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NEW BLOOD ISSUE XVI

ERIN HOLLAND / MONIQUE WHITE / SOYA 365 / CARLY HARMAN / ABBEY STONE


one thousand cranes


exposing local fashion

one thousand cranes (melbourne central) level 1 lonsdale bridge, 300 lonsdale street, melbourne vic 3000 www.onethousandcranes.com.au


EXCLUSIVE FASHION DEALS www.cityblis.com


FJ O R D E

CONTENTS

30 ERIN HOLLAND IS...

NEW BLOOD

Excitement, desperation and aspiration are just Erin Holland is Miss World Australia and next few emotions facing those new to the industry the world

Making a name for yourself is never easy, but some are helping them along

SIX MONTHS LATER

We catch up with the LMFF 2013 National Graduates

STIKE A POSE

Exploring the street style of LA

With the world at his feet Andy Truong creatively sees the world he wants to live in

EDITOR’S DESK

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STREET WALK

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MELBOURNE WRAP UP

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A TOUCH OF SPICE

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HOW TO: START A BLOG

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THE NEW AGE MAN

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HEALTH & WELLBEING

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SEVEN QUESTIONS

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FJORDE STYLE: WOMEN

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STOCKISTS

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FJORDE STYLE: MEN

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A SIMPLE TRUTH...

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BEAUTY: FOREVER YOUNG

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DEAR NEW YORK...

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WAYS IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS

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Sustainable fashion is the only way to go for Monique White

64 PARIS IS CALLING

Carly Harman’s journey is just beginning

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66 BACK TO LA

MONIQUE WHITE

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54 SOYA 365

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106 ABBEY STONE

A simple dream is sometime all it takes

COVER Photographer Jon Lee Stylist Ben Anderson Hairstyling Hair By Ciccone Make Up Ciccone Cosmetics Erin Holland is wearing Belluccio


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FJ O R D E

CO N T R I B U TO R S

EDITORS

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

BEAUTY EDITOR

Patrick Price James Banham

Ben Anderson

Megan Bond

CONTRIBUTORS

PHOTOGRAPHY

MAKE-UP & HAIR

Anna Gilfillan Camille Gower Goerge Seraphim Keira Rae Hocking

Jon Lee Richard Ibrahim Shana Trajanoska

Kat Bardsley Megan Bond Meg Everett

Kristina Bond Lauren Raffa Lauren Roberts Rachel Farah Stephanie Hume

STYLING STYLE ME 365 Alessia Simpson Ben Anderson Julia Zaikine Kate Carnegie

ART FJORDE GRAPHICS

CONTACT US

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Patrick Price pa.price@fjordemagazine.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Ben Anderson enquiries@fjordemagazine.com

enquiries@fjordemagazine.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

ADVERTISING

MARKETING

James Banham jbanham@fjordemagazine.com

Lachlan Taylor ltaylor@fjordemagazine.com

Laura Wong lwong@fjordemagazine.com

GENERAL ENQUIRIES

SUBMISSIONS FJORDE accepts submissions from freelance artists, photographers, designers and journalists, however, we cannot reply to every submission. Please see www.fjordemagazine.com for submission guidelines.

FJORDE Magazine will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result in the use of, or reliance on, the published information. No responsibility is taken for the content, images or advertisements. No part of FJORDE magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Copies of this publication may not be sold. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publishing staff. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without the permission of the publishers. Articles received with no name, address and phone number(s) will not be published. Articles received will only be published by approval of the editorial team. FJORDE Magazine reserves the right to shorten and or edit received articles and letters. FJORDE Magazine does not accept responsibility on articles written by various columnists and writers.

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FJ O R D E

E D I TO R ’ S D E S K

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK We’ve been looking forward to this issue for a while now. We get to look at those amazing individuals who take the risk with their passions in life from design, music, art and the list goes on. We celebrate those brave creative souls that fearlessly enter their respective industries in the hopes of one day breaking through the masses and making a name for them selves. Unfortunately its not as easy as that as those creative minds are met with obstacles and wall that they must overcome to move forward and continue towards their dream. This issue examines those individuals who have strived to break into their respective industries and look at their stories of where they’ve come from and what they’re doing to keep breaking through. But don’t be too disheartened by the tough times there are many individual and groups that support the creative industries like the Spirit of Youth Awards (SOYA). Offering mentorship and guidance to those wanting to continue to take on the world.

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And speaking of taking on the world, we had the pleasure of sitting down with the illustrious Erin Holland. Fresh from her win as Miss World Australia and is already gearing up to take on the world in Jakarta at the Miss World International finals. Lets get behind Erin on the fantastic journey she has ahead. I know the team here at FJORDE will be! I hope you enjoy this issue and for all of you who we haven’t been able to celebrate in this issue, I leave you with this thought. A dream is achieved one step at a time and even though there might be stumbling blocks along the way, if you have the passion and drive to keep moving forward you can achieve everything you want. Best of luck and let us know your story, we’d love to hear it!

Patrick


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BRIDE BRIDE NOW

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SUBSCRIBE

Welcome FJORDE’s newest venture FJORDE Bride by staying up to date with the latest bridal news and fashions. Simply subscribe for free here: www.fjordebride.com

FJORDE Bride brings you wedding fashion, accessories, advice on the greatest areas in Australia to take those memorable snaps, tips and tricks, and of course the greatest bridal dress designers Australia has to offer! All encased in the FJORDE style you’ve become familiar with – class, elegance and sophistication.


FJ O R D E

MELBOURNE WRAP-UP

A TOUCH OF GRACE IN HAWKSBURN WRITTEN BY EMILY COLLIE

Grace is a Melbourne boutique which can be found nestled in the heart of Hawksburn Village. Stocking a selective and exclusive range of international brands, as well as their own coveted label GRACE, the boutique has developed a cult following amongst it’s loyal clientele. The store has a gorgeous fit-out and floor plan and is a must visit for all Melbourne fashion lovers. Perhaps one of the most enduring messages from GRACE is the emphasis on customer

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service. Always delivered with a truly genuine love of their customer, everyone at Grace strives to ensure a customer’s experience is exceptional. Translating this customer experience to Grace’s new online boutique has also been a labour of love, with all purchases going out with handwritten notes and gorgeous gift wrapping.

GRACE

595 MALVERN ROAD , TOORAK VIC 3142 (03) 9827 2133


WINTER 2013

ART MEETS FASHION WITH ‘ALIGNMENT’ WRITTEN BY LAURA TIMBERLAKE

helped to create an almost ethereal ambience. Best of all, it’s versatile – a silk dress purchased now would look just as good with a chunky knit and ankle boots as it would over a Art meeting fashion is not a new concept to me, and I enjoy it more every time I see a bikini in the warmer weather. collection that embraces the idea. In my eyes it Designer Gary Bigeni has collaborated with Another interesting fact to consider is that it’s makes the the fashion more beautiful, and the artist Matthew Johnson to create a fabulous literally like purchasing art – and the garments garments more enjoyable to wear. Spring/Summer 13/14 collection, entitled are so beautiful that you can just see them ‘Alignment’. You can see more of Matthew Johnson’s art at hanging on the wall when you’re done. the Blockprojects’ website. The collection is like a myriad of beautiful silk silhouettes, with prints that quite literally pop. The launch for the new collection was held at http://www.blockprojects.com/ Blockprojects in Richmond. The models and artwork blended seamlessly, and the lighting When art meets fashion it can result in weird and wonderful things. In this case, it was mostly wonderful!

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H O W T O : S TA R T A B L O G

HOW TO: START A BLOG BY: LAUREN ROBERTS

THERE IS SOMETHING LIBERATING ABOUT WRITING A BLOG – SOMETHING ABOUT PUTTING YOUR WORDS OUT THERE FOR ANYONE WITH AN INTERNET CONNECTION TO FIND. THERE IS SOMETHING A LITTLE BIT MAGICAL ABOUT PEOPLE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD BEING ABOUT TO RELATE TO THE WORDS THAT YOU WRITE DOWN.

THERE ARE, HOWEVER, A FEW SIMPLE STEPS THAT YOU NEED TO TAKE BEFORE DIPPING YOUR TOES IN THE BLOGGING POOL FOR THE FIRST TIME. 1. Have a search for blog that you like. Read a whole pile of them. Think about what it is you like about them. Is it the language? The pictures? The font? The adorable little video of the kitten at the bottom of each week’s post? Make a mental note. 2. Decide on what you want to write about. Do you want a theme? UFO sightings in Alaska? Travel? Art? The foods of Swanson Street? Do you want to keep a photoblog or write the entire thing in Piglatin? 3. Determine your target audience. Book lovers? Office workers? Cat owners? Think about what they want to read about and try to tailor your writing style and subject matter to them. This is the easiest way to build up a fanbase. 4. Be exciting. Give your blog a name and take some photos that you think will make what you want to say stand out. Try to mentally plan the next seven blogs - by forcing yourself to do this, it will also help you identify if there is enough material to sustain your blog. 5. Make a commitment. If your blog is going to claim daily posting, make sure that you do blog every day. If you claim you have all the Hollywood gossip, make sure that you do. Anything less than what you promise your readers will take away the credibility of your blog and lose respect.

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WINTER 2013

BY NOW YOU HAVE YOUR PLAN AND THERE ARE A FEW DIFFERENT AVENUES YOU CAN TRAVEL DOWN. 1. For bloggers with some know-how about website design I recommend buying your own domain name. This basically means that you will own website and can blog from there. It’s a bit of hard work and a small fee – but can be very rewarding. Simply Googling ‘buy domain name’ will give you a large variety or companies that trade names. 2. Join a blogging website. The vast majority of these websites are free and have simple start-up instructions. Blogger or Wordpress are very user-friendly for the first-time blogger. Just make sure that you read the terms and conditions and correctly install any software required. And please, please edit the format – individualise your blog so it stands out. 3. Submit your blogs through someone else. There are a lot of excellent blogging websites in the cyberworld but if the topic you are most passionate about has a niche market (like collecting old yogurt containers to make helmets) it might be a good idea to find a pre-existing website and submit your blogs through them as a guest blogger. This way your messages are reaching the people who would be most interested.

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BALANCING ACT

BALANCING ACT BY: GEORGE SERAPHIM

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WINTER 2013

OUR LIVES ARE DRIVEN BY THE NEED FOR FURTHERING OURSELVES IN ALL THE MANY FACETS THAT WE CAN. TECHNOLOGY IS ABUNDANT AROUND US PRESENTLY IN THE WESTERN WORLD AND WITH THE ONSET OF THE IPHONE WE NOW HAVE ACCESS TO SO MANY DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS WHICH RANGE FROM MONITORING OUR BLOOD PRESSURE AND BREATHING RATE TO EVEN AN APP THAT HAS THE ABILITY TO ACCURATELY CHART OUR OWN INDIVIDUAL SLEEPING PATTERS AND ALLOW US TO WAKE UP PERFECTLY DEAD ON THE MOST APPROPRIATE CYCLE CLOSE TO A PRE-SET TIME WE NEED TO WAKE UP. Technology is as vast nowadays as it is advanced, we have at our fingers hypersensitive touch screens which control small super computers that can monitor everything we do and respond however we program them to, our lives are becoming a interwoven software developer’s ocean of never ending spoils. How does this interfere with our natural way of living? As well as our human bodies? and how will we evolve tomorrow based on what we are experiencing today? Are we changing our capacity to not only survive in this world with our brains natural wave functions being somehow hacked into with these disposable devices? It is a question worth asking ourselves and it is worth predicting an answer for. Enhancements in the health and wellbeing industry with regards to our sleep and its health are becoming very popular these days. With many of the population being worked harder than ever before and a silent increase in our populates everyday stresses, a good healthy sleep is becoming a marketable study and people are answering its call with handy little apps and devises that range from bed lights that project images onto the walls and ceiling to make us sleep, to iPhone aps that provide guided meditations to induce us into the required wavelengths needed to induce sleep. Apps are the craze today, we can download a lot of them for free and most others

only cost a mere dollar, we have before us an encyclopaedia of programs that can intermingle in between our lives and each other’s paths. Generations which have come after mine, such as Gen Y are heavily intertwined with the online world and seem to function incredibly well within this realm, they thrive from it and seem to have a missing gene which feeds on technology; older generations though seem to struggle with even the idea. With apps being all the rage and newer ones being created every day, we should remind ourselves that we are here to take control of what we can use to better our own lives and what can be left to the side. These are exiting times we live in, and it is up to us to take the bull by the horns and discern what is for our highest good and what is not, they might be able to build an app to track our every coordinate, but it is important to understand as well that good old gut instincts must always be adhered to and life has its own natural rhythm if we but stop and listen. We are enhanced through natural ways, and in accordance with new technology we can ultimately integrate ourselves to be able to harbour a healthy balance between our mind body and soul and the synthetic world around us. New stuff is everywhere and it is growing in abundance, use it wisely and it can be a heaven sent.

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FJ O R D E

FJ O R D E S T Y L E

WOMEN STYLE REUBEN CHEOK [WWW.REUBENCHEOK.COM]

STATEMENT STRIPES Stripes are the new graphic pattern. Gone are the gaudy, brightly coloured pieces in geometric or symmetric patterns, and ushered in it’s place for this season are stripes. Showcased heavily in New York and London fashion weeks, it is also a hit with the consumers.

Paul Smith, Acne and Jonathan Saunders led the charge at London Fashion Week, whilst Dolce & Gabba-na’s black and white hot pants suit was a breath of fresh air! Gucci and Moschino kept with the two-toned look, in blue and white whilst Tommy Hilfiger stuck with the candy cane type of variety. Stripes are familiar, safe and can be refashioned into new hues and palettes to bring a fresh updated look to this season. Horizontal or vertical or deep angular V’s all featured on a plethora of garments -

tops, jackets, skirts, dresses. The variety is astounding! The trend isn’t just any stripe - they must be at least an inch thick! So no delicate, lady-like lines. If you’re going to wear stripes this season, go all out in-yourface for maxi-mum graphical effect!

Not only are stripes easy to include in any outfit, we all know the secret the allusion of being super slimming when wearing vertical stripes! Marc Jacobs shimmering floor-length gown in vertical stripes and in another spring/ summer trend - monochrome, elongate and streamline the body. So take his example and double up on the stripes, wearing it head to toe in a bold, striking design and pattern.

GEISHA GIRLS The Western’s fascination with the Far East has been well documented in history, politics, cuisine and art. And now, we can apply that to fashion. Miuccia Prada, Etro and Dries Van Noten all heavily pushed the ori-ent trend with delicate satin origami-inspired shapes and pieces, as well as kimono styled garments, with rich embroidery detailing, all adding a touch of luxe. Encompassing this “East meets West” theme are detailed prints, rich, luxurious fabrics and the stereotypical, kimono sleeves. Staple Eastern costume-wear patterns were not the only borrowed reference - garments from Emilio Pucci, Hermés, Issa London and Fausto Puglisi all featured vivid prints inspired by the East. If the Oriental styling is a little too contrived or too heavy in inspiration, go for more masculine garments

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accompanied by pieces that show-off folded paneled details such as Prada’s pastel pink top which add a sense of texture, strength and definition to your outfit. For the quirky, uninhibited fashionista, take a leaf out of Jean Paul Gaultier’s look-book and mix a bit of Boy George inspired makeup and bowler hat with Geisha Girl chic! But a word of caution! Avoid making a fashion faux pas by dressing head to toe in exact Eastern garb repli-ca. Instead, wear one piece at a time and mix it with staples such as jeans, biker boots or t-shirts for a more contempo-rary and relaxed look. Embrace the trend in subtle ways, taking Haider Ackermann’s example of a charcoal structured suit - with it’s tailored jacket tightly wrapped by a leather obi-belt to cinch the waist and add a modern aesthetic and flair.


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MEN STYLE URBAN SAFARI MOVE over army fatigues! We’re officially exhausted of the constant revolution and recycling of the perenni-al staple trend seen in every autumn/winter season. The military trend has been giving its marching orders and now, it’s all about the ‘safari’ as we move into the warmer months. In the direct contrast to the vivid col-ours and bold prints showcased on the runways in the previous season, subdued and subtle colouring cater for the more inhibited creature. And there’s nothing wrong with that! Kriss Van Assche, Kenzo and Comme des Garçons all led the stampede, all producing uncomplicated, ver-satile pieces that fashioned into a rather wearable style for any man. The “urban safari” motifs encompassed earthy hues - khaki, olive green and ochre on tribal/ethnic prints with utilitarian detailing

CITRUS

Coming out of hibernation, a vibrant colour palette marks the end to the dreary, lifeless wintry months and invites a season of experimentation. Building on the burgeoning popularity in the autumn/winter season, though taking a back seat to oxblood and white, orange has slowly infiltrated the runways for this season. Most would scoff at a tangerine palette, but if done carefully and well, it can create a striking look and is sur-prisingly versatile and well balanced. The typical and overdone look has been to team up orange with grey or navy, but follow Salvatore Ferragamo’s styling by mixing bright juicy orange hues with bright, almost neon blues with canary yellow or even purple for a bold look! Talk about an explosion of Skittles candy! You can almost taste the colours in your mouth!

such as tough fab-rics and multiple pockets. However, none embraced the theme more than Balmain. The easiest way to weave a hint of safari without resorting to the dusting off your hidden 70’s full safari two piece is to introduce oversized shorts or utilitarian trousers with multiple pockets in subtle tones of stone. Throw in distressed leather boots or a coloured cardigan in canary yellow for example will help soften the look without looking too “staged.” However for those wanting to push the theme even more, purchase belted safari shirts or shirt jackets in muted beige and soft khaki tones and team it up with dark denim or relaxed chinos in the same shade to create a lighter ambience.

For a formal touch, add an orange tie to contrast a navy suit, sharp white shirt and finish off with tan leather shoes. If a tangerine coloured tie is still too much confrontation for your working environment, keep the attire neutral but dark in hues, and update it with an orange pocket square or orange document wallet or clutch. For the more fashion daring, wear a grey blazer over an orange t-shirt or orange trousers or swap the blazer for an olive bomber jacket, dark chinos with white sneakers to complete a more relaxed casual look. As the weather warms up, citrus hues are a fresh look that is energetic as well as playful and versatile.

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FJ O R D E B E A U T Y : F O R E V E R Y O U N G

F O R E V E R Y O U N G PHOTOGRAPHY: WOODROW WILSON / GROOMING AND HAIR: MEGAN BOND MODEL: TESS [CHADWICKS] & CAMILLE [GIANT]

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WINTER 2013

TESS

FRESH FAC E S

CAMILLE

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WINTER 2013

FORE VER YOU NG ORGANIC RAW COCONUT OIL THE BEAUTY MIRACLE OIL Whilst fast becoming known as the healthiest oil for cooking with, here are a few reasons to use it in your beauty regime: It’s Organic, No Chemicals; It’s economical; Did you know coconut oil is the nearest in structure to your skin’s own natural oils Both your skin’s own sebum oil and coconut oil are ph balanced; Coconut Oil is so high in antioxidants you can store it in its natural state at room temperature for more than a year without fear of oxidisation or formation of free radicals, so that means no preservatives needed; The shorts chain fatty acids and antimicrobial properties of coconut oil help your skin heal, it’s great for acne; HOW TO USE IT: Simply get a small amount let it melt in your hands and massage into a clean face. Allow if to fully soak in before applying makeup, great to replace your night crème with also.

JETPEEL I’m one to try anything that doesn’t involve harsh chemicals or a knife, so a Jetpeel is a cosmetic procedure I will give my tick of approval to. It only uses water, sodium chloride and oxygen. Jetpeel is a noninvasive treatment which incorporates lymphatic drainage, mechanical exfoliation and hydration of the superficial layers of the epidermis. The speed at which the sodium chloride, water and oxygen is delivered to the skin causes liquids to break into micro-droplets, which exfoliate the superficial layers of the epidermis whilst aiding the infusion of vitamins. It’s a good replacement for your facial especially before a special occasion like a wedding or event, there is no risk of it causing breakouts and gives your skin the smoothest possible surface for applying makeup over. However if you have your facial because of the aromatic relaxation experience then this treatment is not for you. It doesn’t hurt at all but it is a bit like skiing really fast in the Swiss Alps, or diving headfirst into the freezing cold ocean. It’s so cold it makes you catch your breath. The upside to this is it certainly wakes you up better than caffeine. Jetpeel treatment is safe and suitable for all skin types, even during pregnancy. The cost of the treatment is between $179-199 give it a go at Minoos Laser and Beauty Clinic www.minooslaserbeauty.com.au

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archie


archie DESIGNED IN MELBOURNE www.archieonline.com.au


FJ O R D E

NEW BLOOD

NEW B LO O D BY CASSANDRA GRESKIE

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WINTER 2013

NEW BLOOD. DESPERATION, ASPIRATION, REJECTION, EXPECTATION, DRIVE, TALENT, COMPETITIVENESS, YOU CAN SMELL IT A MILE AWAY. FROM THE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY CAN BE PERCEIVED AS JUST GLITZ, GLAMOUR AND SKY HIGH SHOES. IT’S NOT UNTIL YOU STEP INSIDE THE SHINNY DOORS, THAT YOU REALIZE JUST HOW MUCH MORE IS INVOLVED! THIS FAST PAST INDUSTRY OF TOMORROW CAN EITHER EAT YOU ALIVE OR GIVE YOU WINGS!

Being apart of the fashion industry is being apart of a movement in time. What a power and exciting responsibility to represent people’s thoughts, feelings and attitudes of a certain time in history. As a new comer you pose a threat. In such a fast pace industry, keeping up is no easy task. ‘New Blood’ may have the very edge that makes someone else yesterday. That’s what makes this industry so competitive. One minute you can be at the top of your game, and the next your left behind. The fashion industry is like a fast train, new passengers constantly waiting to get on from many different stations, all wanting to be apart of the ride and see where it takes them. Does it matter what station you get on at? Does past experience or study guarantee you a first class seat? Breaking into this world is tough, extremely competitive, and one daunting task. Where and how do you start? Three fashionista’s give their words of wisdom on being ‘New Blood’ in the fashion industry.

THE MODEL….. Starting out as a new model I found myself encapsulated with the fast pace speed and diversity of inspiring people that surrounded me. The rhythm of the industry set a new beat to which I was soon addicted. The pressure of trying to keep up and conform to a certain ideal did become exhausting. I felt as though I didn’t have full control over my level of success. It was through this so-called lack of power however, that I discovered my true inner strength. I learnt to just enjoy each experience as part of the journey and appreciate being apart of such a passionate world. The fashion industry taught me resilience, self-belief and strength.

THE STUDENT…… As a young boy I was always drawn to fashion, however academic studies were pushed as a more favorable career choice. I tried to conform to family pressures of following the safer pathway, however my underlying passion uprooted itself and lead me to the fashion industry. I am currently 2 years into a Fashion Design Degree at RMIT University. Starting out I constantly doubted my work and myself. I wanted to fit in and at the same time stand out. I came to a point where my mistrust in myself and constant comparison to those around me was blocking my passion. It was then that I came to the realization that I had to define the fashion industry in my own way and present to the world what it meant to me in order to excel. It is this philosophy that continues to fuel me.

THE STYLIST….. I never studied fashion it was just in my blood. I live and breathe fashion. It is who I am. I knew from the moment I entered the fashion industry that it was where I belonged. As ‘New Blood’ I made it my duty to speak to every person I could and ask every question I could think of. I drew inspiration from successful people around me and decided very early on that I wanted to climb the ladder and reach the top. 5 years on I have managed to establish my name as a respected stylist through hard work and self-belief. The fashion industry is good at making people define themselves. Discover who they are, where they want to go and what they want to represent. No two people are the same; it’s our differences that make us interesting. So find your uniqueness and roll with it. No matter what station you get on at the fashion industry can take you in a thousand different directions. So just get on!

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N ER AIM NEH ? ?O?L?L A N D I S M I S S W O R L D A U S T R A L I A

ERIN HOLLAND is

MISS WORLD AUSTRALIA BY CAMILLE GOWER

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ERIN HOLLAND IS MISS WORLD AUSTRALIA

CROWN MISS WORLD AUSTRALIA WINNER ERIN HOLLAND HASN’T LET HER SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL ENCRUSTED TIARA WEIGH HER DOWN SINCE EMERGING VICTORIOUS FROM THE NATIONAL FINAL IN JULY.

DUELS

Already preparing for the Miss World Championships, to be held in Jakarta in September, the 24-year-old model and classically trained vocalist from Sydney has her eye on the international prize, but she’s modest about her achievement so far. “When they called my name apparently I stood there like a deer in the headlights,” Erin laughs. “Then all of a sudden, it hit me.”` Erin’s background as a performer (she completed a Bachelor of Classical Voice in 2011 and has been on stage since she was four years old) stood her in good stead as she competed against 31 contestants from across Australia in each phase of the Miss World Australia finals. Along with her natural good looks, and strong stage presence, her unique vocal talent helped her to secure the coveted crown, appropriately performing “Maybe this Time” from Cabaret for the talent sector of the competition. Essentially a beauty pageant, Miss World is a philanthropy-focused competition, which operates under the motto of, “Beauty with

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a purpose” – using the aesthetic-focused elements of a pageant competition to promote and endorse charitable work within less fortunate community groups. Beauty pageants are often given a bad rap in the media, but Erin stresses the positive nature of the charitable work that is done as part of the Miss World competition. “There is more to this than meets the eye,” she says. “I did my research and I found it’s a well rounded competition. It’s all about using what you have for the good of others. “All of the recent contestants were intelligent, beautiful, driven women who care about fundraising and charity, and we raised an incredible amount of money,” she adds. The money raised as part of the recent Australian finals will be presented to the Lilla community in Central Australia, as part of an indigenous outreach program supported by the Miss World organization, which also gives to children’s charities including Variety and the Children First Foundation.


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“It doesn’t matter how intelligent you are,” she explains.

The decadent ball gown apparently took designer Julie Sufi of Belluccio gowns several months to hand-bead with thousands of “Some of the doozies come from girls who are sequins, and Erin says she is confident the really not like that, but when you’re put on the gown will make the right kind of splash. spot and under so much pressure, you never know what’s going to come out.” “When in the public eye I think you have a “I’ll feel like a million bucks, because I’ll be real responsibility to make sure you promote a wearing something beautiful,” she says. “But I do think going into the media, and the healthy lifestyle,” she says. public eye, you have to have a handle on what “We’re visual creatures. When we think we “I’ve already had a lot of young girls message you’re saying, “ Erin adds. look good, we feel more confident.” me and ask for advice. Certainly, the media can be harsh. No less Confidence is certainly key. so than when it comes time to review the “For me to be anybody’s inspiration is While physically training for the Miss World always-controversial “national costume” – overwhelming and humbling and I’ll do the championships, Ms Holland says she will also best I can to make sure that I’m a positive role the country-specific ensemble designed to be trying to get in the right headspace for the represent our nation on a global scale at the model and portray that wholesome image.” Miss World event. Last year’s creation yielded competition and for what is to come. A healthy lifestyle, good headspace and the an unfavourable Avatar comparison from “I want to build a bit of a name for myself,” requisite elaborate costumes are one thing, Australian designer Alex Perry, and he was not but the almost consistent yearly gaffes during alone in his criticism of the sequined bodysuit she muses. the interview rounds of the Miss World design which was said to draw inspiration “Hopefully someone will notice me.” competition cannot go unmentioned. Erin from indigenous art. says the occasional “doozy” response to a With that the innate modesty comes peeking This year, Erin will take to the stage in a question by contestants is more likely due to out again, but Erin’s star is certainly just on sequined tea-length ball gown emblazoned the pressure of the competition than a lack of the rise, and sure to be as dazzling as that with the Australian flag, paired with a intellect. Swarovski-studded crown. sparkling headpiece, which takes the form of the Sydney Opera House.

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Photographer Jon Lee / Stylist Ben Anderson / Hairstylist Hair By Ciccone / Makeup Artist Ciccone Cosmetics

As well as the philanthropic aspect of the role as Miss World Australia, Erin says there is a responsibility as a figure within an appearance-based industry to promote a healthy body image.


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The city that never sleeps. New York City, is every fashionista’s holy land. From downtown Brooklyn, to the intense whir of Times Square, one thing is for sure, although the quality of the boot legged Alexander Wang bag’s might have reached an all-time high in recreating perfection, the true New Yorkers authentic style stands out from the wannabes. With their effortless, laid back sense of style, New York fashion happens without even trying. A chic that cannot be re-created, the true New Yorker can usually be spotted in their monochromatic style, in signature NYC Black. The accessories are understated and supportive pieces, after all attitude is the ultimate accessory when you’re in this state of mind. NYC Street Style, straight from the locals themselves. 40 W W W. FJ O R D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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MONIQUE WHITE BY CAMILEE GOWER

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MONIQUE WHITE IS ONE OF A NEW BREED OF DESIGNERS TO EMERGE ON THE FASHION SCENE, ARMED WITH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE COMPLEXITIES OF A CONSUMERDRIVEN INDUSTRY THAT IS BEGINNING TO EMBRACE AND PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN PRACTICE FOR THE FUTURE. GRADUATING FROM QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY IN BRISBANE LAST YEAR, WITH A BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS AND A MAJOR IN FASHION DESIGN, MONIQUE SAYS THAT THE EDUCATION OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WAS INTRINSIC TO THE COURSE. THE ASPECTS OF SUSTAINABILITY IN FABRIC SOURCING AND PRODUCTION PROCESSES FOUND THROUGHOUT HER DESIGN WORK ARE EVIDENCE OF THIS TRAINING AT QUT.

“If I can’t do it in a sustainable way, I won’t do simultaneously detailed and relaxed. it at all,” Monique asserts. With plans to move to America for a year to find a mentor in the area of sustainable design, The fabrics used in her latest collection were all fair-trade or organic. While Monique says before moving back to Australia to start her label, Monique has firm intentions for her the requirement to use sustainable fabrics future as a fashion designer. and processes can be limiting, it’s part of the challenge. Not only is it important to her “I want to do it right,” she asserts. design aesthetic but, more broadly, to the future of the fashion industry.

White’s aesthetic is modern and clean. She seeks to design garments that women will want to wear, rather than creating pieces of art. “Most of the time I’m looking to put together my perfect capsule wardrobe, with all the essential pieces that you need,” she says. “Everything has to be wearable. A lot of thought goes into that.”

“The more you learn, the more you realise you need to learn.” Designers in this frenetic industry can become wrapped up in the daily goings-on of business, but as Monique points out, sometimes it’s necessary to make time to stop and re-assess the way things are done. “I think it’s easier for this generation coming through,” she says. “We’re hoping we’ll be able to plant the seed in the industry.”

“I purposely have an uncomplicated aesthetic. Sometimes you make a statement through Monique explains that her concept isn’t what you don’t do. When I make clothing, I centered on marketing a product as have that in mind – the less is more aesthetic,” sustainable as its defining feature. She she adds. says her job is to create a product that the consumer wants, which also happens to be Her designs are uniquely tasked with her sustainably designed and manufactured. The practically chic aesthetic, which is borne of idea is to change the public mindset to show her own personal taste and inspiration from that the two concepts of sustainability and the women that surround her. aesthetic can be combined, and fashion can be “You need to be able to move in your clothes, produced in an ethical way. to make art, be creative and work in them,” Her design outlook is such that she can she says. incorporate her laidback, functional-yetsleek vision into a sustainable venture that is “I design for a woman who is comfortable in aesthetically refined. her own skin, who throws on her clothes and is out the door. I wanted it to be voluminous “I’m not really that trend driven,” Monique and elasticated and easy to wear. I had a lifestyle in mind, a real woman’s lifestyle and explains. what she would be doing in these clothes.” “A lot of designers are quite heavily influenced by trends, but here in Australia, we This easygoing aesthetic can be recognized have a different lifestyle and different seasons. in the simple silhouettes, clean lines and I think it’s better to just go your own way, and elasticized waists in Monique’s graduate create something that suits our own lifestyle collection, “The Secret History”. The colour palette is similarly bold but unfussy, featuring and the way we live.” crisp whites and greys alongside splashes of vibrant red and punchy denim.

The collection demonstrates an ease of design, which is as organic as the materials used therein. Featuring deconstructed pantsuits, two-piece suits and shift dresses, the silhouettes are an indication of Monique’s unique design aesthetic, which is

Clean, modern and sustainable, Monique’s design aesthetic emphasises the onset of an industry transition into the future. Not the future depicted in the shiny silver bodysuits of the 1970s, but in the manner of the ethicallyaware, aesthetically-focused new generation of designers who are meeting the task of fusing design and sustainability head on.

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BY LAUREN RAFFA IMAGES BY CHRIS FRAPE

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THE AWA R D S Australia. Bursting with youth, bursting with creativity. The competitive journey for those trying to make a name for themselves and their craft can often be testing. The Qantas Spirit of Youth Awards 365 (SOYA 365) exists to encourage those creatively inclined, and for eight years has been the leading grants program for emerging creative Australian talent.

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For those desperate to get noticed in a sea of surrounding remarkable talent, the prizes up for grabs through SOYA365 could provide an invaluable career boost. The winner in each category is awarded $5,000 in cash, $5,000 in air travel and priceless professional mentoring by Australia’s creative elite. SOYA365 provides artists with the opportunity to develop their creative careers not only through financial aid, but allowing them the chance to revel in their inspiration and passion abroad. SOYA365 boasts 13 categories, truly catering to a plethora of creative disciplines. These include photography, fashion, music, written word, interactive gaming, film & video, visual design & communication, animation, visual arts, architecture & interior design and craft & object design.

Australian creative and artists aged 18 – 30 are welcomed to enter their original works into any of the categories. The winners are also offered the opportunity to build a professional mentoring relationship with their creative leaders. Finalists and winners are connected with Australian industry icons, enabling those with valuable years of experience and success to provide pearls of wisdom. With creative leaders such as Zimmermann, Lee Groves, Lisa Dempster and Polly Borland, young emerging talents are able to develop creatively and professionally, honing in on their skills and building up a business base. “The project has been going since 2004, and it’s really about celebrating the creativity of young Australians,” said SOYA365 general manager Krissie Scudds.


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“We try and showcase thousands of young Australian artists and then we really celebrate the winners but value the creativity in all of them. Sometimes we do extra projects with the finalists. For example last year we ran a music workshop with Daniel Johns which was really good. We also made inflight TV commercials for Qantas with some of the other contestant,” she said. As Krissie explains, the opportunities awarded to winners of SOYA365 are priceless. “It’s a really exciting program. It’s great for the winners. They really receive a massive career boost. For any artist, to have that amount of cash and in many cases though it’s the professional guidance that they value the most. The cash just gives them a bit of breathing space.”

“Polly Borland is the photography mentor and she lives in LA… so the winner of that category can use some of their money to go over and work with her or see her. Mark Newson is the craft and object design mentor, who has studios in Paris and London, so the winner of that category usually goes over and spends some time with Mark in his studio.” The mentor relationships provided by SOYA365 exist on a flexible 12 months basis, however Krissie explains that the winners often create such a bond with their mentors that this continues for much longer.

SOYA365 recognised the spell bounding talent of Sydney singer/songwriter Caitlin Park. For Caitlin, the prizes provided by SOYA365 became a reality when she won the 2012 music category. Caitlin jetted off to New York to attend the CMJ festival after winning, and the prize money enabled her to buy new equipment and put together her own record.

“I worked with Lee Groves who was my mentor. It was really great his advice on what I should do, what paths I should take. He actually had mixed quite a bit of my new “That’s the real sort of ‘money can’t buy’ part album as well, which was really cool. It was nice to get that recognition in the industry… of it,” she said. industry wise it sort of pricks up a few ears,” “The mentors give them an entry into the she said. creative industry that they’re a part of, and SOYA is now open 365 days of the year and they really wouldn’t have that level of access each month a different category closes. You to otherwise.” can start by entering at: http://www.soya.com.au/soya-entries-open/.

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SIX MONTHS LATER BY STEPHANIE HUME

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THE L’OREAL MELBOURNE FASHION FESTIVAL’S GRADUATE SHOWCASE IS AN EXPERIENCE LIKE NO OTHER. JUST ASK ANY OF THE DESIGNERS THAT PARTICIPATED IN IT IN 2013. WITH GREAT EXPOSURE COMES GREAT RESPONSIBILITY AND THERE’S NO DENYING THAT EACH OF THE AUSTRALIAN DESIGNERS THAT TOOK PART ROSE WELL AND TRULY TO THE OCCASION. FJORDE HAD A CHAT WITH SIX OF THE NEW TALENTS TO WATCH ON THEIR UNIQUE DESIGN AESTHETIC, WHAT THEY’RE WORKING ON AT THE MOMENT AND HOW THEY FEEL ONLINE RETAIL PLATFORMS ARE CHANGING THE GAME.

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Photographer Vikk Shayen

KARA LIU

Kara’s designs gained attention even before her collections showcased at LMFF earlier in the year, which she just made after returning from an internship with Alexander Wang in New York City. Through the LMFF Graduate Showcase, Kara was able to form relationships with mainstream media and saw the experience as an amazing opportunity for the graduates work to reach a broader audience. Kara’s creative process differs from other designers, with designs informed by an academic method rather than more traditional inspiration sources of music, poetry and other art forms.

“I feel like it is time that I moved on from my graduate collection. I’ve got a few exhibitions and projects lined up, so you will definitely be seeing more of me,” she said. Like many emerging designers, Kara embraces the internet for invigorating the retail space. “Before it was very difficult to get your work out there. However, with the Internet as a great platform, you can do it yourself, you can get your work out there to the other side of the world.”

Kara sees this trend continuing and believes the rise of the blogger has democratised the “I was more drawn to figuring out how parts fit together and how things work. I guess that’s fashion world and is positive that there is a why I started to develop a focus on interesting growing market for young designers through these rapidly growing platforms. ways of garment construction,” she said. With a new collection in the works and many more years ahead of here, Kara is keen to keep moving forward.

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To explore her collection visit karaxliu.com


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MONIQUE WHITE ‘As an emerging designer I could never afford to show’ she An invaluable way to kickstart a fashion design career, Monique believes the experience enabled her to say, ‘I’m here’.

Monique is determined to continue fostering her knowledge of sustainable sourcing and production processes and is keen to find an industry mentor that is working in this way. Monique’s mantra of inspiration is, ‘less is more, make to last and if you can’t do it ethically, don’t do it at all.’

The LMFF experience was also an opportunity to gain feedback on her collection from a wider audience, beyond her friendship As an emerging designer, Monique believes that it is important to focus her energies on and family circle. building her knowledge and skills. She is It also exposed her to an even wider medium, adamant that execution and skill is an integral social media. ‘I was interested and terrified to part of fashion design. see some of the feedback on social media post ‘There has been some discussion amongst show,’ she said. fashion journalists lately that emerging She describes her design aesthetic as designers are lacking in the areas of cut and clean, modern and functional that balances fit, quality etc.’ she informed FJORDE. masculine and feminine style. ‘There is a lot of technical skill involved in ‘I design for a real woman who knows who creating a great garment, as well as innovative she is and has the confidence to use my ideas. I think that young designers would do collection as a basis to create her own style,’ well to remember this.’ she explained to FJORDE.

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Photographer Mardiana Sani

JAC K H A N CO C K Jack’s LMFF experience was a moment where he felt like all his hard work was validated and given recognition by somebody not connected to his institution of education.

Since the showcase he’s been working fulltime at Paul Smith’s in Melbourne CBD store. When he’s not working at Paul Smith, he’s interning at Glen Rollason.

The LMFF NGS was a chance to form lasting relationships with the other graduates and be exposed to the art of handling fashion media.

‘He’s a fantastic role model for me and I’m really lucky to have the position in his practice!’ Jack said of Glen Rollason.

Looking to the future, Jack believes online Rather than focusing on the retail side of the business, Jack’s graduate showcase was a self- and bricks-and-mortar retail spaces both offer their own fashion experience. exploration that questioned what menswear could be. ‘I think a beautiful amalgamation of both online and real-life shopping will exist in the Jack describes his design aesthetic as reflecting the styling of Edwardian aristocratic future’ Jack stated. menswear. However Jack believes the online platforms need to re-consider their approach. ‘I’ve been trained to create clothing using systems. Rather than searching for an ‘Something that could be improved would be influence that drives an aesthetic, I’ve tried the actual experience of online shopping - the to find a manner in which clothing can be created which builds new aesthetics naturally.’ online store needs to be considered from the ground up.’ He said. His approach to design is something beautiful, ‘I definitely design how I cook.. Use what I’ve His portfolio of design pieces and projects can be viewed online at www.tackjancock.com. got, and just keep working it until it tastes great - even if I never cook that again.’

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Photographer Tomy K C Leung

K AT H L EEN C H O O The LMFF Graduate showcase gave the collection Kathleen tirelessly worked toward the exposure it wouldn’t have otherwise seen. LMFF was also an opportunity to discover how the other graduates approached their designs. ‘It was so interesting and inspiring to chat to [the graduates] about how they work and where they get their ideas from,’ Kathleen said to FJORDE.

combined with classic garment features so the overall design is familiar yet intriguing. Since the showcase, Kathleen, along with other graduates from LMFF created a look for Australian Wool Innovation’s wool week. The designs featured at prominent Australian retail space, The Strand Arcade in Sydney. She has also been working on various projects.

Looking to the future, Kathleen plans to undertake a few internships and to gain as Kathleen’s creative process involves playing much experience as possible so she can one around with and familiarising herself with the day develop her own label. fabrics and materials that will then be used to ‘In the meantime I’m happy doing projects to create her designs. make my brand and aesthetic known to more ‘I like to create shapes and forms, and then people,’ she said. see how they might work on the body or on a Her advice for emerging designers is to garment, rather than having a preconceived focus on, ‘developing a clear brand identity idea of what a design should look like in the and establishing a unique positioning in the end,’ Kathleen stated to FJORDE. market.’ Kathleen seeks to create designs with a To stay up to date with Kathleen’s current high attention to detail that incorporate abstract sculptural elements. This aesthetic is projects visit: www.kathleenchoo.com.

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PA R I S I S CALLING F O R C A R LY BY KRISTINA BOND

WE ALL DREAM OF ONE DAY JUMPING ON A PLANE AND JET-SETTING OF TO PARIS TO REVEL IN THE WORLD OF FASHION. FOR CARLY HARMAN THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT SHE DID. SHE THEN WON AN APPRENTICESHIP WITH RENOWNED DESIGNER ALEX PERRY WHO LOVED HER SO MUCH THAT HE DECIDED TO KEEP HER ON AS HIS DESIGN ASSISTANT. NOW WITH HER FEET PLANTED FIRMLY IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY, CARLY IS FOCUSING HER ATTENTION ON HER OWN DESIGNS AND HAS HER SIGHTS ON RUNNING HER OWN LABEL ONE DAY….IT’S THAT SIMPLE!

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Creating and designing has always been something close to Carly, who complete her advanced diploma in applied fashion and technology at The Gordon Institute of TAFE, Geelong, “I have always loved being creative and being very hands on. It’s the fact that I can not only sketch and draw something beautiful but then bring it to life in 3D form. That’s something special”. It’s this obsession that led her to Paris, when she spent time at the Paris American Academy studying elaborate couture techniques and improving her skills.

apprenticeship concluded and now she works alongside industry professionals learning new processes and techniques each day, “The best part of my job would be leaning from such talented industry professionals. I am so grateful to be working alongside Alex and his team and I am constantly learning and evolving as a designer”.

This year Carly had the honour of participating in L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival’s Masters and Apprentices Runway as a part of the Cultural Program. Carly showcased six designs as part of her After returning from Paris, Carly commenced collection. The designs were intricate and featured fabrics which are unique. Leather and work for a company called Collecting the colour black featured heavily and aided Pretty Boys. During this time she entered a competition to win a six month apprenticeship the mysterious nature of the designs. Although both these elements are often perceived to be with Alex Perry and thanks to the amazing harsh and virile, Carly has managed to make methods she leant abroad, before she knew them feminine and extremely elegant. Carly’s it she was packing her bags and moving creations were definitely distinctive pieces, to Sydney to work at Alex’s studio. Carly unmatched to her competition. has remained at Alex Perry even after her


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Photographer Ayden Aramze

For some designers leaving school and entering the world of fashion can often be a daunting and difficult task. Each individual has their own expectations and deals with their own struggles. Surprisingly Carly is dealing with her own battle, “What I struggle most with is not being able to learn everything right now. I am so passionate about couture and the techniques which I am most focused on at the moment. However, I still want to master the arts of tailoring, millenary, swimwear, costume and the list goes on”. Her advice to young budding designers shows the maturity of a seasoned professional – “I think going in with no expectations, a good attitude and an open mind is the best way to make it”. Though she has only been in the fashion industry a short time, Carly has leant some very valuable lessons already about how to be the best in the business, “I like to create time consuming pieces because it sets you apart from the mainstream designers,

because most people are not willing to put in the time it takes to create something like that”. Her inspiration comes of prominent designers like the late Alexander McQueen, Mary Katrantzou and Madame Gres – “I am inspired by designers who don’t follow trends, are forward thinking and basically don’t sleep because they are so engaged and obsessed with what they are creating. That’s what I aspire to be”. Clearly Carly is not a follower of trends. She has recognised the importance of setting her designs apart from the competition and it’s a trait that will no doubt propel her in the fashion industry. More so her inspiration comes from the most enigmatic of places, “My inspiration comes from the way im feeling and what surrounds me. I am extremely passionate and inspired by the couture houses overseas and the techniques they are using. I don’t like to follow the mainstream trends and labels as such. I like to gather random inspiration and work to my own theme. If you

were to look at my inspiration board right now you’d find pleating techniques, beautiful beaded gowns, a skull, a serial killer, guns and a leaf. It’s good to be random; people tend to enjoy trying to figure out a random mind over a mainstream one”. Her personal style outside of designing could be considered as “random” as the inspirations she draws from, “My personal style is a bit bi-polar. Quite classic with an edge. I like to wear a lot of black and randomly inject colour. I love my leather straps, and skulls on my wrists, my gun necklace made of horn and high heels”. So what are this fashionista’s must haves this season? – “At the moment I can’t live without my Hermes black Strap Bracelet, my high waisted black leather shorts and my wool leather trimmed full length black vest”.

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STRIKE A POSE:

FROM STREET PERFORMER TO FASHION DESIGNER, ANDY TRUONG STAYS TRUE TO HIS ROOTS. BY RACHEL FARAH

FROM THE TENDER AGE OF SIX, ANDY TRUONG DISCOVERED HIS LOVE FOR FASHION WHILST SKETCHING DRESSES, VISUALISING THE WOMEN STRUTTING DOWN THE STREET WEARING THEM. AN ENTREPRENEUR SINCE CHILDHOOD, ANDY HAS ALWAYS CREATED IDEAS ON HOW TO MAKE SOME EXTRA MONEY BUT WAS CONSTANTLY REMINDED BY HIS MOTHER TO CONCENTRATE ON STUDYING. `I REMEMBER MY COUSIN AND I PERFORMED IN FRONT OF MY HOUSE AND COLLECTED COINS FROM PASSING PEDESTRIANS. ALTHOUGH WE COLLECTED A TOTAL OF $3.70, MY MOTHER MADE ME GIVE OUR EARNINGS TO MY COUSIN”. YOU WIN SOME, YOU LOSE SOME.

Karma clearly gave Andy a second chance because fast-forward nine years later, Andy found himself in the spotlight recognized as Australia’s youngest designer. “I feel very proud that I have achieved such a goal”. Having self-taught draping, pattern-making, basic sewing and sewing-machine skills, his initiative and determination now have his mother, grandmother and close school friends very proud and supportive of his achievements. Despite the initial hurdles from lack of education and attaining stockists, Andy is proud of his career achievements including Melbourne Spring Fashion Week, scholarships and grants received, television interviews and other press and media whom he has been interviewed by. Asked about the influence of the Internet, he advises despite being a “wonderful world of knowledge, nothing beats first hand learning…anyone can learn to design and sew a garment but not everyone can become successful”. The first collection ‘When Snow White Met Andy Truong’ Spring/Summer The Launch debuted in Melbourne Spring Fashion Festival (MSFF)’s ‘LOOK.STOP.SHOP.’. It was the first time Andy experienced true recognition for his rare and fresh talent, with over three hundred patrons. Seeing his face on the Channel Seven News was a “weird and déjà-vu like” experience however was his golden ticket for national exposure. Naturally his client base has grown since this event. Surprisingly his collection was not borne from Disney inspiration, rather to do with the materials used – linen and lace – and his “Snow White” model’s features: black hair with pale skin and beautiful red lips. Andy’s following collection “Parisian Love” is distinctively floral and feminine, with inspiration found from fabrics sourced. “I wanted the collection to be simple, fresh and wearable for my clients”. Who is a

typical Andy Truong client? Simply, a female equivalent of Andy; ambitious, strong, successful and independent with a whole of pulling power! Although further education is an option – his preference being Parsons in New York - with a bright future and endless career opportunities, Andy is setting his ambitious sights into running his brand full-time. His business vision extends to a global scale, including New York and Paris. The dream of becoming a global couturier is also an emerging reality, as his custom made services – a popular choice for formal gowns - allow him to achieve part of this dream as a couturier on a smaller scale. Aside from his successes in the fashion world, Andy is currently studying year eleven at school and enjoys normal teen activities including listening to music, hanging out with friends, movies, television, and of course sewing, sketching and keeping up with fashion trends reading Vogue. Andy manages the whole process from creating collections, to organizing models, photography, fabric and fashion shows. It’s incredible to believe a talented student can organise and balance his time between school, two jobs and his fashion brand, though he admits his scholarship fashion course at Kangan Tafe each Wednesday afternoon gives him the time to create his collections. His inspiration derives from anything beautiful; from images on Instagram to fashion designer Elie Saabe. We have only seen a glimpse of the vast and deep talent of Andy Truong, and are eager to witness what he unveils in future Fashion Festivals on a national and global scale. His designs will be available on his e-boutique for pre-order in June along with selective boutiques around Melbourne in August/ September.

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WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS BY LAUREN ROBERTS

WE, AS HUMAN BEINGS, HAVE A LOT OF UNTAPPED POTENTIAL. AND SHORT COURSES OR REGULAR CLASSES ARE GREAT WAYS TO SHAKE OFF THAT COBWEB DUSK AND DISCOVER, OR IMPROVE ON, DORMANT SKILLS.

While this list is by no means complete, here are a few ideas to get you going.

1. Get (or renew) your senior first aid certificate. It costs around $100 from a recognised institution (but what’s the price on saving a life?) and takes a day of your time. Not only does that little piece of paper make you look more employable, responsible and caring but it might just save your life. 2. Take a photography class. Cameras are amazingly underrated things – and a course can take your happy snaps from Instagram quality to professional in no time. Beginner, advanced, portrait, landscape, pet photography, day courses, night classes and once-a-week meet-ups – there is something out there for everyone. 3. Join an art class – ever tried life drawing?

It’s liberating and professional, not the shady dark-room that one might imagine. What about learning to use oil paints? Make a quilt? Sculpt? Sew? Needle-knit? Master charcoal? A lot of art classes are run on a weekly basis so that pupils can develop as the weeks progress – but casual attendance is usually welcome

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4. Take a cooking class. What about an all-

day cupcake making class? Ever wanted to make pasta from scratch? Or cook Lebanese? Cooking classes are everywhere – a number of restaurants and market places run night classes with their fresh produce. Universities and education facilities with kitchen facilities often run classes that focus on a specific type of cooking (like gluten-free friendly food or Italian cuisine).

5. Learn a language or brush up on your verbs. Buy a book on tape and listen to it on the morning journey into work. You will be surprised about how much information you can absorb in the hour or so that you usually spend staring into space. For those that need to contact time, I recommend taking a semester’s worth of classes – helpful for motivation and for company. 6. Take a writing class. Learn to blog, write

poetry, submit freelance journalism pieces, keep a diary or start that novel you’ve been planning. Writing classes are run through libraries, universities, schools, over the internet and informally in writer’s groups that encourage feedback of each other’s work.


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7. Join a group of like-minded learners

(meetup.com has some excellent groups for people that want to be authors, painters or quiz night champions) and be open about your goals and the areas you want to improve in. Not only are you networking with amazing people that have the same interests but you can learn from each other and learn the life experiences that you have had.

8. Join a sporting team – social sports (like

basketball, volleyball, soccer and table tennis) are good ways to improve your co-ordination, teamwork skills and physical prowess. They also give you an excuse to get out of the house on an otherwise dull Monday night. Where? In Melbourne, a lot of universities (like RMIT and Monash) run short courses all year around. CAE off Flinders Lane runs short courses that cover a variety of topics from fashion to baking to poetry. First Aid courses and more specialised classes are often run through institutions or online. Have a look around and read some reviews before you make a long-term commitment to a specific class. And good luck, you won’t need it you skilled human being you.

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ALEXI FREEMAN Op Art Coat $1,195 KINKI GERLINKI Edie Top $49 KINKI GERLINKI Drop Necklace $39 KINKI GERLINKI Geo Sunnies $39 QUEEN KHAN DESIGNS The Peel Jeans $180 RUTILE TWIN Rings 90

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ALEXI FREEMAN Carpet Shark Blazer $595 QUEEN KHAN DESIGNS Pom Pom Silk Dress $130 KINKI GERLINKI Snake Platforms $239 RUTILE TWIN Rings

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ALEXI FREEMAN Woven Chain Biker Jacket POA ALEXI FREEMAN Neon Roo Mini Skirt $499 Stylist’s Own Body Suit KINKI GERLINKI Block Cork Heels $99 RUTILE TWIN Rings

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ALEXI FREEMAN Gold Foil Biker Jacket $795 ALEXI FREEMAN Gold Foil Belt $69 QUEEN KHAN DESIGNS Mowgli Singlet $70 KINKI GERLINKI Flower Gem Collar $39 RUTILE TWIN Rings

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Photographer Shana Trajanoska / Stylist Alessia Simpson / Hairstylist Meg Everett / Model Chloe Balfe [Vivens]

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A TOUCH OF SPICE PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD IBRAHIM STYLIST KATE CARNEGIE

Pants & Jacket by Neo Dia Top by Pamela Usanto Shoes from Zomp


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Mesh Crystal Top by Pamela Usanto, Shorts by Neo Dia

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Black Dress by Pamela Usanto Mesh Top by Gwendolynne

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Jacket by Neo Pashmina & leather Dia dress by Divya R $174.99 Dress worn as skirt by Pamela Usanto

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Dress by Pamela Usanto Scarf by Chanel (Vintage)

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Photographer Richard Ibrahim / Assistants Bethany Copeland & Tarn Buasuwan / Stylist Kate Carnegie / Stylist Assistant Julia Zaikine / Hairstylist & Make-Up Artist Kat Bardsley / Model Fiona [Giant]

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A B B E Y STO N E

ABBEY S TO N E By Anna Gilfillan

ABBEY STONE IS A 19 YEAR OLD WITH A DREAM. A DREAM TO MAKE TO MUSIC AS MUCH AS SHE POSSIBLY CAN. TURNING HER BACK ON TALENT SHOWS LIKE AUSTRALIAN IDOL AND THE VOICE, ABBEY HAS OPTED TO DO IT ON HER OWN, STARTING HER OWN RECORD LABEL AND INSISTING ON BEING AN INDEPENDENT SINGER SONGWRITER. AFTER FINISHING SCHOOL LAST YEAR, IT’S ALL ABOUT 2013. ABBEY IS TAKING HER TALENT ABROAD TO THE USA TO RECORD IN SOME OF THE MOST EXCITING MUSICAL CITIES IN THE WORLD. HER POSITIVE ENERGY AND CANDO ATTITUDE WAS RADIATING THROUGH HER AS WE SAT DOWN AT HER ALL-TIME FAVOURITE CAFÉ TO DISCUSS WHO EXACTLY IS ABBEY STONE AND WHERE IS SHE GOING. 106

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A: Certainly I definitely have. The music that we wrote back then, the sound was really different. They were excellent songs there’s no doubt about it, they just weren’t reflective ABBEY: I thought the song was a momentary on what I really wanted to write. At the time I song and I wrote it for graduation, obviously didn’t really know what I wanted to write but it can be applied to other situations but the I knew that those songs weren’t it. So in the fact that we released it around graduation I years after that I went through high school, I just thought the release was perfect, I loved went through all different things, I got my first it. Being able to play it for people, and have job, learnt what it was like to work. So I learnt everyone actually relate to it. I sang it to the more about myself throughout my life, which people it was about when I released it and the really reflected in my writing. Being able to fact that they were all able to be included in figure out who I was through the situations the release and everyone felt the same way and scenarios that I went through really helped that I felt when I sang it, when I recorded it my writing. So yeah I definitely think I found and when I wrote it. So it was really cool, I myself. loved it. F: What do you write songs about? F: I’ve read people describe your sound as an A: It’s all emotionally driven, so if I go eclectic mix of different genres, how would through I really hard situation, the only way you describe your sound? I know how to deal with it and to process A: I was talking to Mum about this last night it, is to write about it. So it’s like a healing and I was like if people are going to ask me process. I’m pretty much an open book. My this question I’ve decided I’m going to say friends know whatever I’m going through, if I this: If you piss me off, I’m going to write an play them a song, they know exactly what it’s angry song, if you make me sad I’m going about. to write a sad song. I don’t really know how F: How long have you been writing songs for? to answer this question straight off the bat. I listen to a lot of different music so I’m A: Probably since I was 12. influenced by a lot of different sounds so if I’m listening to a certain type of genre of if F: You have turned down a lot of TV cattle I’m into an album if reflects in my music. I calls, what were they and why did you turn guess if I had to put it in a kind of genre I’d them down? say pop, RnB, soul- that kind of thing. A: As a singer, before I was a writer, people F: Who are some of the musicians that have would always be like –oh you should go on inspired you? those shows like Australian Idol. I’ve always wanted to do everything my own way. I’m A: I love Adele. She has had a massive quite stubborn in that right. Those shows are stylistic influence on the way I write and really great but I’m not a competitive person the way the I arrange my pieces. I love like that. They kind of turn it into this massive Taylor Swift, I love her lyrical structure, I competition and it’s not about that for me. love the way that she can pour her heart into Music is for everyone and I don’t think it everything that she writes and that’s the way should be something that you have to compete I want to write. So yeah those two big time. for. I think everyone has the right to sing and John Mayor, I love him. It really depends on everyone has the right to write and I think my mood but those would be the top three. you should just do it because you love it. I’ve always wanted to do it on my own and be able F: Is there anyone that you would be keen to to say that I did it on my own. collaborate with in the future? FJORDE: Congratulations on the single release of ‘ For Everything’ at the end of last year, how do you feel about the release?

A: Those three! Haha. I love Ryan Tedder as well. I think he’s an incredible writer. When I found out he was a mentor on The Voice I was like- Oh my God I love this show. F: You co-wrote an album back in 2010 that you said ‘wasn’t you’, have you found yourself in the music your writing now?

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F: Do you watch those shows?

Justin Biebers ‘Boyfriend’. Do you have a favourite cover to sing? A: Haha really? Thank-you. I don’t really play covers anymore, but I used to play ‘Someone Like You’ a lot because I wish I wrote that song. That is like the number one song that I wish I wrote. So I find it really easy to connect to that song, I love to play it and I love to sing it. F: What is your favourite song to sing out of your own songs? A: It’s usually the most recent song that I’ve written. I love playing ‘For Everything’ because that’s always going to mean a lot to me. I recently wrote a song called ‘Figure You Out’ and I love love singing that. We’re still working on that so it’s the most recent and the most raw. F: You’re heading off to the US in June, what are your plans over there? A: So basically I eventually want to base myself over there, to be able to do that and to be able to crack the market we have to start somewhere. So I want to go over there and make as many mistakes as possible in the beginning, meet as many people as I can, write, be inspired by the things I see over there and hopefully come back with another catalogue of songs, then work here and go back again. I want to continuously do that until finally I’m able to base myself there. F: Any plans to do any gigs here or in the USA? A: I think we’re playing a radio show in Philadelphia. We want o see if we can d any open mics. Yeah if I get an opportunity to play a show then I definitely will. F: When do you think you’ll get some more music out? A: We’re planning on releasing a track before we go away. A free track that you can download. It’ a track that I really like too.

Keep up to date with Abbey’s US trip and A: I always complain about them on Facebook new songs by checking out her website http:// and stuff but they’re really my secret guilty www.abbeystone.com.au. ‘For Everything’ is pleasure. I actually love them, I love them. available for download on iTunes. F: On your Youtube channel you’ve posted a few covers that I found really interesting. I especially liked ‘Girlfriend’ your take on


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STO C K I ST

ABBEY STONE www.abbeystone.com.au ALEXI FREEMAN www.alexifreeman.com ANDY TRUONG www.andytruongworld.com ARCHIE www.archieonline.com.au BELLUCCIO www.belluccio.com CITYBLIS www.cityblis.com GUSTO & ELAN www.gustoandelan.com.au GWENDOLYNNE www.gwendolynne.com.au KINKI GILINKI www.kinkigerlinki.com.au NEO DIA www.neodialabel.com ONE THOUSAND CRANES www.onethousandcranes.com.au PAMELA USANTO www.pamelausanto.com QUEEN KHAN RUTILE TWIN www.rutiletwin.com STYLEZILLA www.stylezilla.com.au

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FJORDE MAGAZINE ISSUE 16 NEW BLOOD