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FASHION / CULTURE / MUSIC / DESIGN / THE ARTS / NIGHTLIFE / FOOD

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JOSH PYKE

PRUSSIA STATE OF DESIGN

SPRING ISSUE


P R O U D LY P R E S E N T S

10.09.11

MADE I MElBO

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FJ O R D E | C O N T E N T S

28 COFFEE GRIND

34 TIMELESS FASHION

But what has happened to coffee? Like all things post-modern

Fashion is a circle with a circumference comprised of flops, fads and forevers

46 360

One of Australia’s biggest rappers and leading the charge in bringing local hip-hop

JOSH PYKE

Creating his own niche within the acoustic rock milieu

Creative Desk His/Her Desk UK Correspondance NY Correspondance State of Design Mei.Ko Anna Campbell Learning Our Language Dr.P South Yarra Market Jet Peel Chez Olivier 6

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Take a stroll down Melbourne’s Greville, Acland or Brunswick Street and see why

58 PRUSSIA

Inspired by anything from 1980’s to silhouettes

96 ON THE WALL

The modern day thelma & louise…

THE OP-SHOP DESIGNER

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70 WINTER ALABAMA

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Graffiti continues to grace our city streets providing a mixture of responces

102 BURGER JOINT

For the best burgers in the world! Gossip never tasted better

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COVER

22 24 30 56 82 84 100

Photographer Filip Konikowski Stylist The Ghost Hair Styling & Make Up Sarah Dalton 360 is wearing a custom made tailored jacket designed and created by the FJORDE team


Image: LittleGracie A/W 2011


FJ O R D E | C O N T R I B U T O R S

EDITORS Alex Cybulska Aaron Weinman

CREATIVE DIRECTORS Jamie Li Patrick Price

ART Studioktober hello@studioktober.com

CONTRIBUTORS Alex Cybulska Aaron Weinman Ben Anderson Emma Rezel Katie Woolway Steven McLachlan Vahe Koshayan

PHOTOGRAPHY Ashlee Lauren Filip Konikowski Toni Riales Woodrow Wilson

MAKE-UP & HAIR Elisa Clark Ignacia Johnston Jessica Chavez Price Sarah Dalton

STYLING Ben Anderson

ADVERTISING Contact Jamie Li or Patrick Price

CONTACT US EDITORS Alex Cybulska alex.cybulska@fjordemagazine.com

CREATIVE DIRECTORS Jamie Li jamie.li@fjordemagazine.com

Aaron Weinman aaron.weinman@fjordemagazine.com

Patrick Price pa.price@fjordemagazine.com

GENERAL ENQUIRIES enquiries@fjordemagazine.com

SUBMISSIONS FJORDE accepts submissions from freelance artists, photographers, designers and journalists, however, we cannot reply to every submission. Please see www.fjordemagazine.com for submission guidelines.

Fjorde Magazine will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result in the use of, or reliance on, the published information. No responsibility is taken for the content, images or advertisements. No part of Fjorde magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Copies of this publication may not be sold. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publishing staff. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without the permission of the publishers. Articles received with no name, address and phone number(s) will not be published. Articles received will only be published by approval of the editorial team. Fjorde Magazine reserves the right to shorten and or edit received articles and letters. Fjorde Magazine does not accept responsibility on articles written by various columnists and writers

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FJ O R D E | C R E AT I V E D E S K

FASHION FEVER By Patrick Price & Jamie Li

Now that winter has cast its icy gaze over our fair city, this reminds us of Spring Fashion Week fast approaching and the city has become littered with designers and production companies all plying their trade with gusto.

From winter wardrobes to timeless pieces, we examine how fashion has changed and evolved, the challenges of cultural change and the notion of beauty and art in a world covered and benchmarked on masterpieces.

Meanwhile the Melbourne City Council have been working feverishly to keep everything quiet, so as not to let anything escape. Rightly so, I say, why spoil the fun and excitement of impending flair and design, only a mere month away.

Meanwhile, don’t forget to check out ‘Made in Melbourne,’ presented by us here at Fjorde. In its third year, ‘M.I.M’ showcases some of the hottest young designers Melbourne offers. From casual all the way to evening glamour, don’t miss out on the event of the season.

Fashion however, is not the only mast on the horizon. We have acclimatised to winters cold mistress, and have all come out to play again.

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SPRING 2011

HIS DESK By Aaron Weinman

Life & Style The day had finally arrived. Edging ever closer to thirty, I am no longer a student. You’d think I’d be wrapped. No more dry essays or critical theory. I could finally immerse myself in the hype we know as the work force. Days went by and I continued to put off assessments, stalling on this thing we call life and all things like it. But it’s arrived, I got through unscathed, with a fancy couple of letters to add to my name. The rat race beckoned, but could I handle it for too long? I reluctantly decided to join this race and envelope myself in the corporate world. Believe it, I have sold out and in the wise words of Billy Walsh, “you sir are a mother-fucking snake suit.” Walking in the same direction and dressed in the same mundane colours. I watch as people curse if they miss a train, despite knowing the next train arrives in merely minutes.

I watch the corporate suits and skirts buoyant in their morning glory growing frustrated with train congestion, stepping on another’s finest pair of Julius Marlow shoes. They eventually hit their office space, count the minutes until five o’clock, but I wonder what is next for them all? Squeeze onto that train again? Perhaps hit the gym? Join a Zumba class? Groundhog day creeps up all over again like a vicious plague, before you know it you’ll stare down at your pot belly, complain about your RSI, using stress and your work/life balance as prime excuses.

just do something about it. You only live once apparently. Depending on what faith you drown yourself in. We here at Fjorde hold this in the highest regard. In what seems like no time at all, we have conscientously worked to bring you this special issue. We are here to prove there is life outside the box, nothing should stop you from achieving anything. Seriously

But hey it’s ok, your annual leave is around the corner, maybe you can go throw money at a tourist venue, convinced you’re getting the ‘real’ experience. Personally, dreading the idea of work again is something I plan to avoid. Don’t make excuses,

HER DESK By Alex Cybulska

TIME MOVES FAST Welcome to another issue of Fjorde magazine! Issue four sees us explore once again the best up-and-comers in the world of fashion, lifestyle, music and food. We experience another taste of the best Melbourne has to offer and tell you all about it so you can experience it too. Last time I wrote to you in Her Desk I was a year younger. In the two months gone, I have seen myself add another bittersweet digit to my age and realise I am in fact closer to the big 3-0 than I’m comfortable with. I have to deal with the knowledge that an impending wave of responsibility, nanna socks, a fringe to hide my fine lines and a sudden and surprising love for all things Charlotte Bronte will hit me in a few short years. But as with birthday, looking back, you realise what amazing tools you had as a child.

I can now say I wish I had appreciated tanbark more. I see it as a fantastic aide to help me bounce back after a publicly embarrassing fall as an adult… Ie. Whenever drinking wine or wearing heels. Tubs, also. An organized space where we’d put our books and notes, while now, everything I have is fanned out on my desk in a ridiculous mess. Here is a list of the top 5 things I’ve learnt in the year before my birthday: • Don’t leave your luggage unlocked in a Mexican airport. • Neurofen is not a nutritious Sunday morning breakfast. • Men will never break a life-long habit of leaving wet towels on the floor.

• Dominos pizza is great again. • The Checking In feature on Facebook is the worst invention ever. If I wanted you to know where I was, I would have invited you. I implore our lovely Fjorde readers to understand something, which took me years and years to comprehend. The moment is now and it’s yours! So enjoy issue four. Hopefully we’ll inspire you to get into Melbourne on our blistering cold evenings and live in the moment! Until then, I’ll see you on the other side.

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FJ O R D E | U K C O R R E S P O N D E N C E

LO PREDICTING THE U N P R E D I C TA B L E There’s only one word to describe summer in London – and contrary to popular belief – that word isn’t simply, “rainy” – it is far more accurately described as “unpredictable”. Cold, wet and miserable is not an unsurprising forecast, just look at the millions invested in Wimbledon’s fabulous centre court removable roof to allow the world’s greatest to play-on, no matter what the clouds have in store. However, what often surprises the rest of the world is that we are also privy to the occasional bursts of unrelenting sunshine. We can have days, or even weeks where the sky is blue, the sun burns our vulnerable English flesh and stepping onto a tube is like stepping into a furnace. However, it’s not just the extremes of weather that we have to contend with, it’s the daily irritations of a changeable forecast that can make life just that little bit more of a struggle. These include the classic sunbather’s nightmare of, “it’s hot when the sun’s out, but those goddamn clouds keep getting in the way and giving me goose pimples”, or the classic, “it’s sort of raining, but sort of spitting and if I put up my umbrella I look like a deluded Mary Poppins, but if I don’t use it my hair will take on a life of its own” or my particular worst case scenario of, “it was freezing when I left the house this morning but now I’m melting in my wooly socks and thermal underwear”… The best way to combat this unpredictable season is to adopt the mindset of a boy scout and be prepared, for every eventuality. Looking beautiful and on-trend for the summer is simple enough when primping and preening in the stable micro-climate just in front of your bedroom mirror – but a look that survives a gust of wind, a sudden downpour or a sweltering heatwave, demands a little more forward planning. Firstly, unless the weatherman guarantees heat, cover-up. Mini denim shorts and tank tops look great, but shivering just isn’t sexy. The answer to keeping covered, but staying cool and summery? All over white. The look is everywhere on the red carpets and at the summer festivals. Little white frocks: be they lacy, scalloped, short or long are this season’s must have item. If, you’re anything like me, a white outfit has as much chance of remaining stain-free as an Englishman winning Wimbledon, so keep up-do-date with a simple, white blazer that can go over almost any outfit and bring a bog standard jeans and t-shirt combo to life. This is a must-have item, particularly when it gets chilly in the beer garden. If you do go white, then an umbrella is an absolute essential because white + rain = unintentionally entering a wet t-shirt competition in which you are the only contestant. If it’s not too warm, a beige mac is a timeless and stylish barrier against the elements, just as long as you keep it tight-fitting, current and feminine to avoid the “Colombo-look”.

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NDON SPRING 2011

By Emma Rezel

It’s not just a sudden drop in temperature that can make a pretty little floral playsuit feel entirely inappropriate. If you’re on holiday, the hotter it is, the better. Throw on a bikini and head to the pool or the beach with all the rest. Unfortunately, life isn’t a beach and choosing what to wear on a day-to-day basis can be a bit of a minefield. The mind of a fashion-conscious female is amassed with contradictions. We want to look sexy, but we don’t want to be leered at, we want to look relaxed and keep cool in the heat, but we all want to be taken seriously in our jobs and be judged on our abilities, not our assets. How short is too short for a skirt in the office? If you go out for a drink after work how do you avoid looking stuffy in the heat? If you have to get home alone at night should you bring a jacket to cover up if your top shows off a little cleavage? Context dictates our fashion choices. If you’re at the beach wear a bikini, if you’re studying in the library wear a big jumper, if you’re going clubbing wear a little dress. We define context by the climate, our surroundings, the people around us and the things those people wear. The problem with context is that, unlike an outfit we put on in the morning, it can very rapidly change. Context can be unpredictable. Let’s look at an example. A young girl is getting ready to go out with her friends. They’re going to a night club in town and all her pals tell her she looks incredible in her short red skirt and white top, after all, colour blocking is all the rage this season. After a fun night of drinking and dancing, the young girl must get home by herself. Waiting at the bus stop in the quiet, dark streets of London and 4am, that short red skirt that made her feel a million dollars in the night club, is suddenly making her feel rather vulnerable. As a strange man approaches her she wishes more than anything that she was wearing her oversized university hoodie and her baggy jeans… Often in life, we will be judged, not on who we are, but on the clothes we put on our backs. If you’re caught out in the wrong context in the wrong outfit the consequences may be minor, like feeling chilly when the sun goes down, or they could be severe, such as making you a target for unwanted attention or even, tragically, sexual assault. So if the young girl in our example had been wearing a less sexy outfit, would her fate be altered? Perhaps the men who leer, cat call or even touch when the attention is entirely unwanted simply target the vulnerable and are oblivious to clothing, or perhaps clothing is powerful enough to dictate perceptions and thus, the way we are treated. The human brain must stereotype to a certain extent, we simply don’t have the capacity or the time to take each individual we come across and formulate opinions that are entirely fairly judged upon character and actions. Sometimes, we make snap decisions about the type of person somebody is based on how they look, fairly or unfairly, consciously or unconsciously. This, I believe, is entirely natural and

justifiable. However, it is when interior stereotyping translates to outward action that it can become hurtful, harmful or even dangerous. You may see a girl on the street and think to yourself that her white dress is far too short for the time of day or the chill in the air, but acting upon this snap judgment, by treating her in a disrespectful manner, is simply not acceptable. Earlier this year, a member of the Toronto police force stated that, “women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized”. That this way of thinking can still permeate through apparently civilized, democratic and equal society is shocking and deplorable. It is sad but true that all people are guilty of a little casual stereotyping, but provoking this, either through what we wear or how we behave, does not equate to permitting victimization. Acts of violence, sexual assault and abuse are not to be blamed on the victim, but on the perpetrator of the crime. I lament at the statistics and the comments from the Toronto police force that demonstrate that the legal system does not necessarily hold this viewpoint. Less than 6% of women who report rape in the UK will actually see the accused convicted (www. rapecrisis.org.uk). Old-fashioned, backward and occasionally downright destructive voices are sadly, still audible in today’s society, but the joy of living today is that people are able to stand and unite against these voices. The reaction to the Toronto force comment? Slutwalk. This movement, visible on the internet (www.slutwalk.com) and on streets of several cities, e.g. Toronto and London, is calling women to fight against the practice of blaming the victim in incidences of sexual assault, a practice which is potentially preventing thousands of women from seeing their attackers brought to justice. Although I’m a little dubious about rebranding of the word “slut” to deny ownership to the misogynists who use it derogatorily (“Strong women walk” not quite as catchy?), I am still impressed by this call to action by women fed-up of victim-blaming and gender discrimination. Unfortunately, we cannot control how others will perceive how we look or dress or what reactions this can stimulate. A lot of what occurs in life is entirely unpredictable and out of our own control. All we can do is have the strength to be who we want to be and make decisions that make us happy. But until the rest of the world catches up with female empowerment, be conscious of the fact that in the blink of an eye, the context can change. Carry an umbrella, put a jacket in your bag, avoid walking home alone at night, keep your wits about you and look out for your mates. We may not be able to predict the unpredictable, but we can do our best to be prepared for every eventuality.

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FJ O R D E | N Y C O R R E S P O N D E N C E

H I STO RY I S N OT A LWAY S W R I T T E N By Ben Anderson

While New York is known to be the fashion epicenter of the world, it is also home to some architectural delights. Walking the streets of Manhattan, you can feel a definite sense of culture, music, life, sound and history and while many walk quickly around you hurrying from one destination to the next. I took a moment to stop and look outside the commotion and lights of time square, the cool breeze at the top of the Empire State building and the aroma of Nathan’s famous hotdogs to look at the aging giant and see and hear the story that it tell. From the diner on the corner that has been around before you were born to the latest mega-structure to be erected, the new no longer exist only the story of what came before. Walking along the old raised railway that is now Highline Park from Gansevoort St stretching up to West 34th slowing creeping its way towards Midtown. Now transformed Highline Park breaths life and colour to a somewhat grey existence, modernizing the old to welcome the new it is a subtle yet understated addition to the every expanding city. This is only one story this city has to tell, so I urge your all if you find yourself on the streets of New York to venture beyond the guide books recommendations and discover the inner soul of one of the most beautiful and diverse cities in the world.

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NY


SPRING 2011

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FJ O R D E | M E L B O U R N E R E C A P

FJORDE MAGAZINE PRESENTS

EMERGING MELBOURNE STATE OF DESIGN By Steven McLachlan

From the dark black designs of Prussia, the pastel offerings from Violet and I to the Arabian feel of El Amuleto, the Fjorde sponsored stalls at Melbourne Central brings together Melbourne’s hottest designers to present their pieces. The installation, part of the “State of Design” Festival in Melbourne, was an opportunity for the best in Melbourne fashion to take to the streets, and by streets we mean one of Melbourne’s most popular shopping precincts, to show their work and gather a few more devotees along the way. Lisa Taranto presented a collection of bright dresses that were light and easy to wear. Mina & Katusha and Coelho showcased some of their collection favourites and Accompany by Imagery brought some funky street-wear to the table.

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Chatting to the vendors I got the impression that Melbourne’s shoppers had been impressed by the show. Certainly, the pieces on display were beautiful. El Amuleto and Violet and I, both presenting unique and very wearable pieces. El Amuleto is one of Melbourne’s most elite jewellery lines and their black and gold designs, jewellery and brooches are beautiful, so aesthetically pleasing and looked great on display. Violet and I’s collection of summer dresses were highly wearable and fashionable while Denise SL Spalk topped off the display with some night pieces, mostly constructed from flowing lace. Watch out for a fashion write-up in the next issue of Fjorde magazine featuring the brilliant El Amuleto.


SPRING 2011

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FJ O R D E | M E L B O U R N E R E C A P

MEI.KO We wish Mei.ko every success for 2011 and beyond. WRITTEN BY ALEX CYBULSKA PHOTOGRAPHED BY CRISTIAN CARDONA Mei.Ko, in collaboration with Toni&Guy lauched their styling and makeup services on Friday July 29, to a party consisting of industry heads and Melbourne’s best writers and photographers. The event was hosted in Toni&Guy’s Port Melbourne’s salon and thankfully the rain held off long enough for the night to be a success. The night started with wine and sushi and was topped off with a fashion parade showcasing Mei.Ko makeup as models walked down the length of the salon with crimped hair and gorgeous outfits. The host for the night was Aaron McCarthy, a local emcee who will be hitting our TVs soon with his own travel program. His upcoming events include hosting Body Canvas 2011 with Tottie Goldsmith amongst other exciting endeavours. Mei.Ko was a great opportunity to rub shoulders with the industry’s best. Some faces were better known than others but since the media business is so small, everyone was familiar. We wish Mei.ko every success for 2011 and beyond. Combining hairstyling and makeup is the perfect combination for the complete beauty package and we know they’ll do well!

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SPRING 2011

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FJ O R D E | M E L B O U R N E R E C A P

ANNA CAMPBELL By Steven McLachlan

Renowned for her high quality, classic and timeless designs, Anna Campbell proudly released her latest collection of formal dresses to the Melbourne public in a show designed to showcase not only the elegance of her clothes but also the designer’s quirky side. Her dresses are fluid, classy, flowing and beautiful – and this is why Anna Campbell has remained one of the top choices for bridal wear in Melbourne. Her latest collection, in a move departing from tradition, is sexier and features exposed backs and plunging necklines to bring a little extra to the romantic pieces.

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During the show, guests were treated to cupcakes, macaroons and champagne and the show began with a catwalk of models presenting the latest pieces. Although she is renowned for her bridal wear, Anna also displayed the versatility of her work with the standout piece of the collection, a dress named Indiana, perfect for the Spring Racing Festival. The night was a huge success and it is great to see Anna Campbell moving forward and experimenting with her work. The dresses on display were exquisite and, as usual, this designer has once again proven that she is one of the most sought-after designers in Melbourne.


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FJ O R D E | C U LT U R E

COFFEE GROUND & THE DAILY GRIND

Picture the perfectly aligned crema resting patiently on top of the dark brown liquid, slowly watch the sugar dissolve into the abyss that lies below. The aroma infects the nose and the steams condensation evaporates across one’s face, its always burning hot, so you have no choice but to enjoy the appearance and the individual nuances of your coffee. Eventually you slowly sip away at it, providing yourself with life’s perfect aphrodisiac, coupled with the morning news or coffee shop conversation. Either way, post-modern society has embraced those brown beans, flocking to coffee shops, cafés or restaurants eagerly anticipating the addictive fix of caffeine and/or milk. The origins of coffee are stifling. Thought to be discovered in the northern regions of Ethiopia, the coffee bean can now be found in over seventy countries from Africa to Latin America. The earliest credible evidence of coffee consumption dates back to the 15th century in the ‘Sufi’ monasteries in Yemen, from the Arab world, coffee then spread its wings over Italy, the rest of Europe and eventually landing in the marketing haven also known as the US of A. Much has come to pass since the 15th century, and with its growing popularity, coffee beans are one of the most exported commodities around the globe, single-handedly controlling the income for certain nations like Brazil and Kenya.

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But what has happened to coffee? Like all things post-modern, coffee has found an interesting place in today’s contemporary world. With the addiction of caffeine, consumer interests and viral marketing, coffee has been transformed into the modern persons daily requirement. English Playwright, John Van Druten vehemently said “If I were a woman, I’d wear coffee as a perfume,” illustrating the impact it had on him, along with many other hard-working individuals, seeking the edge that caffeine seemingly brings. Whether you like it dripbrewed or percolated, people from all wakes of life are consuming this bean in all ways, shapes and forms. Like all things in high demand, the globalised world has consumed coffee beans and turned it into the multi million-dollar business it is today. Across Europe, you cannot turn a corner on their cobble-stone streets without finding everyone from students to old ‘Nonna’s’ sipping on espresso’s at regular intervals, whilst on the other edge of the scale, the western world has adopted the ‘Starbucks effect’ with Australia and the USA constructing coffee shops like housing plans. Today the scope of coffee is constantly evolving with weird and wonderful concoctions, turning this into a modern day mocktail.

By Aaron Weinman

What started as simple espressos has blown out into latte’s and cappuccinos, allowing the consumer to choose their poison any which way they like. All one has to do is stand in queue at their local coffee store and take in the plethora of orders being served out. The modern day customer may request soymilk; vanilla or hazelnut flavours and others will put an eastern spin on their coffee with chai mixtures. Personally, I prefer my coffee in the old fashioned way, the simple, yet beautiful espresso, no strings, no bull, both literally and figuratively. Coffee. It continues to take the world by storm, constantly re-inventing itself and providing society with that extra impetus in the morning, willing us to get on with our sometimes-sordid work lives. ‘As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion. Ideas begin to move... similes arise, the paper is covered Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to be a struggle.’ ~Honore de Balzac (1799-1859)


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SPRING 2011

LEARNING OUR LANGUAGE

By Katie Woolway

“INTRODUCING ‘LITE’: THE NEW WAY TO SPELL ‘LIGHT’, BUT WITH TWENTY PERCENT FEWER LETTERS” -JERRY SEINFELD Hello. My name is Katie and I’m a grammarholic. I’m standing here today to share my plight; one that I hope at least some of you will sympathise with. There was a time before spell check, text messaging, and wallposting on Facebook (*cue gasps from pre-teenies and tweenies*), when a solid grasp of the English language used to count for something. Words were spoken, methodically typed on a writer without a delete key, or perfectly printed on rose scented stationery. When I was young, poor grammar was not tolerated by my mother’s auditory receptors.God forbid I ever told her I did something “good”; she would stare me down like I was Shakespeare’s Judas, clear her throat and tell me to try again. Yet, I have her to thank for my doing “well” through my journalism degree and I am pretty sure she will attribute the larger part of my writing success to the fact she fanned the flames for my love of literature and that her genetic bestowment located on chromosome pair 16- “Gift for the Gab” trounced my father’s more passive gene contribution. However, in this “new” generation choked by the pervasive grip of CBF (Can’t Be…well, you know…), we strive to communicate without opening our mouths, without picking up a pen and with the added ability to converse through the simple use of acronyms. We exist within an environment where our brains are so chronically overloaded by information that avoiding taking the time to talk is of the upmost convenience; choosing to cram dialogue into 160 characters per text message, embrace virtual

proximity by initiating a quick “poke” on Facebook or forward a YouTube link of the latest viral sensation via email are much more desirable options. The truth of the matter is our first language is becoming foreign to us; we’re talking in technological tongues that have sentences filled full of LOLs, OMGs, and WTFs. These multi-lettered literary blasphemies further prove our language has become lackadaisical; one tarnished with dialogue dirt and treated with more than just mild nonchalance. It is because of this I have a reason to believe that the English language is terminally ill, lingering on the precipice of collapse, waiting for a RIP engraved headstone to be heaved on its untimely death. The Washington Post writer Gene Weingarten quips the following to conclude his humorous article entitled “Goodbye, cruel words: English. It’s dead to me.” “It was not immediately clear to what degree the English language will be mourned, or if it will be mourned at all…English has become increasingly irrelevant, particularly among young adults.” The immediate survival of the language now depends solely on the fortitude of those bequeathed with the responsibility to teach and reward future generations for their respect and understanding of linguistics; read to your children from cradle to grave, pursue pathways of constant communication and pay them 10 bucks for every ‘A’ they get in English. Should you wish to acknowledge some of the most talented individuals who are continuing to carry the torch for the written word; the Melbourne Writers Festival will be celebrating some of the world’s finest artists of fiction, non-fiction and poetry pieces from the 25th of August until the 4th of September at Federation Square and selected venues around the CBD. The festival program will be available online and in The Age on Friday 29 July 2011. www.mwf.com.au

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FJ O R D E | FA S H I O N

WRITTEN By Katie woolway PHOTOGRAPHED BY FILIP KONIKOWSKI

Fashion is a circle with a circumference comprised of flops, fads and forevers and it seems at times that you are trashing trends as quickly as you are inserting them into your already overstuffed wardrobe. In a generation of excess where less is certainly not more (just ask my shoe pairs piled up on top of one another), the consistency of change is so demanding that we are having panic attacks and pulling muscles rampaging shopping malls just to keep up. However, when you stop to recall the women who have moved fashion in ways that will be remembered, they aren’t your flesh flashing preteenie and tweenie stars that epitomize the neglectfulness of class, style and integrity in today’s “style”. Jackie O. Audrey Hepburn. Grace Kelly. Elizabeth Taylor. Those names will continue to echo through design studios, down runways and into retail stores long after others fade into fashion oblivion. On top of longevity, I think these timeless fashion icons represent a nostalgic sentimentality that can only be found in trends that have survived decades or even eras. My mother presented me with the camel coloured, square leather clutch that she had gripped as a young bride on her wedding night. For me, it was more than just a vessel for lipstick, perfume and a mobile phone, it’s a connection to an event that came before me yet was inarguably important in the process through which I was created. Still in immaculate condition, it is my favourite evening bag because it makes me feel close to my mother every time I use it- it’s a fragment of

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her fashion past nestled into the one I am currently creating. For instance, I purchased a black leather jacket straight from the factory in Florence. Not only does it fit me like it had be waiting it’s whole cow life for me, but it has my initials embossed in 24 carat gold on the inside collar. Every time I wear it, I will always recall the day I bought it- the smell of the rain on the narrow Italian cobbled streets and how I had wound my way through some of the most immaculate, renowned architecture in the world (I also remember the white cloth clad gypsies who were selling kisses as a distraction while they robbed you blind but I was obsessing too much over my jacket to pay them any notice). Then there are the vintage Manolo pumps I found in a consignment store that just happened to be in my size and within my budget; I was on a mission to treat myself for securing my first “real” job when my eyes locked on them upon their counter showcase. I may have squealed like a three year old on Santa’s lap, but it was like receiving the best Christmas present ever; except this one I had earned on my own, not from a withdrawal from the Bank of Daddy. It is after much thought that I have realised that I am not sure that timeless fashion has a definition following its identification as a noun. Instead of articles of clothing or pieces of jewelry, I think it’s a feeling or an expression; a radiant exuberance that reminds you of your grandmother’s closet or the way you remember your mother wearing it when you were young.


SPRING 2011

Photographer Filip Konikowski. Stylist Ben Anderson. Hair Stylist James Ballantyne. Make Up Artist Lina Terzino. Model Anna [Mark Fitzgerald]. Clothes Stylists Own

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THE OP SHOP DESIGNER WRITTEN By Steven McLachlan. PHOTOGRAPHED BY Ashlee Lauren

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SPRING 2011 To be congruent to our inner style, the culture of meshing high-end designer fashion with lower-end op-shop or vintage pieces allows us to express the distinct and different elements of our life through our clothing and communicate the way we feel about our modern, varied lifestyle. Creating a strong, stylish look is an art form with people looking everywhere and anywhere for pieces that will compliment each other and create the desired look. Although not a strictly new concept, mixing highend fashion pieces with low-end op-shop or vintage clothing is popular on the streets of Melbourne and beyond with people like Kate Moss and Winona Ryder showing us it can be a great way to create a unique, appealing look and stand out from the crowd. Op-shops and vintage shops can provide unique and hard to find pieces that, with a little creativity, can play well with expensive designer pieces. It offers a way to reduce the cost of an outfit and can give you the look you need without having to spend money on an outfit constructed purely from designer pieces. Because getting op-shop treasures can save on the cost of an outfit, it is tempting to think about sourcing our entire outfits from the op-shop. This can work, but can often not be as effective as choosing a singular, unique piece found on a bargain shelf with other expensive pieces. There are some elements that you may not want to consider substituting with op-shop or vintage finds at all. Your shoes and purse, for instance, are the kind of items you do not want to sacrifice the quality of.

Great finds aside, you should probably source your shoes and purse from the designer end of the range and maybe choose an op-shop or vintage shirt, jacket, dress or trousers to add to the mix. Similarly, op-shops and vintage shops can often provide fabulous jewellery and brooches that can really change the impact of an outfit with no effort and little outlay. During shows where high-end fashion has been mixed with cheaper, low-end pieces, such as Isaac Mizrahi’s landmark 2004 show, audience members have been unable to tell the difference or identify which pieces were the designer ones and which were the lower end pieces. But creating a mixed fashion look is about more than just this. It’s about mixing up the different elements available to you and being creative with your look. An outfit constructed purely from designer or couture elements doesn’t have the same down-to-earth appeal as an outfit with mixed elements and, if you’re not careful, a piece constructed purely from the local op-shop or vintage shop doesn’t often scream class. Mixing high-end pieces with op-shop or vintage pieces is not just a trend. It is a way of life and it is here to stay. More and more people are raiding op-shops to find unique and unusual items and bringing those to play with more expensive pieces to find the look that truly reflects the differing and varied elements of modern life in Melbourne.

B l ac k farah maxi - mi na & kat u s h a $ 2 89. 9 0

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Photographer Ashlee Lauren. Stylist Ben Anderson. Hair Styling & Make Up Elisa Clark Model Azusa [Darley]. Clothes Mina & Katusha and Stylists Own CollecTion

OFF THE SHOULDER DRESS STYLISTS OWN

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360 FJ O R D E | M U S I C

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360 IS ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S BIGGEST RAPPERS AND LEADING THE CHARGE IN BRINGING LOCAL HIP-HOP INTO THE FOREFRONT AND ONTO OUR AIRWAVES. WRITTEN BY ALEX CYBULSKA PHOTOGRAPHED BY FILIP KONIKOWSKI

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FJ O R D E | M U S I C With over 50, 000 fans on Facebook and collaborations with the likes of Pez, Justice and Illy, if you haven’t heard of him, you’ve certainly heard of his music by now. Hearing him rap at a label launch hit me for 6 (pardon the pun) and I had to interview him for Fjorde. We sat in a bar in Melbourne sipping beers and talking shit most of the night. He opened up to me about his music, new album and his plethora of adoring fans.“I seem to have an army of really loyal dedicated fans” 60, real name Matt Colwell, tells me. “Majority of them would go for war for me and I love that. I reckon if I was gonna go to another country to fight ninjas, I could put a Facebook status up and get about 100 to come with me.” His raps connect with the listener on a much deeper level – it’s not all about sex and drugs, but instead, 60 retells stories of his life and struggles in a way the listener can relate by being unashamed of the issues plaguing his life. And then he’ll mix it up by occasionally throwing in a song like “Facebook Fiend.” “I think it’s important to show a lot of sides to your personality… I have some very serious songs but also have a lot of fun songs. I think I’m like that as a person though, no doubt.” ‘Just Got Started’, a collaboration with “very close mate” Pez, got up to number 4 on the iTunes Australia list while ‘Throw it Away’ with Josh Pyke is getting love from Triple J and Nova. His new album ‘Falling and Flying’ has been delayed several times but is finally confirmed for a September 30th release. “I went into the album with no rules so there’s a lot of different influences on there. It’s also a very, very personal album; most of the songs are personal and deep… I can’t wait for people to hear it! It was meant to come out last September, but I had a pretty fucked up go-kart accident, which caused me to put a hold on it until May this year. It was a blessing in disguise because I made some new songs and made the album ten times better than it was already. But now we [had to] push it back even further … I think the universe is making it happen this way for a reason.” If you follow 60 on Facebook or Twitter you’ll understand the level of anticipation and hype this caused for his most devoted fans who have been craving a hit of quality Australian hip hop. “I think [the Aussie hip hop scene] is very healthy. Even though there has been a solid scene for over 20 years, I think its very early days as well. I kinda compare it to the US hip hop market in the late 80’s early 90’s... 48

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It’s constantly growing. It’s almost become cool to like ‘Aussie hip hop’ for a lot of people as well. I think that’s a great thing.” Several beers later, we end up at a pizzeria down the road from his place for coffee and more beers. Yes, this place had more beer. 60 tells me it’s his local eatery but when I questioned him whether they know who he is, he says no and tells me he has no intention to tell them. I realised that’s the most alluring thing about him because regardless of the amount of fame he’s seen recently, his feet are still planted firmly on the ground with an incessant devotion to his ever-growing legion of fans. 60 is constantly interacting with his ‘ninjas’, recently encouraging his fans to upload pictures of themselves in a ‘shoosh cunt’ pose – which is basically people with their index finger pressed against their lips in various positions and situations. “Haha I took a picture of me doing the ‘shoosh cunt’, then fans started sending in pics of them doing it also. And I asked people to get crazy with it, be creative and do some outrageous shit... and it’s just gone mental, haha.” Meanwhile, #rappertag has generated a phenomenal life of its own. 60 started the craze in October 2010 when he dropped a short freestyle rap and tagged an Australian artist at the end to continue the chain. That artist does the same and tags another at the end of theirs… and so on. “There was a similar thing going on in the states… I thought it would be amazing to get Aussie MCs to do a similar thing. Its really taken off its up to number 35 now!!” Well, number 37 in early July. With his album ‘Falling and Flying’ released next month, 360 is enjoying the successes many young Australian artists would only dream to achieve. He’s paving the way for upand-comers to make an impression in the underappreciated and lesser-known Australian hip-hop scene. “I definitely see it becoming one of the most dominating genre’s in the country, and I can see a lot of artists having success internationally as well… The last 2 Australian music artists to go number 1 were both hip-hop acts (Drapht/Bliss n Eso). And it’s only just starting.”

Falling and Flying available September 30th on Soulmate records. www.facebook.com/3ree6ixty


SPRING 2011

Photographer Filip Konikowski. Stylist The Ghost. Hair Styling & Make Up Sarah Dalton.

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FJ O R D E | M U S I C

JOSH PYKE By Vahe Koshayan

Josh Pyke’s an exceedingly rare breed: quirky, colourful, emotional and above all else, original. It’s easy enough to attribute all manner of influence and peer-comparisons to an artist, but Josh has managed to carve his own niche within the acoustic rock milieu, and has only been getting better and better since his debut in 2005. The new album, “Only Sparrows”, with its fuller genre-mingling but self-assured sound, signifies a newly re-focused Josh Pyke, a person and artist who wants to emphasise the importance of change. In this interviewer’s mind, this is Pyke’s true arrival. “Only Sparrows” is a pantheonworthy record, and one I’m sure will be in the public eye for some time. I had a chat to Josh about his experience making the new record, his penchant for animal imagery and the earliest musical touchstones that would later form his future sound. 50

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F: Are you still working in the studio right now or prepping for a tour? JP: I’m actually in a rehearsal studio for some upcoming solo shows, doing a bit of rehearsal because it’s been a long time since I played all these songs. F: Just recently heard “Throw It All Away” with 360. How’d that collaboration come about? JP: I met him at the APRA awards last year, he’s a nice guy. The person that signed him to EMI is a good friend, they rang me up & approached me do it & sent me some tracks. I was a big fan of the song so I just did it. I forgot about it for a while but then it just came out, seems to have gone really well because I hear it on Triple J almost every day. So I was really happy for him and the song. F: Did you have a hand in producing the track? Because it almost sounds like a hybrid acoustic hip-hop track that you could’ve maybe had input in? JP: He works with a producer who’s done a really great job, I just sort of sang what they wanted me to sing & left it at that. F: I know that it could be described as a cross-genre performance on your behalf, but you do sound incredibly at home in a hip-hop setting. In fact your song-writing structure and vocal delivery and descriptive wordplay have me convinced you’d make a pretty decent emcee yourself. You could pretty much rap most of your catalogue. Would you ever consider dropping a rhyme at some point?


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Photographer Courtesy of MG Promotions W W W. FJ O R D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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FJ O R D E | M U S I C JP: *laughs* Man, “Middle Of The Hill” in particular, I’ve been wanting for years for a hip hop artist to cover it. I totally agree. I love hip hop, early Dilated Peoples, A Tribe Called Quest, early De La. I’m a big fan of hip hop, and I have to admit, in my drunk moments I am known to bust out some rhymes, but that is as much a fantasy of an accountant’s as it is, y ouknow, a rock star. I’d love to think I could do something in that regard, but sadly I lack the confidence. F: When an artist displays a wide and varied musical palette, it usually means they have an equally as wide and varied set of influences. I would love to know what yours are? JP: Early Doobie Brother and all the 70’s rock stuff I grew up on. Also Beach Boys, then later I got into XTC & Talking Heads. It’s just kind of everything I’ve listened to that influences me. Soundgarden when I was a teenager. In some ways my big influence to this day is Soundgarden, because it taught me to play in drop d. But then y’know, I love The Shins, Bon Iver, Fleet Foxes too. Pretty much everything. At the end of it all, 3rd album in, I feel like I’ve honed my sound. All I go for is what feels right & organic, and I think I’m there with this album. F: I agree. I gave “Only Sparrows” a few thorough listens, it sounds like a Josh Pyke album but somehow it’s got this extra weight to it that I can’t really explain. It sounds very full with a distinct atmosphere. Did you produce the majority of it yourself like “Chimney’s Afire” or was it a coproduction? JP: The album was co-produced with Wayne Connolly, who worked with me on “Memories & Dust” & “Feeding The Wolves”. We’ve had a great longstanding working relationship. I had this crisis of confidence at the beginning of the writing process for this album, as I’d been out of the loop, had a kid, wasn’t doing what I was normally doing. I wasn’t really concentrating on music, but more on being a dad & figuring out my life. So listening to the songs for the new record, I didn’t know if they were good or what to do with them. In the end I decided to work with Wayne, and everything fell into place. He gives excellent feedback which allowed for that atmosphere to be achieved. The last 3 songs on the album (“No One Wants A Lover”, “Love Lies” & “Break, Shatter, Make, Matter”) I wrote in New York, and when I came back to record them with Wayne, I felt I had a new perspective.

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SPRING 2011 I remembered why I did what I did for a living, and that I wanted to make music that I can stand by for the next 30 years. Working with Wayne achieved that. Wanting to do something different and working with a producer I trust helped me stay true to myself. F: I noticed on a few songs (“Coffee Cups”, “No One Wants A Lover” & “Factory Fires”) some references to ‘the city’ in a not-so-flattering light. And I can’t help it jump to the conclusion that you’ve grown weary of your hometown (NSW)? JP: The album’s whole underlying theme is realising one’s need to step out of their comfort zone, personally and creatively. The biggest thing I’ve learnt is that you can’t do the same thing even though it’s comfy and successful. You got to keep pushing yourself, keep developing and challenging. So creatively and musically, ‘the city’ is a metaphor for the comfort zone. A place that I know. And in terms of having a relationship with your creative self, you need to shake it up. So yeah, I don’t hate my town. I’ve actually grown to love Sydney the more time I’ve spent here. F: I’d like to think an artist’s lyrics draw on real life experience more often than not, but I know that inspiration comes from many different sources. Are yours largely one or the other or a mix of both? JP: The first two albums and the mini-album were 100% experience, I was basically singing from a diary. In the name of stepping out of my comfort zone on this album, I really wanted to tell stories that were intimate and personal, but were also kind of exaggerating situations in my life or making them up. Or even using books or a piece of art. One song, “Clovis’ Son”, is based on painting I saw at a gallery in Sydney. I saw the painting, got inspired and wrote a song about it. Another source was from the biography of Galileo and his struggles with the Catholic Church. I wanted to sing about things that seemed intimate and personal, and that I could give a universal and fictitious slant to, but have someone still listen to it and feel something. “Factory Fires” is based on those industrial towns in middle America and how they’re being screwed over. So the inspirations are personal but universal, and not just songs about me living in my house or something. F: Apart from the name of the new album, how does the bird imagery factor into your artistry? This also includes the music video for “Middle Of The Hill” &, I guess to a lesser extent, the baby chickens in “Memories & Dust”?

JP: I’ve used a lot of animal imagery, not so much on this record, but in the past I’ve used wolves, foxes, rabbits. They just kind of symbolise certain aspects of life for me. Crows and birds in particular, there’s something evil about them. They usually represent the negative influence in my life or a negative situation. Wolves would be the same. It’s just a way of expressing something or giving shape to it. F: That’s Katy Steele on “Punch In The Heart” yes? Did you guys co-write it and what was the collaboration process with her like? JP: Funnily enough I co-wrote it with Whitley about 4 years ago doing a solo tour in regional NSW. I was holed up in a hotel and wrote the song. Thought about using it on the last album but didn’t. I really wanted it to be a duet and I asked Katy, who I’d known for a couple of years. She lives in New York so I sent it over to her, she recorded the vocals in a studio in NY and nailed them on the first go, sent them back to me and that was that. It was an easy process. F: “Good Head Start” is my favourite song on the set, man. JP: Thanks. Interesting choice. F: Well, if I may explain, I’m an abnormally massive fan of Foo Fighters, and this song could’ve fit beautifully on “There Is Nothing Left To Lose”. It’s that kind of warm, whimsical rock aspect of their late ‘90s material that seems to shine through for me. I just wondered if The Foo played any part in your musical life?

F: Final question - what was the ultimate fate of the guitar boat? JP: We sold it on eBay and donated the money to The Indigenous Literacy Foundation of Australia, for which I am an ambassador for. I thought it was an anonymous bid so I never really found out what happened to it, but someone did tell me recently they saw a girl in Melbourne cruising with it. But who knows. It was a proper boat and everything. F: Oh I know, it looked like it was traveling well in the video. JP: It was traveling at speed, in choppy water it’s a bit rough. But yeah, I’d love to find out what happened to it. If you do, let me know. If anyone DOES have any further information regarding the fabled guitar boat, please don’t hesitate to contact us here at Fjorde or Josh via Facebook. As for the new album, fans don’t have to wait long. “Only Sparrows” drops on August 19th with a tour to follow. In a musical environment that is continually stagnating to the point of nauseating repetition (see: any faux-tech house pop track featuring Pitbull, which by now total in the hundreds), Josh Pyke manages to remain a classic artist, drawing on personal experience and letting the music come out when and where it was meant to. Hopefully someday soon, music in general can return to this simple yet true process of creation. In the meantime, I await the next contemplative & thoughtful yet playful Josh Pyke single and music video – any possibility of putting meerkats and pug puppies together in a hammock?

JP: Oh I love Foo Fighters. I was in a band that opened for them once. F: I hate you so much right now. JP: *laughs* I love ‘90s music. Being 16 and starting to really getting into playing music and being in bands and stuff, you can’t shake those early influences. It becomes part of your musical DNA, even though it wasn’t a deliberate thing. F: Will you be doing more work with Basement Birds? JP: I’d say so, but not for a while I’d imagine. This album’s about to get released which should keep me busy for a couple of years. Everyone’s doing their own thing at the moment, but we’re all keen. I loved working together, and touring was so much fun. Maybe in 4-5 years? But we’ll probably all be old men by then.

TOUR DATES AS BELOW • Thur 8th Sept Cambridge, Newcastle • Fri 9th Sept Uni Bar, Wollongong • Sat 10th Sept Metro, Sydney • Fri 16th Sept The Corner, Melbourne • Sat 17th Sept Bended Elbow, Geelong • Thur 22nd Sept Great Northern, Byron Bay • Fri 23rd Sept Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta •Sat 24th Sept Hi-Fi, Brisbane •Thus 29th Sept The Governor Hindmarsh, Adelaide • Fri Sept 30th Fly By Night, Perth • Sat Oct 1st Astor, Perth

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One of Dubstep’s hottest names gets frank on musical inspiration and his luck in production. In the past two years, dubstep’s popularity has grown in Melbourne, injecting new life into our bass music scene. With sturdier tempo’s than conventional electronic genres and sub frequencies to halt a pacemaker, it’s no wonder that lovers of a variety of music can come together over dubstep love. Those who have dabbled in dubstep are more than likely to have heard Doctor P’s now cult track ‘Sweetshop.’ The brilliance lies in it’s contrast of old school house with modern twisted wobbles, signature to heavy dubstep. Clever vocal splicing also ads to Sweetshop’s kitsch. I was lucky enough to have a chat with dubstep’s it boy after his March performance at Brown Alley. Doctor P, or Sean Brockhurst as his driver’s licence tells you, grew up in Towcester, in England’s north. Yes it’s pronounced like the electrical appliance. Only some will know, his best friend growing up was Josh Steele, more commonly known as Flux Pavillion, another of dubstep’s biggest names.

The two grew up listening to heavy metal music and in early 2000 developed an interest in electronic genres sighting the Prodigy and Fat Boy Slim as two of their favourite artists. As drum and bad became huge in the 56

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By Sonia Khan

UK, Josh decided to get himself a CDJ and Sean decided to have a spin. While the two were naturals on the decks, the next step was to move into production. Working with Cubase, the first tracks were a mixture of what they describe as “strange electro” but predominantly featured a hip-hop sound. It was only after hearing Rusko, the two decided to produce dubstep, and in a strange twist of fate, Doctor P’s first track was Sweetshop in 2009. While Sweetshop was not his favourite track, the masses disagreed and after launching on MySpace and YouTube, Sweetshop went viral and has been played by DJ’s of every genre worldwide. Doctor P feels that the internet has revolutionised the music business. He largely credits it for his own widespread success and emphasizes the opportunities it has created, especially for dubstep, still in its infancy. The level of technological saturation has changed how the music is made, adapted, shared and marketed. I ask him how he views dubstep as a genre, and his own music, telling me “Make the tune for yourself. All I do is make the tune not how I don’t like it.” Dubstep appeals predominantly within the younger crowd, and rightly so with a very niche audience and infant-like trend.


Photography By James Gillot

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PRUSSIA

SILHOUETTES PHOTOGRAPHED BY FILIP Konikowski

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l ac e trench coat $250

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l ac e p ru ss i a pant $ 2 0 0

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ve lve t trench coat $250

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Photographer Filip Konikowski. Stylist The Ghost. Hair Styling & Make Up Sarah Dalton. Model Kasia Stelmach

FJ O R D E | FA S H I O N

v elvet catsui t $180

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ALABAM WINTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY TONI RIALES

AS H | WHITE DRESS: FRENCH CONNECTION $228

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K E Y | LIGHT BLUE SHIRT: CALVIN KLIEN $62 DENIM SHIRT: CREMIEUX $75 KHAKIS: AMERICAN EAGLE $40

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AS H | P L A I D TO P - L I N E A N D D OT $ 5 6 RED JEANS- CITIZENS OF HUMMANITY $120 B I K I N I TO P - V E R S U S $ 3 0

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S E Q | P E AC H TO P : L I N E A N D D OT $ 6 5 F L I G H T PA N T: J B R A N D $ 8 0 B I K I N I TO P : AS OS $ 4 0

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AS H | P L A I D S H I RT: B D G $ 6 0 J E A N S H O RTS : S I LV E R J E A N S $ 4 5

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K E Y | J EANS: LEVIS AND CO $60 AS H | L ACE TOP: WILLOW AND CLAY $75 J E A N S : J OLT $82 S E Q | P EACH TOP: DRAGONFLY $70 O L I V E S HORTS: BCBGENERATION $45 W H I T E DENIM JACKET: GA P $60

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K E Y | JEANS: LEVI AND CO $60 L E AT HER JACKET: VINTAGE RED $198 SEQ | FLORAL DRESS: FRENCH CONNECTION $228 K H A K I VEST: CHELSEA AND VIOLET $45

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K E Y | P L A I D S H I RT: G A P $ 5 5 F LO R A L S K I RT: G I A N N I B I N I $ 4 5 AS H | J E A N S : C I T I Z E N S O F H U M A N I T Y $ 1 2 0 B L AC K A N D W H I T E TO P : I N G $ 6 5

Photographer Toni Riales, Assisted by Monica Daffin. Creative Director Nick Mansfield. Stylist Suzi Wuest. Hair Stylist Jessica Chavez Price. Make Up Artist Ignacia Johnston. Models Key Harwell, Sequayah Chaney, Ashley Parsons [MFW2011]

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FJ O R D E | C U LT U R E

Written by Alex Cybulska

Photography by: Fredrick Goyo

When I was told there’s a new market opening up in South Yarra, it wasn’t just the promise of mulled wine that led me there, but a genuine curiosity of how this will be pulled off and what little designer and vintage treasures are on show. It’s location? An all-too familiar warehouse, tucked behind the bustle of Chapel Street, which is renowned for being a backdrop to an amazing party and everybody’s worst hangover. This was going to be rad. The market was open to all kinds of independent vendors selling their designer jewelry and clothes or on-selling their pre-loved vintage pieces. It’s kind of a mix between a marketplace and a garage sale with a feel really chilled out feel. There’s couches and seats strewn about and food available for those needing nourishment after a hard day’s shop. The launch of South Yarra Market on June 4th seemed very organized and calm, but that’s what you come to expect from the three organizers. Adrian Davis, Liam Magee and Dave Brennan (or, Ko-op as they’re collectively known). “The first week, we realized we had to change the layout a bit,” says Liam. “So got all these stage pieces and got a raised section that you have to walk up and down through.” In the weeks following, they’ve presented Chapel Street shoppers with an alternative to the mainstream, international design houses we’re so used to and organized a shopping experience, which is uniquely Melbourne. South Yarra Markets is a place where up-and-coming designers can reveal their creations to an enthusiastic and encouraging audience. “We felt Melbourne was lacking a really cool undercover market selling fashion, art and vinyl, without the fruit and veg and crappy crafts… it is Melbourne after all – it’s got to be undercover!” say the boys “We wanted to create a cool vibe like some of the London markets like Spitalfields, but on a much smaller, intimate level.” “We live together also so when we’re getting things done, it’s very quick we only have to check with 2 other people to make sure its alright” says Adrian. “So we’re there and an idea will come up and we’re like, what do you think? And we’re like, stuff it lets just do it.”

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“We have very similar personalities as well,” says Dave. “We’re very creative and positive.” “We’re trying to improve the area,” says Liam. “We’re trying to provide something that’ll be good for South Yarra” The boys not only run South Yarra Markets Market, but they’re also opening a shop on Greville Street simply named ‘Clothes’, operate RAD Limo hire, own two warehouses and organize events, festivals and parties. I asked them how they possibly find the time to do all of this, plus maintain some sort of social life, fit in sleeping, eating and sitting through interviews. “We don’t! We work night and day and push through,” laughs Adrian. “We don’t really have weekends or holidays. This is our full time job.” “We know how to do alcohol delivery, crowd control, waste management and food. We know how to do all that really well,” says Dave. Photographer Jamie Li

“We’ve never had to have anyone help us at all. No matter how big it got. Most people can’t run a thousand-person festival,” agrees Liam. “We’re running an indoor 2,500 person basically, festival. And we haven’t had a single fight. “And not one OD or one incident,” adds Dave “But we’re learning as we go,” continues Liam. “It looks like a crazy warehouse party but its really well controlled.” The boys are Melbourne���s leading young entrepreneurs. Their ages allows them to connect with the fashion and fads relevant to people just on the outskirts of the city and provide a service that’s completely in touch with trends. If you can’t bear another market saturated with the same boring clothing, or another craft store manned by a wiry haired old lady with her environmentally friendly hessian sacks that smell more hash-ian then hessian, come down to the South Yarra Markets. They’re open every Saturday between 12 and 5 at Oak Place, off Chapel Street.

SOUTH YARRA MARKET O P E N E V E RY SAT U R DAY BETWEEN 12 AND 5PM OA K P L AC E , O F F C H A P E L ST R E E T

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JET PEEL BY ALEX CYBULSKA PHOTOGRAPHY WOODROW WILSON

For someone whose facial cleansing routine comprises of no more than slapping on a bit of moisturizer and the occasional facial scrub, you can imagine how excited I was entering the Paramedical Skin Clinic for a Jet Peel. Finally my skin was about to get the loving attention it deserved! And what horrendous damage had I done throughout my life, which was about to be revealed? And I soon learnt I was in expert hands. Ilesha Haywood makes studying cosmetic treatments a full time, continual occupation and patented the technique the Paramedical Skin Clinic use with the Jet Peel system. Her clinic has won Advanced Skin Technologies Victorian Clinic of the Year for three years and the 2008 Leader Business Achiever Awards in Health Science. So it’s not a surprise to learn her clientele boasts Dannii Minogue, Sonia Kruger, Kimberley Davis and Livinia Nixon who are avid fans of the Jet Peel and have seen fabulous results. “I think it’s fantastic that they trust us to look after their skin,” agrees Ilesha. “This is their livelihoods, they have to keep their skin in excellent condition. We were found by many celebrities by word of mouth.” I was taken to the consultation room where photos were taken to determine how much red I have in my face (capillaries, rosacea etc) and pigmentation (sun spots, freckles, age spots, hormonal pigmentation) and the results are absolutely shocking. It looked as if I got hit in the face with a large red and brown paint ball, which exploded on my nose spraying bits around the sides of my face. Ilesha was able to isolate my problem areas using this state-of-the-art technology and target them during the procedure. A massive bonus to getting a course of Jet Peel done at the Paramedical Skin Clinic is the use of this machine, which allows Ilesha to see under the surface of my skin and make a more educated analysis of my needs before doing the peel. “It helps me to monitor the progress of patients that are on a course of treatments,” says Ilesha. “Especially with pigmentation where what you see on the surface can sometimes be quite minimal and underneath the skin can be a lot worse.” The procedure itself started with microdermabrasion to my T-section, which exfoliated the top layers of the skin. This is done via crystals gently blasting onto the skin via a slim tube and exiting the same way with used crystals and dead skin cells. Nifty. And after this we got to the good stuff. 84

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The Jet Peel was entirely and completely pain-free. Using pressurized oxygen, saline is accelerated to supersonic velocities and in turn creates a more plump, lifted and hydrated complexion, which reduces fine lines and wrinkles. I know it might seem pretty far-fetched I saw results immediately but I guess I felt them more than anything. Your skin feels smoother and your pores reduced. When I asked about how this was possible, Ilesha said, “I will let you in to a little secret; this is the treatment that our celebrity clients like to have before a red carpet event or before a TV shoot because the results are so fantastic.” I guess in an age where we want to look young and radiant for as long as humanly possible, a Jet Peel treatment isn’t as risky some other methods. The biggest argument for this type of treatment is the natural alternative it provides to Botox and surgery because it’s not invasive and it doesn’t leave you debilitated for days after doing it. The turn around is 10-20 minutes during which your skin might be red and then return to it’s natural color and feels radiant for weeks after. At $720 a treatment, Ilesha assures me bundling 3 or more brings the cost down exponentially making it more affordable for those of us not on celebrity salaries. I highly recommend it for anyone (even men get a Jet Peel done too!) who needs a quick lift and hydrate. You’ll find Ilesha Haywood at her clinics in South Yarra and Thornbury, VIC or at www.paramedicalskinclinic.com.au


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Stylist: Ben Anderson Hair & makeup: Sarah Dalton. Model: Thandi (Darley)

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FJ O R D E | C O N C E P T S

THE FORM OF HIBERNATION PHOTOGRAPHED BY FILIP KONIKOWSKI

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Photographer Filip Konikowski. Stylist Ben Anderson. Hair Styling & Make Up Elisa Clark Model Teale [Darley].

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Share your creative work. Anonymously. Someone is anonymous design. A space for creatives to share their undiscovered work, purely for the love of design. With all importance on creativity, rather than the artist, allows creatives to contribute to a new method of visual understanding.

To submit work: 1.  Email digital files to: info@someoneanonymous.com 2. S end samples of your work via Post to: PO Box 2079, Prahran 3181, Melbourne Victoria, Australia www.someoneanonymous.com


FJ O R D E | A R T

By Aaron Weinman

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The jaw dropping gasps of people in both amazement and disgust at the sight of dazzling colours, incomparable designs and sheer hard work, has become a star attraction for Melbournians and foreigners alike, giving Melbourne the urbane reputation it is renowned for. Journeying throughout the Melbourne CBD, we are fortunate (some may differ) to be littered with shady avenues where creative artists shelter in order to hone and showcase their trade. You only need to turn the corner near Federation Square and you could be easily taken aback by the detail and genius of graffiti artists. But what of the moral dilemma? Young children taking the use of the spray can too far and inhaling its chemicals or the notion that graffiti is nothing but vandalism on our buildings, or our public transport. These arguments have been thrown around for years, but thankfully, the essence of creativity has not been lost on the pure graffiti artists in Melbourne. In what many consider taboo, graffiti has become the staple in contemporary or post-modern art and pop culture. Expressing everything that epitomises our urban culture, graffiti art, like music and film has an incredible ability to express social and political messages along with an entire genre of artistic expression, despite being considered left-of-centre.

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Over the last few years, Melbourne’s most circulated newspapers such as the Herald Sun and The Age have covered the issue of graffiti, both promotionally and somewhat negatively. Regardless of how reflexive you are towards graffiti, the most important thing about this is the wonder of creative society today. The idea that no medium is too small or too broad; graffiti redefines the idea that the world really is your oyster. Despite the argument of right and wrong, the essence of graffiti as an art form will forever remain. The ‘die-hards’ of graffiti art will strongly advocate their precious craft, showcasing their pieces in galleries and exhibitions, maintaining the prominence and messages graffiti intends to send, all whilst remaining independent, avoiding that concept of ‘selling out.’ Its existence in pop culture continues to grow, and despite being completely ‘Indie,’ you could regularly relate graffiti art to hip-hop music, particularly underground hip-hop, forever trying to remain hidden from the commercial public. Take the eccentric dance known as ‘B-Boying’ for example, serving as the companion for particular elements of hip-hop and street art, the difficult style of break dancing can sometimes be seen as the best friend of graffiti artists. Surfing the Internet, researching all things graffiti, the most common trend with these stylish artists is their connectivity with one another


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and their amazing ability to network within their own community. Graffiti in Melbourne truly is a thriving art with groups popping up all over the town, hosting events, featuring in exhibitions and even establishing online gaming groups, purely for graffiti artists. Dissecting the world of graffiti is hard, for obvious reasons they remain a close-knit bunch, not revealing much to the public other than their fascinating works of art itself. The law have constantly intervened over time, thwarting these individuals of their hobby or career for that matter. The forms of graffiti one can find vary with large embodiments of art to low-level gang signs, known as ‘tags.’ With such a broad range of art, its no wonder the law feels compelled to intervene, with many finding it hard to draw the line between the legality of this art. The controversies surrounding graffiti have led to a divided legal community, taking sides over the constructs of graffiti art. While some law officials may positively endorse the beauty of graffiti, they are not without their detractors, who are constantly pushing laws into the government, in an attempt to outlaw it. In an attempt to promote the talent and positive nature in graffiti art, it is uplifting to see Australia proactively taking a stand in promoting this. In an effort to reduce vandalism, many of our beautiful states have designated areas specifically for the wonders of graffiti art. One early

example is the “Graffiti Tunnel” located at Camperdown Campus of the University of Sydney, which is available for use by any student at the University to tag, advertise, poster and create “art”. Advocates of this idea suggest that this discourages petty vandalism yet encourages artists to take their time and produce great art, without worry of being caught or arrested for vandalism or trespassing. Graffiti and Melbourne combine to be forever loved, and hopefully not forever hated. This beautiful city that we at Fjorde Magazine love to rave on about, can gladly admit to being the poster child for the brilliance of graffiti artwork. Many of our lauded lanes are regular tourist attractions as well as popular settings for our budding photographers. Hosier Lane in particular leads the way in location for art, photography and corporate advertising, all due to the spontaneity, tenacity and talent of our very own graffiti artists.

HOSIER LANE M E L B O U R N E ’ S M OST I CO N I C ST R E E TA RT L A N E WAY. “ H OS I E R L A N E ”

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REVIEW

CHEZ OLIVIER By Ben Anderson

When one immerses in everything Greville Street you are treated to both ends of the fashion scale and the same can be said of its dining establishments. Chez Olivier nestled nicely into life on Greville Street and its exterior may seem like any other quaint Melbourne café, but upon entry, you could be forgiven for thinking you have been transported into post World-War two France. With intricate details, Chez Olivier surrounds itself with exposed brick walls, wines racks and tastefully hand-picked Parisian art. Suitable for all conditions, patrons can soak up the sun in the courtyard, sample fine French wine at the bar or utilize their function room. Drowning out the exterior noise of Prahran, Chez entices you to fade away to the subtle notes of boutique French lounge music. Entrées are famous in France, and Chez explains Assiete de Charcuterie as a selection of France’s amazing delicacies such as ‘Pork Terrine’ house made sausage and fresh Pate. Coupled with a blaze’ ambience across the bistro, these appetizers set the tone for great conversation, fruitful wine and delicious food. Chez places a heavy emphasis on staff value and service, their hostess’ live up to such reputation, explaining the premise of the venue, promoting and conserving the aesthetic of a traditional French dining experience, from the food to the atmosphere. The look, feel and sound of Chez Olivier is complimented with native French servers, adding to the escapism you feel in their unique surroundings. The aroma of ‘Tournedos Rossini’ envelopes the area, inviting you to taste a melting Eye-Fillet accompanied by creamy mash, mushroom sauce and finished with a slice of Foie Grass. Heartily full, the dessert menu was a task to peruse, but after much coaxing, the chocolate Fondant, with its self-saucing indulgence was easily consumed, complimenting the elegant experience of the bistro. With design and aristocracy you associate with France, simplified with a warm, cocoa-infused ending, let Chez Olivier transport you away from the bitter cold of winter, teleporting you to the French cobble-stone streets of Notre Dame. 100

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PHOTOGRAPHER WOODROW WILSON

CHEZ OLIVIER 1 2 1 G R E V I L L E ST R E E T PRAHRAN VIC 3181 WWW.C H E ZO L I V I E R .CO M

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REVIEW

BURGER JOINT LE PARKER MERIDIEN 1 0 9 WEST 56TH STR EET N E W YORK NY 10019-3318

By Ben Anderson

If you want something known and want it to get around quick, gossip is the lifeline of all news. The best marketing course of action is simple… start a RUMOUR!! This was exactly what those behind the Le Parker Meridien in New York City accomplished. While marketing has always played an important part in building the reputation of any new venture, it is a tricky business and can ultimately make or break what you are presenting. The Burger Joint, located within the Le Parker Meridien Hotel, took a unique approach to its establishment and created a rumour about its origin - no fancy billboards or commercials, just simple word of mouth on the hard streets of New York City. In doing so, they created a legacy.

The idea was simple. They aimed to create a unique spot in the thick of New York’s hustle and bustle that did not offer the world, but only the best of it… the perfect burger. With a refined menu of a burgers including the classic ‘Cheeseburger’ and ‘The Works’, the house recommendation features a medium beef burger, lettuce, onion, cheese, pickles, tomato, mustard and ketchup. All encased in a warm toasted bun and served in good old butchers paper so you can see the grease and cheese coming through, just like you should. But vegetarians, be warned, you will not 102

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The Burger Joint has a simple and straightforward menu, much like the décor itself. The cuisine on offer is reminiscent of a back yard barbeque complete with cold beer and cask wine, only without the burnt charred burgers, unless that’s how you like it. For me, it’s the house recommendation all the way because no one knows how to cook a burger better than The Burger Joint itself. With ‘The Works’ in front of me, I bit into a well-cooked thick beef patty teamed with lightly salted golden fries and a think and smooth chocolate shake made with real ice cream. Sometimes the simple things in life are the best! As for the décor, wood paneled walls and exposed brick are covered in posters and scribbling’s – a delicate balance of whole-in-the-wall burger joint and high-end quality food! A well-crafted combination that like the rumour suggests has been engineered to perfection. With minimal seating, it’s guerilla warfare and every man, women and child is in it for themselves when it comes to finding a seat in this establishment. Also, prepare yourself to be waiting a while, with lines often out the door and around the corner, but it’s definitely worth the wait. Amongst the Average Joe clientele eating at The Burger Joint, is the celebrity elite from Heidi Klum, Ashton Kutcher to Leonardo DiCaprio who have visited and left sincere messages that they have eaten the best burger in all of New York City. For the best burgers in the world, nothing compares to The Burger Joint in New York City.

Photographer Courtesy of Le Parker Meridien

So the story goes, The Burger Joint has been around for a lifetime and then some! It’s reputation so strong that the owners of the now immaculate Le Parker Meridien had no other alternative than to construct the 42-floor hotel around it. And thus the rumour made its way through the burrows of New York. A tale so spectacular that, there amongst the concrete jungle that surrounded it hid the greatest tasting burger ever to be made… for one and all to find and discover themselves.

be catered for. The best vegetarian meal you can get at this place is a cheeseburger, hold the burger.


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AMERICAN EAGLE www.ae.com

JACK LONDON www.jacklondon.com.au

ANNA CAMPBELL www.annacampbell.com.au

JOLT www.joltstyle.com

BAD, MEET EVIL www.badmeetevil.com

LACOSTE www.lacoste.com

BDG www.bdgclothing.net

LEVIS & CO www.levis.com

BITISI – BY DESIGN www.bitisi.com

LINE AND DOT www.thelineanddot.com

BKE JEANS www.buckle.com

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BODYOGRAPHY www.bodyography.com.au

THE MARKET LANE www.themarketlane.com

CALVIN KLIEN www.calvinklein.com

OAT DESIGNS www.oatdesigns.com

CITIZENS OF HUMANITY www.citizensofhumanityclothing.com

PRUSSIA www.prussia.net.au

FABRICADO www.fabricado.com.au

SOUTH YARRA MARKET www.southyarramarket.com.au

FRENCH CONNECTION www.frenchconnection.com

SILVER JEANS www.silverjeans.com

GAP www.gap.com

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GENOVESE COFFEE www.genovese.com.au

VERSUS www.versusclothing.com

GIANNI BINI www.giannibini.com

VINTAGE RED www.vintage-red.com

GORMAN www.gorman.ws

WARRIOR SHOES www.warriorshoes.com.au

HER PONY www.herpony.com.au

WILLOW AND CLAY www.willowclay.com

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FJORDE MAGAZINE SPRING 2011