. The unit also received a Department of the Army Amended Order 1794-10 on 27 May 2010. September 1, 2010 marked the transition from Operation Iraqi Freedom, to Operation New Dawn. On 11 September the 197th Fires Brigade began its mobilization to Title 10 service and began moving units to Fort McCoy Wisconsin for additional training. During the next two months, the full brigade and its battalions trained for their respective roles in Kuwait to replace the 53d Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) from the Florida Army National Guard. The training continued upon arrival in Kuwait, through a "Relief In Place" (RIP) process in which 197th troops sit side by side with the sections they are replacing to learn the boots-on-the-ground details of their new responsibilities. The 197th Fires Brigade conducted their Transfer of Authority (TOA) ceremony, formally handing off the mission authority between the two units, on 15 December 2010.

The Non-Deployed Unit Subordinate to the 42nd Infantry Division, the HHB 197th Fires Brigade (WP20AA) originated in 1978 and is centered in Manchester, New Hampshire. With origins in Company E of the 2nd Infantry Civil War Regiment, it was previously deployed in Dec 2003 – Feb 2005 in support of OIF II (Operation Iraqi Freedom II). During the Army Transformation of 8 September 2007 the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery (HHB) 197th Field Artillery Brigade was converted into HHB 197th Fires Brigade (197th FIB). The mission of the 197th Fires Brigade is to provide command and control to subordinate FA battalions, with a range of weapon systems as follows: 3rd-197th FA Battalion – High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) (NHARNG) 1-103rd FA Battalion – M777 advanced 155mm towed Howitzer (RIARNG) 1-201st FA Battalion – M109 Paladin Self Propelled Howitzer (WVARNG)


1-119th FA Battalion – M777 advanced 155mm towed Howitzer (MIARNG) 1-182nd FA Battalion – (HIMARS) (MIARNG)

Deployed Unit Organization This deployment of the 197th FIB to Kuwait is a very non-traditional Fires Brigade mission. Very few of the soldiers worked in their Military Occupational Specialty (an MOS is what specific job a soldier is trained for), nor did units perform their normal war-time mission. Consequently the battalions restructured to become Task Forces (TF), for example, 3-197th became TF 3-197th. Once in Theater, the 197th Fires Brigade became subordinate to the 1st Theater Sustainment Command (1st TSC). Also, in addition to its contingent of subordinate units and battalions, the 197th picked up command and control of the following units for the majority of the deployment: 7th Dive Team (WDBRY1), Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base (KNB) Active Duty Army 44th CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear) Company (WH7BAA), Camp Arifjan, Active Duty Army 56.5 Naval Task Force, Camp Patriot, KNB (Active Duty/Reserve Naval and Coast Guard personnel 319th EOD (Explosive Ordinance Demolition) Company (WPYFAA), Camp Arifjan, Washington State Army National Guard

Training for the Alternate Deployed Mission While at Fort McCoy, WI, the 75th Infantry Division conducted training of common collective combat tasks, as well as those inherent to the special missions each battalion would perform in theater. It was the modern day equivalent to the Louisiana Maneuvers of WW II in teaching soldiers how to go to war. Training included weapons qualification, vehicle rollover training, convoy operations, reacting to IEDs, operating a Camp Command Cell, etc.


Location of Deployed Unit The 197th Brigade was spread throughout the U.S. military camps in the country of Kuwait (see Mission, below). Due to location within Kuwait, the camps experienced slightly different local weather – the coastal regions, for example, enjoyed slightly lower temperatures and some small degree of humidity while interior camps experienced a very dry heat. Overall, Kuwait is a country of hard pan desert with a thin layer of sand or dust and having no natural surface water. It has low rolling hills with very little vegetation except near the coast. A thin layer of very fine dust hangs in the air all the time to greater or lesser degrees providing beautiful sunsets, but not doing the lungs any favors. Desert climates are a function of the land’s surface. Typically a “shifting sands” desert gains a great deal of heat during the day, but when the sun’s influence wanes, it rapidly loses its heat and day to night temperatures can vary by as much as 50 degrees. With Kuwait’s hard pan surface, it does reach temperatures of 120 degrees F and more during the summer, but the dense surface doesn’t release its heat during the night and the temperatures may only drop 10 or 20 degrees. During the winter season, the temperatures get as low as the 30s at night and up to the 50s during the day. Also, the rainy season comes from January to mid-march, during which the wet ground turns to a very slippery, "greasy" mud, which in turn, hardens back to its cement-like status upon evaporation. During the Brigade’s deployment, the rainy season was particularly short, with rare light nighttime showers culminating with a single week of rain in early March. The remaining 9 months of the year are host to occasional dust and sand storms which make it difficult to see or breath, requiring some type of mask or covering, while also getting through every crack in every building to infect the indoor air as well.

Original Deployed Mission The mission for the 197th FIB is to provide command and control of subordinate units. The mission of the subordinate units is divided into several different categories including to provide camp oversight and security at the military bases in Kuwait, and convoy escort.


Camp oversight is accomplished through a Camp Command Cell (CCC), also referred to as a Mayor Cell, in that it is the Customer Service Center for the camp's area of operations. CCCs are like the town offices of a small town, with responsibilities to include electrical, water and sewage, safety and environmental, billeting, maintenance, Contacting Officer Representative (this section deals with handling the government contracts in effect on post), communications, Emergency Operations Center, Projects, lights, safety, etc. Some sections within a CCC, have the same duties as their MOS such as the S-1, S-4, and S-6, but most of the other responsibilities have to be learned and are outside the scope of most Army MOS's.

UNIT HHB 197tnth FIB tn th 3-197 3643rd

STATE NHARNG

na 372nd Signal Signal rd ra 1-103 st 1-201 1-119th 1-182nd IH DIVE DIVE 7TH TH CBRN 44 IH CBRN CTG 56.5 NAVAL NAVAL IH EOD EOD 319TH E Btry (TA)

NHARNG

NHARNG NHARNG

RIARNG WVARNG MIARNG MIARNG AD-HI AD-TX CAARNG WAARNG WAARNG MAARNG

CAMP Arifjan Buehring Buehring - Ali-Al-Salem Buehring Arifjan

MISSION Command & Control Kuwait Area Support Group - Kuwait Long Haul convoy escort Camp Command Cell Security Camp Command Cell

Virginia Buehring Virginia Patriot (KNB) Patriot (KNB) Arifjan Patriot (KNB)

Camp Command Cell, QRF RF Camp Command Cell, QRF/ARF Short Haul convoy escort Camp Command Cell, QRF/ARF Underwater Engineering Chem, Bio Radioactive, ioactive, Nuclear Nuclear Harbor / Port Security

Arifjan Iraq

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Target Acquisition


Brief Synopsis of Battalions and Units The short and long haul convoy security mission uses Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles to provide security to military and ‘white truck’ convoys. The Force Protection also uses up armored HMMWVs and Non Tactical Vehicles to provide roving security patrols in their sectors. The Force Protection mission at the Kuwait Naval Base also included manning the towers and the Entry Control Point (ECP – the main entrance to the camp). The Headquarters and Headquarters Battery (HHB) of the 197th FIB was the only unit to deploy in which every soldier did their “normal” jobs.

Changes to the Original Mission Despite a number of Fragmentary Orders (FRAGO's represent either a change to the original Operations Order (OPORD) or they delegate additional taskings), the general mission of the 197th FIB remained unchanged. Some of the FRAGOs have dealt with: • The unexpected low operations tempo (OPTEMPO) of the 3-197th • Afghanistan mission for which selected soldiers supported logistics operations in that area of operations (AO) • Mid-east government uprisings led to crowd control training if needed • Supporting the Kuwaiti government’s 50 – 20 celebration and parade (commemorating 50 years independence from Britain, and 20 years since liberation from Iraq) • Planning for surge capabilities to move equipment from Iraq • Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercises (EDRE) • Fielding of new MRAP vehicles

Significant Events A range of significant events both locally and on the national/international level played their parts in altering the mission on a number of levels. These ranged from raising soldiers’ awareness of something, to being proactive in dealing with an unexpected issue, to performing special training, to reacting to enemy contact.


Some events were local to Kuwait affecting the battalions and units of the 197th. A brief list of these events include: November: • Orchestrating the 4 day pass for 2500 people before leaving Fort McCoy • Flight to Kuwiat • RIP process with our predecessor units December: • Transfer of Authority (TOA) ceremony putting the 197th FIB in charge January: • Black water issue involved the government temporarily prohibiting the pumping of latrine units resulting in overflows, biological waste clean-ups, etc. February: • Involvement in Kuwait’s 20/50 celebration and parade • Orchestrating the transfer of services from 1 major government maintenance contractor to another (CSA to ITT) March: • The 25th saw the worst sandstorm in 70 years by some accounts April: • New Dining Facilities (DFACs) began opening on the U.S. Camps On-going: • Making preparations and accommodations for visiting celebrities (Toby Keith Concert, etc.) and dignitaries (visiting generals) • Dealing with violations to General Order Number One (primarily alchohol prohibition) • Accommodating two new Battalions which had been redirected from Afghanistan to become attached to the 197th FIB in Kuwait • Making preparations for a smooth and efficient hand off to the 1-34th Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT), the replacement unit for the 197th National and International Events include: • Wiki leaks hitting the internet – soldiers prohibited from viewing • mid-east turmoil in Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Libya prompted special crowd control training • U.S. government continuing resolution affects soldiers’ pay • Killing of Bin Laden (0100 on 2 May local time)


Conclusion Throughout this deployment, the 197th FIB played its part on the world stage, finding itself at an interesting place and time in history. The Iraqi troop drawdown was only in draft stage at the time of the 197th's first notification of deployment. Yet ultimately, the brigade was instrumental in helping prepare for the combat troop drawdown to be completed by the end of 2011. The 197th was itself impacted by the overall troop drawdown throughout its entire deployment. Initially the Brigade was to deploy at 110% strength. However, drawdown mandates required that the additional 10% be cut from the Deployment Manning Document (DMD) and the 197th had to reevaluate every subordinate mission assignment and re-allocate missions based on the new DMD in order to do more with less. With the deadline of 31 December 2011 for all troops to be out of Iraq, the 197th FIB and its subordinate battalions set about the construction of a Retrograde Property Assistance Team (RPAT) yard designed to quickly process and redistribute vehicles and equipment brought in by units leaving the theater. The stations of the RPAT yard cover the spectrum from turning in ammunition and vehicle equipment to the final signing over of the hand receipt by the unit commander. From there, the drivers would be bussed back to their unit area, while the vehicles would receive maintenance and cleaning before being shipped home, or back out to a new location. Thus, the 197th had helped set the stage for the combat troop withdrawal from Iraq, and it departed just before the first troops and vehicles began rolling through in late August 2011. Yet another impact of the drawdown was the July 2011 diversion of two incoming battalions from Afghanistan, where their brigade was headed, to Kuwait where they were assigned to the 197th FiB. The Brigade and their replacement Brigade collaborated together as the 197th again had to evaluate and reallocate missions in order to provide a "home" and mission for these two new battalions. Another issue that has always been mentioned in the history of the New Hampshire Army National Guard is the animosity of the Regular Army towards the National Guard troops during deployments from WW I through Vietnam (yet the Guard troops always earning their respect in the end). It


therefore must be noted that during this deployment, a generally good and amicable relationship existed both with Higher Headquarters and with Regular Army units that had any connection with the 197th FiB. This may be attributable both to the National Guard's numerous previous deployments in the Global War on Terror, where Regular Army units fought side by side with National Guard troops, as well as to the higher visibility and reliance on the National Guard by Army planners throughout this last decade. The197th FIB thus distinguished itself throughout the deployment, earning praise from its commanding officers, and continuing the almost century old tradition of excellence set by its forebears.

The Brain Trust


Posted by Granite Thunder on Thursday, July 21, 2011 at 2:01am Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Neal Mitchell, 197th FIB PA The leadership of the 197th Fires Brigade gathered for a scrap book moment at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, July 19. They represent six National Guards (New Hampshire, Rhode Island, West Virginia, Michigan, Oklahoma and Washington), three active duty units and three branches of the U. S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, and Coast Guard).

From rear, left to right, Lt. Col. Peter Parente, commander of 1/103rd FA, RIARNG; Lt. Col. Lawrence Schloegel, commander of 1/119th FA, MIARNG; 1st Sgt. Jonathan Conrad of the 44th Chemical Co., Fort Hood, Texas; Lt. Col. Nicholas Adler, commander of Zone 6 Mayor's Cell (Camp Arifjan), NHARNG; Lt. Col. Christopher Chomosh, commander of 1/180th CAV, OKARNG; Capt. Scott Sann, commander of the 7th Engineer Dive Team, Hawaii; Command Sgt. Maj. Victor May of 3/197th FA, NHARNG; Lt. Col. David Baker, commander of 3/197th FA, NHARNG; Lt. Col. James Challender, commander of Life Support Area (Ali Al Salem), NHARNG; 1st Lt. Keith Toohey, commander of the 319th EOD, WAARNG; Lt. Col. Jimmy Thomas, commander of 1/160th FA, OKARNG; Lt. Col. Clay Coatney, commander of 1/201st FA, WVARNG; Command Sgt. Maj. Stanton Noyes of the Zone 6 Mayor's Cell (Camp Arifjan), NHARNG; Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Jordan, 1/180th CAV, OKARNG; Command Sgt. Maj. Bobby Cales, 1/201st FA, WVARNG; 1st Sgt. William Baumgartner of the 7th Engineer Dive Team, Hawaii; Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry Rouleau of the Life Support Area (Ali Al Salem), NHNG; Lt. Col. Leonard Rusher, commander of 1/182nd FA, MIARNG; Command Sgt. Maj. Kevin Rusher of 1/182nd FA, MIARNG; Col. Peter Corey, commander of the 197th FIB, NHARNG; Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Considine III of the 197th FIB, NHARNG; Commander Thomas Murphy III, commander of Task Force 56.5; Capt. Jason Snelgrove, commander of the 44th Chemical Co., Fort Hood, Texas; Command Sgt. Maj. Jody Arrington of 1/103rd FA, RIARNG; and Command Sgt. Maj. John Lairson of 1/160th FA, OKARNG.


The 1-103rd FA

Symbolism: The shield is red for Artillery. The field piece and cannon balls on a mound are taken from the old Providence Marine Corps Artillery coat buttons, the cannon being changed to face dexter; this device also alludes to the Civil War service at Bunker Hill, Virginia. The gold chevron represents the Cavalry origin of the Second Battalion, while the six fleursde-lis represent the service of the 103d Field Artillery during World War I

LTC Peter Parente

CSM Gregory Jordan

The 1-103rd FA Battalion initially under the command of LTC Baumann, fields the new M777 155 millimeter cannons and has roots in the Rhode Island Militia as far back as 1801. Most of the unit is stationed at Camp Virginia, Kuwait which is Northwest of Kuwait City. Its primary responsibility is to operate the Camp Virginia Command Cell, however, one of their units, the 1207th is supplying a Quick Reaction Force (QRF) at both Camp Arifjan, and the Kuwaiti Naval Base (KNB). An additional, 64 soldiers are assigned to the 3-197th at Camp Buehring.


The 103rd's previous preparation for deployment covered a lot of the warrior tasks and battle drills, allowing the Battalion to focus more on the nontraditional Camp Command Cell (CCC) mission while at Fort McCoy. However, regarding McCoy, the Commander stated that, "the dwell time at Fort McCoy could have been reduced without adversely affecting training. The same training could have been accomplished over 5 or 6 weeks, instead of over 8 weeks." Their Camp Command Cell is divided into three sections, sustainment, Operations and Force Protection, and Contracts/facilities to include maintenance & Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR). At Camp Virginia, the CCC must support and sustain large numbers of transient soldiers, as well as the primary tenant, the 1-119th Convoy Escort Team (CET) Battalion. Since arriving at Camp Virginia on 21 November, the 1-103rd has been proactive in a range of project areas. For example, alerting the Army Support Group – Kuwait (ASG-KU) of the almost overflowing storage crisis of used oil in the motor pools which had resulted from the expiration of a government contract to pick up the used oil. By consolidating living areas of junior ranking individuals, the 1-103rd recovered 20 additional rooms while also upgrading the living conditions on tent pad 14 for the Convoy Escort Team (CET) battalion. Additional Quality of Life projects completed by the 103rd are a complete gym facility overhaul, and an upgraded MWR movie theater, while Force Protection was improved by the construction of new larger guard towers.


Camp Virginia is the host to a varying number of transient units. The 103rd CCC tracks its success with a customer survey, and between February and March, over 3000 soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division passed through, giving the 103rd the highest ratings in almost every category. Additionally, the CCC hosted 375 guests who had been invited to participate in Kuwait's 50/20 celebration (a Kuwaiti celebration of the 50th anniversary of their independence from British rule, and the 20th anniversary of their liberation from an attacking and occupying Iraqi army). The 103rd was able to provide beds instead of cots, to all 375, as well as lockers, linens and laundry. Camp Virginia offers professional development through their Education Center where several unit soldiers attend class, and one 103rd soldier even teaches math there. Others are enrolled in online courses. Soldiers also have a number of opportunities to keep in touch with families through MWR and family support groups, including telephones and computers for direct communication, and many soldiers have their own laptop which uses an internet access card to Skype home. MWR offers a variety of events from movies and movie rentals to Texas "Hold-em" and other card games, 5K runs and weight lifting competitions and an outdoor stage for visiting celebrities. In addition to creating the first Kuwait Baseball diamond made to adjust between Baseball and Softball requirements, the 1-103rd had special help inaugurating their new ball field, with a visit by MG James Nuttall, who umpired the first baseball game on Camp Virginia. The month of March, 2011, saw the biggest impact on mission across Kuwait. On the 25th, a full and severe sandstorm swept through all the camps. On Virginia, most operations were shut down, and off post travel was prohibited as visibility was nearly zero. The 60 mile per hour wind gusts tore roofs off buildings and water sheds, while the wind found every crack and crevice in buildings and offices, and poured in, coating everything with a heavy layer of grit and dust.


In response to the President's mandated draw down of troops from Iraq, the Retrograde Property Accountability Team (R-PAT) was established to facilitate the turning over of Army property and equipment allowing units to rotate through more quickly. Camp Virginia's mission was to construct the receiving yard, and the 1-103rd coordinated the clearing and leveling of this R-PAT yard, Construction being primarily done by members of the 15th Engineering Battalion based at Camp Arifjan. A long list of other construction or structural improvements included setting up Large Area Maintenance Tents (LAMS), renovating MWR and Tactical Operations Center (TOC) facilities, and making improvements to the entry control point and other force protection configurations, often by moving barriers. The Spring also saw a new DFAC open, the integration of a new contracting company called ITT, more construction and renovation projects, and a visit by the Rhode Island Adjutant General, MG Robert Bray. In April, 2011, at a transfer of command ceremony, LTC Peter Parente received the reigns of authority as the new 1103rd commander.

Throughout the deployment, the Battalion was challenged with the additional requirements of the massive drawdown of the United States Forces – Iraq (USF-I). Camp Virginia was selected as the newest site for the establishment of a Retrograde, Property Assistance Team (RPAT) yard. As the USF-I drawdown from Iraq begins, the RPAT yard will retrieve theater-provided vehicles and equipment from 50,000 soldiers as they prepare to head home. The RPAT process will enable the Army to reestablish accountability for the received equipment. In support of the RPAT mission, the Camp Command Cell (CCC) hosted weekly RPAT


meetings which, at times, included congressional delegations (CODELs); and coordinated support from 4 additional units providing logistics and maintenance to the Camp Virginia RPAT mission. The CCC also organized the upgrading of facilities for the demobilizing USF-I soldiers, by the installation of a shower unit and an AAFES trailer. Other improvements included the tactical assembly area gravel roads and the large parking areas/motor pools where the military vehicles will be stored pending movement to their final point of embarkation. Overall, the mission was non-standard in many ways with no source document or field manual explaining operations of a camp command cell. By remaining flexible, the 1-103rd was able to adapt to both the evolving mission and to the physical environment. "Improving the foxhole" projects ranged from force protection measures to repair or replacing structures damaged by the harsh environment, while mission requirements involved R-PAT construction. The success of the 1-103rd was ultimately achieved because of the many diverse experiences and backgrounds of their soldiers, the professionalism to adapt, and their pride to succeed. Commander's Summary Over 20,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coalition partners have been housed and re-deployed from Camp Virginia since December 2010. CCC VA conducted base camp sustainment and support operations in order to ensure a secure permanent party, and transient tenant life support area with the best possible quality of life. Permanent improvements that have occurred since the Transfer of Authority (TOA) was executed in December 2010 include a Large Area Maintenance (LAM) tent for the 1119th FA BN Combat Escort Team (CET) the largest tenant unit on camp, renovation of one Gym 1 flooring, overhauling 10 TOC (Tactical Operations Center) buildings for transient units, completing a new 3,000 Soldier per meal Dining Facility (DFAC) which was the largest project completed since TOA. Security and Force Protection was also greatly enhanced on Camp by the installation of several new security towers; procuring a vault camera for the CET Battalion; installing the MVACIS (Mobile Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System) and Backscatter system (these are X-Ray types of detection devices for explosives, weapons, etc.) at the main entry control point; repairing Tower VBIED (Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Device)


alarms and identifying “big voice” Mass alert system location deficiencies, creating a more efficient barrier plan for facilities that freed up barriers that were needed at other bases, upgrading 5 bunkers and installing two new bunkers based on identified deficiencies. Quality of life enhancements include deconstructing and replacing soldier tents that were deemed no longer appropriate for use and resolving generator safety issues in some Pad areas. MWR Facility enhancements include creating the first Kuwait Baseball diamond for baseball and softball games and upgrading the MWR movie theater with a projection theater and surround sound system. Also renovations and improvements were made to the MWR Stage area. The Camp Sustainment section in support of base operations distributed over 479,031 gallons of bulk water and 151,095 cases of bottled water. The clothing warehouse which falls under the Sustainment section also made a significant contribution. They gather unwanted uniforms and boots from drop bins around camp and sort and store them for other soldiers who need them. The average weekly issue of clothing at the clothing warehouse was $4,833.44 a week and will save the US Government approximately $169,170.40. The Army Direct Ordering program (ADO) also saw a direct savings of $14,537.25 by issuing uniforms and boots through the clothing warehouse instead of ordering them through the program. The Sustainment section also accomplished the turn-in of over 1.3 million USD (U.S. Dollar) worth of excess equipment, tents and spare parts in an ongoing effort to reduce the excess and streamline support operations, while continually providing direct support to all redeploying units. CCC VA support personnel have redeployed over 70 plus separate units through Camp Virginia. The largest include 3rd Brigade Combat Team (BCT)-4th Infantry Division (ID), 2-25th ID, 256th IBCT and 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR). Camp Virginia also housed and supported Soldiers and Coalition partners involved in Kuwait’s 50/20 Golden Jubilee celebration. Units supported include elements of the French Foreign Legion and French Marines, 1st Battalion (BN) 3rd Infantry Regiment "Old Guard" and representatives of U.S. Forces – Iraq (USF-I). In addition to supporting and redeploying Soldiers through Kuwait, Camp Virginia was also selected as


the newest site for the establishment of a Retrograde Property Assistance Team (RPAT) yard. The RPAT will assist approximately 100,000 soldiers as they execute the responsible drawdown from Iraq. They relieve demobilizing units coming to Camp Virginia of excess theater-provided equipment. In doing so, the RPAT reestablishes accountability, enables asset visibility of the received equipment and allocates transportation methods for the flagged provisions. Other improvements to support RPAT were upgrades to gravel roads and large parking areas/motor pools [as large as 10 acres] where military vehicles will be stored pending movement to their final point of embarkation. Camp Virginia and northern Kuwait are a better place due to the CCC VA’s intense efforts and is an “enduring” camp with the ability to support re-deploying units.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Monthly Commander's Historical Up-dates, Commander's Summary, 1-103rd Newsletters]


1-119th FA

Symbolism: The baptism of fire of this regiment occurred in the Toul Sector; this is represented by the canton, the arms of Lorraine. The silver badge of the Second Division of the First Corps of the Spanish-American War is displayed in sinister chief. History shows that for a great many years the district around what is now the City of El Paso, Texas, was known as Ponce de Leon’s Ranch, having been settled and colonized by a group of the followers of that explorer, and who named their new home after their leader. The lion issuant is, therefore, taken from Ponce de Leon’s crest, to denote service on the Mexican Border at El Paso, Texas. (Motto: We Prepare the Way)

LTC Lawrence E. Schloegl

CSM Jody Arrington

1-119th FA is a Michigan National Guard battalion based in Charlotte Michigan. Its primary mission is firing M777A1 155 millimeter Towed Howitzers (cannons). Its normal structure comprises a Headquarters Battery, A, B & C Firing Batteries, and the 119th Forward Support Company


(119th FSC). Each Firing Battery is assigned six 155mm howitzers while the Forward Support Company is responsible for hauling (trucking), and mess and maintenance sections. Prior to mobilizing at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, the 1-119th knew what type of mission they would be fulfilling, and re-structured the battalion to its future deployed configuration six months before mobilizing. Consequently, all pre-mobilization and mobilization training at Fort McCoy was conducted in its war time stance, undoubtedly easing the transition to their theater mission. Commanded by LTC Schloegl, the 1-119th is the primary permanent party at Camp Virginia, and its deployed mission is to provide short haul convoy escort services to 1st Theater Sustainment Command (1st TSC). The 1119th has three companies, Alpha, Charlie, and Delta (1436th EN) conducting these short haul missions, escorting civilian contractor "white trucks" (tankers, flat-beds, and refrigerated trucks) between Iraq and Kuwait. Bravo Company escorts both soldiers and supplies throughout Kuwait, from installation to installation, and to and from the Airport. The primary mission of the Task Force 1-119th is to provide planning, and command and control, for the security of the civilian contracted sustainment missions to Contingency Operating Base (COB) Adder, in Iraq. Ultimately, the 1-119th provides security for approximately 70-80% of all logistics and sustainment supplies moving into Iraq.


During February, the "Red Lions" as the 1-119th is known by, participated in the Kuwaiti 50/20 celebration by sharing space with people from over 30 nations who had been invited to the celebration. Bravo Battery escorted the foreign troops to and from the parade grounds during the preparations leading up to the parade, and as they interacted together, the whole battalion got a crash course in foreign "customs and courtesies," some to their amusement. While the Kuwaiti threat level remains relatively low, the 119th also must face the moderate to high threat level in Iraq which is composed of an aggregate of small to moderate sized insurgent groups. Other distracters to their mission, include; the weather, wildlife in the roads, and interaction with civilian traffic. The primary equipment used by the 119th is a large fleet of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles of the Caiman variety. Additionally, they use 2 ½ ton military work trucks, military wreckers, forklifts, some flat beds, and a fleet of Non-Tactical Vehicles (NTVs = Pick-Up Trucks, SUVs, multi- passenger Vans/Buses). Personal armor, weapons and other protective gear are a normal part of conducting missions for the 119th. Typically, the three convoy escort units follow a three day cycle – Driving north into Iraq the first day, staying overnight, and driving back the second day. The third day is to "reset", cleaning


weapons, conducting vehicle maintenance, and catching up on sustainment training, etc., before waking up to day one again. Training is inherent to any military unit, at home or deployed, and the 1-119th conducts many training classes; both those required by the Army and others required by their higher chain of command. Some of these include Combat Lifesaver (CLS) Recertification, Officer and Non-Commissioned officer Development Programs(ODP/NCODP), Safety Stand-downs, Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT), Suicide Prevention, Anti-terrorism Level 1, Rules of Engagement, Ground Risk Assessment Tool training, Fraternization Program, as well as unit derived Sergeant’s Training Time which comprises the basic Army Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills. Aside from mandatory training, many 119th soldiers at Camp Virginia are availing themselves of the opportunities for both personal and professional development. Some Red Lions recently graduated from warrior leader course, which prepares soldiers to become Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs = Sergeants). Additionally, many are involved in a variety of online and resident college courses available at Camp Virginia. Housing at Camp Virginia consists of tents for the lower enlisted, and trailers for senior enlisted and above. Due to the temporary nature of most of the camps, hygiene facilities consist of trailer units interspersed through the living areas. Transient soldiers have separate large dome shaped tents housing up to 70 soldiers each.


Other amenities at the camp include a new dining facility, two gym tents, and two Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) centers, which provide a range of things to do during soldiers' down time - ping-pong, pool tables, cards, video games, movies that can be checked out or watched in the TV area. The MWR Community Centers also host events on the camp such as Texas “Hold-em” poker games, 5K runs, weight lifting competitions, camel rides, and more. A large outdoor stage has hosted several entertainment events, some of which have included; the Buffalo Jills, the Cincinnati Bengals, Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, and an all women comedy show. 1-119th Soldiers also participate in the intramural baseball and soccer leagues, as well as a variety of individual and non-league sports, including impromptu games of volleyball, basketball, and soccer. An occasional game of cricket, played by the TCN workers, has also been joined in on by Soldiers of the 1-119th. (TCNs or Third Country Nationals are foreign nationals who work in Kuwait under a U.S. government contract.) Commander's Summary The 1st Battalion, 119th Field Artillery Regiment's 594 Soldiers, conducted operations in a high threat environment during its 12-month deployment. Three companies of the battalion provided convoy escort missions throughout Kuwait and Iraq in support of combat operations. The battalion averaged twelve large-scale convoy missions daily consisting of 45 trucks (both civilian contracted and government). The majority of the unit’s missions consisted of escorting sustainment supplies (primarily Class I


(food) and Class III (petroleum, oils, and lubricants or POL)) between Camp Virginia, Kuwait and forward operating base Adder, Iraq. Additionally, the battalion conducted numerous Common Land Transportation (CULT) missions, a long haul convoy security mission, securing Convoy Logistic Patrols for 1st Sustainment Brigade between Kuwait and all parts of Iraq. These missions directly supported Operation Responsible Drawdown by backhauling equipment out of Iraq. The Convoy Escort Teams logged over 1.45 million miles, escorted 58,416 trucks, delivered 119 million gallons of fuel into Iraq and completed 1,023 sustainment missions. The Battalion was engaged 23 times by enemy forces which included improvised explosive devices, explosive formed penetrator, indirect fire, and small arms fire without any friendly KIAs or mission failures. They also treated and evacuated two Third Country Nationals for wounds received during separate attacks. One company from the Battalion was responsible for escorting personnel movements within Kuwait. With a fleet of 32 non-tactical vehicles, their escort duties included: securing personnel movements for Soldiers from their re-deployment camps to the Life Support Area (LSA) and then on to the Aerial Port of Departure (APOD); securing personnel movements for Soldiers from the APOD to the LSA and on to their deployment camp; securing intra-Kuwait movement of personnel; securing personnel from the LSA to APOD for two daily R&R flights, one weekly Rotator flight, and one weekly Freedom flight; securing personnel movements of four 24-hour shuttles that transported Soldiers between camps; and securing movement of equipment from Ali Al Salem Airbase to Camp Arifjan and Kuwait City International Airport (KCIA). The Gateway Mission Company escorted 317,527 personnel with over 563,993 miles recorded in Kuwait. The company completed 13,396 missions in Kuwait without any significant accidents or incidents.


Throughout the numerous missions and miles driven by 1-119th FA CETs, enemy contact was a constant threat. As of 30 June 2011, over 9 months into the deployment, the Battalion Soldiers have been awarded 15 Combat Action Badges and 2 Purple Heart Medals. Additionally, they experienced very few vehicle accidents; 3 no fault accidents while travelling over 2 million miles. There has been no loss of life due to enemy action or accidents. One noted achievement was the Battalions ability to find IED’s and EFP’s (Improvised Explosive Devices, and Explosively Formed Penetrators or "shape charges"). On three separated occasions, Soldiers of the Battalion located enemy devices. The most notable incident occurred on 10 December 2010 on Route Aspen. The convoy escort commander identified a well hidden device after repositioning his vehicle. The photographic evidence of the device obtained by the Convoy Escort Team proved that the device was nearly impossible to spot but allowed the battalion to improve on detection techniques for spotting IEDs. The device consisted of 12" EFP, 40lbs of explosive material and a passive infrared sensor triggering device. The Explosive Ordnance Disposal team determined that the device's transmitter was very sophisticated. Both the Landowner and the EOD team commended the Battalion on being able to find an intact device of this complexity. The Iraqi Army conducted a raid of the bomb maker from the information that was gathered from the EFP. The successful raid captured IED making material and a working EFP IED. 1-119th FA developed and implemented a sustainment training program while in theater to ensure all Soldiers maintained Warrior proficiency with the assigned mission. The Battalion fired over 250,000


rounds of ammunition on numerous ranges while conducting marksmanship qualification and familiarization training. Another great accomplishment of the battalion was sending 59 Soldiers to the Warrior Leader Course. This was done while missions were on going and allowed Soldiers to continue their career development. 1-119th FA moved over 30 tons of CL I and CL V (Class 1-food, and Class 5-ammunition) supplies, plus handled accountability of over 200,000 rounds of ammunition. The units managed over 1,000 work orders for 140 buildings and tents. The battalion procured over $50,000 worth of essential equipment on the Government Purchase Credit Card. The battalion maintained control for 293,032 separate pieces of equipment worth $97,840,000.00 and posted 260 document numbers transferring over 3,000 items. The Battalion oversaw the Found on Installation and turn in of over $3,133,455.00 worth of excess equipment. The Battalion conducted 2 major showdowns for equipment accountability along with 11 separate Command Supply Discipline Inspections. 1-119th FA turned in over 23,000 excess CL IX (class 9-repair parts) material into the Army inventory which was valued in excess of $4.3 million. Overall equipment readiness rating has not dropped below 98%. The Battalion had the highest maintenance rating in the Brigade. Readiness rating for the MRAPs (Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected vehicles) never dropped below 97%, and the Battalion held an average of just over 99% throughout the deployment. The minimum requirement for mission was 90% and the goal was 95%. TF 1-119th FA had the highest mission capable rating for MRAPs in Kuwait according to the British Aerospace Forward Support Representative. The Battalion managed the service tracking


and updates, fault entry, job order processes from initiation to closing for approximately 3,600 pieces of equipment. The SAMS-E (Standard Army Maintenance System-Enhanced) Operators entered and updated approximately 5,000 maintenance tasks. Approximately 2,600 of those tasks were completed by the automotive section and out of these tasks, approximately 170 were vehicle services.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, 1-119th Newsletters Commander's Summary]


1-182nd FA

Symbolism: The background of the shield, semÊ of quatrefoils in gold on a field of red, is taken from the coat of arms of Count Pontchartrain, who was the Minister of Marine in France at the time the City of Detroit was founded. The black fess across the center of the shield is taken from the coat of arms of Cadillac, the founder of Detroit, who was sent here by Count Pontchartrain. The field of red has been substituted for the field of blue of Pontchartrain’s arms, symbolizing the arm of the service to which this regiment belongs, Artillery.

LTC Leonard Rusher

CSM Kevin Day

1-182nd FA is a Michigan National Guard battalion based in Detroit, Michigan. In 2007 as part of an Army wide transformation, it became part of the 197th Fires Brigade, and began fielding its new High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS). This advanced form of Artillery can be loaded faster, and sends its rounds farther, more accurately, and with a smaller crew than the former M198 Field Artillery Howitzer (cannon).


Commanded by LTC Rusher, the 1-182nd joins five other battalions in supporting the 197th Fires Brigade (FIB) for this Operation New Dawn deployment. Two of its companies, Headquarters and Headquarters Company (HHC), and Alpha Company are both located at Camp Patriot (the Kuwaiti Naval Base). HHC is responsible for the Camp Command Cell, the motor pool, a medical section, and unit administration. Alpha Company operates as the land-based security for Camp Patriot.

Of the 1-182nd's other two elements, Bravo Company is housed at Camp Patriot, but daily travels 30 miles North to provide security at the Kuwait Seaport of Debarkation (SPOD). Charlie Company is entirely made up of the 1207th Forward Support Company from Rhode Island. C Company operates as the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) for Camp Arifjan, where it resides. It helps provide security for the camp, and responds to reports of possible or suspected Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) outside of the camp. The mission of the security units requires the full complement of body armor and helmet, and requires the use of personal weapons like M9 pistols, and M4 rifles (an upgrade from the M16) to the M240B machine gun. Vehicles include; M1114 HMMWVs, Non Tactical Vehicles (NTVs), Gators and ATVs. X-Ray scanners and Defense Biometric Identification System (DBIDS) at the front gate provide mission essential information for investigation. "DBIDS is a DOD identity authentication and force protection


tool that is operational at many military locations around the world. DBIDS . . . uses bar codes and biometrics to identify cardholders." (www.macdill.af.mil) The soldiers of the 1-182nd, maintain readiness through Delta Drills (battle drills) and recently participated in a Joint Force drill which involved Army, Navy, and Coast Guard boats as well as Army and Navy Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) helicopters. The scenario involved a simulated fire fight with casualties, rescuing a man overboard, treating the "wounded" and orchestrating EVAC helicopters Aside from drills, there have been no real enemy contacts, however, some distracters to the mission include suspicious items, and some of the Third Country Nationals (TCNs are the contracted workers) rummaging through dumpsters. During January, the unit's HMMWVs went through an upgrade of their electrical system from 200 to 400 amps, but continued having problems. SPC Matthews discovered the issue, and was able to correct it before it became a big problem of countless repair hours and saving the Army over $20,000 dollars. For this, he received the "Hero of the Month" (January) unit award. February marked the Kuwaiti celebration of 50 years of independence from British rule, and the 20th anniversary of their liberation from the Iraqi invasion of their country. A huge international parade was held to commemorate these dual events, and the 1-182nd provided soldiers, vehicles, and equipment. Five HMMWVs, each with a Truck commander (TC), driver, and gunner participated in the parade, while another small group was selected to be guests of honor at the Naval Parade. A small maintenance section, and the Officer in Charge (OIC) and NonCommissioned Officer in Charge (NCOIC) rounded out the troop numbers involved.


Camp Patriot has all the common amenities as other camps. Barracks consist of two-man rooms with cable TV, "almost like home, but not." The previous DFAC (Dining Facility) contractor, won the new bid, but the new contract required them to construct new DFACs on all the camps in Kuwait. May saw the grand opening of the new DFAC at Camp Patriot. A large gym and indoor pool recently hosted a Camp Patriot Triathlon in which 1-182nd soldier Shaun McClaskey came in second behind a soldier from the 7th Dive Team (another member of the 197th FIB, while in theater). Team sports included a soccer team, shown here at their Kuwait vs America soccer game. Other amenities include a well rounded MWR (Morale, Welfare, and Recreation) facility, a PX (Post Exchange), and even a Kuwaiti bazaar which offers something for any interest. In April, a USO (United Serviceman's Organization) sponsored Reading Room was recently created out of an old storage room. Here, soldiers can have themselves video-recorded reading a book to one of their children back home. The book and the DVD are then sent home free of charge to their family. Once every quarter, the Theater Ammunition resupply ship, the MV Virginia docks for an Ammo Download Mission. Conex containers of ammunition are downloaded and hauled to an Ammunition Supply Point (ASP) from which it is distributed to units in Kuwait, Iraq, and Afghanistan. The 1-182nd provides security for this dangerous mission. Working directly with the Kuwaitis, they set up and clear a security route, shut down roads, and escort the flatbed trucks with their conex cargo. Trucks shuttle back and forth to the docks and the 1-182nd are on duty until the download mission is complete. As of June, over 2,000 containers have been delivered.


Commander's Summary

Mission: 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery Regiment (FAR) conducts Force Protection Forces (FPF) Operations at the Sea Port of Debarkation and Embarkation (SPOD/E) and at Camp Patriot/Kuwait Naval Base (KNB); conducts Quick Reaction Force (QRF) to secure Camp Arifjan; conducts Area Reaction Force (ARF) operations throughout the Area Support Group Kuwait (ASG-KU) South Area of Responsibility to secure critical infrastructure, assist in FPF operations and respond to emergency situations; and Camp Command Cell conducts command and control of Camp Patriot in order to provide camp command and sustainment operations. All operations facilitate the uninterrupted flow of personnel and equipment throughout the Kuwait theater of operations. The 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery from the Michigan Army National Guard distinguished itself during operations in Kuwait in support of OPERATION NEW DAWN between 13 November 2010 and 13 August 2011. The 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery was comprised of three artillery batteries, one headquarters battery, one forward support company from Michigan, and one forward support company from Rhode Island. The 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery restructured from its four batteries and two forward support companies into two Security Force (SECFOR) companies, one Area Reaction Force (ARF), one command and control cell, a battalion headquarters, and one Quick Reaction Force (QRF) company. The overwhelming success of the 1st Battalion 182nd Field Artillery in the combat theater can be attributed to the inexorable work ethic, dedication, and teamwork of all Soldiers in the battalion. From the 16th of September to the 12th of November 2010, the 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery mobilized as a SECFOR Battalion to Fort McCoy, Wisconsin


to conduct pre-mobilization requirements and validation for deployment to the Central Command Area of Responsibility (CENTCOM AOR). The Battalion trained and qualified one hundred percent of its personnel as Combat Life-Savers and achieved certification for all post-deployment training requirements. COL Peter Corey, commander of the 197th Fires Brigade, unhesitatingly endorsed the validation of the 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery, certifying that the battalion was trained and prepared for deployment as a Force Protection Battalion to the CENTCOM AOR to assume the mission of installation and operational security in Southern Kuwait. In November 2010, the 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery arrived in Kuwait and conducted Relief In Place (RIP) with the 2nd Battalion, 116th Field Artillery Battalion of Florida. The Battalion completed all tasks to successfully complete the Transfer of Authority (TOA). The Headquarters Company 1-182nd FA assumed the responsibilities of Camp Patriot Command Cell, Base Defense Liaison Team, and Area Reaction Force. Beginning December 2010, the Camp Patriot Camp Command Cell (CCC) conducted base service operations for over 5,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Guardians, and Marines involved in deployment/re-deployment operations in support of Operation New Dawn and Operation Enduring Freedom. Combat units the battalion supported include the 56.5 Commander Task Group (CTG), which includes Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron (MSRON) 3 and Port Security Unit (PSU) 313, U.S. Coast Guard Patrol Force Southwest Asia, U.S. Navy Customs Kilo Charlie Company, Movement Control DynCorps (a civilian contractor to the U.S. Government), 393rd Transportation Harbormaster Operations Detachment (THOD) Harbor Master, 411th Transportation Detachment, 163rd

Joint Memorial Day service


Transportation Detachment, 476th Transportation Detachment, 949th Transportation Detachment, Military Sealift Command (MSC), Naval Special Warfare/Explosive Ordinance Disposal (NSW/EOD), Navy Criminal Investigation Services (NCIS), 7th Engineer Detachment, Army Materiel Command (AMC) with contractors, 2/401st Expeditionary Medical Facility – Kuwait (EMF-K), 519th Signal Company, 3-38th Human Resource Command Postal Company, and 3-43rd Air Defense Artillery Battalion, and over 100 Sailors from the Kuwait Navy. The CCC composed of a Contracting Officer Representative (COR) Office, a Billeting Office, a Base Support Operations Office and a Base Sustainment and Environmental Office, provided force protection, security, life support, and quality of life to all the branches of the military service. The 1-182nd FAR took an extremely aggressive stance on improving the quality of life at Camp Patriot. Examples of improvement projects completed include the movement of the construction of a new Dining Facility (DFAC), reconfigured parking lot resulting in less wear and tear on vehicles for safer entry and exit for vehicles and pedestrians, installed mezzanine level in the AMC building resulting in a floor space increase of 35%, installed a large capacity crane in another AMC building allowing higher level maintenance to be performed on U.S. military boats, repaired and brought online the generator backup for the Combined Joint Logistics Operation Center (CJLOC) resulting in uninterrupted operations during numerous Kuwaiti power grid outages, upgraded TF maintenance office from a tent to a trailer facility with proper power and lighting, designed and built improved water sheds for storage of palletized bottled water, and replaced approximately 20 light carts with permanent light fixtures resulting in a savings of more than $1,000.00 per day in fueling and maintenance contracts. The COR Office enforced strict DOD compliance and ensured that all facets of sustainment operations serviced by civilian contracts were executed to high standards to include power generation, cleaning, sanitation, environmental oversight and logistics. [references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, 1-182nd unit newsletters, 7th Engineer Dive Team newsletter, http://www.macdill.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123198838, Commander's Summary, emails]


Commander's Monthly Historical Narrative C co. TF 1-182 CPT Brian Fielder

Editor's Note: The following is a report from C Co. 1-182nd AKA 1207th Quick Reaction Force (QRF) at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. This unabridged report helps show how some of the units were shifted to accomplish the multi-faceted mission of the 197th FIB. In this case, the unit was separated from its parent battalion and attached to second battalion, yet its mission base was at a third location away from either battalion. Every camp had Area Reaction Forces (ARF), and QRF units. This report is submitted as a representative of the unique type of mission of these units.

1. The Unit A The 1207th Forward Support Company, deployed as Charlie company of task force 1-182, is an element of the 1-103rd Field Artillery of the Rhode Island Army National Guard. B The unit is a support element serving a battalion size unit. 1 Our usual mission is to serve the maintenance and logistical needs of the 103rd Field Artillery Battalion and attached units. 2 Our normal unit structure is based on a Modified Table of Organization and Equipment (MTOE), which is a more or less standardized Army document that lists the people and equipment required for each type of unit. It normally consists of the following: HQ (Headquarters) and HQ section, a Supply and Transportation Platoon, and a Maintenance Platoon.


C Deployed organization/structure 1 The 1207th deployed with 136 people organized in the standard fashion of 3 Platoons and 1 HQ and HQ section. The company was reduced in size to 67 people consisting of a single QRF Platoon and HQ/HQ section. The remaining 69 personnel were distributed among the remaining elements of TF 1-182 2 TF 1-182, originally 1st Battalion 182nd Field Artillery, was for the purposes of this deployment designated a Task Force due to its relinquishing of an Artillery role and its newly assigned multiple missions. TF 1-182 consists of a HQ and HQ Company and 3 other companies each assigned various tasks. 3 C company / 1207th FSC consists of one HQ section and one platoon. The platoon itself is broken down into 4 squads; each is dived into fire teams for administrative purposes, yet operates primarily as assigned vehicle teams. The HQ section is divided into three primary subunits, administrative i.e. personnel and supply, maintenance i.e. motor pool and operations (OPS). D The unit had to retrain for its SECFOR (Security Forces) Mission. We were aware prior to our Annual Training period that we needed to re-organize and re-focus on both mounted and dismounted security operations. In order to accomplish this transition, soldiers were reorganized as described in the paragraphs above shortly after arrival at Ft. McCoy Wisconsin. In the ensuing weeks & months, small units trained together as teams, culminating in a full-scale Mission Rehearsal Exercise (MRE). The MRE replicated in concept the mission(s) that we were going to be performing in Kuwait. E Location: Primarily Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, although we have continuous contact with our higher headquarters both here at Camp Arifjan and Camp Patriot at the Kuwaiti Naval Base (KNB). 1 The terrain is barren hard pan desert. There is very little vegetation in evidence except in Wadi areas. The terrain is slightly rolling, so visibility on a clear day is limited to approximately 2000 meters, depending on the elevation of the viewer. Occasional drifts of sand occur; sandy areas can collect on the roads posing a driving hazard. There are no villages near the camp, and no habitation other than occasional Bedouin encampments.


2 Weather (monthly summary) a Because it is currently winter in Kuwait, the average high temperature has been approximately 65 degrees Fahrenheit, the average low 40 degrees Fahrenheit. It has been reasonably comfortable, and acclimatization has not been an issue up to this point in the deployment. However, it seems much colder in the evening because there is always a breeze blowing, and the temperature drops quickly. b Occasional Rain/Thunderstorms occur, although limited accumulation of rainfall has been recorded (0.20 in.). The rain does help to knock the dust down and make the air smell fresh & clean. c Wind and dust/sand storms occur regularly, although we have not experienced a true sandstorm since arriving in Kuwait. d Weather impacts the mission when wind/dust obscure visibility. Air & road travel are restricted unless absolutely mission essential. 2. The Mission A Our original mission for this deployment was to augment 1st BN 182nd FA aka TF 1-182. It was to provide support for Kuwait missions which included a mayoral cell, area reaction force, two security companies and one QRF company. B We have received Fragmentary Orders (FRAGOs) directing us to provide additional soldiers for several support activities. C Significant Events 1 Company First Sergeant, 1SG Smith assigned to TDY logistical mission in Afghanistan. D Additional taskings 1 Several senior NCO’s have attended week long plus schools at both Camp Arifjan and other posts. 2 Kuwait 50-20 Celebration Support: February marked 50 years since Kuwait became an independent nation, and 20 years since liberation after the 1990 invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi forces under the regime of Saddam Hussein.


E Issues: 1 Primarily a lack of computers, in addition the computers that Inherited from the previous unit were generally obsolete. 2 Site improvement has been a priority for Charlie company, Starting with an immediate reorganization of office space. Several projects remain in progress or in delay due to DPW policies or practices, most notably is a new deck and accompanying sunscreen. 3 Because TF1-182 is located on various posts, operational Information is transmitted thru an extended chain of command can be cumbersome.

3. Major Achievements A Support of the Kuwait 50-20 celebration: Our soldiers participated in a major world event that made international headlines. They were treated like celebrities by the Kuwaiti population that attended the parade, and were able to meet Soldiers from all of the Coalition Countries that participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in 1990-1991. Charlie Company’s contribution was the participation of SGT David Lowe, an Operation DESERT STORM veteran. B Upon transfer of authority in December, Charlie Company brought a new vigor to the QRF mission. Policies and procedures were reviewed and enhanced; relationships with coordinating units were both renewed and reinforced. 4. Significant Events A Holiday visits by both the Chief of Staff of the Army, General George W. Casey Jr. and then Sergeant Major of the Army Kenneth O. Preston. General Casey took the time to address an audience of approximately 1500 soldiers, highlighting challenges that will be faced by the US Army over the next few years. B Major General Nutall, Deputy Commanding General, 1st Army visited at the end of February. General Nutall a Rhode Islander with prior commands of R.I.N.G. units, made a point of visiting the 1207th/C company and his fellow Rhode Islanders. C U.S. Ambassador to Kuwait, Deborah K. Jones visited a static display of a gun truck and talked to a crew from C company who gave an informal brief to onlookers.


D A national public radio reporter came to ride along with the QRF “hot� squad. He rode along for an exterior patrol with 1st squad, led by SSG Beaudoin. 5. Personnel A Unit Operations 1 The company has varying duties; the TOC is staffed 24 hours. The platoon has Squads on rotating shifts 24 hours per day to man the reaction force QRF. They run patrols, and also react to any significant event on & off Camp Arijan 2 The Command Cell staff offices primarily operate 12 hours per day. The S1 Section mans the front desk in the HQ. However, OPS is staffed on a 24 hour basis. Many Soldiers work outside of a normal workday. 3 Most enlisted Soldiers are scheduled for one or more rest days per week. Senior Enlisted and many Officers cannot afford this luxury due to mission requirements, and are happy to take a break when time permits. Additionally, some adjustments have been made to allow for mid-tour leave, the absence of soldiers necessitating that others may have to fulfill their responsibilities for a time. 4 The primary mission is the QRF duty, referred to as HOT shift, this is a 24 hour duty day from 0800 till 0800. This is followed by a day off known as ICE shift, then subsequently COLD and WARM shifts where preparation for the upcoming hot shift takes place. B S-1 Actions 1 Processed 67 leaves, conducted 67 DCS Briefings, coordinated personnel for 50/20 celebration, delivered Mail and performed mail services on a daily basis 2 Processed Army Achievement Medals and Army Commendation medals 3 Processed 5 promotions and several extensions of enlistment 4 Processed records review and Post Deployment Medical Review and Assessments for 67 PAX (number of people) C Issues 1 All sections managed their personnel & had a solid plan to continue routine operations with reduced staffing due to


scheduled leave. Soldiers are willing to put in extra time and/or effort to allow their comrades the opportunity to take leave. 2 The entire leave process requires approximately three weeks to allow for 15 days of time at home. Expectations that there will possibly be some overlap of leave periods, and planning for that eventuality is essential. 6. Operations A Intelligence 1 The threat level in Kuwait is low. However, there is always the possibility of terrorist attack. The recent unrest in the Middle East has generated protests by disenfranchised resident aliens here in Kuwait, although their protests have not been directed toward the U.S. Most countries in this part of the world have factions that are unfriendly to the U.S., and unhappy with their current government. 2 Impacts on the Mission a Enemy activity in our area of operations is not a factor. The primary concern is vigilance against terrorist activity. However, there is still some insurgent activity just across the border in Iraq, and some concern regarding possible intelligence gathering in Kuwait. b Recent civilian demonstrations have curtailed travel into Kuwait City, to avoid any inadvertent contact with potentially violent protesters. B Execution 1 In addition to the Mission set mentioned above, we are frequently tasked to support various work details and efforts to improve the camp. We are occasionally tasked to support VIP visits with drivers, escort, briefings, facilities and the like. 2 Missions to Date: a Patrols QRF: to date (10April) approximately 7 per day X 120 days equals 840 patrols b Logistics Support Charlie Company maintains a company supply office. 3 A Daily Tactical Update (DTU) FRAGO (FRAGmentary Order) is issued against the Operations Order (OPORD). The DTU details orders, taskings, and administrative requirements


for the Battalion. These range from work details and required training, to administrative information requirements. 4 Coordination with 197th Fires Brigade(FiB) HQ & Staff, ASGKU, BSB-N, tenant units and supporting activities on Camp Arifjan, other camps, and sister units within the Brigade are ongoing daily. Without good coordination & communication, many of our missions & requirements would be much more difficult, and much less successful. 5 Outcome(s) a Because of our unique high profile mission and location in close proximity to higher headquarters, Charlie company is often used as a “showcase” unit. Frequently distinguished visitors and dignitaries tour the QRF unit and facilities. b The experienced members of our unit have helped others (individuals or units) whenever possible, which builds credibility and trust, inculcating a supportive atmosphere for the unit as a whole. C Training 1 Exercises a The Army has directed that U.S. forces in Kuwait conduct a monthly Theater Ballistic Missile Exercise as a contingency in the case that nearby countries launch ballistic missiles against Kuwait. We also conduct monthly Force Protection Exercises on the camp. b The unit has conducted multiple training classes required by the Army and our higher chain of command to include Equal Opportunity, Rules of Engagement, and Threat Awareness Reporting Processes. 2 Army training a All units conducted a Safety Stand-Down on Safe Driving in Kuwait and Avoiding and Minimizing Sports Related Injuries. b All units are working on Individual Weapons Qualification (IWQ) and Crew Served Weapons (CSW) qualification as firing ranges and training ammunition become available. “Crew Served Weapons” is Army terminology for machine guns & grenade launchers that are large enough to require more than one person to operate. Additionally, all units are working on Army


Warrior Tasks (Warrior Task Training, WTT) and Battle Drills (AWTBD). This training meets annual proficiency requirements as well as keeping the Soldiers ready for any mission that might be assigned. c All sections & units cross train to allow flexibility of manning. This helps to relieve boredom & reduce complacency. We considered rotating units to different missions, which would have been possible had B Company not received multiple smaller missions. Currently it is not feasible due to the training & mission requirements that are in place. 3 Issues 1 The Safety Stand-Down was successful in that it focused attention on real issues. Recently a civilian contractor was involved in a fatal rollover accident shortly after departing from the camp. Sports injuries have also been a major contributor to sick call complaints, since most of the Battalion’s Soldiers are involved in some kind of physical activity to improve their physical fitness. 2 Because of our 24 hour operations and the distinct shifts required to sustain such an effort, we have discovered that whenever any training, classes or unit meetings take place, they must be given or held twice. This is to guarantee that every member of the unit is able to attend the function, allowing the unit to maintain a constant state of operational readiness. 7. Equipment A Mission Essential Equipment 1 We are currently equipped with M1151 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs), with additional armor and accessory kits for electronic warfare and various types of communication devices. We have 2 Non-Tactical Vehicles (NTVs = Vans, SUVs, 25 passenger Vans/Buses), and a Gator. The HMMWVs are used for QRF and the NTV’s are used to shuttle personnel to various work sites and camp locations. 2 We are also equipped with our usual complement of weapons; M4 Carbines, M9 9mm Pistols, and additional CSWs.


3 The uniform on the camp is the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) in the Universal Camouflage Pattern (UCP). This uniform is worn with a Patrol Cap or “Boonie Hat�. On mission additional protective gear such as the Improved Outer Tactical Vest (IOTV = Body Armor), Fire Resistant ACU (FRACU), Army Combat Helmet (ACH), Nomex (fire retardant fabric) Gloves, and eye protection are worn or carried. Civilian clothing and the Army Physical Fitness Uniform (APFU) are also authorized for wear in Kuwait. 4 Other unique equipment a We are also equipped with numerous computers that form the Army Battle Command System (ABCS), which allow for the update & display of tactical and other information. b Computers are prevalent in every office and work area, many have specialized software, and all perform functions such as word processing and e-mail. With computers comes the need for printers and copiers. There is a perceived need for more. B Issues with equipment 1 For the most part, we have every piece of equipment we could possibly need to perform our missions & tasks. As always, there is a need for more computers & cell phones, although we are able to accomplish the mission with the resources that are available. 2 Readiness & maintenance are outstanding; vehicle readiness rates are in the upper 90% range, and all equipment issues are corrected in a timely manner. 8. Leadership A Mentorship 1 There are numerous opportunities for junior officers and NCOs to operate semi autonomously, examples of this are the Quick Reaction Platoon and squads operating daily, as individual entities. 2 ODP/NCODP (Officer Development Program/NonCommissioned Officer Development Program): ODP and NCODP have been conducted on a regular/periodic basis, topics include the following; Equal Opportunity, Contracting Basics, Counseling, Mission Tactics, Fraternization, Officer


Evaluation Reports, Sexual Assault, Non-Commissioned Officer Evaluation Reports, Officer Career Path, Retention, Army Values, Combat Stress, Leave and Earnings Statement, etc. B Counseling 1 Quarterly requirements for Officer, Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO), and Enlisted counseling are being conducted by leaders at all levels to help Soldiers improve their leadership and work skills. Higher headquarters conducted an inspection of our unit counseling program and were impressed with what they found. 2 Self-Improvement a Many Soldiers are taking advantage of the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), which is a payroll deduction program very much like a 401(k) Plan. In addition, the Savings Deposit Program (SDP), which is very much like a shortterm Certificate of Deposit (CD) is available to us all due to our Title 10 USC Active Duty Status. This program pays 10% interest on a one year deposit of up to $10,000, and is being taken advantage of by many unit members. b Numerous unit members are attending classes at the Education Center, as well as taking online classes. Various Fitness Classes are also being attended by our Troops. Others are continuing with online programs begun before deployment. C Military History 1 A presentation for Black History Month was given by our Battalion Commander LTC Leonard Rusher. The event concentrated on African American involvement in the Civil war. 2 The Unit Historian and Public Affairs Representative (PAR), Steven White is doing an extraordinary job in collecting photographs, as well as narrative information and operational data to document this deployment from the 1207th FSC perspective. Additionally, plans are being made to produce a unit Yearbook as a commemorative for the individual Soldier. Beyond this PFC White is collecting items to be placed on display back at the unit’s new home in R.I..


9. Caring for Soldiers A Families 1 Our unit enjoys the luxury of having a strong Family Readiness Group (FRG) back home. The FRG passes information from the unit and the Army to families & loved ones of our Soldiers. The FRG and the State also have programs in place to assist family members with any emergencies that arise as well as day to day questions about benefits such as health insurance, ID Cards, etc. 2 We have a USO tent here at Camp Arifjan that supports the “Together Through Reading� program, as well as having phones & internet available, and distributing free calling cards. In addition there is an MWR phone facility with Defense Switching Network (DSN) telephones, and several AT&T call centers. Wireless internet is available for a fee in most of the billeting areas, but the service is somewhat slow. Internet service is available for a fee in the billeting areas. Also available on a for-fee basis from local vendors are air cards that operate on the cell phone infrastructure. However, although this service is faster, it is less dependable and much more expensive. B Soldiers 1 Facilities a All soldiers are billeted in permanent buildings. Officers & Senior Enlisted live in similar buildings. Each building has 1 large room, smaller two or more man rooms being created with the placement of lockers. Latrines are consolidated in a large section of buildings in the middle of the billeting area. The area has showers, sinks, toilets, and a large laundry room. b There is currently one DFAC in our immediate area, which serves 3 regular meals and one midnight meal for those that work third shift. There is a new DFAC that has just completed construction. c Other buildings 1 The Camp Command Cell maintains one 2person trailer as VIP quarters. In addition, rooms are generally available to be signed out for additional visitors. 2 office tents, motor pool tents


3 latrine, shower, laundry structures 2 Leisure a Morale, Welfare & Recreation (MWR) and USO provide many facilities & activities; occasional tours in Kuwait City, reading rooms, internet, video games, board games, socials, a movie theater, gym & sports facilities, etc. Of particular note is the “Together Through Reading” program; MWR supplies children’s books, the soldiers read them in front of a digital camcorder, and MWR mails it home to the Soldier’s children. This program has been very popular, particularly for the soldiers with young children. b Charlie Company/ 1207th Soldiers participate in the intramural basketball league as well as the softball league. A number of five kilometer (5K) fun runs have been held, usually on a monthly basis. 3 Post maintenance/improvement a Work orders are handled by Department of Public Works (DPW). Minor issues and emergencies are handled in a timely manner. Ongoing problems are handled as projects to make long-term improvements. b Since the Transfer Of Authority (TOA) in December, our unit has worked hard to improve our area of operations. Our Tactical Operations Center (TOC) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) have worked to streamline reporting processes and improve information flow. c The camp Force Protection Office has executed many projects (some planned by our predecessors) to make incremental improvements to security and force protection measures. They have also been instrumental in removing unwanted or unnecessary concrete barriers and other left over items, improving the overall appearance of the camp. d We have also made progress on other small projects to improve the camp; DPTMS has directed DPW to remove several unused trailers to the storage yard. S4 has initiated the turn-in of approximately 60 unserviceable A/C units, as well as many other miscellaneous items of


unused government property. Transient Billeting is working on renovating tents that are currently unused, and having others that are unusable removed. 10. Commander's comments A The most significant items not mentioned above are the inspections this organization has participated in. We have been evaluated on the Command Supply Discipline Program as well as Signal Compliance and our Non Commissioned Officer evaluation process. B To Summarize 1207th FSC participation in Operation New Dawn to date, I believe it to be successful. We have been able to execute every mission assigned in the time frame assigned. Our Soldiers are fully engaged in the mission and when opportunities arise for additional training, they are taken. We fell into a mature mission with adequate equipment and have continued to improve upon the processes of the unit we replaced. C Our performance to date is inexorably tied to our extended training both back home, and at MOB site (FT McCoy). In addition the high number of experienced Soldiers and Non Commissioned Officers, many of whom have served multiple deployments, has brought a degree of knowledge and experience unavailable to many units. These factors have contributed to our ability to operate at a high sustained operational tempo. Two additional items that should be mentioned are the support we received from our state (Rhode Island), and the recruiting program that enabled this unit to report to the mobilization station at 100% strength.


3-197th FA

Symbolism: The shield is blue to indicate the longer service of the unit as Infantry. The gold lion passant guardant is for service in the War of 1812; the white lozenge—the corps badge for the 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, during the Civil War—represents Civil War service and the fleur-de-lis, service during World War I. The chief is red for Artillery and the winged projectile indicates that it was an anti-aircraft unit.

LTC David F Baker

CSM Victor May

3-197th FA (HIMARS) is a New Hampshire Field Artillery (FA) battalion that roots in New Hampshire's first five Infantry Regiments of the Civil War, and was created by the consolidation of two other New Hampshire FA battalions during the transformation of 2007. Its principal duty is to conduct field artillery maneuvers using a rocket based projectile. This new system, called High Mobility Artillery Rocket System or HIMARS, can fire more rounds, more accurately, and with a smaller crew than their previous howitzers.


Commanded by LTC Baker, the 3rd battalion is based at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, and is composed of four line units which conduct long haul convoy escorts for several transportation battalions throughout Kuwait. Its HHC unit handles all the administrative aspects of the deployment as it pertains to each soldier's career. HHC was the only unit in the Battalion that didn't need to retrain for a different type of mission. Each section in the HHC continues to manage things much as if they were back home. About the only thing they needed to learn was a new set of phone numbers at their higher headquarters, the 197th Fires Brigade. After training at Fort McCoy, the 3-197th landed in Kuwait on 16 November and began their Replacements in Place (RIP) process with the 1-124th IN from Florida – the unit that was rotating out. The 1-124th moved into tents allowing the 3rd Battalion to move directly into their permanent barracks. The Third credits the 1-124th with a detailed training plan, and a thorough training period in the two weeks of the RIP process. The 3-197th was fortunate in this, as other battalions' RIPs did not go as smoothly. Shortly after taking on their new responsibilities from the departing 1-124th, one of Bravo Company's Convoy Escort Teams (CETs) was the target of an IED. None of the soldiers was injured, and they credited their training in knowing what to do while remaining calm. However, the Caiman CET Team 07 was extensively The first 3-197 soldiers to see enemy action damaged. As of the end of January, the Task Force 3-197th has had other enemy contact, but again, training and equipment were credited for no one sustaining any injuries.


At Camp Buehring a number of professional development opportunities are available, from educational services, to online courses, and other distance learning classes. Training events have included Combat Life Saver course, and Warrior Leader Course the prerequisite for becoming a NonCommissioned Officer (NCO = Sergeant). The USO facilities offer scheduled activities, and a game room including foosball, pool tables, ping-pong, darts, and more. A movie room, video game room, and even a "Band Room" ensure there is something for everyone. Internet and phones are readily available, as is a Starbucks Coffee, and a Subway shop. "All in all," writes CPT Michael Butler, "this is a pretty good place to live." The main mission of the Task Force (TF) 3-197th is to provide convoy escorts for long haul transportation battalions throughout Iraq. A typical mission was detailed in the February, 2011 newsletter of the 3197th by SPC Mark Braden, and CPT Brian Calhoun. Quotes and excerpts will be used in the following summary. The first part of a mission is mission allocation which is ninety six hours prior to departure. During this time they receive an intelligence (S-2) brief, covering the last two weeks in their travel area. The day before departure is for equipment checks. Everything; vehicles, weapons,


radios, must be checked for functionality. Just prior to leaving, the Convoy Escort Team (CET) leader brings together the soldiers in the convoy and gives them the mission brief. Typically, about 12 soldiers man four Caiman Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles. Each Caiman has a Truck Commander (TC) that controls the actions of (only) his Caiman. The other two members of the truck crew are the driver and the gunner. Every soldier is licensed to drive a Caiman and the driver's job is to maintain control of the vehicle at all times. The gunner sits in the turret where, with a 360 degree view, he acts as the eyes and ears of the Caiman, and communicates via radio with his own crew as well as with the other trucks. The first leg of any mission is travelling to K-Crossing, at the border between Kuwait and Iraq. Missions are primarily conducted at night, and adding to that difficulty, is the fact the Iraqi roads are often full of unmarked turns, exits, and are covered with potholes, not to mention the constant concern of enemy contact. Missions typically last 5-9 days with about 14 hours of driving each night. Once arriving at their destination, a Forward Operating Base (FOB) somewhere in Iraq, the soldiers try to enjoy whatever amenities they can at their stop over. FOBs all seem to offer the same features with slight variations such as the types of Fast Food available or the size of the local bazaar, where items of all types can be purchased by haggling down the price. When on the road, the CET operates as a tight knit group whose primary mission is to protect one another, and before they start the return trip, they say a quick prayer. After arriving back "home" at Camp Buehring – mission complete – the CET then rejoins the rotation awaiting the next mission. The tight knit group concept is enhanced by numbers of relatives serving together in the Third, from siblings, including two sets of twins, to several fathers and sons, some cousins, and even a married couple. CPT Brian


Calhoun titled his article, "Serving in the Guard A Family Affair" and it offers an interesting dimension to the concept of maintaining family ties both with families back home and by jump starting the close knit unit bonds by providing a type of template to follow. Commander's Summary The 3rd Battalion, 197th Field Artillery Regiment of the New Hampshire Army National Guard distinguished itself during combat operations while participating in the opening phases of Operation New Dawn. The Battalion deployed forward on 16 November 2010 and redeployed to home station in the United States on 17 August 2011. The Granite Steel Battalion's service was critical to the responsible draw down of troops and equipment from the Iraqi Theater of Operations and provided security for base resupply operations. From their base of operations in Udairi, Kuwait, elements of the Granite Steel Battalion conducted Common User Land Transport (CULT) convoy security missions from the Kuwaiti-Iraqi border to such diverse and distant outposts as Basra, Baghdad, Ar Ramadi, and Tikrit. The 3rd Battalion, 197th Field Artillery was organized as a task force of nearly six hundred Soldiers, comprising a Headquarters and Headquarters Company and four Convoy Security Companies. Each Convoy Security Company was further task organized into nine Convoy Escort Teams, or CETs, consisting of twelve Soldiers and four gun trucks. All Convoy Security Companies conducted operations using cross-trained crews and personnel to maximize combat power on the battlefield in order to support logistical movement operations into and out of Iraq. The battalion relied heavily on the training, experience, and professionalism of its junior Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs) and Soldiers, particularly its CET Leaders. The CET Leaders, each a Staff Sergeant, had to demonstrate the ability to make critical decisions regarding rules of engagement and escalation of force, often while operating hundreds of miles from higher


headquarters. Every Granite Steel Battalion Soldiers' performance far exceeded expectations. The Granite Steel Battalion conducted combat logistical patrols that were initiated from their base of operations in Camp Buehring, Kuwait. The Battalion conducted over one hundred and sixty combat missions totaling over 740,000 mission miles throughout Iraq. During the numerous combat missions conducted, enemy contact was common and the members of the Granite Steel Battalion were nominated for over sixty Combat Action Badges and three Purple Hearts. In December 2010, the 3rd Battalion, 197th Field Artillery was designated as the Army branch of Central Command (ARCENT) Tactical Combat Force (TCF) and ordered to maintain a mobile response force, capable of defeating a Level II threat, (a small forward operating reaction force, Military Police, etc.) anywhere within the ARCENT Area of Responsibility (AOR). For the next seven months, the Granite Steel Battalion simultaneously conducted CULT operations and equipped & trained two companies in motorized infantry tactics, techniques, and procedures. Their mission set focused on individual and collective infantry tasks with an emphasis on air mobile operations, critical site security, and urban crowd control. In March 2011, during historic uprisings in Egypt, Libya, and Yemen, the Granite Steel Battalion was called on to conduct an emergency TCF deployment exercise to support Noncombatant Evacuation Operations (NEO) in Yemen. Within 62 hours the Battalion mobilized and transported 2 fully-capable companies and associated supplies to designated departure point in preparation for air mobile deployment. These


companies remained on standby for 3 weeks until being relieved by forces from Marine branch of Central Command (MARCENT). From April-June 2011, the 1st Theater Sustainment Command (1TSC) tasked the 197 Fires Brigade and the Granite Steel Battalion with another critical non-standard mission. Hundreds of MAXX-Pro MRAPs (an upgraded version of the Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected vehicle) needed to be individually driven from Camp Arifjan to Joint Base Balad in the United States Division Center (USD-C) to set the initial conditions for the 2-1 Heavy Advise and Assist Brigade (H-AAB) to assume military operations. The comprehensive plan executed by the 3rd Battalion included a Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) team to accept vehicles at Camp Arifjan, teams of 70 Soldiers to execute convoys, and a liaison team located at Joint Base Balad to facilitate equipment turn over. In total the Battalion moved over three hundred MAXX-Pro MRAPs, identified and repaired over eighty Non Mission Capable vehicle faults, executed sixteen convoys, and drove over 163,000 vehicle miles to ensure that 2-1 H-AAB was fully mission capable on schedule.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, TF 3-197th Summary, 3-197th unit Newsletters, FM 3-100/MCWP 3-3.7.1 found on www.fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/doctrine/army/fm3-100/CH12.PDF Granite Thunder Facebook]


Headquarters & Headquarters Battery 197th FIB

Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The quadrant, an early artillery aiming device, is suggested by the four quadrants formed by the saltire. The nine stars suggested by the State flag of New Hampshire, denote the home of the organization and further represent the unit's participation in nine campaigns during the Civil War. The fleurs-de-lis denote the unit's service in Europe during World War I and II. The Luzon campaign is symbolized by the Philippine demi-sun. The colors blue, white and red denote the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The New Guinea campaign is represented by the seven-pointed star suggested by the flag of Australia, alluding to the Island's former relationship with Australia.

CPT Matthew Dupuis

1SG Jack Baker

HHB 197th Fires Brigade originated in 1978, but draws from a lineage extending back to Company E of the 2nd Infantry Regiment, mustered for the Civil War. With its home station in Manchester, New Hampshire, the HHB 197th was previously deployed in Dec 2003 – Feb 2005 in support of OIF II (Operation Iraqi Freedom 2).


Throughout the train-up and for half of the Operation New Dawn (OND) deployment, the HHB, 197th was commanded by MAJ Jeffrey Samon. Halfway through the deployment, the command changed over to the newly promoted CPT Matthew Dupuis. The HHB's deployed location was at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, along with the 372nd Signal Company where First Sergeant (1SG) Jack Baker was employed as a Contracting Officer Representative, managing the several government contracts in effect on post. According to the Deployment Manning Document, there was no position for a 1SG at the HHB Brigade. However, along with his other duties, 1SG Baker remained very active with First Sergeant business throughout the deployment. It is interesting to note that the HHB 197th FIB, was the only unit to deploy that didn't have to retrain for an alternate mission. Each section had its own part in managing the affairs of the subordinate battalions and units, and the record of the events of the deployment have previously been presented. At the beginning of the deployment, the 197th Public Affairs Officer created a facebook page that tracked the entire deployment of the 197th FIB. What follows is a photo gallery of the HHB both on the job and off, compliments of the public affairs office, and the Granite Thunder facebook page: (http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Granite-Thunder/109224655804175?sk=wall)

Prior to departing Fort McCoy, the HHB had a formal group photo taken


Colonel Peter Corey, commander of the 197th FIB, and brigade Command Sergeant Major Thomas Considine at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait

Throughout Kuwait this past week, the 197th Fires Brigade held formations to award soldiers their Army Combat Patch, formally known as the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia--Former Wartime Service, or SSI-FWS. It signifies that a soldier has participated in combat operations in a hostile environment. It is worn on the right shoulder of the uniform and awarded to soldiers who are deployed in combat zones for 30 days or more. For some soldiers, it was their first. For others it was their second or third, and for one Rhode Island soldier, Sgt. Henry Joly, his fifth. Photos by 197th FIB Public Affairs.


It started out as a friendly bet between the brigade chaplain and a group of majors who had mustache envy. If they all could grow one in, than the chaplain would shave his off - something he hadn't done in about 20 years. Needless to say the chaplain is still sporting his whiskers, but that didn't stop "flavor saver" fever from spreading to other soldiers in the brigade. Photos by Sgt. Brian Gordon, 197th FIB PA, (who has had a mustache since he was 7 years old.)


From front left, Sgt. Katie Hannigan of Manchester, Staff Sgt. Jamie Morse of Goffstown, Sgt 1st Class Jose Durango of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Staff Sgt. Joe Nault, Chief Warrant Officer Charlie Morgan of Rye, and Sgt Rachel Glover of Lincoln. The soldiers, part of headquarters, 197th FIB, play a round of bingo at Camp Arifjan.

A massive sand storm rolls into Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, at about 6 p.m. March 25. A few days later, a Kuwaiti who works on Camp Arifjan mentioned that he had never seen a sand storm of this magnitude in his life. It shut down Kuwait City. The sand crept into AC vents and loose fittings around windows and doors. No house or car was immune, the man said.


197th FIB soldiers deployed to Kuwait gather after an intrasquad hurling match at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, July 17. Back row, from left: Capt. Adam Burritt; Staff Sgt. Michael Ricard; Spc. Tim McMahon; Capt. Dave Devoy; 1st. Lt. Eric Moore and Staff Sgt. Jeremy Chaisson. Front row, from left: Spc. James Berry; Maj. Michael Moranti; Sgt 1st Class Eddie Clements; Spc. Brandon Dodge; Sgt. Jason Burpee and Sgt Jon Demers. They are part of the Barley House Wolves, a N.H. hurling team that competes throughout New England.

Soldiers from Headquarters, 197th FIB, participated in several 5K runs at Camp Arifjan. However, one of their number, who never missed a 5K, became the recipient of this prank. Taking advantage of his brief absence his fellow unit members created a fake "Beat the Heat" 5K on March 27 as temperatures reached 92 degrees Fahrenheit. They spared no expense having fake shirts made up and even faking some pictures of them running. Photos by Maj. Greg Heilshorn, 197th FIB PA.


Capt. Matthew Dupuis, commander of HHB, 197th FIB, shakes hands with 1st Lt. Jason Longval during his promotion ceremony at Camp Arifjan, May 25. Longval, a native of Concord, N.H., is the resource manager for the brigade’s S4. Sgt. Steven Heffernan holds the guidon as the promotion order is read by Chief Warrant Officer Paul Montminy. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Neal Mitchell, 197th FIB PA.

Nurse outranks Doctor: Two members of the HHB Medical Section, Major James Davis M.D., and Lieutenant Colonel Richard Oberman pose on the event of LTC Oberman's promotion


A flag lowering ceremony June 14 at Camp Arifjan marked the end of the British mission in Kuwait. Since 2005, the Operation Support Detachment in Zone 6 has served as a rest and relaxation facility for British troops as well as a logistics office. SGT Brian Gordon of the 197th Public Affairs Office, conducts an interview with the British Commander about their mission. Photos by CW2 Tom Graham, 197th FIB Historian.


Soldiers of HHB, 197th FIB stand at attention before receiving the Army Commendation Medal from Capt. Matthew Dupuis, commander of HHB, for meritorious service in support of Operation New Dawn during a ceremony at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, July 21. From left: Master Sgt. Robert Reeves; Sgt. 1st Class Jon Cilley; Staff Sgt. Liana Nguyen; Sgt. 1st Class Neal Mitchell and Sgt. Katie Hannigan.


Col. Peter Corey, commander of the 197th FIB, NHARNG, and Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Considine lower the New Hampshire state flag Aug. 20 at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait signifying the completion the brigade's mission in support of Operation New Dawn. Photo by Staff Sgt. Lynette Hoke, 1/34th BCT PA.


LTC Michael Pelletier opted for the comfort of sheets as he made up his cot for his last night in theater. The next day, most of the 197th HHB would be on their way back to the states. After a week of out-processing, they would be reunited with family and friends back in New Hampshire. The th deployment of the 197 FIB was finally at an end.


1-201st FA

Symbolism: The chief is blue for Infantry. The two lions represent the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. The saltire counterchanged denotes Civil War service in both the Confederate and Federal armies. The snake alludes to Mexican War service. The Roman sword is indicative of Spanish War service and the fleur-de-lis refers to service in France during World War I

LTC Clay A Coatney

CSM Bobby Cales

1-201st FA is a West Virginia Field Artilery Battalion which fires 155 millimeter self-propelled Howitzers called "Paladins." Commanded by LTC Coatney, the 1-201st traces its roots back to 1735 and was one of the original seven companies that formed the Continental Army in 1775. The 1-201st is located in Camp Buehring, Kuwait, and its non-traditional responsibilities are running a Camp Command Cell, and providing Force Protection.


The HHB, 1-201st operates the Camp Buehring Command Cell with the typical run down of responsibilities: Billeting, Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Force Protection, Post Mail Room, Post Arms Room, Contracting Office, Motor Pool, etc. Alpha Company provides an Area Reaction Force (ARF) for Northern Kuwait, as well as Vehicle search Vehicle search using using mirror mirror to inspect inspect underneath underneath a QRF for Camps Buehring and Virginia. Bravo Company has been split up into platoons, each of which operates in a different area. One platoon is located at the Kuwaiti Naval Base and operates as the Security Forces – South (SECFOR-S). Another platoon acts as the QRF for Camp Ali Al Salem (also referred to as the LSA – Life Support Area, which is the hub for anyone coming into, or leaving theater). A third platoon supports logistical operations at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan Charlie Company provides the security forces, including QRF, for Khabari Crossing (K-Crossing, the check point for the only highway from Kuwait into Iraq). It also escorts vehicle recovery teams into Southern Iraq. As this was a non-traditional mission, the battalion was reorganized upon arrival at Fort McCoy, and two months of training ensued, culminating in the full scale Mission Rehearsal Exercise (MRE), which replicated the future mission in Kuwait. Upon arrival in Kuwait, the 1-201st completed a Relief in Place (RIP) with their predecessor unit as did the other battalions. After taking charge, the unit settled into a battle rhythm (routine). Some of the units run 24 hours,


such as the ARF and QRF, K-Crossing personnel, and the Camp Command Cell EOC office. Other offices in the CCC operate 12 hours per day, with Billeting on call 24 hours. Soldiers are scheduled for one rest day per week, but Senior Enlisted and Officers can only catch breaks as time permits. Cross training and schedule changes were required when the leave cycle began.

Camp Command Cell on flag detail

In addition to the original mission, FRAGO's dictated the development of the QRF for the Life Support Area, as well as to provide additional troops for the SECFOR-S mission. Other missions included to provide 14 soldiers (to join soldiers from sister battalions) for a logistical support mission in Afghanistan from mid January to mid March. Closer to home, a work detail was detached to Camp Arifjan to work in the Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO) in December and January. This office, which receives un-needed supplies from military units, had experienced a backlog and needed workers to help catalog materiel. The 197th FIB was tasked with supporting the 50-20 Celebration in which Kuwaitis celebrated the 50th anniversary of independence from Britain and the 20th anniversary of liberation from Iraq. All of the battalions took part in various ways, and the 1-201st was no exception. Solders were able to participate in a major world event and were treated like celebrities by the Kuwaiti population that attended the parade. They met soldiers from many of the Coalition Countries that participated in Operation Desert Storm in 1990-1991.


A focus on training is high on the list of "musts" and the 201st conducts a monthly Theater Ballistic Missile Exercise, simulating an incoming missile from Iran. Other training includes Weapons Qualification, and Combat Lifesaving Course, while Safety awareness has included training on Safe Driving, and avoiding sports related injuries. They report sports injuries as being a major contributor to "sick call" complaints. The equipment list is also varied ranging from up-armored HMMWVs for Force Protection units like the ARFs and QRFs, to some five-ton trucks, to a small fleet of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles for travel in Iraq. Non Tactical Vehicles (NTVs) are civilian trucks used to shuttle personnel to camps and work sites. Administrative equipment includes computers, printers, and copiers, but also, an Army Battle Command System (ABCS) to display and update tactical information. A wide range of soldier support opportunities are available through the USO and MWR facilities. These include road races of 5 K, 10 K, and both a half and full marathons, "tours in Kuwait City, reading rooms, internet, [phone service with free calling cards,] video games, board games, socials, a movie


theater, gym a& sports facilities, etc." The "Together through Reading" program allows soldiers to video themselves reading a book aloud, whereupon it is mailed home to be viewed by their young child. 201st Soldiers participated in the intramural basketball, softball and now volleyball leagues. A softball team from A CO TF 201 was runner up in the Camp Buehring league and competed in the Kuwait wide tournament at Camp Arifjan. Camp Buehring also stood up a baseball team. The Camp Buehring Scorpions played in 4 games winning 2 of them. We have also pitched in money to buy ourselves some uniforms and equipment. This picture shows our current team, with our new uniforms! LTC Coatney believes the success of the 201st rests on a couple of things. First, that they fell in on a mature mission which was adequately equipped, but secondly, that their training pace for the years between deployments – conducting 24 hour operations at every opportunity – resulted in no great adjustment here in theater, allowing them to excel in every mission they have been assigned.

Maj. Gen. James A. Hoyer the Adjutant General of the st West Virginia National West Virginia National Guard Guard visits visits the 1-201 1 201


Commander's Summary TF 1-201 provides command and control of all Northern Security Force elements (SECFOR-N); Quick Response Force's (QRFs) at Camp Virginia, Camp Buehring, security for the Khabari Crossing; and an Area Reaction Force (ARF) at Camp Buehring in support of the Defense Cooperation Agreement with the State of Kuwait, in order to enhance regional security and stability. Additionally, TF 1-201 has received Fragmentary Orders (FRAGOs) ordering support of additional mission requirements for SECFOR-S, establish a QRF at Army LIfe Support Area (ALSA), provide MEDICs to support one of our sister Battalions (3rd Battalion 197th Field Artillery), the Theater Reserve mission of providing teams to temporarily support logistics efforts in Afghanistan, and support the Defense Reutilization Management Office (DRMO) at Camp Virginia. TF 1-201 FA has taken an aggressive stance on improving the quality of life at Camp Buehring. Camp Buehring command has constantly improved the life support systems and quality of life by greatly enhancing security across camp with the installation of new Entry Controlled Point Blast Towers and 13 perimeter towers, upgraded and painted Casualty Collection Points, upgraded bunkers and standoff distances across the entire camp, and increased restrictions of vehicle access. A second Internet provider was established to increase Soldier morale and enable better communication with family and friends. Constant interaction from the unit with the USO and MWR has ensured a better quality of life for Soldiers in the variety of events made available on post. Since November 2010, over 50,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Camp Buehring boasts over 700 murals, the most Marines have been found found on any of 0 the Northern camps. As the command cell, cell, the the 201 201 st oversees the creation of command these these murals murals and historical historical legacies. legacies.


housed, trained and deployed or re-deployed from Camp Buehring, the largest Coalition and Joint Reception, Staging, Onward movement and Integration (CJRSOI) Camp in Kuwait. TF 1-201 FA was responsible for the reception, staging, onward movement, and integration (RSOI) for all units deploying or redeploying in support of Operation New Dawn (OND) and multiple units in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). Camp Buehring support personnel have pushed a total of 4 Brigade Combat teams through RSOI, plus the Corps Separates (additional units, not part of a brigade) each day, here at Camp Buehring. Included in the units TF 1-201 FA has supported are: the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), the 13th MEU, 1st Brigade Combat Team / 1st Combat Division (1st BCT/1st CD), 2nd BCT/1st CD, 2nd BCT/82nd Airborne (AB), 4th BCT/1st AD (Armored Division), 36th Infantry Division (ID), 149th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade (MEB), 36th Engineer Brigade (ENG BDE), 15th Engineer Battalion (ENG BN), 219th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade (BFSB), and the 6-17th Cavalry (CAV), naming the largest. The Camp Command has maintained a total bed-down-maximum capacity: Transient = Approximately 17,000, capable of increasing to 20,000; Permanent Party (Tenant) = 3,000, currently staffed by 2,500 permanent party personnel; and supported by 7 contract vendors and their supporting sub contractors, (21 separate contracts), for an additional 9,000 contract personnel on camp daily. Camp Buehring has the capability for Reception, Staging, Onward movement and Integration of both North and South bound units. The Base Support Battalion-North (BSB-N)/Camp Buehring Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is a multi-agency command, control, and coordination entity that provides support and coordination to the on-scene responders in order to effectively respond to an event, save life, protect resources/personnel, provide security, and restore good order. The BSB-N EOC has conducted coordination and reporting of over 430 incidents to date including 52 Medical Evacuations MEDEVAC training exercise with Kuwaiti Kuwaiti Border Border Patrol Patrol


(MEDEVACs), 11 suspicious activity reports, 7 vehicle accidents, 6 found Unexploded Ordnance (UXOs), and 2 suspected Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). Quick Reaction Force (QRF) and Area Reaction Force (ARF) were conducted by Alpha Company TF 1-201 FA at Camp Buehring, and the QRF team located at Camp Virginia. The mission included four Area Reaction Force (ARF) squads to support Security Forces-North (SECFORN). Each QRF and ARF was required to maintain a READY CONDITION 2 or 3 status at all times which is 15 and 30 minutes response time respectively. ARF was tasked with providing the security of forces in northern Kuwait by conducting presence patrols, and maintaining host nation relations under the Defense Cooperation Agreement (DCA). Both the QRF and ARF had ten established patrols, completing 474 missions covering 111,330 miles. The QRF responded to 35 emergencies. Each ARF conducted UXO (unexploded ordinance) patrols at all camps on all patrol routes assisting the local Bedouins in locating UXO. Camp Virginia Quick Reaction Force was responsible maintaining the safety of all Permanent Party and Transient personnel on Camp Virginia, Kuwait. This consisted of a minimum 7 daily patrols which included Outer Perimeter, Inner Perimeter, and Crime Rape Assault Prevention Patrols, and any incident or emergency in the 5 kilometers surrounding the Area of Responsibility (AOR). A Company monitored and tracked the locations of all civilian and livestock herder camps passing through the AOR, enforcing a minimum 2 kilometer standoff distance from all military installations. Additional missions included Random AntiTerrorism Measures as assigned, training and implementation of QRF elements stationed at Life Support Area adjacent to Ali Al Salem


Air Base, and providing Event Security during MWR functions. Alpha Company provided maintenance support and a M109A6 Self Propelled Howitzer crew for the 2011 50/20 Kuwait Independence-Liberation celebration parade in Kuwait City. The Camp Buehring ARF conducted weekly host nation meetings with the 25th Brigade Kuwait Commandos providing maintenance expertise, Host Nation Fire and EMS personnel to establish a cultural exchange building an even better relationship.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Monthly Commander's Historical Up-dates, Commander's Summary]


3643rd BSB

Symbolism: The chevron denotes support, the mission of the unit. The stars signify America’s original 13 colonies. The larger star represents New Hampshire which became the ninth state to enter the Union in 1788 and is the location of the Battalion. The following images compose the Battalion – the crossed cannons suggest New Hampshire’s history as a Field Artillery state; the wheel alludes to the transportation capabilities; the black disc illustrates a bomb shell and the 3643d Ordnance Company and the unit from which the Battalion originated.

LTC James Challender

CSM Jerry Rouleau

3643rd Brigade Support Battalion (BSB) is New Hampshire's second battalion to accompany the 197th FIB in this deployment. Commanded by LTC Challender, its normal mission is to provide a full spectrum of sustainment support to the 197th FIB through its Headquarters and Headquarters Company(HHC), Alpha Company (A Co) which has a water, fuel and distribution mission, Bravo Company (B Co) which conducts Maintenance, and its 744th Forward Support Company (FSC).


Although the 3643rd trained and prepared as a battalion, upon arriving at Fort McCoy, it was decided that, due to the non-standard mission, that the 3643rd would be split into multiple units to backfill the many vacant slots across the brigade. Thus, the deployed structure and function of the 3643rd separated the Headquarters from the rest of the companies, assigning it to run the Camp Command Cell (CCC) at the Army Life Support Area (ALSA) at Camp Ali-Al-Salem. The remaining companies, A, B, and 744th were assigned to Camp Buehring to provide Security Forces (SECFOR) for New Hampshire's 3-197th. Additionally, individual soldiers were assigned to locations such as Camp Arifjan, Camp Buehring, and Camp Virginia. The 3643rd reports to two different higher Headquarters; administratively it is the 197th FIB, while operationally, it reports to Area Support Group Kuwait (ASG-KU). This report confines itself to the HHC's Camp Command Cell role at the Army Life Support Area (ALSA), located in the Northwest corner of the Kuwaiti Airbase at Camp Ali-Al-Salem. The terrain is similar to other U.S. Camps within Kuwait, though with this distinction – that due to the exclusion zone around the airfield, there are no villages or Bedouin encampments, leaving the area around the camp susceptible to large sand drifts from the constant wind and intermittent dust storms. Of particular note was the massive sand storm that affected all of Kuwiat, on 25 March. This storm which lasted from 1630 to 2200, turned the sky from daylight to "pitch black" in seconds. Visibility was near zero, and Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) masks were used to keep the dust out of soldiers' lungs.


- -

,

The original mission of providing a full spectrum of sustainment activities to transients and permanent party, was expanded with the squeezing in of 200 additional permanent party members, impacting billeting and logistics. LTC Challender reports everyone stepping up to the plate despite the, "very little formal training available for command cell personnel." His report echoes those from other commanders as well, that the Fort McCoy scenarios had, "no depth and little relevance to what has occurred on camp." The LSA portion of the airbase acts as the Gateway for all troops coming into or leaving the Middle East Theater. As such, one of LTC Challender's major achievements is the completion of a new Contingency Operations and Information Center (COIC) to act as the hub for all command and control of Theater Gateway operations, including all Rest and Relaxation (R & R) trips for soldiers. Significant events include two civilian deaths from heart attack, visits from Manchester (NH) radio and newspaper reporters, and seeing their one millionth passenger pass through their Theater Gateway. Another incident with a Kuwaiti soldier was resolved through direct dialog between LTC Challender and the Ali-Al Salem Commander. On camps throughout Kuwait, Latrine units are primarily stand-alone units that must be pumped out several times a day, and trucked to a Kuwaiti Waste water treatment plant. In December, the Kuwaiti ministry of water, prohibited trucks from dumping, and camps were forced to develop a


"Battle Drill" or a set of procedures to handle the full latrines. The LSA was particularly impacted due to their high population density per latrine, and the CCC implemented the creative acronym "Operation PLOP" (Portajohn, Latrine Overflow Procedures) to stem the tide of overflowing latrines, which was highly successful for the time it was in service. As a CCC, the configuration deviated slightly by assigning the different sections to the traditional Staff sections; S-1 Administration, included Public Affairs, mail, and R & R S-2 Intelligence, included Force Protection issues S-3 Operations, included the Emergency Operations Center, developing SOPs and battle drills and coordinating with other units in a joint environment S-4 Logistics, included, vehicles, salvage, and billeting S-6 Communications (incorporates all aspects of computers, phones, radios, etc) S-8 Finance & Contracts, included contracts and work orders The 3643rd deployed to Fort McCoy with a typical company arrangement with a company commander and First Sergeant. However in Kuwait they morphed into a battalion level staff section, causing confusion among senior Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs – sergeants) and junior officers due to the differences in how things run at a company level versus at a battalion staff level. LTC Challender, in hindsight, proposes the lesson learned that they should have configured themselves into a battalion staff concept upon deploying to Fort McCoy. Morale, at the mid-point of deployment, is a bit on the low side, attributable by LTC Challender to be hitting a middeployment wall, but to some degree, stemming from the unresolved issues of the company to battalion reconfiguration, based on responses to questionnaires.


It is reportedly expected to rise as they will soon be within the 100 day lightat-the-end-of-the-tunnel time frame, signifying the end is near. Trainings on the ASLA include a variety of classes for individuals, groups, or whole sections (Combat Lifesaver, Hazardous Waste Operations, complacency, sports injuries, etc.). The monthly Theater Ballistic Missile Exercise (TBMX), included variations such as Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Device (VBIED), Mass Casualty (MASCAL). Participation in these exercises is fairly low, with some even commenting, "It's only a drill." Mission Essential Equipment includes the standard fare of NonTactical Vehicles (NTV's), SUVs and ATVs, a bus and some heavy equipment, and weapons such as M4 carbines and M9 pistols. However, most of the business of the CCC is conducted using a computer, a cell phone, and a good air conditioner. Soldiers live in either tents or containerized housing with 1-2 roommates, cable TV, internet and refrigerator. Contact with families is maintained through email, and skype, as well as standard postal mail. Soldiers also have a number of facilities on post for recreation, including gym tents, and recreation tents hosting pool tables, ping-pong tables, movies and gaming suites. The Morale Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) section promotes weekly tours to Kuwait City, Karaoke, Bingo, Texas Hold'em tournaments, as well as 5K runs, and softball games. Of particular interest is the Kuwaiti breakfast attended by CCC soldiers and Kuwaiti nationals.


Commander's Summary The 3643rd fell into a mature mission though they continued to improve the conditions of the ALSA through over 25 improvement projects, involving $500,000 worth of equipment and materials and using mostly CCC personnel. Between the requirements of the mission, and the opportunity for self-improvement (online courses), there are no idle hands or minds. However, the flexibility of this unit, as it reacted to the significant tears in its fabric, from being split up, to making the change to battalion configuration, to responding to an environmental emergency, all while executing every mission assigned to it, should be a source of pride to every member of the unit, wherever they might be serving. Morale is rising as each day passes. Everyone is focused on wrapping up all open projects and preparing the required documents and Standard Operating Procedures for their replacements. Redeployment planning has begun in earnest. We are officially in the last 60 days of deployment. This is typically one of the most dangerous periods of a deployment as soldiers are tired, complacency sets in and thoughts start turning to home. My #1 concern is keeping soldiers focused and safe. . . [while] prepping for our replacements. It is impossible to sum up our most significant achievement as one event. Our most significant achievement was taking a diverse group of individuals from multiple commands, with minimal deployment experience and zero camp operations experience and having them become an energetic, take no prisoners, extremely adaptable organization ASLA Stage - Before Before


capable of handling the most difficult and unpredictable events a camp could encounter. Of particular note is that the ALSA was able to do more with less. With the Iraq draw down, lack of Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) resourcing and the general mindset that the ALSA was closing, we were able to make significant And After – at a Memorial Day Service operational, force protection and quality of life improvements throughout the camp. We followed two premises: 1) It is better to ask forgiveness than for permission and 2) The only help we were going to get was from ourselves. The vast majority of our projects were completed using volunteers from within the command cell and materials that we scrounged from the DRMO, within the camp and from other camps. The most significant achievement is that the ALSA has been drastically improved by our presence.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Monthly Commander's Historical Up-dates, Commander's Summary]


BSB North

The design is based on the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia of US Army Central (formerly United States Third Army). The fleur-de-lis in base alludes to the initial activation of the Headquarters, Third Army, at Ligny-en-Barrois, France, 15 November 1918. The five stars refer to the five campaigns Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe, World War II in which the Third United States Army participated. The motto reflects the Third Army’s constant readiness.

LTC Martin D. Snider

SGM Woodrow Ishman Jr.

Base Support Battalion – North (BSB-N) is a unique type of "unit." It resides on Camp Buehring and has oversight over the three Northern camps, Buehring, Virginia, and the ALSA (Army Life Support Area), as well as the lone military access point into Iraq – Khabari Crossing. Initially commanded by LTC Miller, 11 July saw the change of command with incoming commander, LTC Martin (Dale) Snider. The unique mission of BSB-N requires some introduction, as follows:


The U.S. military divides the world into administrative sections called commands – NORTHCOM, AFRICOM, CENTCOM, etc. CENTCOM (Central Command) is the mid east, and the Army branch under CENTCOM is called ARCENT or Army Central Command. Subordinate to ARCENT, are two branches of the Army with different missions: Area Support Group – Kuwait (ASG-KU), is the "property owner" for American bases in Kuwait. It manages all permanent aspects of the camps, from buildings to infrastructure, and resides in Zone 1 of Camp Arifjan. First Theater Sustainment Command (1st TSC), is the operational and logistical arm of ARCENT. It deals with Army operations and all supplies and equipment ("movable things"). It is also headquartered at Camp Arifjan, in Zone 6. The Camp Command Cells of the different units, for example, work under ASG-KU as it manages the Camp's property and infrastructure. Consequently, all building permits, dig permits, moving of structures such as latrine trailers, etc., must go from the Projects section of the CCC to the ASG-KU level for permission. Based on the temporary status of the camps, the answer to many of these building requests is "No." In fact, this has been cited as the biggest impediment to accomplishing soldier quality of life projects in Zone 6 of Camp Arifjan. Because of the distance between Arifjan, and the Northern Camps, the Base Support Battalion – North (BSB-N) was activated in 2005, and resides at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. It serves Camps Buehring, and Virginia, as well as the Khabari Crossing (KCrossing). It is made up of Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel, and currently includes 16 soldiers from New Hampshire's 197th FIB. BSB-N acts as a branch office, so to speak for the ASG-KU, and has the


responsibility and authority to grant, or turn down building permits, dig requests, etc. Commanded by LTC Rollin Miller at the 197th's arrival, LTC Martin Snider assumed command on 11 July. Together, the 19 soldiers and 15 DA civilians are assigned to the U.S. Army Central Command, and manage the same offices as their Camp Arifjan Headquarters. These include: Directorate of Public Works (DPW-N) is responsible for property maintenance, repair, and minor construction in all Northern camps. Engineering Operations direct troop construction programs Engineering Plans and Services create master plans for major construction Building and Grounds take care of maintenance, and base improvement Utilities deals with the electrical utility plants, solid waste collection and disposal, etc. Centralized Management handles all housing issues Environmental manages natural and cultural resources Real Property Maintenance Supply Support responsibilities include DPW equipment, as well as evaluation of contractor performance Public Works Resources Management deal with financial planning, and bugeting Dig Permits authorize any digging through more than 6 inches of soil Directorate of Logistics (DOL-N) is responsible for all matters pertaining to sustainment. Its offices include: Materiel Maintenance Branch (MMB) staffed by Contracting Officer Representatives who provide contract oversight for field maintenance Supply & Services Branch (S & S) provides contract oversight for supplies as well as laundry services, feeding, bottled water, ice, etc.


BSB-N Sustainment Office (S-4) manage organizational equipment, deals with procurement and manages the Government Purchase (credit) Card (GPC). The U.S. Forces at the Khabari Crossing provide "life support" and security for units transitioning to and from Iraq. They must maintain relationships with Kuwaiti Border Security and Customs and Immigration personnel, to enhance security at KCrossing. Communications with Host Nation personnel is important, both in addressing cultural differences and Bunker improvement at K-Crossing K Crossing I sensitivities, and ensuring explicit understanding by Host Nation Forces of current operations, roles and responsibilities. Host Nation Forces responsibilities include; Border Security, providing overall security for host nation forces, Kuwaiti Immigration who validate all required documents for commercial vehicles to enter and leave Kuwait. Kuwaiti customs regulates all goods and materials going through KCrossing. Plans for the U.S. troop drawdown, have involved meetings with United States Forces and Iraq to discuss locations for a new Headquarters facility and to help shape the focus of operations in preparation for the approximately 55,000 service members who will pass through K-Crossing. These meetings and their results constitute the BSBNorth's significant achievement of their deployment.


Amenities at Camp Buehring include professional development opportunities, from educational services, to online courses, and other distance learning classes. The USO facilities offer scheduled activities, and a game room including foosball, pool tables, pingpong, darts, and more. A movie room, video game room, and even a "Band Room" ensure there is something for everyone. Internet and phones are readily available, as is a Starbucks Coffee, and a Subway shop.

Commander's Summary Base Support Battalion - North (BSB-N) Kuwait implements Area Support Group-Kuwait (ASG-KU) initiatives in support of the Defense Cooperation Agreement (DCA) with the State of Kuwait, to enhance regional security and stability; secures and operates safe and sustainable installations within the North Kuwait Area of Responsibility (AOR), in support of ASG-KU Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (RSOI) responsibilities. BSBNorth operates within an extremely diverse mission set coupled with varying degrees of Command and Control relationships. It is the single ASG-KU point of


contact for the Northern Area of Responsibility in support of U.S. Army Central Command (USARCENT). BSB-N serves as the long term continuity between National Guard Rotations, reach back contracts and sole Northern entity for the Defense Cooperation Agreement. The key missions that BSB-N was tasked with and accomplished were the arrival of United States Forces -Iraq rotations in support of 11-01 Requirements; the implementation of the Redeployment/Redistribution Property Assistance Team (RPAT) at Camp Virginia, and Camp Closure Plans in support of Operation NEW DAWN. Force Protection: In order to prioritize resources and increase the sharing of best practices, the synchronization of all four of the Northern Kuwait installations’ Force Protection Programs took place for the first time during this deployment. A complete re-management and re-organization of the ASG-KU SIPR (SIPR = classified or secret) Force Protection SharePoint site allowed for a streamlined and logical flow of information, making it easier for the ASG-KU Antiterrorism community to share documents. The creation of a standoff improved over 20 separate projects, without the purchase of additional barriers by means of redistributing available barriers from the entire ASGKU AOR. Monthly vehicle search exercises were delegated to the lowest level in order to increase ownership of security operations by each installation Force Protection Officer (FPO). Over 60 successful night and day exercises took place and improvements in SOPs (standard operating procedures) and plans came as a result from lessons learned from each exercise. The BSB-N Force Protection Officer assisted each installation FPO in creating higher headquarter solutions for reoccurring After Action Reports (AARs), to include drafting an ARCENT FRAGO (a Fragmentary Order is an additional order or requirement that gives more information than an initial Operations Order upon which it is based) which issued specific tasks to each tenant unit to support the Antiterrorism and Emergency Management Programs


KHABARI CROSSING: Base Support Battalion-North (BSB-N) is responsible for the Coalition Border Crossing between Kuwait and Iraq called Khabari Crossing (KCrossing or KX). The KX was established in 2007 as the sole Border Crossing in Kuwait for Coalition Forces conducting ground movements to and from Iraq. Prior to 2007, Coalition Forces were crossing into Iraq through the Abdaly Border Crossing in Northern Kuwait. In 2005 the State of Kuwait requested that Coalition Forces conduct ground movement operations at separate crossing away from the one used by their citizens and commercial transportation. In 2007 the KX was established as a Joint Operating Base between U.S. Forces and Kuwait Ministry of Interior Forces (KMOI) with the joint mission of overseeing ground movement for Coalition Forces entering to and from Iraq. BSB-N was the lead element in that coordination process. BSB-N's overall mission at the KX is to oversee the quality of life support, movement control and security for units transitioning to and from Iraq. BSB Units ensure a safe and secure environment at KX in order to allow the freedom of movement by U.S. and Coalition Forces. BSB-N personnel continually build relationships between Kuwaiti Border Security, Customs and Immigration personnel to enhance security and stability at KX. Key task for BSB-N at KX: 1). Ensure camp is postured to provide quality life support to units moving into and from Iraq. 2). Provide Force Protection for Camp, utilizing QRF (Quick Reaction Force) assets to maintain a safe and secure environment.


3). Provide Movement Control to oversee units transitioning to and from Iraq in support of Operation NEW DAWN. 4). Maintaining levels of personnel, material, consumables, and facilities to sustain the planned activities for KX. In 2010, BSB-N executed multiple camp infrastructure projects to increase the installation footprint to assist with the first OIF draw down unit (4/2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team or SBCT) and to prep for future retrograde of U.S. Forces. BSB-N has built 24 processing booths for Kuwaiti Immigration and Customs personnel.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, RPAT Blurb, misc. emails, MUC summary]


CCC Arifjan Zone 6 (372nd Signal Co)

Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The quadrant, an early artillery aiming device, is suggested by the four quadrants formed by the saltire. The nine stars suggested by the State flag of New Hampshire, denote the home of the organization and further represent the unit's participation in nine campaigns during the Civil War. The fleurs-de-lis denote the unit's service in Europe during World War I and II. The Luzon campaign is symbolized by the Philippine demi-sun. The colors blue, white and red denote the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The New Guinea campaign is represented by the seven-pointed star suggested by the flag of Australia, alluding to the Island's former relationship with Australia.

LTC Nicolas Adler

CSM Stanton Noyes

As a unit, the 372nd Signal Company from Manchester, NH falls under the 197th Fires Brigade (197th FiB). Its primary role is that of facilitating the communication between the 197th Brigade and its subordinate units as well as with its higher headquarters. With the deployment of the 197th FIB, the


Signal Company was mobilized and many of its members filled needed vacancies within the Brigade. The remaining members became the Camp Command Cell (CCC) Arifjan Zone 6, and the unique positions within a CCC were populated by soldiers from other units throughout the state. Additionally, a Camp Command Cell, though small, is a battalion level element with a Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) commanding, and therefore needs its own Unit Identification Code (UIC) in order to "conduct business." The Signal Company UIC was thus designated for use by the Zone 6 Camp Command Cell. The 372nd turned CCC is administratively assigned to the 197th FIB, while operationally, it provides direct support to the Area Support Group – Kuwait (ASG-KU). A Camp Command Cell is sometimes referred to as a Mayor Cell, in that it is the Customer Service Center for their area of responsibility. It resembles the town offices of a small town, with responsibilities that include electrical, water and sewage, safety, billeting, maintenance, Contacting Officer Representative, communications, etc. Some sections, such as Personnel and Logistics, work within their Military Occupational Specialties (MOS), while most other sections had to learn their responsibilities through onthe-job-training. The CCC Arifjan Zone 6 arrived in Kuwait on 18 November, 2010, and went through the Transfer of authority (TOA) ceremony on 6 December whereby they took over authority from their predecessors.


In January, 2011, the 197th FIB was tasked to send logistics specialists to Afghanistan to help locate and validate U.S. Army equipment hand receipts for items loaned to Afghanistan for their own fight against terrorism. This group included SSG Lambert – the Environmental Officer from the CCC. His absence was a factor in an internal personnel shift to help cover his vacancy. Although he returned in early March to pick up his responsibilities at the CCC, the Afghanistan mission continues for other members of the SSG Lambert Lambert in n Afghanistan Afghanistan 197th FIB. February, 2011 saw the country of Kuwait put on a 50/20 celebration (50 year anniversary of independence from Britain, and 20 year anniversary of liberation from Iraq). This event was supported by several 197th FIB units, but only affected the Arifjan CCC by the addition about 400 personnel to our transient population. Two significant issues also occurred between December, 2010 and February, 2011 – which affected all the camps in Kuwait. LTC Adler reports the February transition from one major maintenance contractor, to another to have had the most significant impact on Zone 6. Essentially there was no continuity training between the outgoing contractor and the incoming, and only in some cases were individuals hired over to positions within the new company. This poorly managed hand-off caused some Tactical Operations Centers' generators to run critically low on fuel, and other generator light sets to run completely out and go dark. This resulted in soldiers of the CCC having to ride-along with the new contractors to show them the new re-fueling routes. It also resulted in mandatory soldier training classes (fire warden, etc.) being cancelled for a couple of months before being phased back in.


The second issue affecting all the camps in Kuwait began in December and was put on hold for 30 days, resurfacing again at the end of January. Because of the temporary status of the American Camps in Kuwait, there is very little infrastructure for sewage, requiring most camps to rely on various sizes and styles of portable facilities with holding tanks for the waste (anywhere from a somewhat traditional "porta-potty" to trailer sized bathroom units). An Army contract provides for these waste holding tanks to be pumped out and brought to the Kuwaiti waste water treatment plant to be dumped. The issue began when the Kuwaiti Ministry of the Interior denying the black water trucks from dumping their latrine waste at the wastewater plant due to high levels of industrial waste, resulting in a back up and overflow of some latrine units throughout Kuwait. In Zone 6, a "battle drill" was developed in which soldiers were to make use of only those facilities on the sewage line. The battle drill was able to remain on the shelf, as a resolution was reached which allowed trucks to dump into lift stations in Camp Arifjan (lift stations are large underground cement reservoirs with pumps that push sewage through large pipes to the water treatment plants). The waste trucks from the other Camps also came into Arifjan to empty their sewage. Of special note, was the huge sandstorm on 25 March. It was the reportedly the biggest in 70 years. It was dark within minutes of sweeping over Arifjan, and forced dust masks and goggles onto anyone having to be outside. It shut down the Dining Facility (DFAC), and infected every building with varying layers of dust, depending on how tight the structure was. It took a full day to clean up, and parts of several more days to finish the job. Safety is a huge issue on Zone 6, and as such, generator lights have been placed strategically to provide a safe environment throughout the night,


while a Roving overnight Patrol identified by their reflective vests, circulate throughout the camp to provide a presence. Prior to the arrival of the 197th, a violent assault took place, and during the tenure of the CCC, there have been incidents of voyeurism on females in shower units. These incidents highlighted the need for increased security in Zone 6, and led directly to the installation of locks on all female shower units. The scope of this project, involved several of the CCC sections working together: Because the shower trailers were leased from a contractor, the COR section had to procure authorization to modify these structures. The Logistics (S-4) section had to locate locks that would fit directly into the existing doors with no modification, the Projects section was responsible for the installation, and Billeting oversaw key distribution. With varying degrees of skepticism, the project went forward, but has proven to be working quite well, and within the first month, the locks helped prevent an assault. The Roving Patrol is another security measure to ensure Soldier safety. Under the direction of the EOC, Zone 6 tenant units assign service members to provide a strategic presence during the evening and nighttime hours. Teams receive their evening's briefing, and take their positions as either as a roving or stationary patrol. The roving patrols cover the large areas between PCBs (permanent soldier living areas) and throughout the tent pads, while stationary patrols are positioned as to keep visibility on the various rows of shower or latrine units. This safety net has helped prevent further incidents in Zone 6, and in one case, the Roving Patrol was able to apprehend a perpetrator trying to flee. The Zone 6 Command Cell's equipment includes vehicles for most of the sections along with ATVs and four-wheelers along with maintenance equipment like a Bobcat, forklifts, and a flat bed. The weapons, mostly M4s are locked up and their ballistic vest, helmet, and chemical suit and


mask are kept at their work area, for accessibility during an exercise or attack. An arsenal of office equipment, however, is the primary tool for most of the Command Cell, and includes computers, printers, scanners, and shredders. Apart from office equipment, is the ever present air conditioner – a "nice to have" during the winter months, but a vital item when temperatures push into triple digits. As with other units, the Zone 6 CCC has conducted the Theater Ballistic Missile Exercise which sees a general lack of participation ("It's only a drill"), however, some soldiers hit the bunkers, and reporting into their respective units seems to be improving. Safety training includes weekly awareness training during a Commander's Update Brief (CUB) presentation, as well as safety stand-down, and Composite Risk Management instruction. A recent training mandate was the establishment of the Sergeant's Training Time – a three hour block of time from 0700 – 1000 Wednesday mornings. This is to reinforce soldier tasks, battle drills, and section training. This has gone well, but seems to negatively impact the sections conducting their business of the day. Camp Arifjan soldiers are able to take part in numerous educational opportunities, both in required courses (Contracting Officer Representative, Safety courses, etc.) Ruck March in computer, communications, and leadership courses at ARCENT University and online college classes. Leisure opportunities also abound with MWR activities such as pool and Ping-pong, video games, Movie Theater and rentals, along with various competitions, contests, and


tournaments. Additionally, a number of CCC soldiers join in on the variety of 5K fun runs, ruck marches, and recently, Camp Arifjan's first 10 mile race. To date, the Camp Command Cell has been faced with a number of issues which have ongoing ramifications. The black water issue was resolved, but personnel in the COR section continue with the extra duty of inspecting and logging in every single truck from every other camp that dumps into the lift station. The COR section has had to deal with the extremely complicated process of contract renewals, requiring them to go through the procedures to establish special extensions for continued services. The issues surrounding the new ITT contract pressed several sections to step up and help facilitate the many quality of life issues. The Logistics and Projects sections both continue to push forward on procurements or project approval – issues that, halfway through the current deployment, were started half way through the predecessor's deployment. Finally, the Camp Command Cell hosted the Pre-Deployment Site Survey (PDSS) team from the 1-34th IBCT of Minnesota, who will be the CCC replacements. This visit was very successful, helping better prepare the 1-34th to take up their responsibilities more smoothly as they deploy to take over the CCC. The spring brought periods of sustained winds called the Shamals. These occasionally surpassed 30 miles per hour – powerful enough to blow away anything not properly anchored, such as the Marine tent, which took a year to erect, and was rendered scrap in one day. These winds were also the driving force behind the number of dust storms we experienced through the end of June. The long awaited Dining Facility (DFAC) had its grand opening in April. This new facility has two large "bays", each of which is larger than the entire old DFAC. These new DFAC's have been built at all the camps being able to handle troop feeding more efficiently. Three months after the opening the old DFAC has finally been disassembled and the refrigerator


and freezer units relocated. This new facility has the capacity to feed 3000 Soldiers per hour. The Federal Budget Resolution caused vast numbers of soldiers and DA Civilians anxiety over whether they would continue getting paid. Soldiers' Leave and Earnings Statement (LES's) did reflect both loss and reimbursement of portions of their pay. The Zone 6 Camp Command Cell is a composite of numerous units and as such, it happens to have nine members of New Hampshire's 39th Army Band, representing enough of a variety of instruments to put on a show at the Zone 6 stage. They did an excellent job, and their concert was well received, playing a variety of music new and old to including rock and country. A few weeks later, they were part of a Host Nation Engagement, where they met and played music with the Kuwaiti National Guard band. The month of May brought the New Hampshire Adjutant General, Major General William Reddel, and the State Command Sergeant Major John Nanof. The following month brought, the Assistant Adjutant General, Army Brigadier General Craig Bennett. Their itineraries included tours of the camps, and visiting with NH soldiers as well as presenting coins to Soldiers who have done outstanding jobs. May 11, 2011, saw the first Heat Category V, in which the shade temperature was about 120â °, and 130â ° in the sun, a sign of things to come. On two different occasions this spring, minor disasters were averted one by a CCC soldier, who followed up on the news that a SIPR (secret) computer had been stolen. His quick actions allowed a search of dumpsters to be conducted, where it was soon found. The second incident was a dryer fire in one of the laundry trailers. A soldier from another unit happened to be


present when it broke out, and using the fire extinguisher, he suppressed it preventing its spread throughout the entire trailer. Finally, an increased need for Tactical Operations Centers (TOC's), both by the 1st-34th Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT) – the CCC replacements – and other Camp Arifjan units, prompted the CCC to action. First, Billeting designated

additional tents to be used for TOC office space, which included the team effort of moving the entire contents of the two supply tents to adjacent tents. Secondly, the S-6 who had recently completed a complete rewiring of the Command Cell's office trailers and tents, with new phone and internet lines, was able to bring connectivity to five new Alpha Pad tents converting them to TOC tents. The Command Cell sections continue to prepare for the arrival of their replacements, expected within a week as of this writing. The 372nd's end of tour barbeque represents the end of a long and challenging deployment, in which many rose to the challenge of this new non-traditional military mission – as a small part of a much larger machine preparing for the huge draw down of troops later this year. And, as the baton is passed, the future of Zone 6 is now spoken of in terms of its return to the Kuwaitis in the not-too-distant future.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Monthly Commander's Historical Up-dates, personal observation]


319th EOD

The colors crimson and yellow are for the Ordnance Corps. The gears indicate the general mechanical mission of the unit and the shell symbolizes the general supply mission. The point represents Mount Rainier and the general geographical location. The palm wreath is for combat service in the pacific in World War II.

1LT Keith A. Toohey

1SG Steve Kim

The 319th Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company is a National Guard unit from Camp Murray in Washington State (WPYFAA). It was initially commanded by Captain (CPT) Alfred Johnson with First Lieutenant (1LT) Keith Toohey taking over in July. The primary mission of the EOD is the safe disposal of basically any type of explosive device. Unlike most other National Guard units here, this is not a non-traditional mission for the 319th. In fact, EOD regulations prohibit EOD forces from being tasked with non-EOD missions.


The unit mobilized at Joint Base Lewis McChord in Alabama, where it received its deployment training for its Central Command (CENTCOM) mission. During Global Anti-Terrorism Operational Response (GATOR) training, the 319th and six other teams scored better than 95 percent of the Active Duty EOD teams, with Team Bonzai, as the 319th had begun to be called, scoring at the top of all National Guard EOD teams. However, the unit was not without challenges. The Army had previously modified the EOD unit structure from 23 positions (Pax) to 44 Pax, but the 319th was not authorized the extra 21 positions. Consequently, it had to divide its 22 members into nine teams, yet it would be responsible for the same scope of mission as a fully staffed 44 Pax unit. Arriving in theater in November, 2010, the EOD's deployed mission was to "provide forward stationed, rapidly deployable EOD assets capable of full spectrum EOD operations in support of CENTCOMs mission. Conduct EOD force protection operations to defeat or mitigate conventional and unconventional (nuclear, biological, chemical, and improvised) explosive devices in our assigned area of responsibility. . . " The319th's deployed nine team unit was soon broken up into four locations: four at Camp Arifjan, two teams at Camp Buehring, Two teams in Bagdad, Iraq, and one team stationed at Qatar, to support Army assets there. Although their mission might resemble some scenes from the movie "The Hurt Locker," real life rarely compares to the high drama of Hollywood. In fact, the 319th is constantly working with Kuwaiti and other country's' EOD teams in disposal operations. Ultimately, their mission is generally to try to prevent the destruction caused by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), through education, training, and information sharing with EOD teams from other nations, including Lebanon, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, and Saudi Arabia. CPT Johnson, the unit's initial commander in theater, relates how the bond that develops between EOD Technicians crosses language and cultural barriers.


While disposal of explosive materials can involve disarming an IED, for the 319th, it has primarily been to dispose of Code H or unserviceable ammunition, through detonation. Unserviceable ammunition includes ammunition of all sizes that has exceeded its shelf life, is corroded, or damaged, and which cannot be used for combat or training. The size of the ammunition determines whether it is burned, or detonated. Smaller rounds of .50 caliber and under, are burned, while anything larger gets blown up. These EOD techniques actually save the U.S. government millions of dollars by not having to ship tons of dangerous cargo back to the United States for disposal. Along with American ordnance, the Kuwaiti Ministry of Defense has over two million tons of code H explosives itself, both of which present a safety hazard to the country. The 319th has to date destroyed 349,600 lbs (175 tons) of U.S. CCH (Category Code H) and 1,182,400 lbs (590 tons) of Kuwaiti CCH as of 26 May 2011. A controlled detonation of Code H involves selecting a location away from anything. Sometimes a shallow pit is dug, and the ammunition is stacked up in the pit, or laid out along the ground. Protective equipment isn't usually worn during these steps, as the danger is generally low. After stacking, C-4 explosive charges are laid along the top of the stack


of ordnance. Next, the C-4 cartridges are wired together. Since C-4 is activated by electricity, there is no danger even at this step, though a flack vest might be worn during this stage. Finally everyone is cleared of the area, and the wires are attached to the detonator, from which a pulse of electricity initiates the explosion rendering the pile of old ordnance – or what is left of it – harmless. For their mission, the EOD does not require any armored tactical vehicles. Rather, they have a number of Non-Tactical Vehicles (NTVs) including a stand-by truck and team to respond to any EOD incident at the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait. For an Embassy response, or any other IED mission, the 319th also has modular bomb proof suits, as seen in the movie (Hurt Locker) for bomb diffusing. These special suits have three layers of protection. It is the initial shock wave of an explosion that causes death. The rigid outer layer of the bomb proof suit takes the initial hit of the shock wave and reflects some of it, while the remaining energy passes through to a middle foam layer. This material absorbs more of the energy, before the shock wave gets to the inner layer which functions like a regular bullet proof vest, to help stop any shrapnel that may have gotten through. The helmets' features include an anti-fog multi-layered acrylic face shield, a lamp, video camera, and a twoway radio communications system. Additionally, an inner cooling suit circulates ice water from an internal reservoir, keeping the wearer somewhat cool when wearing all this equipment in the 100 degree heat of the Middle-East.

Commander's Comments The 319th EOD has completed missions throughout the CENTCOM AOR traveling to such countries as Kyrgyzstan and Saudi Arabia. We have destroyed over 650,000 lbs of U.S. Code H ammunition in support of the


U.S. Retrograde out of Iraq. However the most significant achievement of the 319th EOD deployment occurred within the first two months of arriving in theater. Without it, none of these other events would have happened. When the 319th EOD first arrived in theater the road connecting the Ammunition Storage Point (ASP) storage area and Camp Arifjan was closed off by the Kuwait government and the U.S. was not allowed to transport explosives on Kuwait highways. All demolition ranges were closed to U.S. operations. This was a major problem for the ASP as they began to approach their max capacity of explosives and had no way to destroy the expired ammunition that was dangerous to store. Through working with the Kuwait EOD forces and their command we were able to re-open relations through training and joint operations which in turn influenced the Kuwait government to reopen the ASP road and allow the transportation of explosives on Kuwaiti highways.

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Granite Thunder Facebook, Article on Demilitarization Operation by SPC Ekta Shrestha (marineeod.com), 319th December newsletter, CCTECF PowerPoint, article "How bomb-proof suits work" http://dvice.com/archives/2010/03/hurt-lockersui.php emails]


44th CBRN

Symbolism: Or (gold) is a color traditionally used for the Chemical Warfare Service. The dragon clutching a lightning bolt is reflective of the unit's aggressive attitude. The lightning bolt symbolizes the ability to fight with or against fire, gas and smoke. The automobile wheel represents the unit's mobility for rapid response. Motto: FLAMMIS VINCIMUS (With Fire We Conquer) in transparent red.

CPT Jason Snelgrove

1SG Conrad

The 44th CBRN Company of the 2nd Chemical Battalion is a Regular Army unit from Fort Hood Texas (UIC WH7BAA). Commanded by CPT Jason Snelgrove, the 44th arrived at Zone 6 on 6 Dec 2010. As a Regular Army unit, it was deployed to perform its normal "peacetime" function, which is Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Defense. The 44th was to be "on call" to respond to nuclear, biological, and chemical threats in 26 countries throughout the mid-east area of operations.


Upon its deployment, it retained its normal unit structure: Headquarters Platoon – handles administration, maintenance of equipment, and basic logistics and operations Decontamination Platoon (Decon PLT) – performs decontamination on every scale including detailed troop decon, equipment decon, and terrain (landscape) decon of all four hazards; chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear. Reconnaissance Platoon (Recon PLT) – performs air, water, and ground analysis using a specialized vehicle called a Fox M93A1 (shown here). This rolling laboratory can detect, identify, mark, sample, and report chemical and radiological contamination on a battlefield. Hazardous Response PLT (HRP) – performs dismounted reconnaissance, such as entering a building, using a sophisticated photoionization detector and protective equipment. The original 44th CBRN Company was falling in on a new configuration for CBRN Companies, that of two Decon PLTs one Recon PLT, and one Hazardous Response PLT. Due to the situation on the ground, there was no real need for two Decon PLTs, and the 44th changed to a single Decontamination Platoon. After a few months into the deployment Captain (CPT) Snelgrove received the mandate that the company's response time to react to a CBRN threat (ie., pack everything and be ready to move) went from no established time frame, to a 6 hour limit. This introduced a complicated set of problems to the unit, since the time it takes to load and ship the company could realistically take longer than 6 hours. And, there was the possibility of


having to respond to incidents in more than one country at the same time. Quoting the Commander's Historical Narrative, No longer would there be a separate PLT specializing in different aspects of CBRN Defense, but instead each PLT would incorporate the aspects of an entire CBRN Company. 2 Squads from each PLT were transferred to another PLT. This left each PLT have 1 Decon squad, 1 HRP squad and 1 Recon squad. This was a very challenging logistical operation with all of the equipment from the platoons having to be re-distributed. This new company structure allows us to meet the 6 hour reaction time and allows us to respond to 3 simultaneous missions.

Throughout the first half of their deployment, the 44th has not had to respond to any "real-world" missions, however, staying prepared for the possibility, has stretched the existing manpower thin. Additional taskings include conducting weekly escort missions in Afghanistan to ensure the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicles (MRAPs) are not tampered with. A second task involves training Kuwaiti Army and National Guard personnel in the whole spectrum of CBRN operations. Here, a platoon goes to the Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Directorate to instruct in Decontamination, Mounted and Dismounted Reconnaissance, Hazardous Response in regards to WMDs, and Mitigating Operations. Located in Kuwait, the terrain is generally a hard packed desert surface, flat with very gradual rises, shallow depressions, and sparse vegetation. The humidity is very low most of the time, and the temperatures go from a low of about 40 degrees F. to 120 degrees F. in the summer, and reaching 135


degrees F. in the sun. Breezes and winds usually carry a talc brown dust, but occasionally larger particles join the dust to create a burnt orange haze that limits visibility to varying degrees. Still other times, more of a sand storm develops with a thicker and more brown haze which can significantly limit visibility, enough to prohibit driving. Rain usually arrives during winter months, and can turn the hard packed surface into an extremely slippery hazard to driving. Although the CBRN has more interaction with host nation soldiers and civilians in both Kuwait and Afghanistan, there have not been any enemy threats to mission. The weather actually poses more of a mission threat than enemy contact. Dust and sand storms cause blackout conditions on the roads. The near concrete conditions of the roads is deceptive since a little rain can turn it into a greasy slippery mess. The resulting mud can potentially become deep enough to trap their vehicles. In fact stuck trucks is an ongoing concern as their Decontamination Vehicles use a lot of water and other liquids. Heat is another enemy of the 44th. High temperatures will destroy both equipment and the decontamination solutions. These must be kept in a cool environment, which, at Camp Arifjan, means Air Conditioners run by diesel generators. If they go down, it is imperative they be repaired ASAP. Another specialized (refrigerated) container stores another decontamination chemical called Supertropical Bleach with a flash point of 160 degrees (F). These storage facilities must be checked several times a day to ensure the safe keeping of their contents. Training has been heavy for the 44th during this deployment. In addition to reacting to simulated CBRN incidents during the During the Theater wide Ballistic Missile Exercise, they conduct training on Soldier Warrior Tasks, and Safety. Finally, the new unit configuration necessitated a heavy cross-


training throughout each platoon to create three DECON/RECON/HRP Platoons. As expected, The 44th fields an assortment of specialized equipment as large as trucks, and as small as hand held sensors. The FOX M93A1, already mentioned, is designed to provide situational awareness of Nuclear, biological, and Chemical hazards to increase the survivability of combat elements. This rolling laboratory is completely sealed off, allowing the three man crew to work in shirt-sleeves, even in a contaminated area. Sensors integrated into the vehicle chassis can detect chemical agents up to five Kilometers (3 miles) away. A commercial photoionization detector called a MultiRAE, is a sophisticated hand-held gas sensor for dismounted reconnaissance, while another hand held instrument called a Draeger-Tube can test for specific chemicals, or a family of chemicals. Finally, a Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) provides breathable air in hazardous or toxic environments. Receipt of a real life mission, would come through ARCENT to the 1st Theater Support Command (1st TSC) to the 197th FIB and then to the 44th. At that point, everything needed for a full spectrum CBRN response will be taken: The FOX Recon Vehicle, a FALCON Decontamination vehicle, and HRP (Hazmat Response Platoon) equipment, as well as general supplies to set up stations, day or night. With some variations depending on troop or vehicle exposure, the 44th would set up a Detailed Troop Decontamination (DTD) site. Factoring in the direction of the wind, several stations would be set up; A wash station, a rinse station, a dry station and a monitoring station. If a vehicle still registers Nuclear,


biological, or Chemical (NBC) readings, it is sent back through the stations again, until contamination is no longer detected. Being on Camp Arifjan, the soldiers of the 44th have the same amenities already mentioned, from the Pre Cast Concrete Billets (PCBs), to the new DFAC, the Gym, PX and Community Center where Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) activities take place. Soldiers participate in the various fun nights, 5 K road races, and even made the playoffs with their Softball team, the Red Rockets. Additionally, many soldiers advanced their education through classes ranging from technical onsite classes in Security, Network, and Fiber Optics to online classes ranging from HMMWV Relay races Leadership, to History, to Biology. The first real-life mission for the 44th came on 29 March. The Hazardous Responses Platoon (HRP) was called to respond to a situation where 4 personnel were taken to the hospital with feelings of nausea after complaining that their building smelled of rotten eggs. With their equipment, HRP determined that the odor was produced by sulfur dioxide. This was later revealed to be caused by an old sewage line running underneath the facility. In addition to the real life mission, three major training events were also conducted. The first scenario dealt with a chemical ballistic missile strike impacting on 1/44th AMD BN area of operations. During this training mission, 44th CBRN successfully conducted sampling operations of the suspected chemical hazard, a fixed site decontamination of a missile defense system (launcher) and finally, performed (simulated) emergency patient decontamination of the causalities. On June 15th 44th CBRN CO conducted a training mission, OPERATION CERBERUS, at the SPOD (Sea Port of Debarkation). This was a full spectrum CBRN training mission involving the company as a whole. The


scenario dealt with reacting to hazardous chemical ordnance. In the scenario a bulldozer operator had uncovered eight 155 Millimeter Artillery rounds with 4 of them appearing to contain mustard gas. SECFOR-South (TF 182) deployed the QRF and ARF to cordon off and secure the mission site while 44th CBRN Company conducted route reconnaissance presumptive analysis, sampling, mitigation and decontamination of the site. Additionally, a team from 319th EOD supported the operations by rendering safe any unknown explosive hazards. SPOD Fire and Rescue were also present with EMTs and Medics. The 44th CBRN will continue their mission until November, 2011. [references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, for Distinctive Unit Insignia: http://www.nbc-links.com/dui-Battalion.html, FOX vehicle image http://www.cbrne.army.mil/warturtles.htm ] th CBRN CBRN 3rd PLT and a platoon of Kuwaiti Soldiers 44th


511th Engineer Dive Team

The 511th Dive Team served a one year tour in Kuwait, from February of 2010, to February of 2011. For most of their deployment, they were under the command and control of the 53rd IBCT. The 197th took over for their last three months in theater. The following article by SFC Neal Mitchell (197th PA office) summarizes their yearlong mission. 511th honors year of underwater missions By Sgt. 1st Class Neal Mitchell, 197th FIB PA

In a tent flanked by air tanks, diving suits and underwater helmets, more than 50 Army divers attended a Transfer of Authority ceremony on Kuwait Naval Base, Feb. 17. Capt. Edouard de Courreges, commander of the 511th Engineer Dive Detachment, Fort Eustis, Va., relinquished command to Capt. Adrian Biggerstaff, commander of the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment, Fort Shafter Flats, HI. [Col. Sean Ward, Deputy Brigade Cmdr for the 53rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, is assisted with putting on a Dive Helmet, May 13th . . . where he also promoted their detachment cmdr, Lt. Edouard De Courreges, to the rank of Capt. in an underwater promotion ceremony forty feet beneath the surface.]


“To the 511th, you accomplished a lot over the past 12 months. You have done an excellent job representing the detachment, the Army and diving as a whole,” de Courreges said. “You have exceeded all my expectations coming into this deployment.” The 25 soldiers of the 511th completed 88 missions in Kuwait, Iraq, Oman and Qatar. They spent a combined 1,650 days diving in water temperatures from 40 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. In Iraq, they recovered more than $3 million of military equipment and executed numerous force protection missions safe guarding billions of dollars of military sea transport equipment. In total, the 511th divers spent more than 18,000 minutes underwater in support of U.S. Navy, Army and Coast Guard vessels as a part of Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. Despite the high operation tempo, the detachment was able to qualify four Unlimited Diving Supervisors and nine Salvage Divers, allowing divers to compete for promotion to higher rank. “By all measures, the 511th Dive Team well fulfilled its requirements as a strategic asset to the CENTCOM Theater of Operations,” said Col. Peter Corey, commander of the 197th Fires Brigade. The brigade provides command and control for the dive mission based at KNB. For the 7th Dive Team, this marks a return engagement to the Middle East. Biggerstaff and one of his senior divers, Staff Sgt. John Geffert, were here with the unit in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This time, as the unit leaders, they bring a brand new group of divers. “511th Dive leaves behind them a great reputation,” Biggerstaff said. “7th Dive is prepared to continue to build upon this reputation.” The 511th not only accomplished a great deal, but made the extra effort to keep the 7th appraised on operational changes during the last year, Biggerstaff said. “That exchange of information makes us better prepared." For a captain, the mission was “a good deal,” de Courreges said. “I think that I’ll miss it.” For more info on the 7th Dive Team, checkout its facebook site: http://www.facebook.com/pages/7th-Engineer-Dive-Team/105525036159201 [References: Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, http://www.dvidshub.net, Granite Thunder]


7th Engineer Dive Team

The logo of the 7th Dive Team uses a diver’s helmet to represent the surface supplied diving conducted by the unit. Below their unit name, is the Castellated structure – the symbol of the Engineering Corps, and beneath that is the 65th Engineering Battalion, to which the 7th belongs. At the top of the logo, depicted in red, is the Island chain that is home to the 7th Dive, the 50th state, Hawaii .

CPT Scott Sann

1SG William S. Baumgartner

While Combat Engineers conduct a wide variety of missions on land, at the waterline, Divers take over. The 7th Engineer Detachment (Dive) was activated in March 1986, in Panama. The first personnel had arrived in August 1985 to begin receiving personnel and equipment. At the time of activation, the 7th was only a 9-man detachment. It was attached to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 536th Engineer Battalion. In September 1988 the MTOE changed transforming into a 17 man detachment.


The 7th Engineer Dive Team, is an Active Duty Army unit from Hawaii, (UIC – WDBRAA) that falls under the 65th Eng. Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command. Commanded by Captain(CPT) Adrian Biggerstaff, the unit deployed to Camp Patriot on the Kuwaiti Naval Base (KNB) in February for a one year deployment, in which they will conduct their primary mission of underwater engineering. This includes, but is not limited to underwater demolition, welding and cutting, inspections, photography, harbor clean-up, and harbor floor surveying. Upon arrival, the soldiers of the 7th were divided throughout the Central Command area (CENTCOM) to support a variety of duties. Squads were on rotations to include: 2 weeks in Qatar, 1 month at Joint Base Ballad, Iraq and spending I SPC Morales Morales pulling pulling up fishing fishing net in Qatar Qatar I the remainder of their time in support of day to day operations at Kuwait Naval Base. As the team entered April the need for their presence in Qatar was no longer required which eventually lead to all troops being located in KNB by the beginning of June Host Nation interaction with Members of the 7th Dive, is crucial to the team’s success in Kuwait. A working relationship with Kuwait Military involves both joint training, including a major exercise with the Kuwaiti Navy on the recompression chamber, and receiving approval of dive sites for missions. Additionally, civilians, now more than ever, an essential part of the Army’s mission in wartime. They were an intricate part of processing the 7th into theater and also operate as environmental compliance officials among other things. The threat level in Kuwait remains stable, though the Dive missions outside of Kuwait may have faced a different threat level. As with other units, the local weather is the primary influence on the mission. Rain is not a primary


concern in this environment, however, it can cause a lot of mud. Winds, however, arrive from seemingly nowhere and kick up dust storms that can put a screeching halt to operations. The 7th Dive Team operates with the standard fare of equipment as any other unit. Primarily utilizing Non-Tactical Vehicles (NTVs) on post, they hook up with another unit for transportation when off-post missions dictate, such as travel to Iraq. On these occasions, the most common mode of transportation is the Mine Resistant, Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle. The traditional battle dress, Fire retardant Army Combat Uniforms, (FRACUs) are also required when traveling outside the wire. In hostile areas, Kevlar helmets will be donned along with Improved Outer Tactical Vests (IOTVs) with all its bullet-proof plates in place, eye protection, ear protection and gloves. Each team member is proficient in the operation of both the M4 rifle and M9 pistol. Depending on the situation, either of these weapons may be carried by any rank. Additionally, the typical compliment of office equipment, computers, printers, scanners and copiers, etc., are mission essential to the smooth running of mission operations. The 7th Engineer Dive Team also has a variety of specialized equipment that bring a whole new spectrum of possible operations. They use nylon and rubber Dive suits, with gloves for protection and weighted boots for surface supplied diving The KM 37 fiberglass helmet has a wide viewing screen and both supports the oxygen delivery, and provides communications with the surface or with other divers. Other slots are available for external attachments such as lights, or video camera. A surface air supply system th converts pressurized air from 77 Dive Team trains Kuwaiti divers on storage tanks through the divers' recompr recompression chamber operations umbilicals to their mask.


Hydraulic tools allow the divers to perform duties underwater that may otherwise not be possible by other "scuba only" certified units or combat divers. Further, a recompression chamber is available for the treatment not only of dive injuries but also injuries sustained during flight or by burn victims. Actual missions by the 7th Dive Team included refreshing their skills in Full Spectrum Operations (FSO) at various training areas throughout Kuwait, and inspecting ports, piers, and vessels in Qatar and Oman. In Iraq, they worked with the 20th Engineer Brigade to inspect float bridges, clear anchor cables and replace anchors if needed, and to generally assist bridging companies during their withdrawal from theater. And while training opportunities in the states can be limited, deployment generally offers an exponential amount of training. Throughout the deployment, the 7th Dive has concentrated on leadership training among SPC Tim Bullington clears both the officers and Non-commissioned debris from a Pontoon Officers (NCOs) of the unit. A large bridge anchor line percentage of the unit's soldiers are currently outside Camp Camp Tiji, Tiji, Iraq enrolled in either an online university course, or are learning a language through Rosetta Stone online. The unit strives for the self-improvement and development of Soldiers both in and out of the workplace. In a wartime environment, the 7th Dive finds amenities of life quite adequate, with good Internet connectivity available in soldiers' own rooms, making video chatting with family members easy any time of the day. Soldiers live three to a room, in the barracks, and shower and bathroom trailers are available close by. On-site laundry facilities are accessible 24 hours a day, and a free laundry service is provided for any service member who wishes to have it done for them with a 48 hour maximum turn around.


with 7th Dive Zumba Fitness with

The KNB offers soldiers a top notch gym, Dining Facility (DFAC), and Post Exchange (PX). Further, the Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) program, hosts many events celebrating all walks of life. Poker tournaments are a staple as well as dances and visits from a long list of celebrities. Additionally, they offer public computers, gaming systems and televisions, along with ping-pong and pool tables, all available 24 hours a day. Many competitive sporting events are held in which members of the 7th participate often. A member of the Dive Team has won every road race held since their arrival as well as winning the Camp Patriot modified triathlon. This race consisted of the cumulative distance covered in three 20 minute events, using the indoor pool, spin bikes, and treadmills. Seven Dive Team soldiers were the crowned champions of the post dodgeball tournament, and volleyball and basketball tournaments also have considerably large turnouts. Unit sponsored events, such as boat trips or pizza parties help ensure team cohesiveness through a little fun.


MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD

16 June 2011

SUBJECT: 7th Engineer Dive Detachment (EDD) Historical Narrative, Part II

1. The purpose of this memorandum is to document the major accomplishments and significant events that have occurred during the 7th Engineer Dive Detachment’s deployment in support of Operation New Dawn. 2. Major Achievements and Significant Events by Location a. Kuwait: 7th Divers used training areas throughout Kuwait to refresh their skills in Full Spectrum Operations (FSO) Mission Essential Tasks. I. From 03-05 May 11, the 7th EDD conducted a demolition range in the vicinity of Camp Buehring in order to practice surface demolition calculations. The range included a variety of targets, to include steel and timber projects, as well as a number of different explosive charges and firing systems. II. On 16 May 11, the 7th EDD deployed to Mubarak Range to conduct a M4/M9 range in order to qualify 15 personnel on the use of the M9 and to verify the zero of the team’s M4s. 100% of the team was successful in qualifying on their weapon system. b. Iraq: The 7th maintained a presence in Iraq by stationing members of the team on Joint Base Balad (JBB) on a monthly rotation. Primarily working with the 20th Engineer Brigade, the dive team was responsible for assisting bridging


companies during their withdrawal from theater, as well as responding to quick reaction missions involving the recovery of personnel or equipment. I. On 26 April 11, members of the 7th EDD deployed from JBB to conduct an anchor inspection of a Maby Johnson Float Bridge in order to identify which anchors needed to be replaced. Divers were able to remove debris from the anchor lines and identified five (5) anchors that were worn out beyond repair. This was a typical service rendered by the 7th EDD during their time in Iraq. c. Qatar: 7th EDD worked closely with members of the Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) to coordinate Anti Terrorism/Force Protection (AT/FP) swims to ensure their safe passage through ports throughout the ARCENT Area of Responsibility (AOR). Inspecting vessels entering the port in Qatar, where a large percentage of Army and Military Sealift Command (MSC) vessels offload and on load cargo, was one of 7th Dive’s enduring missions. I. From 23-27 February 2011, members of the 7th EDD conducted force protection security dives on two piers in preparation for the berthing of 2 Army Logistics Support Vessels (LSVs). Immediately following the dives, the team proceeded to conduct security swims on the pilot boat, which was an 18 meter vessel. The divers removed a fouled fishing net from the port screw of one of the LSVs. The pier was inspected and found to be free of obstacles and explosives. The successful completion of this tasking led to a follow on mission to document the damage on a separate pier. d. Oman: 7th EDD established an enduring mission in Oman to conduct AT/FP swims for U.S. vessels entering the port. I. On 28 May 2011, 7th Dive deployed a four-man SCUBA team to Salalah Port, Oman, in order to conduct an AT/FP swim on one of the port’s berthings in order to prepare for the arrival of an Army LSV. By coordinating with SDDC, the team was able to establish a Memorandum of Agreement for future dive


operations to ensure that adequate security measures and sustainment assets would remain available for follow on missions. SCOTT SANN CPT, EN Commanding

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report, Blackanthem.com, military news (11 May 2011), hawaiiarmyweekly.com/news (APR, SEP, OCT), 7th Engineer Dive Team Monthly Newsletters, Accomplishments memorandum, 16 June 2011]


Task Group 56.5

Symbolism: An anchor, common to both branches of service, supports the flags of both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Coast Guard, representing their current integrated and intertwined maritime expeditionary service.

CDR James B. Andrews

MKCM Daniel W. Jensen

(Master Chief Machinery Technician)

The Commander Task Group (CTG) 56.5 operates out of Camp Patriot at the Kuwaiti Naval Base (KNB)and is commanded by Coast Guard Commander James Andrews. 56.5 is a composite of the U.S. Navy, and the Coast Guard's Port Security Units (PSUs) forming the Maritime Expeditionary Security Squadron (MSRON) with units from San Diego, California, and Everett, Washington. MSRON's deploy world-wide for surveillance and security of aircraft, airfields, convoys, ports and harbors, roads, etc.


Components of the MSRON completed pre-deployment training in San Diego, and at Fort Dix, NJ, and arrived in theater around mid-January. The mission of the 56.5 is to protect Kuwait ports and high value assets (HVA's) such as U.S. Cargo coming in and out of theater. From Camp Patriot, boat teams patrol both KNB and a harbor at nearby Al-Shuaiba, while a security detachment has a team at Al Basra Oil Terminal. An important aspect of the 56.5's mission is their equipment. In addition to land based equipment like generators, air conditioning units, and trucks up to Tractor Trailer sizes, they operate a variety of boats from 25 foot Transportable Port Security Boats (TPSU's) to larger 34 foot Sea Arks. While the personnel got to know each other, training classes in cultural awareness, threat assessment, and concealed weapons helped them develop into their respective teams and integrated divisions while creating their routines and protocols of operation for the deployment. Another training offered is the Navy Expeditionary Warfare Pin (EXW). Participants must complete a qualification course in core military skills, and pass a qualification board hearing. Authorized for the Navy and Coast Guard, a number of 56.5 Sailors and Guardians are participating. Camp Patriot also offers the full range of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) amenities including; movies, computer access, video gaming area, pool, ping-pong, foosball, and competitions such as Bingo nights, Texas Hold-em competitions, Karaoke, 5K runs and more. The PX, located just outside the Camp Patriot gate is well supplied with a normal assortment of items to include clothing and a spectrum of electronics.


In March of 2011 The CTG 56.5 Medical Department comprised of MSRON 3 Hospital Corpsmen and PSU 313 Health Service Technicians identified critical shortfalls in the regional Emergency Action Plan which lacked a chemical gas exposure evacuation contingency for personnel operating at the Kuwait Seaport of Debarkation (SPOD). Without delay, the Medical team investigated numerous Health Service bulletins as well as Preventive Medicine inspections to identify all lethal chemicals with the potential to pose a significant threat to Sailors and Guardians operating in the region. They immediately developed training modules across multiple commands encompassing all aspects of preventive measures to take in case of an industrial accident within the port. The Medical team also developed several Courses of Action which led to the establishment of an operationally minded plan to be initiated in the event of a chemical incident. Their thorough analysis and planning led to a comprehensive evacuation plan for the SPOD that will ensure all personnel will be able to safely egress from the port in an expedient manner in the event of a major catastrophe. Their foresight, innovation and ingenuity have secured the safety of personnel operating at the SPOD now and in the future. The CTG 56.5 Boat Maintenance Facility (BMF), with input from the Boat Division, was able to document and quickly correct over 200 equipment discrepancies, restoring all patrol boats to a fully mission capable status. Most importantly, the BMF team played a pivotal role in ensuring Navy and Coast Guard patrol boats were fully mission capable during over 100 High Value Asset escorts of Army Landing Craft Utility vessels (LCUs), Logistics Support vessels (LSVs), Landing Craft Mechanized vessels (LCMs), and Military CTG 56.5 56.5 Boat BM2 Stewart and BM2 Morgan from CTG Sealift Command Detachment Bravo,, participate participate in an underway underway gun gun vessels and U.S. shoot in the Arabian Gulf. warships. Additionally,


the BMF team provided operational boats to support over 4,000 Transportable Port Security Boat hours and over 1,000 hours of maintenance and repairs on the patrol boats. The operational planning and coordination by BMF personnel resulted in over 45 convoys to the SPOD and over 100 boat launch and recoveries without incident. The BMF personnel consistently provided the Commander, Task Group 56.5 Boat Division with fully operational boats for continuous training of personnel, to include the qualification of 17 Coast Guard and Navy Tactical Coxswains. Also during the deployment, members from the CTG 56.5 N6 (Communications) Department were called upon to assist with the Kuwait Naval Base Boathouse renovation. The resources of four different commands were utilized in the relocation of a 40-foot radio tower from the Port of Al Shuaiba that was then installed at the new boat house on Kuwait Naval Base thus significantly enhancing the Boat Watch Officers’ ability to identify possible threats before they enter the harbor. Additionally, four HF/VHF Command and Control radio circuits were installed along with an Army network switch and workstation. By accomplishing these tasks, the N6 Boathouse Renovation Team directly improved the communication between the Boat Watch Officer and CTG 56.5 tactical craft. The resourcefulness of the Team aided in the cooperation of Kuwaiti and US militaries. Also during the deployment, members from the CTG 56.5 N6 (Communications) Department were called upon to assist with the Kuwait Naval Base Boathouse renovation. The resources of four different commands were utilized in the relocation of a 40-foot radio tower from the Port of Al Shuaiba that was then installed at the new boat house on

May 5, 2011; Thomas F. Murphy III, Commander, Task Task Group Group 56.5, 56.5, along with Sailors from the Boat Detachment, pose pose with with BM3 8M3 Jarvis Jarvis D. Caston Caston and at Detachment, his reenlistment ceremony on the KNB Boathouse.


Kuwait Naval Base thus significantly enhancing the Boat Watch Officers’ ability to identify possible threats before they enter the harbor. Additionally, four HF/VHF Command and Control radio circuits were installed along with an Army network switch and workstation. By accomplishing these tasks, the N6 Boathouse Renovation Team directly improved the communication between the Boat Watch Officer and CTG 56.5 tactical craft. The resourcefulness of the Team aided in the cooperation of Kuwaiti and US militaries.

June 3, 2011; Members of the Commander, Task Group 56.5 Boat Division pose pose for a photo photo in front Camp Patriot Patriot MWR MWR Division front of the Camp building. ding. Sailors Sailors are holding holding a Harley Harley Davidson Davidson Motorcycle Motorcycle banner banner sent from a Seattle area Harley Davidson dealership. The banner is filled with signatures well-wishes filled with signatures and and well wishes to the Sailors Sailors and Guardians in Kuwait

[references: Commander's Annual Historical Report and monthly updates, Unit Newsletters, www.defense.gov ]


E/101st (TA) Battery

Symbolism: The shield is red for Artillery. The tomahawk and powder horn allude to the earliest history of the regiment. The canton is white, the old Infantry color. The anchor and cannon device is a portion of the Corps badge of the 2d Division of the 9th Corps, in which Battery "A" - then the 11th Battery, Massachusetts Light Artillery, United States Volunteers served during the Civil War. The crowned fleur-de-lis is taken from the coat of Arms of Verdun and represents the World War I service of the organization

CPT Matthew S. Nowak

1SG Kevin J. Thompson

Echo Battery (E Btry) of the 101st Field Artillery (FA) from Massachusetts, is a Target Acquisition Battery (TAB), using radar units to detect incoming rockets, artillery, or mortars, and relaying their flight positions as targets for Air Defense Artillery (ADA) batteries. Its parent unit, the 101st has a long history as the Boston Light Artillery, and its lineage reaches back to the 1600s.


Echo Battery is the Target Acquisition unit for the artillery of the 197th Fires Brigade (FIB), however, due to the non-traditional mission of the 197th its TAB asset was not needed. Echo Battery therefore, was tasked to deploy with the 1/174th Air Defense Artillery Regiment battalion from Ohio, which was the first National Guard battalion to be deployed with this important mission. Thus, Echo of the 101st is included in this report signifying that the entire 197th Fires Brigade and its assets were all deployed at the same time. Being a specialized unit, there is no non-traditional mission for Echo Battery, meaning that all its soldiers will be working in their Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) manning the radar units. The deployed mission of the TAB will be to provide radar target acquisition capability to USF-I (United States Forces in Iraq) for battlefield intelligence. E/101 FA (TAB) is responsible for running six radar sections, as Section Chief SFC Fortune, is loading well as providing Command the fill into their radios to insure that their the and Control for eight additional second second means means of communication communication is up and operational with their TACON higher target acquisition radars throughout Iraq. E Battery will also be responsible for providing the personnel and management of a theater wide target acquisition radar repair, parts, support, and distribution program in conjunction with the Forward Repair Areas (FRA). Additionally E/101 FA, under the command of USF-I, will manage the retrograde movement (reduction of force in theater) of radars in and out of theater as base closure and reconsolidation takes place in Operation New Dawn (OND). Echo Battery's 14 Radars are located throughout Iraq, and are all connected to the Counter Rocket, Artillery, and Mortar (C-RAM) system. With 6 to 7 man sections running 24 hour operations, the 14 radars provide C-RAM information to battlefield commanders, as well as to support the


Force Protection mission by giving alerts to U.S. and Coalition bases of an incoming attack, thus allowing personnel time to "run for cover." Echo Battery's deployed Higher Headquarters is the 1/174th Air Defense Artillery (ADA) from Ohio. Using radar input, an ADA section will aim their 20 millimeter guns and blast a high number of shells at the path of the projectile, intercepting and destroying it. (see addendum from www.nationalguard.com, for a good description of the operation of how the ADA reacts to data from the C-RAM radar sites). The enemy threat level varies day to day and differs from FOB to FOB (Forward Operating Base), and incidents of indirect Fire are reported to be increasing with the weather warming C-RAM Air Defense Artillery test fire Iraq up. Nevertheless, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:C-RAM_test_fire_Iraq.jpg the TAB battery reports that enemy activity has had no impact on their mission. The weather though, plays the role of enemy adequately enough. Heat – 100 degrees and climbing – takes its toll on personnel and equipment. An abnormal amount of rain in April, and severe dust and sand storms have caused increased maintenance to radar units as well as delaying the arrival of critical parts. Nevertheless, the soldiers of Echo 101st, were able to upgrade all 14 radar systems with new Firefinder software, while following the commander's intent to mitigate SPC Keble, a Firefinder Radar Operator, against unplanned maintenance in is cleaning the Q36 radar to ensure it is order to keep systems up and running running at a top efficiency in this country’s summers heat. he hot summers operational. Most of the sections


have been cross-training their soldiers to perform both the Radar Operator's job, and to conduct routine maintenance to support this mitigation process. Mission essential equipment for E Btry, includes Non-tactical vehicles (NTVs – trucks) and HMMWVs for transportation on the FOB. They wear the Army FRACU (Fire-Resistant Army Combat Uniform) and are occasionally required to add their IOTV and ACH (Improved Outer Tactical Vest and Advanced Combat Helmet) while being armed with M16s, grenade launchers, and machine guns. Two challenges related by the commander, are the difficulty in conducting training when the Battery is drawn out across Iraq, and keeping up with maintenance on the trucks. The primary piece of equipment of the Target Acquisition Battery is the ANTPQ36 v8 Firefinder Radar system. Once this Radar picks up a signal, it monitors it for a ballistic trajectory (the path it takes due to the pull of gravity). If the signal doesn't have a ballistic trajectory, the system rejects it. If the signal shows a TPQ-36_Firefinder_radar trajectory, the (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/TPQ-36_Firefinder_radar) TPQ36 will extrapolate (mathematically predict) the launch and impact point. Although it has limitations, this is generally the information sent to the ADA units who fire their intercepting rounds. Life on the FOB consists of two or four man Containerized Housing Units (CHUs – commonly pronounced "choos") with a bed, a desk, airconditioning, a refrigerator and sometimes a television. The FOB also


Our tropical oasis here in Iraq

maintains a DFAC (Dining Facility), Gym, a USO center (United Serviceman's Organization), and laundry facilities. Most offices are in a hardened structure, and radar shelters are attached to a variety of different building types, both wooden, and CHUs. Post maintenance is in the process of adding T-walls in some areas, while tearing down wooden structures around the base.

Morale is reported as generally good. Soldiers are able to reach home on the internet through SKYPE or Magic Jack, though email and face book are the most popular. Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) events have included the season opening of the swimming pool with a pool party, a Battery Barbeque shared with COL Corey, and the opportunity for a few soldiers to visit a Phalanx Gun – a ship borne version of an ADA unit. Also, several Echo Btry soldiers volunteered to be part of the Iraqi Children's Day, an event to show the children that Americans are not the "bad guys." A number of soldiers are also participating in online courses.

Commander's Summary Overall, E/101st ADA finds itself in the middle of international politics, and are taking positive steps in their part of the re-posturing of Iraq, both by keeping vehicles in shape, and practicing pro-active maintenance on the radar systems to mitigate unplanned problems. Battery E (TA) 101 FA made up over 70% of AN/TPQ36 radar systems in Iraq. The Battery was comprised of Active Component Soldiers from Ft Sill and National Guard Soldiers from Massachusetts. They manned 15 radar systems throughout Iraq, which were located on 10 separate FOBs and in 3 Multi-national Division areas. There, radar systems worked in conjunction with C-RAM sense and warn providing protection to Soldiers and civilians alike.


The work the radar crews did in maintenance exceeded previous contributions from radar crews. The systems uptime was at 95% across theatre. The theater average was only 92%. This reliability increase was not by accident. It was based on their hard work, determination and performing the proper maintenance at the proper intervals. The increase in uptime of the radar systems provided additional target acquisition capability for our Sense Warn mission. These radar systems were essential for force protection measures being made across Iraq. The Battery Headquarters provided essential support to all radar systems throughout Iraq. They worked in combination with the FRA (Forward Radar Activity) in distributing millions of dollars in radar parts every month. This mission was as important if not more important than our work with the Radar systems. Their work did not just affect the Battery’s needs but was essential to all the radars in operation in Iraq. Headquarters not only provided the radars with the materials they needed to perform their job, they also supplied the sections with services such as vehicle and generator maintenance support, which required personnel to fly to these different locations to provide on-site maintenance. The First Sergeant and I are very proud of the work our Soldiers have accomplished while in theater. It is by their hard work and determination that made the mission as successful as it was.

E/101st's current banner representing the 69 Soldiers here in Iraq today painted by SPC Auditore


Addendum:

FROM: National Guard Website (http://www.nationalguard.com/mobile/news/2011/feb/09/ohio-entrusted-with-c-ram-mission)

Ohio Entrusted With C-RAM Mission February 9, 2011 By CPL Daniel Eddy, Courtesy of United States Divison-Center Baghdad, Iraq Ohio's 1st Battalion, 174th Air Defense Artillery Regiment battalion, is the first National Guard battalion entrusted with a lifesaving counter-rocket, artillery and mortar mission here. The Counter-Rocket, Artillery and Mortar weapon system mission has been an Active Duty mission: Joint Task Force 1st Battalion, 174th C-RAM employs the first National Guard battalion in Iraq to assume the C-RAM responsibilities. "This is one of the proudest moments of my life, being in command of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, and one of the key members of the first National Guard battalionsized units to be entrusted with the C-RAM mission," said Captain Lawrence Bogan, commander, HHB, JTF 1-174th C-RAM. The 1st Battalion, 174th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, is an Ohio National Guard unit based in Woodlawn, a suburb of Cincinnati. "I didn't know this was the capacity that I would be doing it in, but helping people and saving lives is exactly what we were meant to do," Bogan said. "We are proud to be a part of this task force, represent the 174th ADA Brigade and our great state of Ohio for the opportunity to perform this C-RAM mission—very proud." An insurgent spends days scouting the spot. He moves at night so his actions are cloaked by darkness. He emplaces the payload he has spent countless hours preparing. Everything is in place. He lights the mortar—directed right at a U.S. military forward operating base. As the rocket or mortar hurdles toward the compound, a C-RAM weapon system sounds the early warning and lights up the sky. Within seconds, the mortar is destroyed. The insurgent won't be taking any lives tonight—not on the watch of JTF 1-174th CRAM.


Army and Navy personnel with JTF 1-174th C-RAM, United States Forces—Iraq operate and maintain multiple C-RAM systems across Iraq, ensuring the safety of service members 24 hours a day. The C-RAM, a land-based version of the Phalanx weapon system equipped on Navy ships to protect vessels from incoming missiles, was first used in 2005 in Iraq. The Army has adopted the technology and is now using the same idea to protect U.S. bases from threats lobbed over the walls. "We [have] 20-millimeter rounds that we will fire at a rapid rate in a pretty significant quantity," Bogan explained. "We provide an early warning to alert of incoming indirect fire and then engage, basically shooting down a bullet with another bullet." When the C-RAM fires it can be heard miles out, and when standing next to it one can feel the ground rumble underfoot. But before the 20 mm rounds can intercept the indirect fire, Soldiers and Sailors must take certain measurements, in a short amount of time, to ensure lives are saved on the base. "When we get a confirmation of an incoming round, that's when we go into our engagement battle drill," said Staff Sergeant Ryan Osner, noncommissioned officer-incharge of the engagement operations cell. "We have to confirm the air space is clear. Once the air space is clear, we send the order to send-fire permit. The gun will track and then the gun will engage. Simultaneously, the warning system will send out the 'incoming call' to [speakers] near the projected point of impact." Osner said in the beginning, the job was slow and scary, and resulted in quite the adrenaline rush. "Being able to shoot something down out of the air, with all the technology and gun systems that we have, is awesome," he said. It's an awesome feeling that two years ago he didn't even know he would experience. Around January 2009, Task Force 1st Battalion, 174th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, initially received orders to deploy to the U.S. capital, Washington, DC. The mission required them to work with the Norwegian Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System and to train on the Avenger missile system, the weapon system the unit is qualified to operate. Then the change of orders came: In September 2009, the unit received orders to deploy to Iraq to work with the C-RAM weapon system.


"The first question we all asked was, 'What is C-RAM?'" said Lieutenant Colonel Greg Gustafan, commander of JTF 1-174th C-RAM. "That's not an air defense weapon system that any of us have worked with." The JTF, Navy counterparts included, trained for 90 days at Fort Sill, OK, to learn the CRAM's capabilities. Bogan said the transition from Avenger to C-RAM was challenging because it's a completely different weapon system and they have to coordinate with different organizational assets. With the Avenger mission, they would go on their own and perform their mission solo. Bogan said the Soldiers have adapted well to the change on all levels throughout the training process. "Everyone, from the moment we have started this, has taken it very seriously, and that has been the piece that has made us the most [successful]," he said. "Everyone has paid very close attention, and they have executed flawlessly to this point." A Gatling gun is not the only element of the C-RAM system, which is referred to as a "system of systems." Collectively, the C-RAM is made up of multiple computer and radar systems working together, which connect to the early warning system. All of those "brains" are tied into the muscle of the machine—the Gatling gun itself. Each system has redundant capability to ensure the overall system is running at all times. "You have off-the-shelf radar the Army uses in field artillery ‌ designed to pick up rockets and mortars launched at ground level," Gustafan said. "These, in conjunction with our Air Defense radar systems, allow us to cover the entire third dimension; from very high altitude to the trajectory more common to rockets and mortars at lower launch elevations." The computer systems can determine the trajectory of the round and predict where it will be at a certain point of the sky and from there, the radars and the Phalanx gun go to work, tracking the round and determining the most effective firing solution, Gustafan said. The radar, however, picks up more than just rockets, artillery and mortars launched at the base. It detects anything in the sky, which includes helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles, blast fragmentation from other sources and gunfire, Gustafan said.


"So what those [radar] operators have to do is be able to discriminate between [what] is on the screen and see what may meet the ballistic criteria to be a potential threat," he said. Osner said there's a lot of learning involved in this mission, but he's gained a lot of experience along the way.

[Resources: Commander's Annual Historical Report, websites http://www.nationalguard.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/ , https://rdl.train.army.mil/ , Commander's Summary ]


1st Battalion, 160th Field Artillery

The shield is scarlet and yellow for Artillery. The dividing line represents the Red River; the projectile in chief, the Artillery fire; and the bezant in base, the clean cut hits made by the 160th Field Artillery Regiment. On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules an Indian’s head with war bonnet, all Proper.

LTC Jimmie Thomas

CSM John Lairson

Following World I, a light artillery battery was organized as Battery A, of the 1st Oklahoma Field Artillery. The 75 millimeter cannons, drawn by white horses, became known as the "White Horse Battery," and today, Battery "A", 1st Battalion 160th Field Artillery is the oldest artillery unit in the Oklahoma National Guard. The 160th FA saw action in World War II where it supported the 179th Infantry Regiment in the European theater, including action at the Salerno beachhead and the drive inland against the counter-attacking Germans. Today, the 160th Field Artillery is in Direct Support, of the 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) of the Oklahoma Army National Guard.


1st BATTALION 160TH FIELD ARTILLERY OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM 2011-2012 DEPLOYMENT TRAINING

The 1st BN 160th Field Artillery headquartered in Chandler, Oklahoma started their major pre-deployment training at Ft Sill Oklahoma on March 10, 2011. During their time at Ft Sill, the 160th trained on a multitude of small arms, crew serve weapons, and two artillery pieces; the M198 and the new M777 howitzers. The units proposed mission in Afghanistan was to provide Artillery support for their area of responsibility and to provide embedded police mentor teams for the Afghan National Police (ANP) and the Afghan Uniformed Police (AUP). Upon successful completion of their training at Ft Sill, the 160th returned home to see their families for the final four days before they left on April 6, for their mobilization training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi and the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) at Ft Polk Louisiana. At Camp Shelby, the 160th took part in many different training exercises to include but not limited to, convoy operations, Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) recognition, IED defeat, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) rollover training, and key leader engagements. The soldiers of the 160th Field Artillery completed all of the training tasks assigned to them in a superb fashion.


In early May the 1st BN 160th Field Artillery arrived at Ft Polk’s Joint Regional Training Center. Here the soldiers of the 160th lived on a mock Forward Operating Base where they trained with role players on their Police Mentor jobs. The task at hand was to assist the ANP and AUP with their everyday jobs and help them establish better police force. The 160th’s police mentor teams paired extremely well with their “Afghan” counterparts during this training and was recognized by the JRTC staff as being one of the best units during that rotation. On June 3, 2011, the 160th Field Artillery returned to Camp Shelby Mississippi for the final stages of their post mobilization training. However, on June 7, 2011, the battalion was notified that their mission had changed. The unit was now tasked with Command and control of Camp Buehring, Kuwait and the Theater Gateway Mission at Camp Virginia, Kuwait. Soldiers of the 160th will now provide convoy security for units going to and from Kuwait City International Airport, Quick Reaction Force (QRF) and Area Reaction Force (ARF) for the northern camps in Kuwait, and will run the command cell at Camp Buehring. The 1st BN 160th Field Artillery left for Kuwait on July 1, 2011.

[References: Commander’s reports]


1st Squadron, 180th Cavalry (WY24TO)

Symbolism: A silver color metal and enamel device overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure three Indian arrows pyramid wise argent. Attached above from a wreath argent and azure an Indian’s head with war bonnet all proper. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a silver scroll inscribed “TANAP NANAIYA KIA ALHTAIYAHA” in blue letters.

LTC Christopher Chomosh

CSM Brian Miller

The 1/180th Cavalry Regiment has a rich operational history reaching back to the European Theater in World War II, where they participated in campaigns in Sicily, Salerno, Anzio, France, and Germany. In 1951, the unit was deployed for the Korean War. Most recently, the 180th has deployed to Egypt in support of the Multi-National Force (MFO) in 20022003; Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan (2006-2007); Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq (2007-2008). They are currently deployed to Kuwait in support of Army Central Command, ready to deploy anywhere in the Middle East.


The 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team(IBCT), of which the 1st Squadron, 180th Cavalry is a part, is from the Oklahoma National Guard. It is a completely self sufficient brigade hosting the complete ensemble of infantry, cavalry, artillery, military intelligence, engineer, signal, support maintenance, medical and heavy transportation units. Arriving in June and July, their units will begin their "full spectrum" of duties in the east-central region of Afghanistan. However, two of their battalions, including soldiers of 1st Squadron, 180th Cavalry, will be redirected to Kuwait, where they will handle operations in and out of Iraq, as well as covering down on 11 different countries as the Theater Contingency Force where they can potentially be deployed with very little notice. The 1-180th Cavalry was mobilized for deployment on April 1, 2011 and arrived in Camp Shelby, Mississippi on April 4 to begin mobilization training. Initially, the Squadron was training for deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, and Troopers trained in counterinsurgency techniques, as well as combat tactics and weapons for the next three months. In early May, the Squadron moved to Fort Polk, Louisiana to train at the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC). There, they received advanced counterinsurgency training through realistic exercises with highly trained opposing forces. During this training, th the 1-180 used multiple types of aircraft from the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade to conduct operations, including air assault, medevac, air movement, and close combat attack. The 1-180th also conducted Close Air Support training with members of a Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) from the 146th Air Support Operations Squadron (ASOS), from the Oklahoma Air National Guard in Oklahoma City. The 1-180th earned high marks from the Trainer/Mentors at JRTC and attained a rating of Category IV, the highest training category for combat units. Once the training was completed, the unit returned to Camp Shelby, to prepare for deployment.


In late June, the Squadron conducted a Casing/Uncasing the Colors ceremony, where the Colors of the 1-180th Infantry were retired and cased for the last time, while the Colors of the 1-180th Cavalry were uncased and flown for the first time. This marked the completion of the transition of the unit to the Cavalry. Shortly after this ceremony, the unit received notification of a change of mission; they were informed that they would no longer be deploying to Afghanistan. Due to the withdrawal of forces from Afghanistan, the 1-180th was to be re-routed to Kuwait, to serve as the Theater Support Command’s Mobile Reaction Force (MRF), to be prepared to deploy anywhere within the Army Central Command (ARCENT) area of responsibility. After a few weeks of diverting equipment shipments from Afghanistan to Kuwait, elements of the 1-180th began deploying on June 30. By July 3, all remaining members arrived in Camp Beuhring, Kuwait. Once there, the unit began to build the MRF from the ground up.

On July 27, the unit conducted another Uncasing ceremony, where the Colors of the 1-180th Cavalry were uncased and flown on foreign soil for the first time. With the departure of the 197th Fires Brigade, a National Guard unit from New Hampshire, the 1-180th will be attached to the 1-34 Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT), of the Minnesota Army National Guard.


Members of the unit are serving in Iraq, helping to return equipment and vehicles to the Continental United States (CONUS) in support of Operation New Dawn. Four officers have been attached to the US Air Force in Afghanistan to serve as Ground Liaison Officers in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The 1-180th continues to prepare for contingency operations in the ARCENT area of responsibility. 1-180th Cav Troopers conduct weapons training at Camp Beuhring, Kuwait, July 2011.

[references: 45th IBCT Powerpoint (14 May 2011), Granite Thunder facebook, 145th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, tulsaworld.com, Manny Gamallo – World Staff Writer, Commander’s update]


197th Fires Brigade Deployed Manning Document of 27 June, 2011 197th Fires Brigade HHB COL LTC LTC CSM SGT SPC MAJ CW2 MSG SFC SGT SGT SGT SSG LTC MAJ 1LT SFC SGT MAJ CPT CPT SSG SPC MAJ SSG SSG

COREY PETER L LEAHEY MARK W WILSON DANIEL T CONSIDINE THOMAS PERREAULT MARK A PROVANCE ALAN G MORANTI MICHAEL J MONTMINY PAUL G RADCLIFFE ROBERT CAVE MARK R ROBAK RACHEL L HANNIGAN KATIE L MORSE RICHARD N RICHARDS CARA M OBERMAN RICHARD DAVIS JAMES W PAULL JOSHUA R CILLEY JON P NGUYEN LIANA B DENNEHY JAMES W PAPPAIOANOU JAMES BEDELLS David J MORSE JAMIE L VICINANZO JOSEPH D VEINOTTE STEVEN E NOLAN RICHARD D KELLER MARK F

F

B

F

L

LTC CW2 MAJ SFC SGT SPC CPT 1LT 1LT MSG SFC SGT SSG SPC LTC LTC MAJ MAJ MAJ 1LT SGM SFC SFC SFC SFC SSG SSG

CAMPBELL EDWARD W MORGAN CHARLIE HEILSHORN GREGORY D MITCHELL NEAL I GORDON BRIAN W WHITE KAYLA R MONGELLI STEVEN M DONOVAN JENIFER L KENNEY LOGAN T REEVES ROBERTJ CANAVAN MATTHEW P GUZMAN SIGFREDO WEAVER JASON H MOSHER BRITTANY S LEBLANC JOHN A PELLETIER MICHAEL J BENNETT SEAN P NEVILLE WILLIAM R SAMON JEFFREY M GRONDIN GERARD J GOSSELIN ROBERT R BRIGHT MARK O BOUCHARD DENNIS P EMERY JESSE H DODGE MICHAEL C HURST STEPHEN J DAMATA ANTHONY P

SPC SPC PV1 MSG PFC PFC PV2 LTC CW4 MSG SSG SGT CW2 SSG CW2 2LT 2LT CPT CPT CW2 SSG SGT SPC SGT SPC SGT MAJ

LEVASSEUR PETER E TILTON NATHAN D FAWCETT RAYMOND D MCCABE JEFFREY B MOUA TOUCHUESHI HEDGES CHARLES J HOGAN STEVEN A STUART ROBERT J CLEMONS DAVID N PRATTE THOMASR NAULT JOEL L GLOVER RACHEL A FILIAULT ANDREW M FLEHARTYSTREVIG RACHAEL I HURLBURT GLEN S LONGVAL JASON P STAUBIN ALBERT J GRAY JOSEPH R DUPUIS MATTHEW M GAGNON MARK R MCLAUGHLIN ROBERT H WAGNER ANDREW J HEFFERNAN STEVEN J HAYES ELIZABETH S KILEY DARRELL R LOCHNER FREDERICK M PERREAULT ERIC S

197th Fires Brigade BSB North MAJ CPT CPT SGM 1LT CW2

HOGANCAMP ERIC B JONES TRAVIS A CHAMBERLAIN TYLER D HOUTEN STEPHEN CREMIN DENNIS P YERGEAU SCOTT A

SFC CPT MAJ CPT SGT MAJ

VANDELL RAY A MCCARROLL DANIEL J MACDONALD ERIC W WHITE TIMOTHY L LECLAIR DAVID S ULRICSON DAVIS K

1SG CW4 MSG SGM

PINETTE RICKY G WEGNER RALPH E WESTGATE JAMES F FLINT DANIEL E


TF 1-119th Michigan Army National Guard Short Haul & Convoy Escort Camp Virginia Headquarters and Headquarters Battery LTC MAJ CSM CPT SFC SFC SPC SPC SSG SFC CPT SPC CPT 1LT CW3 SFC SSG SSG SSG MAJ SGM CPT SFC SSG SSG SPC MAJ SFC SPC SGT SPC CW2 MSG SSG

SCHLOEGL LAWRENCE E MEYERS SCOTT L ARRINGTON JODY L SHEILS JEREMY K SHERMAN KEVIN R WALTERS ELLINGTON A KREITNER JEFFERY A ORFANT KORY A MCAULIFFE THOMAS M RILEY STANLEY MARTINUS BRIAN S SNYDER MICHAEL J YORDY OBIE B CARPENTER JACOB M MAIDENS CYNTHIA A HALL BERNARD J KUBICKI KEITH A LIVINGSTON JONATHON S KORSON DUANE P WILSON STEVEN R GEER TERRY L STRICKLAND LONNIE R KENNY ROGER A WILBUR ROBERT D HICKS KEVIN J LAMEIRA BRENTON P KRAYSC SHAWN M HUNTER MICHAEL R HUSS WESLEY D WHIPPLE BRANDON S TEIXEIRA AMANDA E COOK SHAWN D HAHN CHARLES I MOSLEY EMANUEL I

SGT BUELL KURT W SGT ELLIS SHANE D SPC BRISTOL SEAN E PFC POMEROY JAMES A CW4 MACLAREN TODD D MSG HILL DAVID C SSG HALL JEFFREY L SSG ROOT AARON A SGT WARREN BRYON D SPC BUCHANAN TIMOTHY S 2LT PRINCESAYWARD KATHLEEN SSG BOGUE SCOTT A SPC SHRUM JACOB R SPC THURMAN KENNETH E SPC WHIPPLE CRAIG R SPC CADY TYLER S 1LT BRAINARD ROBERT G SGT HOELTZEL DANIEL D SSG LONSBERY MICHAEL A SSG ORR JOSEPH A CPT OBRIEN DANIEL L 1LT RIPPLINGER PETER M SSG DUMARK JENNIFER M SGT VALENTINE CHARLES L SPC PETROU JOHN A MAJ SCHRAMM ERICK R 2LT BOULET SAMUEL J SFC DALE BRUCE H CPT COCHENOUR MICHAEL J 2LT STEPHENS ADAM J 1SG MCKEOWN ALFRED H SSG GULLETT JUSTIN D SPC SMITH WADE R

SGT CPT CW3 MSG SFC SFC SFC SSG SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC SSG SGT SGT SSG SSG SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SGT SGT

ROSE MATTHEW C SYLVESTER ADAM R THOMPSON JEFFERY S BERGQUIST JOHN M RINCKEY BRAD A HUNTER MATTHEW A SKIDMORE STEPHAN M SCHEIBLE JOHN J DUKES RAYMOND L FORTES LUIBETH M FOURNIER JOSEPH C RIVERA NATASHA L MASA KEITH E BISON NICHOLAS S DYMOND MARK A HART SETH D JOSEPH JAMIE D MAROSZEK AMY L RICE NICHOLAS R SPENCER ERIC S COTE DAVID L PERRY STEVEN M HAYWOOD JOSHUA D WRIGHT KYLE N CAIN JONATHAN A PARKER ERIC L COLLINS CODY A CURTIS ANDREW P GROFF JUSTIN S EASH JOHN MIEL WYATT P TOLAN GERGORY W WALCH DESMER G


TF 1-119th Michigan Army National Guard Short Haul & Convoy Escort Camp Virginia Alpha Company 1LT 1SG 1LT SFC SSG SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC 1LT SFC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC PFC SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC PFC SGT SPC PFC SGT SGT SPC CPL SPC PFC SSG SPC SPC SGT

HENDRIKSE JOHN R BENNETT JAY C BOWLES JOSHUA M BUCKLEY DAVID J MERKLE JOHN E STIER GERALD S INNES DREW S KONTZ ROBERT M WIMBURY WILLIAM H YERKES JERRY D LUND GUY A CORSI ANTHONY D STEWART TOMMY R PEABODY DUSTIN J HOBBINS MICHAEL J HARTMAN ROBERT R LEHMANN DREW W MANSELL MICHAEL A PUTMAN JASON L KNAPPEN KURT L TASIOR CHRISTOPHER M WYATT MATTHEW R LANDENBERG DONALD A LITTLE SHAWN W MILLER BENJAMIN D HEPLER STEPHEN L MARKHAM DONALD L LAMOTTE RAOUL T DRIVINSKI WILLIAM K SIMPSON BRIAN M BOLLAERT SETH A BAUGHMAN SKIP W SYMINGTON WILLIAM G BRUN MARY R ADAMS LAWRENCE M MOORE TABITHA K AUMANN BRANDON C SANDERS WILLIE L SIMON JOSEPH M BONNER RAYMOND R WILLIS KALETTE S WILSON GUY T

SPC STANISLAWSKI NATHANIEL C SPC DIAZBAEZ EDUARDO SGT NITSCKE GABRIEL W SPC NUNEZ CHRISTOPHER S SPC MOGA ROBERT E SGT MACHIELA JEREMY D SPC SLEPPY DANIEL A SPC OLSEN TRACY M 1LT BAIN IAN N SFC COURTRIGHT STEVEN B SPC FRIES JORDAN R SSG WHITE BRAD A SPC ELLIOTT KYLE J PFC CHRISTIE JAMES R SGT SYACSURE DENNIS W SPC WILLIAMS ROBERT G SPC SAWICKI CHARLES S SGT OMELIANOFF MATTHEW C SPC KROOM JOSEPH M SPC SMITH ANDREW L SPC HUNT CARL S SPC MOORE MICHAEL J SPC CROSSMAN DANA M SSG ZACHOW CRAIG R SPC FRANKOVICH KYLE J SPC MEIER JOHN F SGT LAURENCE STEVEN E SPC BATES DONALD G SPC FIEDLER JASON J SGT MEADOWS SAMUEL D SPC HAGAN BRIAN L SGT CUBA BRYCE I SGT DIAZ LOUIS L PFC HARRINGTON CHRISTOPHER J SPC SUMNER NICHOLAS J SSG SELDEN SEAN E SGT HURLESS AUSTIN L SPC ALSAEDI MOHAMMED F VACANT PV2 ELLIS ERIC M

PFC MICHALSKI THOMAS F SPC TIBBLES BENJAMIN R SPC STONECIPHER MICHAEL S PV2 REED CODY SGT RISKE STEVEN E SPC SCHEMBER SHANE A SGT JOHNSON BRYAN D 1LT MCAFEE MICHAEL L SFC VANDERMARK KRESTON D SGT FIELDS MASON M SSG LARK BRIAN K VACANT PFC BATTLES COURTNEY S SGT DOW JOSEPH D PFC BENTLEY JOSHUA A SPC FESLER JONNEY M SGT COOPER LAURENCE D SPC COURTADE ADAM S SPC CRAFTS JOSHUA W SGT CADDELL JASON E SPC SLOAN BENJAMIN L SPC MCGHAN BRANDON W SSG SCHULTZ SCOTT A SPC HART JESSE A SPC LOUIS RYAN C SPC HOWE CHADWICK J SPC POWELL SARAH E PFC DIXON BILLY D SGT SPIERING CORNELIUS T SPC FOSTER NICHOLAS P SPC DIGIOVANNI JEROME J SGT ESSEX DIAMOND K PFC BROWE JARRED A PFC BAILEY DEVANNE L SSG SHIERY SCOTT M SPC FESSENDEN MICHAEL F SGT STRIGGOW KENNETH C SGT MOORE TIMOTHY M SPC BUCHOLTZ KEVIN A SPC DEMUTE SHANE M SGT ROBINSON LARRY T


TF 1-119th Michigan Army National Guard Short Haul & Convoy Escort Camp Virginia Bravo Company CPT 1SG 1LT SFC SSG SSG SGT PFC SPC SSG SPC SGT 1LT SFC SPC SSG PFC PFC SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SSG M CPL PV1 SPC PFC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC L SPC E SSG SGT

AUSTHOF JEFFREY A PATRICK MATTHEW F MASON PETER C JOHNSON JEREMIAH L HAVILAND THOMAS L SPEARS JAMES R EICHHORN MARK A FRYE JEREMY C EICHHORN ALLEN M RIVERA ROBERT M MCBRIDE JUSTIN R GEER TERRY L BENNETT JAMES R AVALOS JOEL KOWALSKI MATTHEW E DAVIS ANTHONY S LOVELACE ZACHARY B HEATH JERRY H NOKES MICHAEL A CLARK JAMES M WOOD TODD B KENNEY SCOTT W BATE STEVEN J NELSON ERICK D CHURCHILL JIMMY J DESIRA JOSEPH A BLEVINS EPHRAIM BETTS CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON JUSTIN D RIEDER THOMAS R REINSMITH ERIK D WAGNER JOHN F VARADI RAUL J HORST CORY D WINEGAR MATTHEW A GASCHO LUKE J EBNIT JOSEPH R RAMIREZ CHRISTOPHER DICKINSON KRISTOPHER POLO JOE R KING MICHAEL V

SPC SGT PFC SPC SGT SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC 1LT SFC SPC SSG PFC PFC A SGT SPC PV1 W SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC PFC SSG SPC PV2 SGT CPL SPC SGT M SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT

GRZYBOWSKI TIFFANY M WENGER MARK A WALKER BRIAN M BOUZIOS JOHN G WORDEN DALE A KEMP DANIEL A JENKINS SCOT B MUSSER MARK A MARSHALL CLINTON E OLNEY JERRY W NAGORSKI PATRICK E MCBRIDE SHAWN R NIGH CHRISTOPHER S SUTTON JASON E KAISER JOEL D WASHINGTON KENNETH MASLOWSKI JOSHUA D WEBB BENJAMIN D RIVENBURGH RICHARD DOUGLAS MATTHEW J LOVELL MICHAEL A SULLIVAN BLAINE R WILKE DENNIS P BRIGGS CURTIS D LEE ALEXANDER V ROGOWSKI RANDALL S ANAYA JORGE V LAROCHE JORDAN J HOLLINSHEAD KYLE S COSTON CLIFFORD C KINDER BENJAMIN F BRYAN CHRISTOPHER METHENY GARY D MAPES TIMOTHY D JACKSON SAMUEL I SMITH GEORGE C ROTUNDA RUTH A LODOVISI ANTHONY M ZIMMERMAN MARTY R FRICKE CRAIG A SNYDER DAVID P

CPL COSTON MICHAEL R PFC KNAPP JARED J SGT SHANKEL JASON D SPC BRADBURN TIMOTHY A SPC CRIPE MATTHEW J SGT LYON STEVEN W SPC JOHNSON JOHN F PFC NEUBAUER MAXWELL R 1LT OSBECK GARY M SFC BERG JAMES J PFC POP MONROY G SSG HIGGINS JAMES M SPC SCHAFER MATTHEW A PFC ROGERS RICHARD R SGT SANDEL LANCE J PFC SCHUTT JOSHUA D SPC CRAVEN MATTHEW W SGT HECHT JEFFREY L SPC LAPOINTE JOSEPH T CPL CONKLIN MARY E SGT MCLANE STEVEN L PV2 CAMPBELL MICHAEL W SGT BHOLA THOMAS H SSG HUTCHINSON CHRISTOPHER L SPC SIMON STEVEN M SPC JONES JODY R SGT MUNOZ JUAN H PV2 SAMEK GENVIEVE L SPC FASTEN MAXWELL F SGT THOMAS JASON E PFC HOLT KAYLA R SPC BAILEY THOMAS R SGT SHERMAN JEREMIAH J PFC OFFENBAKER ROBERT D PFC RUSSELL JAMES L SSG LAGIOS RANDY G SGT JENKINS JASON A SPC WINTERS HAROLD L SSG LAVICTOR BRIAN R CPL FORGIE TIMOTHY A PV1 DICKINSON ASHTON D


TF 1-119th Michigan Army National Guard Short Haul & Convoy Escort Camp Virginia Charlie Company CPT 1SG 1LT SFC SSG PFC SPC SGT SPC SSG CPL SGT 1LT SFC SPC SSG SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC R SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC PFC

CARROLL MATTHEW J KLEINHARDT DUANE C AVERY DELBERT E ROBINS JAMES S WEST DARI L MORLEY LOGAN W SKRIBA JACOB B STRAUSS MARK C HEALY JACOB K BURNS WILLIAM H DOMAN SCOTT A OTIS DAVID K SANDS RICHARD J GREGORY JOSEPH R MURRAY BRANDON R ELDER HANK W DIETZ DAVID E LANE JOSHUA H LIEHR DENNIS B WILT JAY A POST KRISTOPHER T LINDER RICHARD E SULCS MATTHEW S HERRINGTON MICHAEL VISSER JAY H YBARRA NICOLAS J ALSAADY AHMED K BETZ ROBERT C SHELTON STEVEN L PERSON JOSHUA G PRIEBE SEAN M HOULDSWORTH ERIC S FOWLER LLOYD M BUTLER DAVID A STERLE JOSEPH D SHINN JOSHUA E WIERSMA BRIAN C WILLIAMS KENNETH R WULFF JAN M JOLLEY CRAIG A PUEBLO JONATHON J FARCHONE MIC A

SSG SPC A SPC SGT PFC PFC SGT SPC PV2 1LT SFC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT PFC PFC SGT PFC J PFC SGT PFC PFC SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SPC SPC

RHINARD ROBERT C RICHARDSON DEVAUGHN MARSHALL DREW Z KEEHR RILEY C TRAN DAN N ANDERSON RYAN M WILLIAMS REGINALD E ALBARKAT SHARIF M COLLAR ANDREW T LIMAS RUBEN SEND MATTHEW A SANDS ANTHONY L FARRELL STEVEN K GAUTHIER JACOB J TIEFENBACH JOHN J KINNEY SCOTT S WHITFIELD JOSHUA M LACH MARTIN WILLS ERIC T MICHEALS CHRISTOPHER ARNZ JOSEPH HILL DOUGLAS T GARDNER JORDAN M SHUMWAY JACOB D SMITH MICHAEL T RIZKALLAH JACOB I SABIN JOSHUA A BETZ DALE A FITZNER KENNETH R SLEIGHT WILLIAM J BEDUNAH JOHN A HUNTER MICHAEL J PERSON JEREMY L ELDER RICHARD A MILLS BRANDON T LITTLE ALEX W ABBOTT JASON A KOCAN JACOB T COLLIER ANDREW M GRUNDEN STEPHEN K BURTON ZACHARY A

PFC LEITER WILLIAM L SPC FREEMAN NATHAN W SPC FIERKE NATHAN W PFC FENNELLY BRETT F SSG WICKENS DAVID C SPC NGUYEN JOHNBAO N SPC JACKSON DAVID L 1LT HEADY CHARLES J SFC WILLOUGHBY ERIC D SPC VALENTINE AARON S SSG WINDGASTON THOMAS G SPC ANDERSON JAMES M SPC ADAMS JASON M SGT DANNEMILLER MARCUS W PFC HOLLAND ERIC D SPC BANNERMAN JESSE C SGT FRANZOI FRANK A PFC THOMAS MICHAEL J SPC MATTHIESEN DANIEL L SGT EHRIG PATRICK M PFC LEACH NATHON J SPC THEORET RYAN D SSG MERRILL KENNETH R SGT SMITH LARZ A SGT SCHMIDT MICHAEL J SGT PARKS DEAN M SPC CUDDAHEE JEREMY J PFC GRIFFES GARY L SGT KLACKING MICHAEL R PFC HUGHES DANIEL T SPC HENSLER JONATHAN C SGT HAWKINS STEVEN J SPC COVEL ALONZO J PFC MENTER AARON M SSG DAVIDSON STEVEN P SPC ZAPPONE GREGORY J VACANT SGT KENNEDY TYRELL A PFC DALFONSO STEPHEN SGT DOLAN STEPHEN M


TF 1-119th Michigan Army National Guard Short Haul & Convoy Escort Camp Virginia Delta Company CPT GRAHAM CHRISTOPHER G 1SG PEYERK DUANE M 1LT BROLSMA MATTHEW A SFC AXTELL LON H SSG BOWMAN RANDALL W SGT WOODS JASON A SPC ANDERSON TODD T SPC FLETCHER HOLLY R SSG GUILD JOSHUA D CPL HAASE JESSICA L SGT VERHULST KELLY A 1LT ALMA MICHAEL H SFC LYTLE ANDREW J SPC SPENCER AMY M SSG FELTMAN JAY R SPC FRENS THOMAS M SPC COLE CURTIS M SGT RONNING DAVID P PFC DIERKING MICHAEL C PFC TINNEY SEAN P SGT ARMSTRONG SEAN D VACANT SPC JONES EMANUEL J SGT SHERWOOD JODY W SPC RENDAK JOHN J PFC KAILING JORDAN M SSG KLOPP ERIC M SPC STRUYK MICHAEL S VACANT SGT FREES DARRYL E SPC CALISTI STEVEN M SPC SMITH EVAN L SGT MOORE AARON C SPC SPENCER CLAY R SPC SOLIS JOSEPH M SPC AVINK JUSTIN L SPC OBERMILLER TIMOTHY G PFC NOTO JOSHUA R SSG BOUCK DALE J SPC BROMLEY BERNARD E SPC WIER BRENT J SPC HARRINGTON JEFFERY V

SPC MOE JEREMY W PV2 BOSTWICK WILLIAM B SGT EDWARDS TIMOTHY L SPC ROBB ERIC J SPC SPRING BRANDON P 1LT DEUTSCH MOSES M SFC HAASE SHAWN W SPC CARRIER JAMIE L SSG JOHNSON JENNIFER L SPC KIRCHOFF FRED J SPC ANDRY DEREK R SGT SKA J TERRI L SPC FORTIN LONNIE L PFC OSWALD NATHAN G SGT DEGROOT KENNETH R SPC JAVINSKY JOSHUA D SPC SPOELMAN TIMOTHY D SGT MCFARLAND ERIC G SPC RIGGS PATRICK J PFC DIAZ ALFREDO M SSG STRESSMAN RUSSELL K SPC GOUDREAU KYLE S SPC SCHWAB MATTHEW C SGT DEXTER ROCKY J SPC JAHNKE JACOB SPC STITT DAVID L SGT FOUTY MILES J SPC FRENS DAVID L PFC THOMAS DAVID A SGT GRONDSMA PHILIP J SPC DIRHEIMER JASON R SPC NELSON CODY M SSG STITT WESLEY J SPC CONNELLY FRED E VACANT SGT FEASEL WALTER W SPC SYREK CASEY L SPC MCCABE CHRISTOPHER SGT STRANDBERG CHRISTOPHER M SPC FINK BRIAN M VACANT SGT VARELA TABYTHA A

SPC COWELL DEREK M SPC BOS MATTHEW M 1LT BEATTY BRETT A SFC WEST BRYAN D SPC GRIMM JACOB D SSG SPOON DARRIN F SPC WALLACE JOISHUA SPC DAVIS JOSHUA A SPC WIER SEAN A VACANT SPC KLOCKO TYLER A SGT MARTINEZ MANUEL PFC SIGAFOOSE MICHAEL R SPC STRANDBERG JERRY L SGT MCDERMOTT MICHAEL T PFC DENAWAY JACOB W PFC WIGGERS BRYAN A SSG MELOCHE RAYMOND M SPC ARREDONDO LAMARR A PFC GILMAN JEREMIAH J SGT ELLIS JUSTIN J SPC TANIS JAMES A SPC HATZ JASON D SPC OSTYN ROSCOE J SPC CRUZAN RUSSELL PFC RAYMOND FARRAND F SGT DIRHEIMER JARRED M SPC BARNHARDT ROBERT D SPC POTTER JAMES L SSG BOWEN DANIEL W SPC JOHNSON JEREMIAH C SPC KOSTEN MATTHEW D SPC REED WALTER J SPC PARKS JOSHUA J VACANT SGT ANDERSON RICHARD R PFC DRUMMOND KYLE J PFC MORGAN ASHLEY M SGT MEEUSEN CHASTA L SPC ROSIER JESSE M SPC SCHRADER KENNETH W


TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Force Protection South Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base Headquarters and Headquarters Battery LTC MAJ CSM CPT SGT 1LT SFC SSG SPC SGT M SGT CPT CPT 1LT SGT CW3 SFC SPC SSG SGT

RUSHER LEONARD D FRAZER ROBERT B DAY KEVIN L LIVINGSTON CARL E FRAZIER TIMOTHY I BISHOP MYRON W CANN DOUGLAS N DILLEY DARREL R NICKSON SEAN A HORVATH CHRISTOPHER WRUBEL PETER A TZIZIK DANIEL M FISHER BRIAN S ASHFORD ANTHONY A BARNES AARON V BANUSKEVICH CURTIS D DEFOREST BRIAN R BROWN DEREK C HUANG BIN ROSSMAN BRIAN E

CPT REED JOSEPH A 1LT HALLEAUX DOUGLAS G MSG SALADINE ANTHONY J SSG MULLINS COLIN Y 2LT BRYANT KERVIN J 2LT VIBBERT BRENT W 2LT QUACKENBUSH REBECCA J SSG ROBAK FRANK J SGT VAUGHN ROBERT E SGT MCCLOSKEY KYLE G SPC SWIDER NIKKILEE A SPC CAMELI TODD A SPC TAYLOR CHRISTOPHER W CPT JORSTAD CHAD M MSG BATES CLEVELAND P 1LT RAMMIDI TUELO G SSG GIBBS MICHAEL R 1LT RHODES RASHEED A CPT MIOSKU GEORGE G 1SG HALL DAVID R

CPL URUGUTIA-CASTILLO ROSSANA V SGT OLDS GENE A SPC PRIEST STEVEN P SPC SMITH WILLIAM R SPC SUTTON CHRISTOPHER S SPC KLING JOHN P MSG MILLER STEVEN P SFC WHITCHER SHARON M SFC MINOCK WILLIAM D SSG NAPIER MYZELL SGT FUTTER FREDERICK W PFC MONGER STEVEN L SPC BEJGER JASON M SGT FAIRBOTHAM MARK L SGT FALL BETTY J SGT SAPIEN CHAD E SPC SCHALK CHRISTOPHER I SPC MATHEWS DOUGLAS E


TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Force Protection South Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base Base Support MAJ MSG CPT 1LT SPC SGT 2LT 1LT L

KNIFFIN LAWRENCE G GONZALES MIGUEL CULLIVER MICHELLE E KOZELSKY IAN C YAKEL DOUGLAS J CHEEKS TERRY HOOVER SHANE W MCCORDBROCK TINYSHA

CW3 MANDUJANO LUIS J SFC SELPH WILLIE J SPC WOODRUFF JOSEPH E SSG BEAGLE JAMES J SFC JOHNSON GEORGE L SSG SIROIS DONALD R SGT JACKSON WILLIE F SPC RYAN-MEREDITH BRENDAN

SFC SSG SGT CW3 1LT SSG SSG SGT SPC

ANDERSON CLYDE KELSEY BERNARD JANIK MICHAEL G BRYAN JOSEPH D MARTIN DEVANNE R SIKLAWI GASSAN S SWIASTYN STEPHEN T GOUGH VICTORIA E MCCLAIN KRISTIN J

SPC SSG SGT SPC SGT SPC SPC CPT 1LT 1LT

PHIM CHRISTY DEMAIO DAVID C STEVENS ZOTA RODERICK JAMES A GILLIARD ROERT C MOREL JUAN J VANASSE NATHAN R LEMELIN STEPHEN J SKRUMBELLOS RONALD A JACKSON CAREY J

TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Force Protection South Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base Area Reaction Force 1LT SFC SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SSG SGT

MCDANIEL JERMAREO L DAVIS MATTHEW B DOWNEY KELLY J PULLOM LAVALLE J CHOICE ANDRE L BENTON RODGER A ARMSTRONG JASON L PFEIFFER CARL A LOUDON RANDY M STALEY AARON A

SPC SGT SPC SGT SFC SGT SGT SPC SSG SGT

BULLOCK DAVID J WARE WESLEY J WASHINGTON TREY J WILLIAMS NISSAN VEGA JOSE L AYER MICHAEL R BROPHY SEAN V GITY ROBERT L BROOKS DARWIN M GANAWAY YVONNE D


TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell, Force Protection South Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base Alpha Company CPT HERSCHLEB DOUGLAS A 1SG ANDERSON CHESTER G SGT JONES DARRYL C SGT LACEY GERALD J SPC GASKIN DEANDREA SPC HERRERA FLORA M 1LT WILSON ERIC J SFC GREER SCOTT B SSG ROBITAILLE STEVEN M SGT WIDMARK JAMES A SPC JONES CHRISTOPHER B PFC COBB ANDIAGO R 1LT WALLACE ROSS A SFC DUBBS MICHAEL E SPC RICKARD KYLE W SSG NIEBRZYDOWSKI WALTER F SSG WILSON BARRY L SPC BIEDRON SETH M SPC RANDALL RODERICK G PFC SCHULZ KEITH P SGT MARTIN LACEY K SPC MICHAUD ANDRE C VACANT SPC MALOUIN JAMI S SPC AMARAL ALEXANDER SSG HERRON DONALD A SSG MCCLOSKEY RYAN B SPC CUNNINGHAM DELROY H SPC CRAIG ANDREW W PFC WALKER CODY D SPC PLONKA NEIL D SSG BUXTON THEODORE G SPC ALLOR JESSICA M SPC BUNDY JASON A SPC SELLERS DONALD O SPC HARDY DOMINICK D PFC NELSON ALTON E SSG ALCORN IVOR C SGT TRISCHE DALE L SPC MIESLER WESLEY E SGT BURDEN SEAN R SPC LLOYD TAD M SPC QUIST JOSEPH J SGT DONEGAN JOSHUA R SPC DEMMER ADAM W SPC GRIGSBY BRYAN J SPC SNYDER TIMOTHY S SGT WILLIAMS KENDRICK D SFC BILLINGSLEY ERNEST H SPC FONTANA ANTHONY M SPC MADDEN ANTONIO A SSG MALONE HOLLIS J

SPC SGT PV2 SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC 1LT SFC SGT SSG SGT SPC PFC SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SPC SGT SSG SGT PFC SPC PFC SPC SSG PFC SPC SPC SPC SGT SSG SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC PFC PFC PFC PFC SGT SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC SPC PV2

ANDREWS DION J RICHARDSON DARRYL C LAMPKIN LAYTHAN L OLIVER JEFFREY P HILL BRIAN A PEREZ SALIM E MCCLASKEY SHAUN E FLETCHER NATHANIEL D SKEEN ROCKY N KENDRICK JAMIEL L FALL ADAM C WALTON TOUSSAINT M CALLAWAY RODERICK P SCOLES CHRISTOPHER A SMITH CURTIS E DEBERRY DWAYNE S GORDEN JUSTIN A STANHOPE MARK T DUNKLIN ROLANDO F IRVIN MARIO D BERRY BRANDON D BROCK JASMINE E CARY JOHN B PETERS MICHAEL S LOCKWOOD KEVIN D KIMBROUGH DAVY A BUTLER JAMES H STROTHEIDE ROBERT L KREMHELMER JOSHUA P HOOLSEMA ERIC J TORRES ANDRES K MILLS ALAN M JENKINS ANTHONY MCLIN WILLIAM J BIGGER JAMES R ARRELL JASON H HAGERTY TAMIKA L DILLARD MATTHEW M WILSON GORDON S DAVIS BRENT J PETERS FRANCIS J CORTES BRYANT L BROWN DAVID M MERCURIO JOHN E BROWN ELIJAH T MACKAY TYLER D MARFIL REBECCA L INSISIENGMAY JASON B DUPRE MICHAEL A ALLEN DOUGLAS A MCKEON KEVIN WILSON KELLIE MOREL BRYANT

PFC GAGNON JASON SPC TATUM STEPHEN J SPC DAVIS ROBERT M SPC GLOVER MICAIAH J 2LT BRYANT ISAIAH K SFC HALE DOUGLAS G SPC GLUCK MICHAEL J SSG PENN STANFORD L SSG JOHNSON ANDREW L PFC HARTLEY WILLIAM F PFC RAY ERICA D SPC GRANDOWICZ THOMAS J SPC LEGG HENRY S SGT THOMAS QUINTIN L SPC CRAWFORD ANTHONY B SGT MORSI JOSEPH K SPC SANDOVAL NOEL A SPC FLEESON JOSHUA D SSG CARTER ULYSSES L SGT THOMPSON DAVID M PFC VICKERY KALEB T SPC BUCKLEY KEVIN A SPC OSBORN MICHAEL C SGT WEATHERSPOON RAYMOND E SGT ESTES RICHARD H SPC MILLER ALVIN L SPC GRAY JEFFERY A SPC LEONARD SHAUN M VACANT SSG HOWIE DAVID M SGT BEAMON TERRANCE R SGT NICHOLSON JUNATOR S SPC SOUTHARDS DAVID L PV1 BYES TERRELL M PFC BAUMGRAS DAVID C SPC COGEAN DAVID SPC QUINN ERIC SPC GONZALEZ ISRAEL SPC REMOND RAYMOND PFC DIAZ THOMAS M SSG GRIGSBY ROBERT E SPC EDWARDS MYA H SPC HOWELL FREDERICK VACANT SPC SANVILLE KYLE SPC CHAREST LEO M SPC SCHWABE FAITH E SPC STONE ERIK SPC BERTHELETTE MICHAEL SPC COOK GREGORY D


TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Force Protection South Camp Patriot, Kuwaiti Naval Base Bravo Company CPT WILLIAMS ARNOLD W 1LT NYAMFUKUDZA TAKURA 1SG HITE JAMES M SSG HEIM CHRISTOPHER J PFC LEUNG STEPHEN R SPC VARIN KEITH SPC OLNEY THOMAS A SPC UNDERWOOD KELVIN K SGT NOWICKI CHRISTOPHER SFC SPROVIERO MARK A SSG NASH BRYON E SPC HARMON BRIAN L PFC TARKER JASON M SPC ALLEN MATTHEW P 1LT SAWYER MATTHEW T SFC HILLAKER NATHAN F SPC FULLER CODY L SSG MICHAEL MIKE J SGT HOOK NICHOLAS J SPC CROSE KEVIN M SPC VANEECKHOUTTE REMI D SPC BATCHELDER CAMERON SGT ALTAMIRANOGUTIERREZ RAMON SPC DANNARD DEMETRIUS SPC CALLIS MATTHEW R SPC SMITH ANDREW R SSG DICKIE ALLEN C SGT CASE MATTHEW S PV2 PRIEUR RICHARD D PFC HANSEN JOEL M SPC MILLER JOHN R SPC LAFLAMME DEREK SPC DORBOR JAMES SPC MAILLET PHILIP PV2 MOWEN CHRISTOPHER SSG ADKINS GLENN E SGT MARCHEK JEREMY F PFC ZYNGIER RYAN N SPC CARD JOHNATHAN E SPC HANNA BRANDON A SPC WINGETT CHRISTIPHER PFC SHONK CALEB W SPC MCFADDEN DANNY R PFC HOLMES SYERA I SSG HUETT DENNIS W SPC CHAVEZ-BOUKNIGHT ANGEL M SPC TYSON TRAVIS J

SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC PV2 SSG SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC PFC SGT 2LT SFC PFC SGT SGT PFC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC SSG SGT SPC SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC SSG SGT SPC SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC SSG SGT SPC PFC PFC SPC

LEWIS MICHAEL L MARSHALL JONATHAN E CUMMINGS DEWAYNE A ADAMS JEFFREY R SNOW ALAN C AUSTIN DANIEL E APRIN CHARLES Y DAILEY ADAM DAY BRANDON S DEMASKE PAUL D DENNIS MICHAEL A DILLON AARON E EVERETT JUSTIN M GAVIN JOSEPH M COLLINS REGINALD L CASWELL MARK C SCANLON BRENT D COMSTOCK THOMAS E JACOBS HUNTER J WALKER ANTONIO R MOORE RICHARD F PASSINGHAM MATTHEW SMITH JONATHAN E REID DAVID J NEELEY JONATHAN E MITCHELL SARRAH H VONHINKEN CARL N RASMUSSEN ANDREW WILCOX HENRY D BRANTLEY JOSEPH M CARTER RODNEY G SHEPHARD MICHAEL L BARKER MICHAEL C BROOKS STEVEN L MCCULLEY ERIC A MCNALLY LANCE B WHITMAN OWEN A PENNINGTON TIMOTHY J BROWNLEE ALEXANDER REED NICHOLAS E BARNES JOSHUA H SLOAN WARREN D SKRIBA SCOTT J ARTHUR WILLIAM M HATFIELD WILLIAM K WOOD JASON M SMITH CHRISTOPHER E FRINK BRIAN L DARDIS BRIAN F

SPC PFC PFC SSG SPC SPC SPC SPC SPC PV2 SPC 2LT SFC SPC SSG SGT SPC PFC PV2 SPC SPC PFC PFC SSG SGT SPC PFC PFC SPC SPC SPC SPC SSG SPC PFC PFC SPC SGT PFC PFC SPC SSG PFC SPC PFC SPC SPC PFC PFC

SCANLON PATRICK B MOORE KYRON M SEDLAK JEREMY R HOBAN JEFFREY D HENDERSON JOSHUA POPKINS JASON W NEFF MICHAEL A ROY MARC A SMITH SWISHER SMITH MONTRE SPARKS IAN RANDOLPH ANTONIO D SWANSON MICHAEL J STOTT MATTHEW S WAGNER CHARLES J DAMAN RONALD E JAYSKA RYAN K HALFACRE BRANDON D LAMONS LOGAN G CUTRIGHT ALBERT B BULLOCK RYAN A NADEAU BRENDEN B WHITE AARON T LAFOGG STEPHEN LEAO EDUINO CARR JOSHUA HOMERSTON JUSTIN M CARR DEREK J POPE RONALD MELENDEZ MICKEY FERRI MATTHEW CHADWICK ALAN S SPALLA WILLIAM C MCCAIN BENJAMIN D PETERSON JONATHAN I TAYLOR STEPHAN R TABARES OSCAR G VOGT TONY D BLOUNT LONDON A HOUNSHELL STEVEN C WESTMAN PHILIP H GOSS DERICK M GALLEGOS ROBERT J CARTER GIONATHAN B HAMMERLE ALEXANDER BARRY RICHARD H LIENHART NOLAN F VASQUEZ RENE J RAY DAVID B


PFC SSG SPC SPC

WICHOWSKI BRANDON R RIGGLEMAN LEONARD L STANSBURY BRIAN K STEN THOMAS E

SPC SGT PFC SGT

WISHART JORDAN C WOOD WILLIAM J SHUGARS CHARLES PAUGH STEVEN R

PFC CRAWFORD JIMMY L PFC PUFFINBERGER JUSTIN

TF 1-182 Michigan Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Force Protection South Charlie Company 1207 Quick Reaction Force Rhode Island Army National Guard Camp Arifjan th

CPT 1LT 1SG SPC SPC SFC SPC SPC SFC SGT MSG SPC PV2 SGT SGT PFC SPC SPC 1LT SFC SPC SPC SPC SPC

FIELDER BRIAN P GONSALVES GREG SMITH KEITH A MCKINLEY PAUL J DUNHAM CHRISTIAN M NEYLON DEBORAH A BRULE RICHARD D RAMBACHER KERI A WILSON CHAD J THOMAS TERRENCE N EDDY MICHAEL A MEEHAN WILLIAM D DONLAGIC EMA E GIGGEY JAMES E McCOY JENNIFER M WHITE STEVEN W PAUL THANOOE SIMMONS IONA N BOBROFF MICHAEL B O'KEEFE SCOTT C BROWN ROBERT E LOREN SHAWN P BLAKE MATTHEW S BOAYKE HARRISON A

SPC KNIGHT GERALD L SPC KHIM DANNY SSG BEAUDOIN RYAN M SGT WHITE STEVEN R SGT TURNER JOSEPH SPC FREDETTE CHRISTOPHER J SPC TINER MATTHEW J SPC BUCHANAN ANDREW J SGT FRENCH JASON E SPC SANTOS FRANCISCO J SPC LeBLANC CHRISTOPHER W SPC BERUBE STEVE M PFC BROWN DANIEL J SSG BARROSO KEVEEN R SGT SILVA CRISTIANO M SPC TUM SOKTHEY SPC CHARETTE PAUL M SPC JUMELLES GIANNY S SPC INSTASI JUSTIN T SSG ORTIZ RAFAEL PFC CABRAL BRENDAN J SPC GIRALDO JOHN A

SPC SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC SSG SPC PFC SPC SPC SSG SGT SPC SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC SPC

HEWITT BJON D MARTINEAU JOSHUA M LUGO DAVID BELIVIEU RICHARD J CHARETTE JOSEPH A TARDIFF RICHARD H MERCURIO THOMAS O BOYLE ROBERT A BAROLLE ANDY J BECHARD PAUL J CLARK FRANKIE J MATA GREGORY C DUPUIS CHRISTOPHER R STAHL MICHAEL T DOUGHTY MASON C TAVAREZ EDWARD N BUSSIERE TIMOTHY J LOWE DAVID F ROBITAILLE ROGER M FERREIRA DARREL J MORALES GABRIEL DASILVA JUSTIN


3643rd BSB New Hampshire Army National Guard Camp Command Cell LSA (Life Support Area) LTC CHALLENDER JAMES P MAJ GAGNON TONY J CSM ROULEAU JERRY D 1LT MARTIN ALTON W PV2 Garon Robert J SSG CONNELLY BRIAN K SGT SCHMOTTLACH DANIEL G WO1 VASQUEZ FERNANDO K MSG BOWLEY OSCAR 1LT GIAMPETRUZZI NICHOLAS R SGT BURPEE JASON T SPC DAVIS MELISSA A

CPT MSG SFC SGT SFC SPC SPC SPC 1LT SSG SGT SGT SGT 1SG

KRUGER KENNITH COYNE JONATHAN M SHEA ROBERT S SMITH JEREMIAH M DOW WILLIAM N MANNING MARCUS SAYLOR BENJAMIN CHENARD JOSEPH A THOMPSON TRICIA T BROWN KENNETH E DOVICH STEPHEN P PERYER JENNIFER DINEEN JARED K AUGUSTUS JASON W

F

B D

C

SGT SPC 1LT A SPC SPC 1LT CW2 WO1 MSG SSG SGT SGT SPC

JOHNSON ROBERT J HERBERT SELENA J WOLFGRAM ELIZABETH ROSS CHRISTOPHER A WILLIAMS RICHARD J RIORDAN EMILY P COX RUSSELL B PETRIN ATHENA M BROGAN MARK A STOCKTON JOHN C FERLAND ADAM E RORICK ANTHONY J HOWARD ERIN E

3-197th New Hampshire Army National Guard Long haul Convoy Escort Camp Buehring Headquarters and Headquarters Battery LTC BAKER DAVID F MAJ BOUCHER MATTHEW P CSM MAY VICTOR J SPC PALMER RYAN D 1LT EMERSON ANDREW H SSG IMONDI MICHAEL D SPC SIUDUT JASON P SSG STEPHENSON MICHAEL SPC MURPHY RYAN C SPC TESSIER JOSEPH D SSG PARKER JAMES H CPT MEHER PHILIP A VACANT - No Authorization CPT MOSELEY JASON J CPT TEAGUE ROBERT E CW3 JENSEN KEITH G SFC PLANTE PATRICK W SFC GREENE JEROME L SSG PRYZBY DAVID R SPC ZIEROFF ZACHARY S SPC CONNOR TODD L MAJ OUELLET DANIEL R SGM BEECHER DAVID R CPT CALHOUN BRIAN P

SFC CLARK IAN C 1LT DEBOURGKNECHT CULLEN T SSG MCEVOY ANDREW C SGT GARBER SHELLY A PFC PATRICK STEPHEN J SPC CARRIER JOSHUA A SSG MCGRATH BRIAN G SPC LONG MATTHEW R SPC POOLE JEREMY W PFC LARRABEE LEN A SSG KRISTOFFERSEN PAUL Y SGT WATSON GARRETT J SPC DISTEFANO VINCENT A PFC AYERS JOHN L CPT GARDINER JAMES J VACANT SPC STAUDER CHRISTOPHER 1LT WILLETTE BRIAN R SFC LANDRY JAY R SPC WHITE JOSEPH A SGT FERRIS FRANCIS G PV2 LACOMBE RUBENCE 1LT HUNTINGTON DONALD A

SSG DUQUETTE CHRISTOPHER B SGT DUCHESNE BRIAN M SPC MINAHAN JOHN R CPT LORE JASON R 2LT BRIDGES KEVIN B SFC ROBERTS SCOTT H SGT ROSSIGNOL DANIEL P SFC FRASCONE NICHOLAS W CPT HUFFMAN HEATH D 1SG MONROE CLIFFORD S SSG TUCKER HENRY A SGT ZIEROFF GREGORY J SSG BETANCOURT LUIS A SPC WHEATON MATTHEW M WO1 VOIGHT DAVID T CW2 HOEY JOHN B SFC DONISI BRYAN J PFC KENDALL LUKE J PFC GILES JOSHUA C SPC CUSSON JOSHUA R MSG AMEY PAUL R CW3 DOCKHAM RANDALL A


3-197th New Hampshire Army National Guard Long haul Convoy Escort Camp Buehring Alpha Battery CPT THOMPSON CHRISTOPHER P 1SG CANAVAN SCOTT A 1LT TAYLOR BRADLEY D SFC DELLINGER WALTER E SSG CHESNIS JAMES A SSG HARVEY STEVEN P SSG MCLAIN STEVEN A SGT HARVEY KENNETH J SPC TULLOS KENNETH S SSG BYRNE LAWRENCE K SPC LINTEAU HEATHER M SPC HIRAK JOHN J SPC RICH ADAM C SPC STACKPOLE MICHAEL J 1LT MOORE ERIC D SFC ARMSTRONG JOHN S SGT COLCORD RICHARD J SSG CRANE ERIC S SPC LAVOIE RYAN P SPC MILLER DERYC P SGT BOYNTON DAVID M PFC PENN SCOTT C PFC PINARD JOEL M SGT HYSON PAUL A SPC JOHNSON GEOFFREY M SPC KASSE CARLOS A SGT EWALT JOSHUA C SPC KIM CALVIN D PFC ESTAVILLO BYRON P SSG OUELLETTE DARIN R PV2 TODD JOBBIE L SPC PICA FRANKIE SGT GARNEAU WILLIAM E PV1 MCENTIRE JONATHAN R SGT NASH RYAN K SSG LEBLANC SCOTT J PFC WESTGATE JORDAN A SPC GOULET JASON M SGT WHITING RANDALL E PFC SWAN NICHOLAS C PFC SMITH JUSTIN A SSG ELLIOTT BENJAMIN L PFC SULLIVAN ROBERT A PVT CORCORAN NICHOLAS A

SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC PFC SGT SPC PFC 1LT MSG PFC SSG SPC SPC SGT A SPC SPC SGT PFC SGT SGT PV2 SPC SFC SPC PFC SGT PFC PFC SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC SGT SSG SPC PVT SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC

DOMALOAN GORDON D HUNT BRANDON R GARCIA JOSEPH L ALLISON CHARLES J MORANCIE BRODIE M COX MATTHEW R HAMILTON BRUCE F HARTMAN JOHN E TREMBLAY BRANDON M WHITAKER SCOTT J STCYR CHRISTOPHER L WALLACE ANDREW J BOULANGER DAVID A VOISINE MATTHEW R CRABTREE FRANK S LABRECQUE NICHOLAS GEORGES JONATHAN CARBERRY JOSHUA M CHAUSSEE WILLIAM R GRIMES ANDREW M CHAPMAN MICHAEL B CONE ROBERT E HORNBROOK NOLAN A NICHOLS DANIEL G PELKEY DAVID P HUOT CARL R PLAISTED ROBERT R KING CHARLES D BEAUDOIN CORY N HIGGINS DARRYL C CARVER RANDAL G GAGNON JEFFREY S TROPEA JOSEPH W LASHER ANDREW M RICHARDSON ANDREW J MOREL DANIEL F COLBURN SHAWN W COLLIER ADAM R SALAS-OGILVIE LUIS E DUVAL BENJAMIN R CHALOUX BRETT J JUDD LINCOLN N PAKENHAM PAUL R ALONARDO LANCE M

SPC CONNORS JOSHUA M SGT ROTH WILLIAM J PFC TALON JACOB E PFC EAMES RAYMOND E 1LT CURTIS DANIEL S MSG THIBODEAU MICHAEL A PFC FAVALORO VITO M SSG HANNAN JAMES V SGT CONNORS MICHAEL P SPC COMBS DONALD M SGT PHELPS WITTY S SPC BELANGER JOSEPH E SPC SIMMS STEPHEN T SGT KILUK MICHAEL J SGT THOMAS STEPHEN A SPC TENHAVE RYAN L SGT HUTTON CHAD D SGT KING RANDY E SPC HILL DANIEL F SSG PHILBRICK HUNTER J SPC MAYNARD JESSE W PFC JONES GEORGE P SGT LAFLAMME PETER A SPC OLEARY SEAN P SPC RODRIGUEZ JUAN J SSG EPISON JERRY L SPC LONG PATRICK N SGT KREISZ MATTHEW P SSG SAVAGE WILLIAM C PFC WILCOX BRYAN T PFC BRIAND RYAN A SSG AUSTIN SCOT A SPC CHOURAMANIS CHRISTOPHER C PV2 CHADWICK BRANDON G SGT EMOND PAUL J SPC CAMPBELL PAUL M SPC TROPEA ANTHONY R SGT PARADIS JOSEPH R SPC ANDERSON DEVIN J SPC DINEEN CHARLES J SGT WILLIAMS DALE T SPC DAVIS JONATHAN R SPC MANN THOMAS J


3-197th New Hampshire Army National Guard Long haul Convoy Escort Camp Buehring Bravo Battery CPT 1SG 1LT SFC SFC SGT SSG SPC SSG SSG SPC SGT SPC SGT 1LT SFC SPC SSG S PFC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC SPC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC CPL SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG SSG SPC

BUTLER MICHAEL A PAGE DAVID L SEAVEY JEFFREY A BILL PETER J GERMAIN DAVID P DODGE AARON C LEFEBVRE DAVID R CROUCH TIMOTHY R HARTLEN BARBARA A CHAISSON JEREMY D DUONG VIVAN T MARTIN WILLIAM M LARRABEE WAYNE R TWARDOSKY RANDYLL K STANSFIELD CRAIG B SMITH CALEB M PELCHAT NATHANIEL M TAYLOR CHRISTOPHER PAQUIN ZACHARY A BEST JAMES R GRASSIE ANDREW W RICHARD MICHAEL B MANNING BRENDAN R BALL STEVEN W PAUL DANIEL M SEATON THOMAS M CHILDS ANDREW D HEINCY DONALD K GENTHNER GORDON C SITTIG CHRISTOPHER C FOURNIER NICHOLAS C WONG LEMUEL A OSBORNE DANA R LABOSSIERE MICHAEL S NANCE JUSTIN M DANIELS CHRISTOPHER KLEMARCZYK JEFFREY DEHAAN JUSTIN M LEBLANC CHRISTOPHER BLAIS NICHOLAS D DINGMAN JONATHAN W RANDLETT RICHARD W GAMACHE ERIC R DURANT WAYNE S

SGT PFC SPC SGT SPC PV2 SGT SPC SPC 1LT SFC PFC SSG SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SGT PV2 SPC SGT SGT SSG SSG SGT CPL SGT SGT SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC

CAMIRE GLEN L CHARNLEY PAUL A LABONTE TRENT M GHENT RICHARD A GATES DONALD W DONOVAN WILLIAM J HORTON SCOTT E PARADIS COREY M CAIRNS KENNETH A NOGUERAS ELIAS HEROUX MICHAEL P JOHNSON THOMAS L JOHNSON KENT J LAVOIE NICHOLAS M DIROSA JAMES R BERNIER DUANE R HANSON ERIK R KEANE RYAN N WESTGATE BRANDON J LAHTI ORYAN R SNYDER JAMES L SAVOIE BRIAN R BEAN SEAN E MARTIN JOSEPH E HAMMOND CHARLES B BEAUDETTE FREDERICK OCTAVIANO STEVEN C ILLUM GARION E BROWN THOMAS J STONE TYELLE T SAEZ CARLOS J MALAVE PEDRO J RIVERA JAVIER SWITZER LEO J MONTANEZ ALEX PONDER RYAN C LUBO LUIS C BRADEN MARK A MORGAN PATRICK E OCAMPO JUAN D HINKLEY DANIEL L SKINNER SHANE A COYLE ADAM D BURNS STEVEN J ENOS CHARLES R

SGT JOLY HENRY J SPC BURRELL ALLEN D SPC REILLY WILLIAM 1LT CLAXTON RICHARD A SFC LEMIRE JEFFREY H SGT HIGDON JAMES K SPC MEASLEY HANS N SSG SPICER RONALD A SPC PENA MEJIA ALAN A SGT ZITO RONALD F SGT DESROSIERS THOMAS P PFC DUMONT NICHOLAS A SPC MASSA MATTHEW M SGT MAZON TERRYL L PFC EHLERT SEAN A PFC CORREIA MICHAEL J SGT ALVES ANTHONY J SPC NACCI ROBERT J PFC IAPICCA ANTHONY R SSG COBURN HEATH D SPC TURNER JOHN S PFC POEUNG HENRY SGT ALMEIDA MICHAEL N/A PV2 LABONVILLE ADAM S SPC CARTER MICHAEL L SGT MARTLEY CHRISTOPHER D SPC O'BRIEN ROBERT R SPC LEE RANDY A SGT GAGNON MARC R PV2 CORBIN ADAM M SPC OCAMPO BRYAN SSG LEMIEUX WILLIAM A SPC MACHADO JEFFREY SGT GREENE MATTHEW E SGT HULKOW PAUL V SPC PASQUAL THOMAS A SPC JOHNSON NICHOLAS L SGT AKERS RICHARD S SPC CHAMPIGNY DONALD L SPC MARTHERS MICHAEL P CPL ELKINS PATRICK R SPC GENSEL KURT PV2 McELREAVY DENNIS J


3-197th New Hampshire Army National Guard Long haul Convoy Escort Camp Buehring Charlie Battery CPT BURRITT ADAM W 1SG FERLAND WILLIAM M 1LT DEVOY DAVID D SFC IRWIN KEITH D SGT PLANTE ERIC P SPC RORICK KAITLIN S SSG STONE PAUL M SPC GODIN ERIC P SSG BRIDGES MEGAN L SGT ADAMS MATTHEW T SGT JADIS MYLES E SGT FLEEGLE JEFFREY J SPC HELIE DAVID C SPC CROWLEY ALLYSON L 1LT SIIK LUCAS A SFC WIGGIN EDWARD R PFC KING JASON A SPC PITTMAN MICHAEL G SFC RIDENER LARRY J SPC SADIK MUSTAPHA PV1 WILEY JESTIN M SGT MCCULLOUGH TIMOTHY P PV2 MCMANUS ROBERT P PFC BRYSON JOSHUA R SGT STMARIE CHRISTOPHER J SPC LAMBERT JAYSON R SPC MCMAHON TIMOTHY F SGT HYLAND FRANCIS A SPC BARRON WILLIE F SPC DOWERS DARREN M SSG KENDALL JAMES M PFC FULLER SETH K PFC COTTON MATTHEW J PV2 COTTING TIFFANI L PFC WHITTUM KEITH T SPC LABELLE SHAUN W SGT DAVIS MICHAEL A PFC HEATH JASON M PFC BERLO JOHN C SPC BERRY JAMES S PFC HARZBECKER JACOB P SPC DUBIA SEAN C SSG CAMBRA MICHAEL R SPC LADD COLIN J

PV2 SGT SPC PV2 SGT SPC SGT SPC SPC PFC 1LT SFC PFC SGT PFC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC PFC PV2 T PFC PFC SSG SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC PFC SGT PV2 SPC SSG SPC PFC G SGT PV2 PFC SGT

LINDH SAMUEL M FITTON DENNIS R STEADMAN DANAY D FAUCHER JARRET C BAKAS GEORGE C HUGHES BRANDON W CLAY ELIZABETH A DOOLING PAUL D MARTIN CHAD M SIDMAN ANGELIQUE M SCHWAB ANDREW R HICKEY MARK E NOYES JENNIFER R DREW JAMES L SLOAN AARON R DUGGAN WILLIAM F ROBERTS RICHARD D PSZENNY RUSSELL F MINARD TROY G CROCKER CHARLES J KILLAM JONATHAN L BUTLER GARY M CONNELL CHRISTOPHER SOUCY WILLIAM P SANVILLE JOSEPH L MCLAIN SEAN R MARTEL RYAN J WHITEAD ASIA A MONAHAN MATTHEW P CURRIER KENNETH J LEMAY KRYSTAL M BRIGGS DARIN E BELL KENNETH L ROMANO GREGORY A CAMPBELL BRIAN D SANTANA OSMAR S PARIS NICHOLAZ F SMITH DONALD K MEADOWS JOHN T BROUILLARD JONATHAN MORRISON SEAN D LAMOTHE CALEB P WHITNEY ANTHONY C DUMAIS WILLIAM L

SPC PFC SGT SPC SPC 2LT SFC PFC SFC SPC SPC SPC SPC PFC SGT PFC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG PFC PFC SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC PFC SPC PV2 SPC SSG PFC SPC SGT SPC SPC SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC PFC

ULYSSE JEAN BENTON ROBERT E HEBERT JOSHUA D KEY JEFFREY N SWEENEY JEFFREY S CLEVELAND WILLIAM S PENN DAVID A SCHULTZ HALEY E NOWACK HOON J JOHNSTON ETHAN K PILCHER DOUGLAS S RUSSO DEREK R TORRES MEGAN M CLARK JEREMY T BOURASSA TEDD M DOW EVAN R GUERREIRO JACINTA J MAO SAMEY TOWERS DANIEL A MAILHOT TYLER S NEWCOMB THOMAS R CROWDER ALEX R CHANDLER JENNIFER M JONES SCOTT L CASS JOHN W LEONARD CODY R ZUBICARAY RAUL P GARLAND RYAN E KEECH PHILLIP J DALTON DANIEL A FRAUSTO LUIS A TRUDEAU FABIAN R ARNOLD ROBERT BARRETT PATRICK W SARGENT JUSTIN A HAYES JONATHAN M DAY BENJAMIN A GOUGH GREGORY J JUDKINS MICHAEL J CONKLIN TIMOTHY J HANLEY BENJAMIN T CHANNELL ROBERT L KONTS CHAD S PEACE BRYAN A


3-197th New Hampshire Army National Guard Long haul Convoy Escort Camp Buehring Delta Battery MAJ 1SG 1LT SFC SPC SGT SSG SPC SGT SSG SGT E SPC SPC SPC 1LT SFC SGT SSG PV2 SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SGT PV2 SPC SSG SPC SPC SPC PV1 SPC SGT PFC SPC SGT PFC PV2 SSG SPC PFC SPC

HALL STEVEN J MILLER JEFFREY C PUFKI THOMAS E HEMINGWAY WAYNE J GREEN SLADE C ARTHURSCOTT DANILO I BOISVERT CRYSTAL G KIROUAC MICHAEL G STATTON SUKARI D JAMES FREDERICK E ZIEMIANSKI BERNADETTE SHARP CHRISTOPHER L FULLER GLENN H WARD DUSTIN E HESKETH JONATHAN W FORTIER DONALD R POTVIN ADAM H CAPEN RICH R CROCHIERE JOSHUA M GILDING ZACHARY M STOCKFORD TODD J MARTEL STEPHEN A MCGUIRE ROBERT J PERKINS BRIAN A FURCA JOSEPH AUSTIN AMY M TIBBETTS GARY M MASON NICHOLAS D ROJEK ROBIN F SOUCY JASON E PETRILLO JOHN P BENSON RYAN A PARKER JUSTIN G RIZZO NICHOLAS D GROSSET KEITH PINCENCE RICHARD J COOK ANDREW T CAREY ZACHARY N SCHAIBLE DWIGHT W REYNOLDS PETER M RAIMUNDO DAVI A PAQUETTE PHILIP J EASTMAN JONATHAN M TETREAULT CAMERON J BOUCHER PATRICK J

PFC CUMMINGS JOHNATHAN M SGT LINN JEAN M SGT CZEKALSKI ADAM M PV2 ENOKIAN JONATHAN E PV2 HOGANCAMP ELLIOTT F SGT WILLIS CHRISTOPHER VACANT SPC EVANS RONALD P 1LT KECY ZACHARY S MSG BLAD ROBERT R SPC TUFTS GREGORY A SSG PETERSON EDWIN A PFC FRASER ANDREW W SPC THOMPSON KEVIN W SGT RUSSELL GARY W SPC WATSON ANDREW K PFC TULLY MICHAEL T SPC HAMILTON PAUL A SPC KING RONNIE T PFC DELISLE MORGANA SGT HEBERT DANIEL V PFC BREWSTER ASHLEY K SPC PETION ANDRE G SSG SMALL TREVER E PFC KAZAKIS STEVEN N PFC BURKE BRIAN F SGT CLIFFORD ANDREW M SPC HECKERMAN TIMOTHY P SPC PLOSS JAMES M SGT WESTCOTT JASON R PFC VANWINKLE CURTIS A PFC DEMERS KYLE R SGT ELLIOTT WAYNE A SPC MACDONALD JOSEPH S SPC PENN KENNETH D SSG RICARD MICHAEL J SPC LANDRY JAMIE S SPC HOWE DANIEL M SPC CUMBERBATCH ADAM A SPC CUENCA JACE C SPC OCONNOR ALEXANDER T SGT MUNROE DANIEL F SPC WRIGHT SHAWN M SPC NORRIS MARK J

SGT SHIELDS MICHAEL J PV2 LADD DANIEL A PFC MAILHOT ANDRE D 1LT LABELLE BRANDON J SFC CLEMENTS EDWARD L SPC PLANTIER MATTHEW S SPC LEVICK ANDREW E SSG COLBY TIMOTHY S PFC BRECHEEN OLIVIA N SPC MARINO ADAM A SSG WHITE ARTHUR L PV2 BUNKER JOSHUA T SGT CLOW SHAWN D SGT DEMERS JONATHAN R PFC WENZEL ANDREA M PFC BESWICK COLIN M SPC DOMINGUEZ ANGEL A PV1 SAMUELSON RICHARD W PFC MILLER TIMOTHY W SSG MORGAN RICHARD A PV2 PATNODE NATHAN E SPC NEDEAU JOHN A SPC DELISLE DAVID A SPC BELIVEAU BRANDON L PV1 DUCLOS KURT E SPC BROUCK GREGORY J SGT WEBB JOHN F SPC MOORE CHRISTOPHER P PV1 MORIN JOHN G VACANT PV1 DENNEY ADAM D SPC MANGAN MICHAEL F SSG BACHELDER JOHN T SPC FORTIER THERESA L PFC PELLETIER CAMERON J SGT CROSBY JEREMIAH E PFC BARR JENSINE L SPC CARTY ERIC J SGT FARRAR GORDON S PFC VEILLEUX DANIELLE M PFC JACQUET FRITZGERALD SSG GRANT GEORGE PFC GLADDING SHANE C PFC DODGE BRANDON F


372nd Signal Company New Hampshire Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Camp Arifjan LTC MAJ CSM MAJ SSG SPC SPC SSG SPC C SGT SPC SPC SPC SPC CW2 1SG SSG SSG

ADLER NICHOLAS S FINK DAVID A NOYES STANTON R WALZ JEFFREY G BREAULT JOSHUA M DESMARAIS VIOLET C WASHBURN RYAN M BOURGEOIS DANIEL J CHAPMAN GREGGORY DESROCHERS JOHN P FLOOD MICHAEL S WAITES DAWN L CHAISSON JONATHAN K ROY SHAWN L GRAHAM THOMAS E BAKER JACK B TUCKER SUSAN M GONZALEZ LUIS A

PFC PFC M SGT SGT SPC SFC PFC SSG SGT PFC SFC SPC SSG MSG SSG SFC SFC CPT

WARCHOL SHANE P PATTENJOHNSON KAYLA COOKSON DAWN M CREECH AMANDA A RUSSELL BENJAMIN J GRAVES DAVID DALEY NICHOLAS S COKER DARRELL A HODGE CHRISTIAN F MARTIN JASON L GEORGE LAWRENCE R JONES TAYLOR D CARTER JONATHAN J DUGRENIER KEVIN R LAMBERT THOMAS L RACZKA EDWARD S SEARS DOREEN A LEONARD BENJAMIN R

SFC SSG CPT 1SG SFC SSG PV1 PFC PFC SSG SPC SGT SFC SGT T SSG SSG

HINXMAN KURT W DARBY, JR. JOHN L WESTHAVER RICHARD A FREDETTE KANDY L LEWIS CLYDE A POOLE JACOB I JOHNSON CALVIN E MCMAHON DEREK L JACKSON SHAWNA C FRECHETTE PETER J CAMIRE ARIELLE A CHAMBERS MATTHEW R LESTAGE MICHAEL F SHAUGHNESSY RICHARD SAWLER MARTEL

KEVIN A JAMES J


TF 1-201st West Virginia Army National Guard Security Forces North Khabari Crossing Camp Buehring Alpha Battery SGT SGT SGT SGT SPC SGT SPC SSG SSG SSG SGT SGT SPC SGT SSG SPC SPC SSG SGT SGT PV2 PFC SGT SFC SFC PV2 SPC 1LT CPT PV1 PFC 1LT PFC SSG SSG SGT SPC CPL PFC PV2 SPC PFC SPC SPC 1SG SPC 1LT SPC SPC SGT

BARET JOSHUA DAVID BEARFIELD FREDERICK ALLAN BLAKE CHRISTOPHER ALAN BLEDSOE JEREMY ALLEN BOLYARD RONALD ALLEN BRADBURN JENNINGS LEE BRENNER ADAM CHANDLER BYRD JESSE JR CANTERBURY JOSEPH BURL CHANNELL AARON MATTHEW CHIDESTER BRIAN CHARLES CONRAD CLAYTON JOHN CROWTHER JEREMY MICHAEL CRUICKSHANK JOSEPH ALLEN CUSTER ZACCHARY SCOTT DAMICO LOUIS MICHAEL DANIELS CODY JAMES DAVIS RANDY WAYNE DERRING SCOTT EUGENE DUKE NATHANIEL JULIUS EHRGOTT MATTHEW LEROY ELLIOTT BRENNAN LAURENS ESPINOZA HERIBERTO NMN FALCONE JOHN JOSEPH JR FOX PAUL DENVER JR FRAZIER ANTHONY LEE FRIST IAN SHAW GARRETT DOUGLAS HEAZELTON GAZAWAY BRIAN KENNETH GOLDSTEIN IAN ZACHARY GRAY JAMES GUSTIN GRILLI JOHN FRANK GUY MATTHEW ROBERT HARDY JEFFREY SCOTT HEALEY NATHANIEL LYNN HEDRICK PHILLIP BRYAN HENSLEY DUSTIN ALLEN HESS CARL WILLIAM HOOVER RICHARD GAYLE III JANSSEN DAVID PATRICK JELACIC CHRISTOPHER ROBERT JOHNSON JUSTIN DANIEL KETTERMAN MARTY RAY KNOTTS ADAM SCOTT LAMBRUNO NICKOLAS WILLIAM LARUE WILLIAM MICHAEL JR LAWSON ROBERT JAMES LOWE BRANDON MARTIN LUKE JOHN ROBERT JR MALLOW WILLIAM CHARLES JR

SSG SPC SPC SPC SSG SFC SPC SGT 1LT SGT PFC SGT SFC SPC PFC SPC SGT SGT SGT SPC SGT SPC SSG SGT PFC SGT SPC SPC PV2 PFC SPC SPC SPC SGT SGT SSG SGT SPC SPC SSG SGT SGT SSG SGT SFC SGT SPC PFC PV2 SPC

MANNON JEREMY ANDREW MAYS SHERMAN JOHN MCBEE JOSHUA ALLAN MCCARTY AMANDA JANE MCCOLLAM DOUGLAS ALLEN MCCUMBERS RONNIE DEWAYNE MCDANIEL STEPHEN DALE MCDANIELS ANDREW JAMES MCGAHA KYLE CHRISTOPHER MCGUINNESS BRIAN JAMES MCKENZIE MICHAEL SHAWN MCNEIL EMERY ROY III MILLER MICHAEL ALLEN NANCE GREGORY ALLEN JR OBRIEN MARK NMN OLIVERIO FRANK ANTHONY PARKER ALFRED LEE PEGGS COMAN DOUGLAS PONTIS BRANDON EDWARD POWELL RYAN MITCHELL QUICKEL JASON ELLIOTT RAINES STEPHEN LEE II RASCHELLA JOSHUA EARLE RAY SCOT ALLAN REITZ JONATHAN ANDREW RHODES EARL TOMMY JR RICHARDSON WESLEY ALLEN RICHARDSON CAMELLIA LYNN ROBERTSON WESLEY NEAL ROSIER JONATHAN MATTHEW SCOTT BRANDON LEE SCRANAGE DAVID KENT JR SESZKO MARCI LYNN SHANOR JOSHUA NMN SHIFLETT MARC HUGH SHIFTLETT ADAM THOMAS SIMONS DANIEL ROBERT SMALLRIDGE ANDREW MIKAL SPEARS KENNETH ANDREW SPENCER TIMOTHY BEAU SPHAR BRIAN ERIC SROUT TERRY WAYNE STEMPLE CHARLES JEFFERSON JR STOREY DEAN EDWARD STOREY CHARLES WOODROW SWECKER EARL MATTHEW TAMASANG ANSELM NKWENTI TAYLOR JUSTIN CURTIS THOMAS JOHNATHAN MICHAEL TICE NATHAN ALLAN


SSG SPC SGT SPC SSG SGT SPC SPC

VANDEVENDER JUSTIN WADE WADDELL JOSHUA CHARLES WADDELL MATTHEW JOSEPH WAMSLEY NICHOLAS RAY WARNER SAMUEL JEFFERSON WATKINS RAYMOND ARTHUR WATRING ROBERT EARL WAYTS JEFFREY DAVID

SGT SSG SPC SPC SSG SFC SPC

WILMOTH COREY EDWARD WILSON JASON K KRAMER WOLFORD ROBERT JIMMY ALLEN WORKMAN WILLIAM LEE WORKMAN JACOB ALAN WORKMAN SAM LUCAS WRAY MATHEW WADE

TF 1-201st West Virginia Army National Guard Security Forces North Khabari Crossing Camp Buehring Bravo Battery VACANT SPC ANDERSON COLE AARON SPC ARNOLD RANDALL SCOTT SPC ARNOLD BENJAMIN SIMON SFC BELLES PAUL NMN SPC BLAIR JOSHUA DONALD SPC BOGGS MICHAEL WARREN SFC BOOKOUT FRED ARMID SGT BRAITHWAITE JEFF ALAN SSG BRAITHWAITE RODNEY EUGENE SPC BURKETT HUNTER JAMES SPC CAFFREY JOHNNY LEE 2LT CIMORELLI ANTHONY JOHN SGT COLE DAVID OSCAR SSG COLLINS CHRISTOPHER LEE PFC COMBS MARK ALLEN SSG COOKE ROBERT JAMES PFC CORLE MICHAEL CAMERON SPC CORWIN CHRISTOPHER JAMES SGT CUFFEE ROBERT LEVARD SGT DALE JEFFREY SCOTT PFC DEMASKE PAUL DOUGLAS SPC DICKEN LANCE DARWIN SPC DILLSWORTH RUSSELL CLEO SGT ELLIS TYLER SCOTT PFC EVERETT JUSTIN MARK SSG EVERETT TYLER MATTHEW SSG GALBRAITH JEFFERY THOMAS PV1 GARINGER ALEXANDER IAN SPC GAZZOLI WILLIAM JOSEPH PFC GOODMAN JUSTIN LEE CPL GREDLER MICHAEL EDWARD SFC GREGORY CHARLES MATTHEW SPC HAINES TREVOR MICHAEL SSG HAMILTON SCOTT NELSON SSG HOBAN JEFFREY DEAN 1SG HOFFMAN JASON MICHAEL

SPC PFC SPC SGT PFC PFC 1LT SPC SPC 1LT SPC CPL PV1 SPC SGT SFC SPC SPC SPC SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC SPC SGT SGT SGT SPC PFC SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SSG CPT

HOTCHKISS GREGORY RYAN JOHNSON ALBERT CLAY JORDAN JASON EDWARD JOSE AARON KEITH LANCASTER MATTHEW JEFFREY LEVENE BRIAN REED LILLEY CHRISTOPHER DAVID LILLY STEVEN AMADEUS LINDSAY BRANDON MICHAEL LOWE CHRISTOPHER RYAN LOY ERIC JAMES MARSHALL ANDREW BROTHERION MARTIN ERIC ANDREW MATHIS PAUL MICHAEL MCCANN BRIAN JAMES MCCRAY GREGORY WADE MCDANIEL JOSEPH WAYNE MERSING JOHNATHAN TYLER MEYERS KEVIN LEE MILLER (HALSTEAD) SHONNA RAE MYERS RYHAN LEE NUNGESSER ROBERT JOHN ORD CHAD MICHAEL PAUGH ELIJAH KAHAU PAUGH JOSHUA DAVID PERRY ANTHONY NEIL PERRY CHARLES RICHARD PIRAINO DEVIN MICHAEL PIRAINO JORDAN DURELL POPKINS JASON WILLIAM RAKOSI MICHAEL WEBSTER RODERICK BENNETT CHARLES RUSH JAMES PAUL RUTHERFORD JASMINE ANN SALESKY BRENT LEE SANDERS JASON LEE SHAMBLIN CHRISTOPHER CHARLES


PFC SPC SPC SPC SGT SFC SPC SPC

SHUGARS CHARLES HENRY SHULTS COLLIN EDWARD SMITH COLIN KASSEL SPEARS LOGAN MICHAEL STANISLAV BENJAMIN JAMES STILES SEAN THOMAS STOWELL ERIC SCOTT TAYLOR MICHAEL PAUL

SPC TRAVIS DONALD RICHARD VACANT VACANT SPC WALTERS ALBERT RICHARD SPC WEST KASEY EDWARD SFC WESTFALL CRAIG ALLEN SPC ZACOT DANE EDWARD

TF 1-201st West Virginia Army National Guard Security Forces North Khabari Crossing Camp Buehring Charlie Battery VACANT SGT ADAMS KENNETH JOSEPH 1SG ALLEN STEPHEN LEE SPC ALLEN KEVIN LEE SPC ALLEN DEVIN SCOTT SPC ALLEN (BROWN) KAYLA SHONTIA SGT ANDERSON AARON STEWART SPC ASHER MARC ERIC SPC AYERS CAMERON HUNTER SPC BARNES MICHAEL ALLEN 1LT BENNETT RICHARD JASON SGT BENNETT CHRISTOPHER WILSON SSG BENNETT JEREMY MICHAEL SPC BOSTIC SHANNON DUANE SPC BRADY STEVEN GREGORY SPC BROWN CRAIG MICHAEL SSG BROWN CLIFFORD MICHAEL SSG BROWN GARY LAWRENCE SFC BROYLES JONATHAN RAY PFC CAIN DANIEL Jr. GAYLE SPC CALDWELL BRIDGET NICOLE PFC CALMES EVAN NICHOLAS SPC CARR CLIFTON RAY PFC COPLEY TIMOTHY RUSH 1LT COSS RYAN ANTHONY SGT COTTLE JASON WAYNE SPC COTTRELL MARVIN JR KAYE SPC COX CHRISTOPHER LEE SGT CRIST RAYMOND CECIL SPC CUTLIP ARRON RANDOLPH SSG CUTLIP RANDOLPH FRANKLIN SPC DUNBAR MARK FRANKLIN SPC DUNBAR LEWIS EDWARD PFC ERWIN JEREMY THOMAS SPC FOLK DEREK CHARLES

SGT SGT SPC SPC SPC SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC SSG SPC PFC SPC SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC SSG SFC SGT PFC SPC SPC SSG SPC SPC SPC SFC SGT SPC SFC SPC SPC

GATTO GREGORY ANTHONY GENTRY KIP ANTHONY GLADWELL NATHAN SETH GORDON DOUGLAS LEWIS GOSNELL STEVEN BRIAN GRAB BRYAN CABILLIC GRAHAM MATTHEW ERIC GROGAN JEREMIAH ADAM GUNTER SILAS ROSCO HALL MICHAEL PATRICK HANNA ROBERT III JOSEPH HARRAH STELLA ANN HATCHER TIMOTHY RAYMOND HAWKINS DAVID LEE HIGGINBOTHAM JOSHUA MOORE HIIRONEN CODY JAMES HOKE TIMOTHY WAYNE HOKE DANIEL LEE HOLLAND RANDALL LEE HOWELL TIMOTHY WAYNE HUGHART JULIAN RAY HUGHES LONNIE ALLEN JACKSON ROBERT WARREN JACKSON, ROBERT DALE JOBE, DAVID ANDREW KING ROBERT MICHAEL KOWALSKY DENNIS JAMES LAVAY TYLER NELSON LEMLEY CHRISTOPHER EDWARD LIPTRAP TIMOTHY ALLEN LUSHER FRANKLIN SHAWN MACVEIGH STEVEN JOSEPH MATHIS STANLEY CLARK MAY SAMUEL PETER McCLELLAND DONALD LINDSY


1LT SPC SPC SGT SPC SPC PFC PFC 1LT SSG SFC SPC SPC CPT SPC SPC SPC SGT SGT SPC SPC

MCINTIRE JUSTIN RICHARD MEADOWS CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH MEADOWS GREGORY DAVID MILLER ROGER LEE MILLER KENNETH THOMAS MILLS ZACHARY FRANK MORGAN BRADLEY NATHAN MORRISON MATTHEW FOSTER NAUMANN CHARLES EUGENE ONEIL PATRICK JR. JOHN OSCAR WYATT GREGORY OWENS BRADLEY REECE POINDEXTER RONNIE LEE PRATT SHAWN ERIC RHODES JASON DWAYNE RICE MICHAEL JOSEPH RICHARDSON JOEL JESSE RICHMOND GREGORY LEE RICHMOND JOHN WILLARD ROBINETTE AARRON SAMPSON GREGORY ALLEN

SGT SIZEMORE JOSEPH EDWARD SPC SPAUR ANDREW JAMES SPC STALNAKER JESSE ADAM SPC STODGHILL RONALD GRANT SGT STONE GABRIEL LANCE SPC TEAGUE NATHAN DONALD SGT THOMAS KENNETH GEORGE II SGT THOMPSON JOE MARVIN VACANT PFC VANGILDER JOSHUA COLE SPC VONKUTZLEBEN ALEX JOACHIM SPC WAGNER GEORGE ALLEN SPC WALSH JAMES SUTPHIN SPC WALTON TOMMY LEE SGT WEIKLE LEO DOUGLAS SPC WIGGINS MARCEY LYNN PFC WILEY ANTHONY DEWAYNE SPC WILEY MICHAEL JR. ALLAN SSG WITT PAUL ALLEN SSG WOLFLEY KADE NMN SPC WORKMAN JEREMY DEAN

TF 1-201st West Virginia Army National Guard Security Forces North Khabari Crossing Camp Buehring Headquarters and Headquarters Battery SFC SGT SPC SGM SFC MAJ SPC MSG SSG SSG SGT PFC SGT SPC SGT CPT SGT SPC SPC SPC CW4 CSM

ACCOR, HARRY FRANKLIN III ALLAIN ROGER EDGAR ALLEY TIMOTHY EDWARD ARNOLD GEORGE JOSHUA BALL DUANE ALLEN BATISTE THOMAS RANDALL BEGLEY JAMES MATTHEW BIBB KEITH ARLEN BLAKE MARGARET ELIZABETH BLAKE TRAVIS JULIAN BODKIN TRISHA RENEE BRADLEY MICHAEL SHANE BRIDEAU CHARLES ALVIN BRITNER JONATHAN DANIEL BROOKS ANDREW MICHAEL BROWN SHAUN PATRICK BROWN JOSEPH ANTHONY BROWN, MICHAEL GENE BUCHHOLTZ BRANDON MICHAEL BURDETTE CHRISTOPHER RAY BUSEMAN JAMES WILSON CALES BOBBY LYNN

SGT SSG SSG SGT SFC SGT 1LT CPT LTC PV2 SPC SGT SFC CPT SPC SGT 1SG SGT CPT PFC SFC CPT

CALHOUN ALBERT DAVID CALHOUN ALBERT DAVID CARLSON JASON HARLAN CARNES JAMES ALAN CARPENTER CHARLES RANDOLPH CASTO ADAM KYLE CHIDESTER CARL EUGENE CLEMENS STEPHEN NMN COATNEY CLAY ALAN COOK WILLIAM GLEN COX,(NIDAY) CYNTHIA KAY CRADDOCK KENNETH DONALD DAVIS MICHAEL HAROLD DEHAVEN GRANT DOUGLAS DELSERRO JOHN JAMES DEVALL SHAWN ERIC DIXON SCOTT DAVID DODSON JEREMY ROBERT DOUGLAS DOUGLAS NATHAN DRINKARD JASMINE NOEL ELLIOTT JAMES WESLEY ESTEP MICHAEL CLINE


SPC SPC SGT SSG SFC SGT CW3 1LT SSG 1LT SSG SGT SPC SPC SGT PFC 2LT SGT SPC SFC SPC SPC SGT SSG 1LT 1LT SPC SGT SGT SSG MAJ SGT SPC SPC SPC SGT SSG CPT SPC SFC SPC PFC

FOLEY JEREMY WAYNE FOSTER JOSHUA LEE FURREY ROBERT PAUL GARRETT RUSSELL STEPHEN GARTON (CURTIS) RENEE DAWN GEORGE THOMAS NEIL GLUGLA PETER PAUL GROSE BRIAN LEE HAGER KEITH BRIAN HALL JAMES LESLIE HAMMACK ROY DOUGLAS HAMMOND KENNETH RAY HAYS DARRELL PAUL HEANEY TROY NMN HEFLIN CASEY NEIL HOLBERT JESSICA SUE HORTON CHET VERNON HUNTER MICHAEL EDWARD HUTWAGNER EDWARD FABIAN JACK DANIEL HALL JORDAN BRIAN SHANE KARNES BILLIE EUGENE KOTSKO JAY PAUL KYLE ANGELA VICTORIA LANTZ JESSICA DIONE LEE RAMONTA ANDRE LEVERTON JOY MAQUEL LEWIS AARON RAY LINDSEY STEVEN MICHAEL LOY RHONDA ALICE MACPHERSON ROBERT DOUGLAS MONTESI ALBERT DANIEL MORELAND JENNY LEE MORGAN JEREMIAH DON MORLAN JOHN TRAVIS MULLINS LUCAS MICHAEL MURPHY DONALD LEE NELSON STEVEN FRANKLIN NESSIBU BERUK BEZABH OLIVERIO JOHN NMN ORBAN NICHOLAS SHAUN PAXTON JAMES STEVENS V

SGT PENDLEY DAVID SHURVIN CPT PHILLIPS LUKE MASON SPC PHILLIPS MICHAEL CRAIG SSG PIERCY CHARLES STERLING SFC POLING MARK CHRISTOPHER SGT POTTS BRAD WESLEY PFC PRATHER CHARLEEN NYCOLE SPC RAMSEY CHRISTOPHER RYAN SPC REDD JULIAN NYANANTI 2LT REED CHARLES JOSEPH SPC RHODES JOSHUA RANDALL SSG RICHARDSON DEBRA ANN 1SG RICHMOND SCOTTY JOE SPC ROACH HORACE JR SPC ROSSI PATRICK DREW SSG SAILOR AARON CHRISTOPHER 1LT SAMPLES JEREMY SETH SFC SANDY MARK CHRISTOPHER SPC SAPP RYAN SCOTT PV2 SEE COLTON LEWIS SFC SHAFFER JASON WAYNE PFC SHAMBLIN NICHOLAS RYAN SPC SHARP ARTHUR JOEL SGT SISK SCOTT WALLACE SGT SNYDER JEREMY RAY SFC SPAULDING HADEN KEITHER SSG STEVENS JOHN HARLEY SPC STIVERS CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL SPC STUCK TODD RICHARD SGT TEETS TONY NATHANIEL SGT THOMAS LARRY RAY JR VACANT SGT VEDDER AARON BRENT SPC WAITES GREGORY NMN PV2 WELCH TREVOR TYRONE CPT WILLIAMS EDWARD TILLMAN SPC WILLS MARTY JOHN SPC WILSON BRANDON LEE SFC WOLF BRANDON MICHAEL SSG WOODARD AARON JAMES SFC ZIRKLE ROGER VINCENT


TF 1-103 Rhode Island Army National Guard Camp Command Cell Camp Virginia Headquarters and Headquarters Battery LTC BAUMANN JR PHILIPP H CSM LAFOND RICHARD H SPC DIPPOLD BENEDIKT J PFC HOPKINS TYLER E SGT TAYLOR THOMAS W SSG TELUS VLADIMIR CPT DECRISTOFORO ANTHONY J 1SG BENOIT DONALD R 1SG CARDINAL HUBERT J WOLF TODD M SPC MAINELLI MICHAEL T MAJ LEMONT DAVID A CPT HELTON GARY L SSG HARDING DARLENE M SGT NAGBE NATE L SPC EDWARDS NATHAN D CPT SUCH THEODORE H SSG ALLEN STEVE G SPC OUTLAND EMERY C SSG CEVALLOS JORGE M SPC TOOLE ROBERT J SPC KING ERIC J SPC ROSARIO LEMUEL CW3 KING DONALD A SSG ABBRUZZ KEVIN B CW2 STACK GREGORY B SFC DESLAURIERS DONALD R

SFC SSG SGT SGT PFC SPC WO1 SSG SGT CPT SSG SSG SPC SPC SPC PFC SPC PFC O CPT 1SG SFC SFC SSG SSG SPC MSG SSG

MESSINEO PETER A HAMILTON BRIAN R ANNELLI ANNA M PICHETTE STEPHANIE L CONNOLLY JOSHUA M PETRILLO MICHAEL P PAQUETTE GARY S KAY THOMAS L HOULE TIFFANY L SMITH DANIEL A DUNHAM GORDAN L LOPES ADEMILDO G MURPHY SEAN E MCILVAINE RAME N SARGENT JOHN R SIMONEAU ALISSA RYAN PATRICK J MENAWONU OLUSANYA LAWRENCE PETER JORDAN GREGORY FLYNN DAVID D PIMENTAL JAMES PAIVA JAMES R PEARL JOSEPH D DENTON PATRICK OLSON SCOTT J LUCIK CORWIN J

A S A

S

SSG SSG SFC SSG PFC SFC SFC SGT O 1LT SFC 2LT SSG SGT CPT SGT PFC LTC MAJ SFC SFC SPC SGT 2LT 1SG SGT SPC SGT

LOPES DAVID KRAJCZYNSKI KIM DURANGO JOSE G POTRIS JAMES E BASS WERNER MILTON A SNELL SCOTT J SANTIAGO JOHN G DELROSARIO JONATHAN SYKORA JAMES D MATOS ROBERTO S BAYSAH ALBERT B HASSARD GLEN A LEVEILLEE BRYAN S VACANT BASSETT ERIC S COUGHLIN IAN #REF! PARENTE PETER J FLYNTZ JAMES F MILETTE SEAN E PRICE LARRY T NEAL DANIEL A PECKHAM ELLERY M DIAS NELIA N TAILLON DAVID R PRUM BEN VASQUEZDIAZ CARLOS E PURCELL WILLIAM D


Title 10 US Code ready reserve Cornell University Law School http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/uscode10 /usc_sec_10_00012302----000-.html

TITLE 10 > Subtitle E > PART II > CHAPTER 1209 > § 12302 § 12302. Ready Reserve

(a) In time of national emergency declared by the President after January 1, 1953, or when otherwise authorized by law, an authority designated by the Secretary concerned may, without the consent of the persons concerned, order any unit, and any member not assigned to a unit organized to serve as a unit, in the Ready Reserve under the jurisdiction of that Secretary to active duty for not more than 24 consecutive months. (b) To achieve fair treatment as between members in the Ready Reserve who are being considered for recall to duty without their consent, consideration shall be given to— (1) the length and nature of previous service, to assure such sharing of exposure to hazards as the national security and military requirements will reasonably allow; (2) family responsibilities; and (3) employment necessary to maintain the national health, safety, or interest. The Secretary of Defense shall prescribe such policies and procedures as he considers necessary to carry out this subsection. He shall report on those policies and procedures at least once a year to the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate and the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives. (c) Not more than 1,000,000 members of the Ready Reserve may be on active duty, without their consent, under this section at any one time.


Presidential activation 7463 http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Proclamation_7463 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation A national emergency exists by reason of the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States. Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, I hereby declare that the national emergency has existed since September 11, 2001, and, pursuant to the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), I intend to utilize the following statutes: sections 123, 123a, 527, 2201(c), 12006, and 12302 of title 10, United States Code, and sections 331, 359, and 367 of title 14, United States Code. This proclamation immediately shall be published in the Federal Register or disseminated through the Emergency Federal Register, and transmitted to the Congress. This proclamation is not intended to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any person. In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twentysixth. George W. Bush


Presidential activation 7463 http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Proclamation_7463 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation A national emergency exists by reason of the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States. Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, I hereby declare that the national emergency has existed since September 11, 2001, and, pursuant to the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), I intend to utilize the following statutes: sections 123, 123a, 527, 2201(c), 12006, and 12302 of title 10, United States Code, and sections 331, 359, and 367 of title 14, United States Code. This proclamation immediately shall be published in the Federal Register or disseminated through the Emergency Federal Register, and transmitted to the Congress. This proclamation is not intended to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any person. In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twentysixth. George W. Bush


Department of Defense

DIRECTIVE NUMBER 1235.10 November 26, 2008 USD(P&R) SUBJECT: Activation, Mobilization, and Demobilization of the Ready Reserve References: See Enclosure 1

1. PURPOSE. This Directive: a. Reissues DoD Directive (DoDD) 1235.10 (Reference (a)) to update policy and responsibilities for mobilizing the Reserve Component (RC), to include appropriate guidance from Secretary of Defense memorandum, “Utilization of the Total Force,� January 19, 2007 (Reference (b)). b. Implements those provisions of law that pertain to the call or order of units and individual members of the RCs to active duty in support of operational missions, in contingency operations, during a national emergency, or in time of war. c. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for: (1) The calling or ordering to active duty and the managing of the RCs during periods when members of the RCs involuntarily serve on active duty under sections 12301(a), 12301(b), 12302, 12304, 12406, or 331-335 of title 10, United States Code (Reference (c)). (2) The ordering to active duty of RC volunteers under section 12301(d) of Reference (c) in support of operational missions, in contingency operations, during national emergencies, or in time of war. (3) Planning, preparing, and executing the mobilization and demobilization of RC units and members serving on active duty in support of operational missions, in contingency operations, during national emergencies, or in time of war.

2. APPLICABILITY a. This Directive applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 Inspector General of the Department of Defense, the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other organizational entities within the Department of Defense (hereafter referred to collectively as the “DoD Components�). b. This Directive applies to those elements of the Coast Guard Reserve when serving as elements of the Department of Navy.

3. DEFINITIONS. Terms used in this Directive are defined in the Glossary.

4. POLICY. It is DoD policy that: a. The decision to activate RC forces is made only after determining that it is both judicious and prudent to do so. (See Enclosure 2.) b. To the extent possible given operational considerations, RC forces shall be activated with the consent of the individuals being called or ordered to active duty. (See Enclosure 2.) c. Predictability of the RC forces is maximized through the use of defined operational cycles and utilizing force generation plans to provide advanced notification that allows the implementation of the train-mobilize-deploy model. (See Enclosure 2.) d. Units and individuals of the Ready Reserve ordered to active duty without their consent shall be kept on active duty no longer than absolutely necessary. (See Enclosure 2.) e. DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1235.09, DoDD 1352.1, and DoDI 1235.12 (References (d), (e), and (f), respectively) shall govern the activation of the Standby Reserve and the Retired Reserve.

5. RESPONSIBILITIES. See Enclosure 3.

6. INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS. Services shall report unit and individual activation, mobilization, and demobilization information through Defense Manpower Data Center and Defense Readiness Reporting System (DRRS). This reporting requirement is exempt from licensing in accordance with paragraph C4.4.2. of DoD 8910.1-M (Reference (g)).

7. RELEASABILITY. UNLIMITED. This Directive is approved for public release. Copies may be obtained through the Internet from the DoD Issuances Web Site at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives.

2


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 8. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Directive is effective immediately.

of Defense

Enclosures 1. References 2. Guidelines 3. Responsibilities Glossary

3


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 ENCLOSURE 1 REFERENCES

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l)

1

DoD Directive 1235.10, “Activation, Mobilization, and Demobilization of the Ready Reserve,” September 23, 2004 (hereby canceled) Secretary of Defense Memorandum, “Utilization of the Total Force,” January 19, 2007 Sections 115, 331-335, 10102, 12301, 12302, 12304, and 12406 of title 10, United States Code DoD Instruction 1235.09, “Management of the Standby Reserve,” April 2, 2007 DoD Directive 1352.1, “Management and Mobilization of Regular and Reserve Retired Military Members,” July 16, 2005 DoD Instruction 1235.12, “Accessing the Ready Reserves,” January 19, 1996 DoD 8910.1-M, “Department of Defense Procedures for Management of Information Requirements,” June 30, 1998 DoD Instruction 1215.06, “Uniform Reserve, Training, and Retirement Categories,” February 7, 2007 Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Memorandum, “Programs to Support Utilization of the Total Force,” April 18, 2007 DoD Directive 5125.01, “Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs (ASD(RA)),” December 27, 2006 DoD Directive 7730.65, “Department of Defense Readiness Reporting System (DRRS),” June 3, 2002 Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel & Readiness Memorandum, “Revised Mobilization/Demobilization Personnel and Pay Policy for RC Members Ordered to Active Duty,” March 15, 20071

Availability at www.defenselink.mil

4

ENCLOSURE 1


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 ENCLOSURE 2 GUIDELINES

1. Judicious and Prudent Use. The decision to activate RC forces must be made only after determining that it is both judicious and prudent to do so. The following guidelines shall be used: a. Support the predictable use of all RC forces by notifying RC members up to 24 months in advance that they are being considered for activation and by issuing mobilization orders as soon as it is operationally feasible to do so. The Department standard for mobilization approval to mobilization date is 90 days, with a goal of 180 days. However, this does not preclude orders being published as close as the same day the RC member is ordered to active duty, should the operational situation warrant it and the Secretary of Defense approve it. b. Enhance the predictable use of RC forces by establishing rotational-ready forces and by employing RC forces where practical in support of our national defense strategy. c. Ensure deployment and rotational policies are as flexible as possible to meet combatant command requirements. d. Maintain an operational RC force that is ready and available to respond in the designated timeframe and can sustain its contribution in a protracted operation. e. Consider the release of RC members from active duty before completion of the period of service specified by their orders in coordination with the supported CCDR. f. Ensure early consideration is given to the practical use of alternate workforce sourcing solutions such as Active Component (AC) forces, DoD civilian personnel, coalition forces, hostnation support, civilian contracted labor, technological solutions, other governmental agencies, Non-Government Organization, Private Voluntary Organization, or other means that may be available. Innovative management alternatives, such as using retiree volunteers, civilian auxiliary members, and reach back support, shall be applied whenever operationally appropriate. g. When activating RC forces that backfill deployed AC forces on their installations, ensure that the critical function or capability the RC unit or individual provides is to augment mission requirements, military families, and/or the military installation community. h. Ensure that RC forces are employed in a manner that maximizes the use of their core capabilities throughout the ordered duration of active service. i. Multiple uses of mobilization authorities to involuntarily activate RC units or individuals shall be consistent with the defined frequency and duration planning objectives for involuntary mobilizations as outlined in paragraph 3.b. of this enclosure.

5

ENCLOSURE 2


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008

2. Voluntary Service. Volunteers shall be encouraged to the extent possible given operational considerations. a. The limitations of sections 12302 and 12304 of Reference (c), either in numbers of personnel or period of service, do not apply to individuals volunteering for active duty under section 12301(d) of Reference (c). b. RC members voluntarily ordered to active duty under section 12301(d) of Reference (c) are accounted for in accordance with DoDI 1215.06 (Reference (h)). c. Time spent on active duty by an RC member under section 12301(d) of Reference (c) is considered dwell time.

3. Predictable Involuntary Service. Predictability in the use of RC forces shall be maximized. a. Authorities. RC units may be mobilized for multiple contingencies using either section 12302 or 12304 of Reference (c) or any combination of these authorities. The defined frequency and duration-planning objectives for involuntary mobilizations that are outlined below must be followed. Adherence to these defined frequency and duration planning objectives, however, does not apply for a full mobilization (section 12301(a) of Reference (c)), emergent missions, operations, or national emergencies requirements. b. Defined Operational Cycles (1) The involuntary mobilization for members of the RC forces shall be for a maximum of 1 year at any one time. At Service discretion, this period may exclude individual skill training required for deployment and post-mobilization leave. (2) The planning objective for involuntary mobilization of Guard and Reserve units is 1 year mobilized to 5 years dwell time (1:5). Today’s global demands will require a number of selected Guard/Reserve units to be remobilized sooner than this standard. The intention is that such exceptions be temporary and a move to a broad application of the 1:5 goal as soon as possible. Continue to plan force structure on that basis. Exceptions shall be approved by the Secretary of Defense. (3) Individuals who are involuntarily mobilized with a frequency and duration beyond the established frequency and duration planning objectives for involuntary mobilizations, as stipulated in subparagraph 3.b.(2) of this enclosure, shall be incentivized as described in Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (USD(P&R)) Memorandum, “Programs to Support Utilization of the Total Force,” (Reference (i)). (4) The period of dwell time shall be from the demobilization date of one involuntary mobilization until the mobilization date of the subsequent involuntary mobilization.

6

ENCLOSURE 2


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 (5) The Secretary of Defense may modify RC defined frequency and duration planning objectives for involuntary mobilizations within authorized limits imposed by statute and consistent with operational requirements. c. Train-Mobilize-Deploy. The train-mobilize-deploy model shall be used to provide ready and available forces. (1) RC pre-mobilization resourcing and training shall reduce post-mobilization training to the shortest time period possible to increase the time available for deployment. (2) Force generation plans for the RC shall be maintained to provide ready and available forces that are appropriately resourced and trained. Service-specific force generation plans shall support the operational cycles and mobilization frequency and duration planning objectives for involuntary mobilizations established by the Secretary of Defense. (3) Force generation plans shall be resourced for allocating personnel, training, and equipment to ensure employment readiness. (4) Mobilization and demobilization processes shall be standardized within the Services to facilitate ready access to the RCs. (5) Mobilization for training shall only be used after exhausting traditional means to increase individual skill qualification required for deployment. d. Notification. RC units shall be provided up to 24 months prior to mobilization date. e. Mobilization Approval (1) The Department standard for mobilization approval to mobilization date is 90 days, with a goal of 180 days. (2) The Secretary of Defense may waive this requirement for emerging requirements; crisis response; Defense Support to Civilian Authorities missions; and humanitarian assistances. f. Mobilization and Demobilization (1) Mobilization of ground combat, ground combat support, and ground combat service support shall be managed on a unit basis. This will allow cohesion and predictability in how RC units train and deploy. (2) Individual Augmentee will be managed on an individual basis. (3) Cross-leveling of personnel shall be minimized. Alternate methods shall be used such as task-organizing at the unit level; the use of volunteers, the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) and Inactive National Guard (ING); or cross-leveling personnel out of non-deployable units.

7

ENCLOSURE 2


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 (4) The use of Stop Loss shall be minimized. (5) Units and member duty locations shall not be restricted to the location specified by the order to active duty. Members of the RC ordered to active duty to supplement the Active forces are also Active Federal forces and may be reassigned once on active duty. They are interchangeable with the AC for any operational commitment. (6) Units and individuals of the Ready Reserve ordered to active duty without their consent shall be kept on active duty no longer than absolutely necessary. They shall be released from active duty as promptly as possible, consistent with operational requirements. Individuals ordered to active duty as a unit shall be released as a unit whenever practical. This excludes members who must be held on active duty for medical, legal, or other administrative reasons. (7) Service Secretaries are responsible for the demobilization process for units and individuals under their command. g. Use of IRR as Personnel Pool. The IRR and ING shall be used as personnel pools. Members in the IRR and ING provide a range of capabilities to support future conflicts and shall be considered viable options. Activations shall be done first with the consent of the members being ordered to active duty. If there is a need to involuntarily activate a member of the IRR or ING, preference shall be given to those not previously ordered or called to duty.

8

ENCLOSURE 2


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008

ENCLOSURE 3 RESPONSIBILITIES

1. USD(P&R). The USD(P&R) shall: a. Develop and oversee personnel policies for the RC. b. Develop and maintain mobilization/demobilization personnel and pay policy for RC members ordered to active duty in support of operational missions, in contingency operations, during a national emergency, or in time of war.

2. ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR RESERVE AFFAIRS (ASD(RA)). The ASD(RA), under the authority, direction, and control of the USD(P&R), is the principal staff assistant and advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense and the USD(P&R) for all RC matters. The ASD(RA) shall develop and enforce policy, programs, and guidance for the activation, mobilization, and demobilization of the RCs during periods of national emergency, in time of war, or as otherwise authorized by law, in accordance with DoDD 5125.01 (Reference (j)).

3. SECRETARIES OF THE MILITARY DEPARTMENTS. The Secretaries of the Military Departments shall: a. Prepare activation, mobilization, and demobilization plans, including all transition and release plans and all home station procedures for activation, in accordance with this Directive. Periodically review and test these plans to ensure that a capability exists to mobilize RC forces and to assimilate them effectively into the Active force, including missions involving homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities. b. Ensure the existence of systematic procedures for alerting, ordering, or calling members of the RC units, sub-units, teams, and individuals to active duty. Take appropriate actions to provide resources to bring Service members and organizations to required deployable readiness levels prior to mobilization. Secretaries of the Military Departments’ approval are required to allow units to deploy by exception. c. Ensure procedures are established for determining the judicious and prudent use of RC forces. d. Activate RC forces with the consent of the individuals being called or ordered to active duty to the extent possible given operational considerations, while maintaining the deploying unit’s collective training readiness and cohesion.

9

ENCLOSURE 3


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008 e. Report unit and individual activation, mobilization, and demobilization information through Defense Manpower Data Center, DRRS, and GSORTS. GSORTS is available until DRRS is fully implemented. f. Ensure all AC and RC reporting units update their task and mission assessments in the GSORTS and DRRS at least monthly per DoDD 7730.65 (Reference (l)). Assessments are made against the unit’s current assigned mission-essential tasks, evaluating the unit’s ability to perform their tasks to prescribed standards, under the conditions expected in the theater of operations to which they would be deployed. g. Recruiting and retention efforts should target the replenishment of stressed capabilities and procedures to reclassify RC members to meet the skill sets for predictable requirements of future campaigns. h. Monetary and non-monetary incentives may be used by the Services to attract volunteers in support of operational requirements.

4. CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall: a. Advise the Secretary of Defense, after consultation with the USD(P&R), the ASD(RA), the Secretaries of the Military Departments, and the CCDRs, on the need to augment or expand the Active forces with members of the RCs. b. Recommend to the Secretary of Defense and the USD(P&R) the period of service for units and members of the RCs ordered to active duty. c. Report to the Secretary of Defense and the USD(P&R) the anticipated use of units and members of the RCs ordered to active duty, in coordination with the Secretaries of the Military Departments and the CCDRs. d. Ensure CCDRs requests for capabilities are as detailed as possible without specifying which Service or unit shall meet the requirement. When joint requirements are being sourced, utilize all forces available that can provide the required capabilities. This shall further ensure the judicious and prudent use of the RCs. e. Assist the Secretaries of the Military Departments in providing 90 days with a goal of 180 days’ notice prior to involuntary mobilizations approval to mobilization date for RC members by validating and sourcing the requirements early.

5. CCDRS. The CCDRs, through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shall: a. During planning and execution, identify RC forces requirements as early as operationally feasible, to meet mobilization notification guidance by the Secretary of Defense.

10

ENCLOSURE 3


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008

b. Ensure the use of military personnel is judicious and prudent, and the feasibility of meeting the requirement with alternate personnel sources has been considered. c. Maintain visibility and personnel accountability regarding the capabilities being provided by those RC members involuntarily activated. d. Employ RC forces in a manner that maximizes their core capabilities for the duration of their deployment. e. Ensure that RC units and individuals are returned to home station in sufficient time to execute accrued leaves and accomplish release from active duty processing in accordance with DoD and individual Service policies.

11

ENCLOSURE 3


DoDD 1235.10, November 26, 2008

GLOSSARY For the purposes of this Directive, the following definitions apply: dwell time. The period of time between the release from involuntary active duty pursuant to section 12302 of Reference (c) and the reporting date for a subsequent tour of active duty pursuant to section 12302 of Reference (c). Such time includes any voluntary active duty performed between two periods of involuntary active duty pursuant to section 12302 of Reference (c). mobilization for training. Mobilization for training is military occupation specialty/Air Force specialty code/Navy enlisted classification or additional skill identifier producing individual training performed pursuant to section 12302 of Reference (c). The intent of this training duty is to provide a specialty qualified member to a unit for future mobilization, and not to perform common-task-type functional training. notification. When a unit or individual is notified (verbally or writing) of a pending mobilization. operational cycle. Includes the period of involuntary mobilization followed by the period of demobilization before the subsequent involuntary mobilization. The lengths of these two elements of the operational cycle shall be set by the Secretary of Defense. volunteer. A member of the RC who is ordered to active duty with his or her consent.

12

GLOSSARY


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 1 of 16

DA Order Issued

DA MOBILIZATION ORDER 1692-10 ONE/OEFIOIF

-

(011847ZAprlO)

1. REFERENCES: A. FORSCOM-16812

- GWOT

B. FORSCOM-16904

- GWOT

C. HQDA-20048 - GWOT D. HQDA-20090 - GWOT E. HQDA-20179 - GWOT F. HQDA-20183 - GWOT G. FORSCOM-17136

- GWOT

H. HQDA-20233 - GWOT I. HQDA-20246 - GWOT 1. HQDA-20263 - GWOT K. USASOC-1614 - GWOT L. 1st Army-16106 - GWOT M. FORSCOM-17268

- GWOT

N. FORSCOM-17278

- GWOT

O. FORSCOM-17288

- GWOT

P. FORSCOM-17298

- GWOT

Q. FORSCOM-17304

- GWOT

R. USARC-7430 - GWOT S. 1st Army-16190 - GWOT T. 1st Army-16191 - GWOT U. USARC-7473 - GWOT V. 1st Army-16208 - GWOT W. FORSCOM-17345

- GWOT

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 2 of 16

X. FORSCOM-17350

- GWOT

y. FORSCOM-17351

- GWOT

Z. MEDCOM-3285 - GWOT AA. MEDCOM-3287 - GWOT AB. MEDCOM-3288 - GWOT AC. MEDCOM-3289 - GWOT AD. FORSCOM-17362

- GWOT

AE. 1st Army-16306 - GWOT AF. HQDA-20422 - GWOT AG. FORSCOM-17370

- GWOT

AH. FORSCOM-17373

- GWOT

AI. FORSCOM-17374

- GWOT

AI. 1st Army-16307 - GWOT AK. FORSCOM-17381

- GWOT

AL. 1st Army-16331 - GWOT AM. 1st Army-16332 - GWOT AN. 1st Army-16334 - GWOT AO. FORSCOM-17382

- GWOT

AP. FORSCOM-17385

- GWOT

AQ. FORSCOM-17387

- GWOT

AR. FORSCOM-17390

- GWOT

AS. FORSCOM-17391

- GWOT

AT. FORSCOM-17392

- GWOT

AU. FORSCOM-17399

- GWOT

AV. FORSCOM-17400

- GWOT

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 3 of 16

AW. FORSCOM-17401

- GWOT

AX. FORSCOM-17402

- GWOT

AY. 1st Army-16351 - GWOT AZ. FORSCOM-17406

- GWOT

BA. FORSCOM-17407

- GWOT

BB. FORSCOM-17408

- GWOT

BC. FORSCOM-17409

- GWOT

BD. 1st Army-16372 - GWOT BE. 1st Army-16373 - GWOT BF. FORSCOM-17413

- GWOT

BG. FORSCOM-17414

- GWOT

BH. FORSCOM-17415

- GWOT

BI. FORSCOM-17416

- GWOT

BJ. FORSCOM-17425

- GWOT

BK. 1st Army-16382 - GWOT BL. 1st Army-16383 - GWOT BM. 1st Army-16387 - GWOT BN. FORSCOM-17433

- GWOT

BO. FORSCOM-17446

- GWOT

BP. 1st Army-16448 - GWOT BQ. 1st Army-16450 - GWOT BR. USASOC-1632 - GWOT BS. 1st Army-16462 - GWOT BT. FORSCOM-17459

- GWOT

BU FORSCOM-17468

- GWOT

BY. FORSCOM-17469

- GWOT

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 4 of 16

BW. FORSCOM-17471

- GWOT

BX. FORSCOM-17476

- GWOT

BY. FORSCOM-17477

- GWOT

BZ. FORSCOM-17478

- GWOT

CA. 1st Army-16485 - GWOT CB. FORSCOM-17483

- GWOT

CC. FORSCOM-17491

- GWOT

CD. FORSCOM-17496

- GWOT

CE. FORSCOM-17497

- GWOT

CF. FORSCOM-17521

- GWOT

CG. FORSCOM-17523

- GWOT

CH. FORSCOM-17526

- GWOT

CI. FORSCOM-17548

- GWOT

Cl FORSCOM-17549

- GWOT

CK. FORSCOM-17567

- GWOT

CL. SECDEF MEMO 20 SEP 01, MOBILIZA TIONIDEMOBILIZA TION PERSONNEL AND PAY POLICY FOR RESERVE COMPONENT MEMBERS ORDERED TO ACTIVE DUTY IN RESPONSE TO THE WORLD TRADE CENTER AND PENTAGON ATTACKS. CM. SECDEF MSG 131954Z SEP 01, ATSD: PA/DPL, SUBJECT: PUBLIC AFFAIRS GUIDANCE (PAG) FOR PARTIAL MOBILIZATION OF THE RESERVE AND NATIONAL GUARD. CN. DA MSG 101958Z JUN 04, SUBJECT: ARMY FY05 FINANCIAL MGT GUIDANCE IN SUPPORT OF CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS - CHANGE 1. CO. DA MSG 220125Z JAN 03, SUBJECT: MODIFICATION OF ARMY ROTATION POLICY. CPo DA MSG 052324Z SEP 03, SUBJECT: OIP ROTATION AND MOBILIZATION POLICY. 2. THE PRESIDENT, PURSUANT TO TITLE 10, USC, SECTION 12302 AND EXECUTIVE ORDER 13223 IN SUPPORT OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER AND PENTAGON ATTACKS, AUTHORIZED THE MOBILIZATION OF UNITS AND INDIVIDUALS OF THE READY RESERVE. 3. THIS MESSAGE PROVIDES AUTHORIZATION TO ORDER THE RC UNIT(S) LISTED IN PARA 5 BELOW TO ACTIVE DUTY UNDER PARTIAL MOBILIZATION AUTHORITY (TITLE 10, USC 12302). A. UNIT PERSONNEL ARE INVOLUNTARILY

ORDERED TO ACTIVE DUTY IN THEIR

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 5 of 16

CURRENT GRADES AND POSITIONS FOR AN INITIAL PERIOD AS SPECIFIED BELOW ABSENT AUTHORIZED EXTENSIONS OR REORDERS TO ACTIVE DUTY, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF DOD DIRECTIVE 1235.10 OR SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE. B. PURSUANT TO PRESIDENTIAL EXECUTIVE ORDER 13223 OF 14 SEPTEMBER 2001, YOU ARE RELIEVED FROM YOUR PRESENT RESERVE COMPONENT STATUS AND ARE ORDERED TO REPORT FOR A PERIOD OF ACTIVE DUTY NOT TO EXCEED 25 DAYS FOR MOBILIZATION PROCESSING. PROCEED FROM YOUR PRESENT LOCATION IN SUFFICIENT TIME TO REPORT BY THE DATE SPECIFIED. IF UPON REPORTING FOR ACTIVE DUTY YOU FAIL TO MEET DEPLOYMENT MEDICAL STANDARDS (WHETHER BECAUSE OF A TEMPORARY OR PERMANENT MEDICAL CONDITION), THEN YOU MAY BE RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY, RETURNED TO YOUR PRIOR RESERVE STATUS AND RETURNED TO YOUR HOME ADDRESS, SUBJECT TO A SUBSEQUENT ORDER TO ACTIVE DUTY UPON RESOLUTION OF THE DISQUALIFYING MEDICAL CONDITION. IF, UPON REPORTING FOR ACTIVE DUTY, YOU ARE FOUND TO SATISFY MEDICAL DEPLOYMENT STANDARDS, THEN YOU ARE FURTHER ORDERED TO ACTIVE DUTY FOR THE PERIOD SPECIFIED BELOW. TIME SPENT ON MOBILIZATION PROCESSING (UP TO 25 DAYS) IS COUNTED AGAINST AND RUNS CONCURRENTLY WITH THE PERIOD OF MOBILIZATION AUTHORIZED/DIREC C. UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED, THIS ORDER DOES NOT AUTHORIZE THE MOBILIZATION OF PROMOTABLE COLONELS OR GENERAL OFFICERS. D. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT (AMEDD) RESERVE COMPONENTS (RC) MEDICAL CORP, DENTAL CORPS, AND NURSE ANESTHETIST OFFICERS MOBILIZE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE ARMY, MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS (ASAM&RA) 90-DAYBOOTS ON THE GROUND ROTATION POLICY, DTD 2 OCTOBER 2003. THESE SOLDIERS WILL CONTINUE TO BE INVOLUNT ARIL Y MOBILIZED lAW CURRENT OSD POLICY AND WILL NOT EXCEED 24 CONSECUTIVE MONTHS OF PARTIAL MOBILIZATION AUTHORITY. E. THE ARNG AND USARC WILL ENSURE THAT EVERY SOLDIER IN ANY UNIT IDENTIFIED ON THIS ORDER THAT IS MOBILIZED AND SENT TO A MOB STATION WILL HAVE AT LEAST 12 MONTHS INDIVIDUAL DWELL AS OF THE UNITS MOBILIZATION DATE. SOLDIERS WITH LESS THAN 12 MONTHS INDIVIDUAL DWELL AS OF UNITS MOBILIZATION DATE MAY WAIVE THIS REQUIREMENT IN WRITING IF THEY DESIRE TO MOBILIZE AND DEPLOY WITH THEIR UNIT. F. THE FOLLOWING UICS ON THIS ORDER ARE AUTHORIZED TO MOBILIZE UP TO 110% OF THEIR APPROVED MOB PAX lAW HQDAMESSAGEDATED 181735Z MAY 05, SUBJECT: ARMY PERSONNEL REPLACEMENT OPERATIONS FOR OIF AND OEF: W8AQYG, W8ATZ3, W8J7AA, W8JJAA, WNG7Rl, WPNVCO, WPNVCl, WPNVD3, WPNVE3, WPNVT3, WPTYAA, WPWAYl, WQOUAl, WQOUA2, WQOUAA, WQ56U2, WRDCAl, WRDCA2, WRDCA3, WRDCA4, WRDCTl, WRDDAl, WRDDA2, WRDDA3, WRDDA4, WRDDAA, WRDDTl, WRYUAl, WRYUA2, WRYUA3, WRYUA4, WRYUAA, WRYUTl, WSI4AA, WSRFAA, WTGKAA, WTTJAA, WVD3AA, WVRIAl, WVRIA2, WVRIAA, WVRI Tl, WWCAAA, WX5YY3, WZMRAl, WZMRA2 AND WZMRAA. G. ALL SOLDIERS SERVING ON TDY/TCS ORDERS FOR DUTY IN EXCESS OF 180 DAYS MUST REPORT TO THE SERVICING INSTALLATION HOUSING OFFICE OR CONTACT ARMY LODGING SUCCESS (1- 800-462-7691) FOR GOVERNMENT HOUSING SOLUTIONS. IF

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 6 of 16

NO GOVERNMENT LODGING SOLUTIONS ARE REASONABLY AVAILABLE, THE SOLDIER WILL BE ISSUED A STATEMENT OF NON-AVAILABILITY AND REIMBURSED UP TO 55% OF THE MAXIMUM DUTY LOCALITY PER DIEM (LODGING AND MEALS AND INCIDENTAL EXPENSES). FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THIS GUIDANCE MAY RESULT IN NON REIMBURSEMENT OF EXPENSES. 4. MOBILIZATION STATIONS (MS) ARE SHOWN IN PARA 5. THE UNIT(S) WILL MOBILIZE AND MOVE TO ASSIGNED MS lAW TIME LINES ESTABLISHED IN THE FORSCOM MOBILIZATION AND DEPLOYMENT PLANNING SYSTEM (FORMDEPS) UNLESS OTHERWISE DIRECTED BY MACOM COMMANDER. UNIT STRENGTH WILL NOT EXCEED THE AUTHORIZED LEVEL STATED IN PARA 5. 5. THE FOLLOWING UNIT(S) IS/ARE HEREBY ORDERED TO ACTIVE FEDERAL DUTY UNDER TITLE 10 USC, SECTION 12302 EFFECTIVE: A. MOBILIZATION DATE 02 APR 10 AND MOBSAD 02 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTTJYl 0981 MD DET DET 1 3 1 365 SPOKANE WAFT LEWIS W A B. MOBILIZATION DATE 16 APR 10 AND MOB SAD 19 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8LZ03 W8LZ USA CPS OF ENG CELL B 3 8 400 HQ US ARMY COE DC FT MCCOY WI WV51C3 0250 CS BN CO C MED FWD 32 1 254 SEA GIRT Gl NJ CP SHELBY MS C. MOBILIZATION DATE 20 APR 10 AND MOB SAD 23 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WPGEYK 0028 IN HQ HHC ID FWD 192 1 400 HARRISBURG Gl PA CP ATTERBURY IN D. MOBILIZATION DATE 22 APR 10 AND MOBSAD 25 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8AJVL W8AJ MOARNG ELE JFHQ FWD 1852 1 367 JEFFERSON CITY Gl MO FT HOOD TX E. MOBILIZATION DATE 23 APR 10 AND MOB SAD 26 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WX5YY3 0684 MD CO AREA SPT FWD 3 2 1 378 COLUMBUS G 1 OH FT LEWIS W A W8A9WC W8A9 TNARNG ELE JFHQ FWD77 2 1 365 NASHVILLE G 1 TN FT LEAVENWORTH KS W7TXZY W7TX FORSCOM AUG UNIT DET 68 3 1 365 FT MCPHERSON GA FT MCPHERSON GA W857W2 W857 USAR CMD AUG DET 69 3 1 365 FT MCPHERSON GA FT MCPHERSON GA F. MOBILIZATION DATE 30 APR 10 AND MOBSAD 30 APR 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W86DZQ W86D 1ST BN 338TH RGT DET 57 3 1 365 FT MCCOY WI FT MCCOY WI G. MOBILIZATION DATE 0 1 MAY 10 AND MOB SAD 04 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTPEB 1 0020 SF BN 03 CO B FWD 2 34400 ROANOKE RAPIDS G 1 NC CP SHELBY MS WRIQY6 0153 JADET DET 6 37365 NORRISTOWNPAFT HOOD TX WY42B4 015610 BN CO B FWD 4 2 2 180 CP MURRAY WA FT BELVOIR VA

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 7 of 16

H. MOBILIZATION DATE 12 MAY 10 AND MOB SAD 15 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8KMSB W8KM 4005 USAH DET 181 3 3 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BENNING GA I. MOBILIZATION DATE 14 MAY 10 AND MOBSAD 17 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8KMSC W8KM 4005 USAH DET 18232365 LUBBOCK TX FT SAM HOUSTON TX W8KMSD W8KM 4005 USAH DET 183 3 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT SILL OK W8KSZF W8KS 7238TH MED SPT DET 48 3 3 365 BROOKLYN NY CP ATTERBURY IN W8KMS4 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1743 6365 LUBBOCK TX FT BELVOIR VA W8KMS5 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 175 3 3 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BRAGG NC W8KMS6 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 176 3 2 365 LUBBOCK TX FT CAMPBELL KY W8KMS7 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 177 3 2 365 LUBBOCK TX FT KNOX KY W8KMTP W8KM 4005 USAH DET 161 32365 LUBBOCK TX FT BLISS TX W8KMTQ W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1623 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT CARSON CO W8KMTR W8KM 4005 USAH DET 163 3 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT IRWIN CA W8KMTS W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1643 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT LEONARD WOOD MO W8KMTT W8KM 4005 USAH DET 165 3 2 365 LUBBOCK TX FT LEWIS WA W8KMTU W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1663 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT WAINWRIGHT AK W8KMTV W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1673 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BLISS TX W886YB W886 USAR STRAT CMD DET 11 3 1 365 PETERSON AFB CO FT CARSON CO W8KMTY W8KM 4005 USAH DET 170 3 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT LEWIS W A 1. MOBILIZATION DATE 17 MAY 10 AND MOBSAD 20 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WY42B5 015610 BN CO B FWD 5 22 164 CP MURRAY WA FT BELVOIR VA K. MOBILIZATION DATE 19 MAY 10 AND MOB SAD 22 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WSBCWN 0075 MD HSP DET 87 3 1 365 TUSCALOOSA AL FT BENNING GA W7LZZ6 W7LZ CP SHELBY DET FWD 392 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS L. MOBILIZATION DATE 21 MAY 10 AND MOBSAD 24 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8KMSE W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1843 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT RUCKER AL W8KMS3 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 173 3 3 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BENNING GA M. MOBILIZATION DATE 25 MAY 10 AND MOBSAD 25 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8HCZB W8HC 1ST BN 382D RGT DET 44 3 1 365 FT SILL OK FT HOOD TX N. MOBILIZATION DATE 26 MAY 10 AND MOB SAD 29 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8KMSF W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1853 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BENNING GA

o. MOBILIZATION DATE 28 MAY 10 AND MOB SAD 31 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8EXWI W8EX 7232D MED SPT DET 56 3 1 365 NEW ORLEANS LA CP SHELBY MS W8KMSG W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1863 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT GORDON GA W8KMSA W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1803 2365 LUBBOCK TX FT EUSTIS VA W8KMS8 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 178 3 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BELVOIR VA

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 8 of 16

W8KMS9 W8KM 4005 USAH DET 179 3 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT BRAGG NC W8KMTW W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1683 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT IRWIN CA W8KMTX W8KM 4005 USAH DET 1693 1 365 LUBBOCK TX FT LEONARD WOOD MO P. MOBILIZATION DATE 31 MAY 10 AND MOBSAD 31 MAY 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W7Z4Z1 W7Z4 3D BN 411 TH RGT DET 34 3 1 365 INDIANAPOLIS IN CP ATTERBURY IN Q. MOBILIZATION DATE 01 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 04 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W7ZPZJ W7ZP USAR SMALL ARMD DET 51 3 1 365 FT GILLEM GA FT BENNING GA R. MOBILIZATION DATE 05 JUN 10 AND MOBSAD 05 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W863Yl W863 2D BN 311 TH RGT DET 1 3 1 365 FT BRAGG NC CP ATTERBURY IN S. MOBILIZATION DATE 06 JUN 10 AND MOBSAD 09 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WR7CY A 0652 CS HQ DET 13 3 1 91 HELENA MT FT BLISS TX T. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 JUN 10 AND MOBSAD 15 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W86TYL W86T USAR ELE 205TH BDE DET 203 1 365 EDINBURG IN CP ATTERBURY IN U. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 18 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W85YYS W85Y 3D BN 309TH RGT DET 26 3 1 365 LIVERPOOL NY FT DRUM NY V. MOBILIZATION DATE 23 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 26 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8Z8Y A W8Z8 LA ARNG MED DET FWD 10 2 1 220 JACKSON BARRACKS LA FT BENNING GA W8AJVK W8AJ MOARNG ELE JFHQ FWD 184 2 1 400 JEFFERSON CITY G 1 MO CP ATTERBURY IN W. MOBILIZATION DATE 24 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 27 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8AQYG W8AQ NV ARNG ELE JFHQ FWD 16258400 CARSON CITY G 1 NV CP ATTERBURY IN W87NYA W87N 2100TH MI GP DET 1 3 1 365 BLOOMINGTON IN FT LEAVENWORTH KS X. MOBILIZATION DATE 25 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 25 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W857W3 W857 USAR AUG UNIT DET 69 3 9400 FT MCPHERSON GA FT BENNING GA y. MOBILIZATION DATE 27 JUN 10 AND MOB SAD 30 JUN 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZKKAA 0100 CH DET CHAPLAIN DET B 3 2400 FT SNELLING MN CP SHELBY MS

Z. MOBILIZATION DATE 02 JUL 10 AND MOB SAD 05 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 9 of 16

W8BRZQ W8BR OHARNG ELE OML T 1.5 FWD55 2 12400 COLUMBUS G3 OH FT POLK LA AA. MOBILIZATION DATE 03 JUL 10 AND MOBSAD 06 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8ATZ3 W8AT ILARNG ELE JFHQ ISAF-A6 2 18400 SPRINGFIELD IL FT POLK LA AB. MOBILIZATION DATE 14 JUL 10 AND MOB SAD 17 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8ZKY9 W8ZK NE ARNG MED DET FWD 92 1 120 LINCOLN G2 NE FT BENNING GA AC. MOBILIZATION DATE 18 JUL 10 AND MOB SAD 21 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W700YW W700 100TH TRAIN DIV DET 30 3 1 270 LOUISVILLE KY FT LEAVENWORTH KS AD. MOBILIZATION DATE 23 JUL 10 AND MOBSAD 23 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8HJYQ W8HJ 2D BN 350TH RGT DET 243 1 365 CP BLANDING FL CP SHELBY MS W7Z1 YL W7Z1 2D BN 3 13TH RGT DET 20 3 1 365 FT DRUM NY FT DRUM NY W7Z4Z2 W7Z4 3D BN 411 TH RGT DET 353 1 365 INDIANAPOLIS IN CP ATTERBURY IN AE. MOBILIZATION DATE 24 JUL 10 AND MOB SAD 24 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W868ZK W868 2D BN 338THRGT DET 52 3 1365 LAWRENCE IN CP ATTERBURY IN AF. MOBILIZATION DATE 31 JUL 10 AND MOBSAD 31 JUL 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W87FZF W87F 2D BN 346TH RGT DET 48 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS W87FZE W87F 2D BN 346TH RGT DET 47 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS W87GW5 W87G 3D BN 346TH RGT DET 46 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS W8HNZI W8HN 3D BN 349TH RGT DET 33 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS W87GW4 W87G 3D BN 346TH RGT DET 45 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS AG. MOBILIZATION DATE 02 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 05 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTMHY7 0324 PO CO DET 7 3 5 400 WILL FITZSIMMONS CO FT DIX NJ AH. MOBILIZATION DATE 03 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 06 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WPTY AA 1225 CS BN HHD 2 78 400 DETROIT G 1 MI FT HOOD TX AI. MOBILIZATION DATE 04 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 07 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WSBCWP 0075 MD HSP DET 88 3 3 365 TUSCALOOSA AL FT BENNING GA AI. MOBILIZATION DATE 05 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 05 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W87FZD W87F 2D BN 346TH RGT DET 46 3 1 365 CP SHELBY MS CP SHELBY MS AK. MOBILIZATION DATE 07 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 10 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQRXAO 0140 AV BN 01 CO A 243400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

WQRXAA WQRXBO WQRXDO WQRXEO WQRXTO

Page 10 of 16

0140 AV BN 01 ASSAULT UH-60 20400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX 0140 AV BN 01 CO B SPT 2 43 400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX 0140 AV BN 01 CO D AVN SUPPOR 273 400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX 0140 AV BN 01 CO E FWD SPT 291 400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX 0140 AV BN 01 HHC 2 78 400 LOS ALAMITOS CA FT HOOD TX

AL. MOBILIZATION DATE 12 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 12 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W869YQ W869 2D BN 337TH RGT DET 243 1 365 SELFRIDGE MI CP ATTERBURY IN AM. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 15 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W86SYF W86S USARELE 158TH BDE DET 153 1 365 PATRICK AFB FL CP SHELBY MS AN. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 18 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WRTLAO 0413 CA BN CO A CIVIL AFRS 3 32400 LUBBOCK TX FT DIX NJ AO. MOBILIZATION DATE 18 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 21 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WP7MA3 0252 IN BN 01 CO A FWD 2 2 1 400 WILLIAMSTON NC CP ATTERBURY IN WPE6C4 0113 IN BN 02 CO C FWD 4 2 1400 WOODBRIDGE Gl NJ CP ATTERBURY IN WVFKAA 0217 TC CO TRK CBT HET 3 299400 FT SAM HOUSTON TX CP ATTERBURY IN AP. MOBILIZATION DATE 20 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 23 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WRDCAA 0469 EN CO MOB AUG RCP 3 0400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDCTI 0469 EN CO CO HQ MAC 3 16400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDCAI 0469 EN CO PLT A ASLT PLAT 328400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDCA2 0469 EN CO PLT A ASLT PLAT 328400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDCA3 0469 EN CO PLT A ASLT PLAT 3 34400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDCA4 0469 EN CO TM A FLD MNT M 3 16 400 DODGEVILLE WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDAA 0428 EN CO MOB AUG RCP 3 0 400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDTI 0428 EN CO HQ MAC 3 16400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDAI 0428 EN CO HQ MAC 3 28 400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDA2 0428 EN CO PLT ASLT 3 28 400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDA3 0428 EN CO ASLT PLT 3 34400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRDDA4 0428 EN CO FLD MNT TM 3 16400 WAUSAU WI FT MCCOY WI WRYUAA 0309 EN CO MOB AUG RCP 3 0400 BRAINERD MN FT MCCOY WI WRYUTI 0309 EN CO HEADQUARTERS 3 16400 BRAINERD MN FT MCCOY WI WRYUAI 0309 EN CO PLT A ASLT PLAT 328400 BRAINERD MNFT MCCOY WI WRYUA2 0309 EN CO PLT A ASLT PLAT 328400 FERGUS FALLS MN FT MCCOY WI WRYUA3 0309 EN CO PLT A ALST PLAT 334400 BRAINERD MNFT MCCOY WI WRYUA4 0309 EN CO TM A FLD MNT MA 3 16400 BRAINERD MN FT MCCOY WI AQ. MOBILIZATION DATE 21 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 21 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W868ZJ W868 2D BN 338TH RGT DET 51 3 1 365 LAWRENCE IN CP ATTERBURY IN AR. MOBILIZATION DATE 21 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 28 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 11 of 16

WSXKAA 0380 MP DET CRIM INVEST 3 21 365 HWD OF OAKLAND CA FT BELVOIR VA AS. MOBILIZATION DATE 22 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 25 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQOUAA 0656 TC CO TK MD POL 5000G 3 0400 HOBART IN CP ATTERBURY IN WQOUAI 0656 TC CO EAC MINUS 3 122400 HOBART IN CP ATTERBURY IN WQOUA2 0656 TC CO DET 1 347400 LAPORTE CNTY VETR IN CP ATTERBURY IN AT. MOBILIZATION DATE 23 AUG 10 AND MOBSAD 26 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQ22YJ 0883 MD CO DET 18 3 46 400 SPRINGFIELD MA FT LEWIS W A AU. MOBILIZATION DATE 25 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 28 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZDJYC 0744 MP BN DET 163 12400 BETHLEHEM PA FT BLISS TX AV. MOBILIZATION DATE 26 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 29 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTTJAA 0981 MD DET SANITATION 3 13 400 SPOKANE WAFT LEWIS W A AW. MOBILIZATION DATE 27 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 30 AUG 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WROUA6 0376 FI CO DET A FINANCE M 3 26400 WHITEHALL OH FT MCCOY WI AX. MOBILIZATION DATE 30 AUG 10 AND MOB SAD 02 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQ56U2 0452 OD CO PLT U AMMO ORD 3 53 400 ABERDEEN SD FT DIX NJ WTTPA5 0387 AG CO PLT A POSTAL PL 321 400 BETHANY MO FT DIX NJ AY. MOBILIZATION DATE 01 SEP 10 AND MOBSAD 04 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQ92AA 0592 OD CO MOD AMMO ORD 3 0 400 BILLINGS MT FT DIX NJ WQ92Al 0592 OD CO 592 ORD CO 3 31 400 BILLINGS MT FT DIX NJ WQ92Ul 0592 OD CO PLT U AMMO ORD 3 47400 BILLINGS MT FT DIX NJ WQ92U2 0592 OD CO MED LIFT PLTN 347400 BILLINGS MT FT DIXNJ AZ. MOBILIZATION DATE 07 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 10 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WNG7Rl 0169 AV BN 01 1ST CMD CO A 3 35400 FT BRAGG NC FT HOOD TX WSMMAA 0336 CS HHC CBT SUST SPT BN 3 78 400 BUCKEYE AZ FT BLISS TX BA. MOBILIZATION DATE 10 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 13 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WWCAAA 0789 MD DET SANITATION 3 10400 FT STORY USARC VA FT LEWIS WA WPNVT3 0126 AV BN 03 DET 3 HHC 2 2 400 SO BURLINGTON Gl VT FT HOOD TX WPNVCO 0126 AV BN 03 CO C 2 45 400 SO BURLINGTON Gl VT FT HOOD TX WPNVD3 0126 AV BN 03 DET 3, CO D 2 12400 SO BURLINGTON Gl VT FT HOOD TX WPNVE3 0126 AV BN 03 DET 3 CO E F SP 27400 SO BURLINGTON Gl VT FT HOOD TX WPNVCl 0126 AV BN 03 DET 1 CO C 2 40 400 WESTFIELD Gl MA FT HOOD TX WPNVC4 0126 AV BN 03 DET 1 CO C FWD 2 24 400 WESTFIELD Gl MA FT HOOD TX

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 12 of 16

BB. MOBILIZATION DATE 11 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 14 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WP3BAA 0197 FA BN 03 HIMARS FIRES UA 20400 CONCORD Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WP3BTO 0197 FA BN 03 HHS 2 69 400 MANCHESTER Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WP3BAO 0197FABN03 BTRY A241400BERLINGI NHFTMCCOYWI WP3BAI 0197 FA BN 03 DET 1 BTY A 224400 LANCASTER NH FT MCCOY WI WP3BBO 0197FABN 03 BTRYB 2 66 400 NASHUA Gl NHFTMCCOYWI WP3BCO 0197 FA BN 03 BTRY C 2 41400 PORTSMOUTH Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WP3BCl 0197 FA BN 03 DET 1 BTY C 2 24 400 FRANKLIN Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WP20AA 0197 FA HHB HHB FIRES UA 289400 MANCHESTER Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WY2AAO 3643 CS BN CO A 242400 SOMERSWORTH G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2ABO 3643 CS BN CO B 2 58 400 MANCHESTER G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2AAI 3643 CS BN DET 1 CO A 2 34 400 CONCORD G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2AAA 3643 CS BN FIRES BDE 2 0400 MANCHESTER G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2ATO 3643 CS BN HHC 2 57400 MANCHESTER G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WP20FF 0197 FA BDE FIRES 2 1 400 MANCHESTER Gl NH FT MCCOY WI WP34AA 0103 FA BN 01 155MM 20400 PROVIDENCE Gl RI FT MCCOY WI WP34TO 0103 FABN 01 HHS 2 83400 PROVIDENCE Gl RI FT MCCOY WI WP34BO 0103 FA BN 01 BTY B 2 67400 NO SMITHFIELD RI FT MCCOY WI WP43AA0201 FABN01155SP20400FAIRMONTGI WVFTMCCOYWI WP43 TO 0201 FA BN 01 HHB 2 70 400 FAIRMONT G 1 WV FT MCCOY WI WP43AO 0201 FA BN 01 BTY A 281 400 ELKINS G 1 WV FT MCCOY WI WP43BO 0201 FA BN 01 BTY B 2 45 400 MORGANTOWN G 1 WV FT MCCOY WI WP43Bl 0201 FA BN 01 BTY B DET 1 236400 KEYSER Gl WV FT MCCOY WI WP43CO 0201 FABN 01 BTY C 2 45 400 HINTON Gl WVFT MCCOY WI WP43Cl 0201 FABNOI BTYCDET 1236400RONCEVERTEGI WVFTMCCOYWI WPTIAA 0119 FA BN 01 155 SP 2 0 400 LANSING MI FT MCCOY WI WPTITO 0119 FABN 01 HHB 155 SP 270400 LANSING MI FT MCCOY WI WPTIAO 0119 FA BN 01 BTY A 155 SP 285400 PORT HURON Gl MI FT MCCOY WI WPTIBO 0119 FA BN 01 BTY B 155 SP 2 85 400 ALMA Gl MI FT MCCOY WI WPTICO 0119 FA BN 01 BTY C 155 SP 2 85 400 CHARLOTTE Gl MI FT MCCOY WI WPUAAA 0182 FA BN 01 MLRS 2 0 400 DETROIT G2 MI FT MCCOY WI WPUATO 0182 FA BN 01 HHS 2 63400 DETROIT G2 MI FT MCCOY WI WPUAAO 0182 FA BN 01 BTY A 250400 DETROIT G2 MI FT MCCOY WI WPUABO 0182 FA BN 01 BTY B 250400 BAY CITY Gl MI FT MCCOY WI WPUACO 0182 FA BN 01 BTY C 2 49 400 LANSING MI FT MCCOY WI WX8PAA 1436 EN CO HORIZ CONST 2 131400MONTAGUE Gl MIFTMCCOYWI WY3KAA 0372 SC CO NETWORK SPT 234400 MANCHESTER G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2BAA 0744 CS CO HIMARS 2 89400 HILLSBORO G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WY2BAI 0744 CS CO DET 1 238400 LITTLETON G 1 NH FT MCCOY WI WX7ZAA 1201 CS CO FWD SPT CO 1552 150400 KINGWOOD WV FT MCCOY WI WP9VAA 0182 CS CO FWD SPT CO, HI 2 127400 DETROIT MI FT MCCOY WI WX7YAA 0119 CS CO FWD SPT CO 1552 131 400 AUGUSTA MI FT MCCOY WI WPCOAA 1207 CS CO FWD SPT 2 130400 GREENWICH RI FT MCCOY WI BC. MOBILIZATION DATE 12 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 15 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WSQCAA 0210 PI DET MBL PUBLIC AFF 3 20 400 CARY NC FT DIX NJ BD. MOBILIZATION DATE 13 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 16 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

WTECAA WTECUI WTECU2 WTECU3 WTECU4 WTECU5 WTECU6 WTECU7 WTECU8 WTECU9 WTECVl WTECV2 WTECV3 WTECV4 WTECV5 WTECV6

Page 13 of 16

0438 MP DET LAW AND ORDER 30400 SALT LAKE CITYUT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET HQ DET 3 4400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET MP OPERATION TM 3 11400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET MP DESK TEAM 36400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET TRAP INV TEAM 1 3 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET TRAP INV TEAM 23 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET TRAP INV TEAM 3 3 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET TRAP INV TEAM 43 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET TRAP INV TEAM 53 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET INVEST TEAM 1 32400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET INVEST TEAM 232400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET INVEST TEAM 332400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET INVEST TEAM 432400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET INVEST TEAM 532400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET FORCE PRO TM 1 3 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX 0438 MP DET FORCE PRO TM 23 2400 SALT LAKE CITY UT FT BLISS TX

BE. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 SEP 10 AND MOBSAD 18 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WR84Y2 0206 HQ TM DET 23 2400 PFC WM MCWHORTER SC FT JACKSON SC WZPNAA 0428 TC CO TRK MDM CGO 34T 3 0400 JEFFERSON CITY MO CP ATTERBURY IN WZPNAI 0428 TC CO MINUS 374400 JEFFERSON CITYMO CP ATTERBURY IN WZPNA2 0428 TC CO DET 1 349400 HANNIBAL MO CP ATTERBURY IN WZPNA3 0428 TC CO DET 2349400 SPRINGFIELD MO CP ATTERBURY IN BF. MOBILIZATION DATE 19 SEP 10 AND MOBSAD 22 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTGKAA 0971 MD CO LOGISTICS SPT 3 80400 OGDEN UT FT LEWIS W A BG. MOBILIZATION DATE 26 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 28 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WPDW AA 0036 IN HQ DIV 2 288 400 AUSTIN TX FT LEWIS W A WX4HAA 0000 AR HHC DIV TAC CP 2 149400 AUSTIN Gl TX FT LEWIS WA WX4FTO 0000 AR BN HHC SPECIAL TR 2 195400 AUSTIN G 1 TX FT LEWIS WA WX4FAO 0000 AR BN SIG CO 2 137400 AUSTIN G 1 TX FT LEWIS W A WV5Y AA 0036 AG BND DIV 2 40 400 AUSTIN TX FT LEWIS W A WPMOA4 0133 FA BN 04 BTY A FWD 4 2 13 400 SAN MARCOS G 1 TX FT LEWIS W A BH. MOBILIZATION DATE 26 SEP 10 AND MOB SAD 29 SEP 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTE7Y3 0814 MP CO DET 33 11400 ARLINGTON HEIGHTS IL FT BLISS TX BI. MOBILIZATION DATE 28 SEP 10 AND MOBSAD 01 OCT 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZMRAA 0370 TC CO TRK MDM PLS 3 0400 BROWNSVILLE TX FT MCCOY WI WZMRAI 0370 TC CO MINUS 3 109400 BROWNSVILLE TX FT MCCOY WI WZMRA2 0370 TC CO DET 1 3 61 400 KINGSVILLE NAS US TX FT MCCOY WI BJ. MOBILIZATION DATE 01 OCT 10 AND MOB SAD 04 OCT 10 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WPW AYl 0200 CM TM RECON FWD 2 5 400 BIRMINGHAM AL CP SHELBY MS

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-D Order

Page 14 of 16

WQl VA4 0408 AG CO PLT A POSTAL PL 3 21 400 SHOREHAM NY FT DIX NJ WVD3AA 0329 MD CO AMBULANCE 3 73 400 ERIE PA FT LEWIS WA BK. MOBILIZATION DATE 07 OCT 10 AND MOBSAD 10 OCT 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WVRIAA 0820 SC CO TAC INSTL NTWK 3 0400 SEAGOVILLE TX FT BLISS TX WVRI Tl 0820 SC CO PLT TIN PLT V2 332400 SEAGOVILLE TX FT BLISS TX WVRIAI 0820 SC CO 1ST PLT 3 72400 SEAGOVILLE TX FT BLISS TX WVRIA2 0820 SC CO 2D PLT 3 48 400 SEAGOVILLE TX FT BLISS TX BL. MOBILIZATION DATE 15 OCT 10 AND MOBSAD 18 OCT 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WP9XAA 1129 FI DET 2 26 400 SMYRNA G2 TN FT MCCOY WI BM. MOBILIZATION DATE 16 OCT 10 AND MOB SAD 19 OCT 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZVIAA 0948 TC TM MVMT CONTRL TM 321 400 LAS VEGAS NV CP ATTERBURY IN WS14AA 0145 TC ELE THEATR OPENELE 354400 ANNISTON AL FT HOOD TX BN. MOBILIZATION DATE 22 OCT 10 AND MOBSAD 25 OCT 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WSQJAA 0206 PI DET BRDCST PUB AFF 3 27400 GRAND PRAIRIE TX FT DIX NJ BO. MOBILIZATION DATE 03 NOV 10 AND MOB SAD 06 NOV 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W7Y424 W7Y4 SC OP SPT AIRLIFT DET 24 28400 W COLUMBIA G2 SC FT HOOD TX BP. MOBILIZATION DATE 08 NOV 10 AND MOBSAD 11 DEC 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WQZEW A 0228 AV RGT 02 DET 45 3 8 400 WILLOW GROVE PA CP SHELBY MS BQ. MOBILIZATION DATE 23 NOV 10 AND MOB SAD 26 NOV 10 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZWAAA 0957 TC TM MVMT CONTRL TM 321 400 VICTORVILLE CA CP ATTERBURY IN BR. MOBILIZATION DATE 03 JAN 11 AND MOBSAD 03 JAN 11 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTHBAA 0029 PI DET MOBILE 2 20 400 BALTIMORE G 1 MD FT DIX NJ BS. MOBILIZATION DATE 22 JAN 11 AND MOB SAD 25 JAN 11 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WSRF AA 0077 CS HQ SDST BDE WO SIG 3 309 400 FT DIX NJ FT HOOD TX BT. MOBILIZATION DATE 03 APR 11 AND MOBSAD 06 APR 11 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WTKTAA 0403 AG CO REPLACEMENT CO 3 25 365 PUNXSDTA WNEY PA FT BENNING GA BU MOBILIZATION DATE 03 JUN 11 AND MOBSAD 05 JUN 11 DIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8JJAA W8JJ 1173 DSA TRANS TML BN 3 94 400 BROCKTON MA CP SHELBY MS

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 15 of 16

BY. MOBILIZATION DATE 05 JUL 11 AND MOB SAD 07 JUL 11 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA W8J7AA W8J7 1182 USA TRANS TML BN 394400 NORTH CHARLESTON SC CP SHELBY MS BW. MOBILIZATION DATE 05 JUL 11 AND MOB SAD 08 JUL 11 UIC DESCRIPTION COMPO PAX TOUR LENGTH HOME STA MOB STA WZAMAA 0294 AG CO REPLACEMENT 3 25 365 LAKE CHARLES LA FT BENNING GA 6. THE UNIT(S) LISTED IN PARAGRAPH 5 ABOVE WILL BE NOTIFIED OF THE MOBILIZATION EFFECTIVE DATE WITHIN 24 HOURS OF RELEASE OF THIS MESSAGE. THE MOBILIZATION PERIOD MAY BE ADJUSTED DEPENDING ON MISSION REQUIREMENTS. COMMANDERS WILL INFORM SOLDIERS TO PLAN ACCORDINGLY. 7. MACOMS WILL APPLY THE PROVISION OF AMOPES, FORMDEPS, AND AR 600-8-101 FOR PERSONNEL PROCESSING. 8. THIS ORDER IS THE DA MOVEMENT DIRECTIVE. PROVISIONS OF AR 55-113 AND AR 55-355 APPLY. SUPPORT INSTALLATIONS ARE DIRECTED TO PROCESS REQUESTS FROM SUBJECT RC UNIT PENDING RECEIPT OF HARD COPY ORDERS TO ACTIVE DUTY. 9. OMA FUND CITATIONS FOR MOBILIZED UNITS: ALL ARMY PERSONNEL, EXCEPT SOCOM ASSETS, ORDERED TO DEPLOY IN SUPPORT OF OPERATIONS NOBLE EAGLE AND/OR ENDURING FREEDOM WILL CONTACT THE RESPECTIVE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE FOR FUND CITES. A. ALL UNITS, EXCEPT SOCOM UNITS, CONTACT THE SERVICING 1 INSTALLATION RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE AT THE DESIGNATED MOB STATION FOR TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION FUND CITES. B. TRAVEL ADVANCED ACCOUNTING CITATIONS MUST CITE A SPECIFIC FISCAL STATION NUMBER (FSN). RESERVE COMPONENT PERSONNEL WILL MOBILIZE AND DEMOBILIZE AT THE SAME STATION. CITE THE FISCAL STATION NUMBER OF THE STATION WHERE MOBILIZATION 1 DEMOBILIZATION OCCURS (THE SAME STATION WHICH ISSUES THE ADVANCES). FOR ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE REFER TO DFAS-IN REG 37-1 (ADVANCES AND PROGRESS PAYMENTS). 10. DEMOBILIZATION OF UNITS IS PROHIBITED WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL OF DA. INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS OF THE UNIT WILL DEMOBILIZE WITH THE UNIT UNLESS PROVISIONS OF AR 600-8-24 OR AR 635-200 APPLY. 11. PUBLIC AFFAIRS GUIDANCE. SEE REF CM, THIS MESSAGE, FOR SPECIFIC GUIDANCE. 12. ALL SOLDIERS DEPLOYING INTO AFGHANISTAN AND PAKISTAN WILL POSSESS INTERCEPTOR BODY ARMOR (IBA). IN AN EFFORT TO IDENTIFY INTERCEPTOR BODY ARMOR (IBA) FIELDING REQUIREMENTS, ALL UNITS DEPLOYING TO AFGHANISTAN AND PAKISTAN ISO OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM AND NOT PROCESSING THROUGH THE FORT BENNING CONUS REPLACEMENT CENTER (CRC) WILL NOTIFY HQDA OF IBA REQUIREMENTS. HQDA CAT POC IS G8 WATCH OFFICER AT DSN 223-4827, CML 703-693-4827.

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


Draft DAMPS-U Order

Page 16 of 16

13. ACTION ADDRESSEE WILL ACKNOWLEDGE RECEIPT OF THIS ORDER TO DA (DAMOODM), MOB SHIFT LEADER LTC MARC HANSEN, DAMO-ODM, DSN 227-4375, EMAIL TO AAODOMM@HQDAARMY.SMIL.MIL. 14. PRIMARY ADDRESSEE WILL RESPOND BY EMAIL TO POC IN PARA 13 ABOVE.

https://mobcop.army.millconusa/templates/daorder.aspx?uid=60929&type=P

6/212010


197th Fires Brigade Deployment 2010-2011