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Trusted equipment for the Conscious Hunter 2018 / 2019


In 1960, Åke Nordin founded Fjällräven in his basement in the Swedish town of Örnsköldsvik. Since then we have stayed true to our mission of developing timeless, functional and durable outdoor equipment, acting responsibly towards people, animals and the environment and inspiring more people to discover outdoor life. Forever Nature

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O PUR E YA TH E V L C E YO R T O W E D OURT OF S


FJ Ä L L R ÄV E N H U N T I N G FA L L   /   W I N T E R 2 0 1 8 P U B LI SH E R

Fjällräven International P RO D UC TIO N LE ADE R

Malin Andersson GRA FIC DE SIGN E R S

Anna Gustin Lotten Borneng Annika Wikberg T EX T

Anette Andersson, Oscar Askelöf, Håkan Wike P HOTO S

Anette Andersson, Håkan Wike, Fredrik Lewander, RedWolf Studio AB I LLU S TRATIO N S

Goodname Digital Art Studio P RE- PR E SS

Peas and Understanding P RI NT ADV ISO R

Digaloo P RI NT

Ruter AB

Full focus

with the right equipment

fjällräven has been a well-known brand among hunters for over 50 years because our products work so well on long days and nights out in the wilderness. So developing an entire collection specifically for hunting seems like a completely natural step to take.   Conscious hunting, as all hunting should be, is a big part of genuine game preservation and requires unconditional respect for nature, animals and the ecosystem that we create together. When you are out hunting, you have to be able to fully focus on the task at hand and, to be able to do this, it is imperative that your clothing and equipment function perfectly.   This year’s hunting collection has been developed with versatility and individual adaptation in mind. What kind of hunt are you going on? What is important to you?   If I had to move silently through wet scrub or hike up a steep forested slope in October, I would choose to wear Lappland Hybrid Trousers with all the great ventilation options they have, and apply the layering principle to what I wore on my top half.   But you might choose something else. And this is just as it should be.   The backpack’s journey from 1960 to today has also given results and now there are many alternatives to choose between for when you, just like us, want to keep your hands free. If you are looking for a smaller backpack for day hunts, I can recommend our latest addition – Lappland Hike 15.   I think that both our sustainable material choices and our experience of trekking in challenging terrain and varying climates can be clearly seen in this year’s collection. I hope that you can see it too. And that you find exactly what you need for a great hunting experience.   Good luck!

Martin Axelhed, CEO Fjällräven

Fjällräven does not take responsibility for printing errors and cannot guarantee accurate reproduction of colour in online/ printed material. Products can be sold out and prices may vary.

fall & winter news 2018

This year we are making use of wool’s fantastic properties more than ever. Both in the new ribbed base layer Värmland Woolterry – for maximum insulation, and our new compact backpack Lappland Hike 15 that has a back plate made from hardpressed wool recovered from factory spill.

Värmland Woolterry Half zip

Värmland Woolterry Long Johns

Lappland Hike 15

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28.

20. 58. 44.

54. content


content a rt icl es Pürsch hunting with Oscar von Stockenström..............................28 The Outdoor Hunter – Lisa Lindblom....... 44 A good shot – Ted Lagrelius........................ 52 Gustav the iii’s mistake that made everything right – Daniel Ligné................54 Dad, restaurant manager, hunter – Pierre Karlsson............................ 58

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material & focus products 1. Inner layer – wool...................................10 2. Middle layer – fleece and wool.............. 14 3. Outer layer – g-1000.............................. 16 Greenland Wax........................................ 20 Lappland Hybrid Trousers........................22 3. Outer layer – Eco-Shell & Hydratic......24

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4. Insulation layer – down & synthetics....26 Lappland Hike 15......................................36

r e a d mor e The philosopy behind Fjällräven’s hunting gear............................................... 6 Build your own system................................8 Carry comfortably, move freely................. 35

f ol l ow us!

34. 7


The philosophy hunting gear behind Fjällräven’s

with Johan Skullman, Fjällräven’s material expert, hunter and test team leader

our philosophy is simple: Nothing can disturb your focus when you are hunting, regardless of what type of hunting you are taking part in. For this reason we have developed a clothing system that delivers with regards to fit, versatility and hunting-specific details. The same applies to our other equipment, such as our hunting backpacks.

  It is incredibly important that everything fits well and feels comfortable. Nothing can hang loose or be too restrictive. Pockets should be in the right places and even when they are full they should be comfortable and follow movements easily.   All our clothing systems build on the layering principle – using several layers of fabric and air

the philosophy behind fjällräven's hunting gear

that can be regulated according to needs and the situation. Layers that are well adapted to each other. A fabric can’t catch on another fabric, feel rough against the skin or make a noise when you move. In addition, important functions such as wicking moisture away from the body, keeping you dry when it’s wet or insulating against the cold are challenges individually but


even more so when in combination with each other. This is why we believe so strongly in the layering principle.   Then we have the practical details that also have to work well, and this is where precision comes into play. Where should I put my ammunition so I can easily reach it? How high should my radio be for maximum range without getting

in the way? Its attachment can’t be too wide or too narrow, it has to be perfect!   Where can I put my dog tracker so it’s easily accessed? How can I tie up my friend's dog – I need a pocket I can put an extra leash in…   Where will I put my knife and latex gloves for when I need them to gut an animal? Where is the pocket for my gps and rangefinder?

The bottom line is that all our clothing and equipment has to be so good, simple and well designed that you don’t have to think about anything but the actual hunt.

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never too cold, never too warm.

Build your own

system

Layering your clothing is nothing new. But creating an entire system, where materials have been developed specifically to work together, is not so common. Fjällräven’s hunting collection consists of a flexible system of materials that you can regulate yourself according to your needs and the situation you find yourself in.

1. build your own system

inner layer – wool closest to your body Wool gives optimal comfort, wicks moisture away and regulates warmth even when wet.

2.

middle layer – fleece and wool

Fleece and wool bind a lot of air and continue to wick away moisture. Use fleece and woollen sweaters, preferably with zippers or buttons so you can regulate them yourself.


3.

outer layer – g-1000, hydratic and eco-shell Our own durable outdoor fabric g-1000 makes the perfect outer layer. Hydratic and Eco-Shell as well – for when it is extra wet and windy.

4.

insulation layer – down/synthetics

When it is extra cold, you need extra insulation. Down is the warmest but in wet and damp weather, synthetic padding is preferable.

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Close to the body

Värmland Woolterry is a high performance base layer in a soft merino wool blend. The inside is made using a looped technique that lifts the fabric away from the skin and creates an insulating layer of air. The striped pattern creates channels that further contribute to the amount of air that is trapped and also to air circulation.

The outside is a polyester and polyamide blend that is durable and friction-free against garments layered on top. This has been specially developed for Fjällräven for optimal insulation and pliancy by Aclima. It wicks away moisture effectively and gives a comfortable, dry feel against the skin. Perfect for hunting in cold conditions.

Male version

värmland woolterry Art no: 90838. Sizes: xs-xxxl. Material*: Wool terry: 52% wool, 35% polyester, 13% polyamide. Wool rib: 95% wool,5% elastane. Wool interlock: 100% wool. Rec. price: 159,95 €

1. inner layer – wool

Värmland Woolterry Half Zip W

Värmland Woolterry Half Zip M

Värmland Woolterry Long Johns W

Värmland Woolterry Long Johns M

Rec. price: 159,95 €

Rec. price: 159,95 €

Rec. price: 139,95 €

Rec. price: 139,95 € *) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin


1.

Inner layer Nature’s most gifted material

wool fibres are incredibly versatile and can be used in many different clothing layers. Wool is sustainable and biodegradable – qualities that make it perfect for those of us who want to thoughtfully and sustainably contribute towards a better environment.

Choosing a woollen garment A thin base-layer set in merino wool is first and foremost great for keeping warm but it will also be a fantastic transporter of moisture away from the skin. It will work just as well under a shell jacket as it will under a warm mid layer.   A knitted woollen sweater is an example of an outdoor garment that will keep you warm but also well ventilated. Knitted garments in coarse wool are often elastic and easy to use as they are. With a windproof garment on top, you have a really warm combination that is easy to regulate when needed.   Woven or felted woollen fabrics are denser and will pull and pill less. A garment made from felted wool is perfect as an outer garment for

stalking game, for example. These garments are more wind resistant than knitted garments, but are still breathable. They release moisture and circulate air.   Sometimes we reinforce woollen garments with g-1000 on the outside, on the whole garment or just on parts of it, to increase resistance against the elements and wear.

Same but different Merino wool comes from merino sheep and is an extra soft, high-quality wool that does not irritate the skin – for this reason it is popular in base-layer garments that are worn against the skin.   Lambswool comes from the sheep’s first shearing and is extra soft and pliant but the fibres aren't as fine as merino wool.   Regular wool from domestic sheep is warm, durable and soft. Different knitting techniques can be used to vary insulating ability, for example by creating a smoother or a more airy structure.   Recycled wool has been used for a long time

without being defined as recycled. This is primarily true for felted wool as recycled wool usually has shorter fibres. Felting makes the wool more compact, which makes it more windproof and reduces the risk of it getting caught in branches and scrub.   Wool blends are used to increase the durability of woollen garments. Wool fibres are mixed with other fibres, either synthetic or other natural materials.   Spill wool is wool that is too coarse to be used for clothing. When we press it and shape it, it becomes perfect as a moisture and heat regulating back plate on the backpack Lappland Hike 15.

Washing and care instructions Used wool detergent and wash woollen garments carefully by hand or used the wool program on your washing machine. Do not soak. Shape your garment after it has been washed and lay it flat on a towel to dry

Functional advantages • Quiet • Warm, even when damp • Moisture wicking • Resists bad odours • Non flammable Environmental advantages • Natural product • Sustainable • Bio-degradable • Doesn’t need to be washed so often

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Lappland Flannel Shirt LS M

Canada Shirt LS W

Forest Fleece Jacket M

Keb Fleece Hoodie W Rec. price: 199,95 €

Sörmland V-neck Sweater W Rec. price: 139,95 €

Sörmland Zip Cardigan M Rec. price: 199,95 €

Rec. price: 99,95 €

Koster Sweater M

Rec. price: 169,95 €

2. middle layer – fleece and wool

Rec. price: 159,95 €

Rec. price: 229,95 €


2.

Middle layer Adaptable and heat regulating

the layer that you constantly vary and regulate depending on the situation. Our fleece sweaters both wick away moisture and keep warmth in. Knitted blends with wool, recycled polyester and elastane when you want

more freedom of movement. Or brushed on the inside for extra comfort and friction-free on the outside thanks to a polyester and polyamide blend. Soft sweaters knitted in merino wool and hardwearing woollen shirts are optimal

choices when you want something cooler. Just what you choose and in which combination is entirely dependent on the weather you are hunting in and the intensity of your activity level. 17


3. outer layer – g-1000


3.

Outer layer Durable, weatherproof, adaptable

G-1000 Silent Eco

Hardwearing

Windproof

fjällräven garments are all designed to be versatile and adaptable. And this is why we make so many of them from our very own outdoor fabric g-1000.   Durable and versatile garments that work well in all kinds of weather and can handle the moisture that builds up inside when you are active. The secret is the waxed, tightly woven polyester and cotton combination that makes for a very strong fabric. If you want to enhance its water resistant properties on the shoulders and knees, for example, just simply rub a few extra layers of Greenland Wax on

Breathable

Adaptable

Water resistant

these sections - our especially produced, tried-and-tested impregnation method. If you’d rather your garment was airy with better ventilation, you simply wash the wax out.   It takes a lot of training and patience to develop the skill of being able to move about unnoticed in the forest. You have to avoid any kind of contrast – both visual and audible. You have to make soft, slow movements where you take into account the wind direction, the surface you are walking on, branches you have to move out of the way, thickets you need to avoid, while always keeping a low

UV protection

Mosquito safe

profile and letting it take the time it takes. Needless to say, your clothing and equipment are important in all this. And this is why we have developed G-1000 Silent Eco for our hunting collection.   Waxed and tightly woven in recycled polyester and organic cotton and then brushed to make it extra pliant, comfortable and silent. In places that are really exposed to wear and tear, such as the lower legs, we use G-1000 HeavyDuty, our extra durable version of g-1000.

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Forest Parka M

Rec. price: 579,95 €

Lappland Hybrid Jacket M Rec. price: 329,95 €

Sörmland Tapered Winter Trousers W Rec. price: 189,95 €

Brenner Pro Trousers M Rec. price: 219,95 €

Grimsey Vest M Rec. price: 149,95 €

3. outer layer – g-1000


Sörmland Padded Vest M Rec. price: 199,95 €

Värmland Jacket M Rec. price: 469,95 €

Värmland Thermo Bag Rec. price: 279,95 €

Brenner Pro Padded Jacket W Rec. price: 449,95 €

Drev Trousers M Rec. price: 219,95 €

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Adapt

your garment to any weather and any activity

greenland wax is the impregnation used for all of Fjällräven’s g-1000 products. The wax has been produced since the late 1960s by the same Swedish family business – the recipe is secret but the ingredients are simple: pure paraffin and high-quality beeswax.   In addition to the wax making pro-

greenland wax

ducts wind and water resistant, it also increases durability and extends the life of the g-1000 fabric.   Greenland Wax is a true handicraft. The paraffin is melted in a large pot (believe it or not it’s the same pot that has been used since the 1960s). When the paraffin has reached the right temperature, blocks

of beeswax are added and everything is stirred together. The mixture is then poured into moulds and allowed to set, before being packed into cardboard boxes.    Today we make thousands of blocks of Greenland Wax every year. And every one of them is made in the same pot.


This is how to use Greenland Wax With Greenland Wax, you can easily customize your g-1000 garments according to different weather conditions and activity levels. Backpacks can also be waxed. More wax provides a denser material that Rub the wax on

is resistant to weather and wind. It also increases the durability and life of the equipment. In warm weather, the wax can easily be washed out to get a cooler garment with increased breathability. Warm the wax in

Repeat

Standing or walking in rain - wax shoulders, arms and hood. Also, the backpack’s lid and underside.

Lying in wet shrub - wax the front of the garments several times to keep moisture out.

Wax the knees of the trousers several times to protect against moisture and wear.

Wax the lower leg of the trousers when walking through shrublands.

Sitting still – wax the seat of the trousers.

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1.

6.

3.

4.

5. 2.

8.

7.

1. Durable hybid-trousers with optimized fit for active hunting. The design is based on the award-winning Keb Trousers with stretch material for exceptional freedom of movement and silent, durable and weatherproof G-1000 Silent Eco. 2. G-1000 Silent Eco with recycled polyester and organic cotton. 3. Pre-shaped knees with openings for knee-pads. 4. Ventilation zippers from knee to hip. 5. Mesh pocket in large right leg pocket for phone or radio. 6. G-1000 Silent Eco reinforces high wear areas such as knees. 7. Boot hooks that are easy to fold away when not in use. 8. Adjustable leg endings for close fit around the boot shaft.

lappland hybrid trousers


The result of seven years’ development

Developing an extra hardwearing garment with optimal fit and maximum freedom of movement requires something that we here at Fjällräven have always prioritised: Reality. Testing the garment often, in challenging terrain and over a long period of time is invaluable. This is the only way that we can make sure that the stretch fabric sits well, exactly where it should. This is how we note

which seams need to be reinforced and which details need to be adjusted. Lappland Hybrid Trousers are based on prize-winning Keb Trousers, which have been tested and adjusted since 2011. You will notice the results of this process when you go hunting – no matter what kind of hunt it is.

Female version

lappland hybrid trousers Art. nr: 90648 (women) / 90647 (men). Sizes: 34-48/44-60. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Fit: Regular fit. Waist: medium high. Leg endings: fixed length. Rec. price: 229,95 €

Organic cotton

*) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin

Recycled polyester

PFC-free impregnation

Adaptable

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3.

Outer layer Protection against wind and rain

3.outer layer – eco-shell & hydratic


Eco-Shell

Hydratic

Waterproof with good breathability. Pliant and light shell garments for active hunting.

Waterproof and breathable membrane, often used in combination with G-1000 Silent Eco and an insulation layer.

when you are covering large amounts of ground and want to have light, convenient gear that protects you from everything the weather can throw at you, Eco-Shell is a given. Fjällräven’s sustainable shell fabric provides you with complete protection in wet weather and tough conditions. At the same time, it efficiently ventilates out the steam that builds up inside when you are active, so that you stay dry on the inside as well.  Eco-Shell is Fjällräven’s answer to what environmentally sustainable shell garments can look like. Because here at Fjällräven we want to make clothing that will keep you dry and comfortable without compromising hunting and outdoor life in the future.   This is why we use recyclable polyester in all three of the fabric layers that together built up the fabric’s functionality. In addition to this, the outer face fabric is made from recycled polyester and is impregnated without the use of environmentally dangerous fluorocarbons. To top it off, Eco-Shell clothing is climate compensated.   Eco-Shell is also light, quiet and stretchy, making it the perfect companion when you don’t want to let bad weather stop you from having a good day’s hunting.

Hydratic in combination with g-1000 is used to protect you from weather and wind in a number of Fjällräven’s hunting and outdoor garments. Hydratic is a liner – a thin layer that works as a moisture barrier together with fabrics that are otherwise not waterproof, such as g-1000, or fabric used in jackets and trousers padded with down or synthetic insulation.   In some garments, Hydratic is only used in exposed sections – such as over the knees and rear so you don’t get wet when you sit or kneel on damp ground. At the same time as Hydratic stops water from getting in, its breathability lets out any moisture that builds up on the inside, keeping you comfortable and reducing the risk of getting cold due to damp under layers.

Example:

Example:

Lappland Eco-Shell Jacket M

Brenner Pro Jacket M

Wind and waterproof shell jacket for active hunting. Light, durable Eco-Shell with stretch gives a soft and quiet garment with excellent freedom of movement.

Waterproof hunting jacket in soft, quiet G-1000 Silent. Clip-on radio attachment and many pockets, including one with an ammunition holder on the arm.

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4. Insulation layer Insulate and protect against the cold

4. insulation layer – down & synthetics


Down

Synthetics

Compressible, light and ethically produced. For when weight is important and the cold is harsch.

For damp, cold conditions

down gives the most warmth for its weight and is easy to compress into a small pack volume. If you are going to be out in the extreme cold, down is the obvious choice, just as it is if you prioritise low weight.   However, down insulates less effectively when it gets damp, and it needs to be stored and cared for carefully, for example when it is washed.   In the extreme cold, the air is dry and down is your best choice. Some down jackets have a moisture check so they can also insulate well in wet weather.

synthetic insulation is more durable than down and the fibres have the ability to recover their loft well even after extensive use. They can also withstand getting damp without their insulating properties being greatly reduced. Jackets with synthetic insulation can be washed more frequently and they cost less. Disadvantages include that a synthetic jacket will insulate less than a down jacket of the same weight and it will also take up more space in your pack. In temperatures around zero, when snow can turn to rain or sleet and back again, synthetic insulation is an excellent choice.

Example:

Example:

Sörmland Down Shirt Jacket M

Sörmland Padded Jacket M

Durable “shirt jacket” padded with down in quiet and hardwearing G-1000 Silent Eco. The chest pockets are positioned so they are not in the way of a gunstock and the lower pockets have ammunition holders. Just as suitable at the shooting range as for everyday use.

Waterproof jacket in G-1000 Silent Eco, lightly padded with warm synthetic insulation. Simple design with all the basic features you need for a good day in the forest.

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pĂźrsch hunting with oscar von stockenstrĂśm


Pürsch hunting with Oscar von Stockenström

Oscar von Stockenström grew up with hunting as a natural part of his everyday life. Fjällräven accompanied him out stalking fallow deer in February, and met a passionate and responsible hunter. Text & photo: Anette Andersson

A

fter just under a hour of driving along winding winter roads in Sörmland, it is time to park the car and start our hunt. Oscar von Stockenström reminds us kindly but on no uncertain terms to close the car doors softly so we don’t scare any close-by game away. With full respect for the task ahead of us, we tread slowly and place our boots carefully as we start on our way into the wilderness. Branches that could snap loudly bend softly instead, and with concentration we choose where we place our feet to avoid stepping on anything that could make a noise. There is almost no wind, which means that any sound we make will be magnified. Behind the tree-covered ridge we are quietly making our way up is a herd of fallow deer warming themselves in the weak

winter sun. There is a thin layer of snow on the ground so the deer are easily spotted. And so are we. With a discreet wave of his hand, Oscar lets us know that we can take a few more steps forward. Once we are within 200 metres, we lie down on our fronts and belly crawl forwards in the snow, moving very slowly all the time. Despite the relatively large distance between us and the herd, we can tell that they are aware of our presence. They stop and turn their heads towards us. Oscar is waiting for a safe, clean shot; if he doesn’t get one he won’t shoot at all. Just as my legs have almost lost all feeling in the cold snow, he pulls the trigger. The herd takes off and we get up and go over to the fallen deer. When Oscar gets there, he places his hand carefully on its still body.

  “If anyone were to ask me if I like to kill animals, the answer would be no. I am a hunter, I like hunting. But to kill an animal without the hunt is not for me,” he says looking down at the deer’s face.   We take a break among the spruce trees and turn our faces towards the afternoon sun, which actually has some warmth in it despite it being February. Oscar tells us that he was born into hunting. As part of the sixth generation of Berga Säteri, he learned early in life that hunting is a natural part of running a large country estate. He was only twelve when he got his hunting licence and three years later he shot his first larger animal, a roe deer.   “I was as shaken as I was euphoric. It could almost be described as practicing for a 31


Animals have a clear advantage with their amazing senses – smell, hearing and sight. You have to make the right decision, either by being fast or by persevering for longer.

pĂźrsch hunting with oscar von stockenstrĂśm


competition. I had practiced and practiced, failed and practiced some more. And then suddenly everything fell into place. All the planning and effort came together to get that end result,” he says.   Both his father and grandfather have been very keen hunters, and Oscar has both looked up to them and been inspired by them. When he was small, he stood eagerly by his 70-year-old grandfather’s bed as early as 4am so he could go out and hunt pigeons. Another hunting memory from his childhood was a moose hunt during the 80s, when the moose population was booming. Oscar and his father were out one evening stalking roe bucks in the late autumn. Suddenly there were three moose standing in front of them.   “We crept closer and closer, and dad encouraged me to lift my head and watch so I could experience what was coming next. But I just told him to hurry up and shoot. I thought it was so exciting but I didn’t dare look up in case I ruined everything. Dad has told that story so many times,” says Oscar with a smile.   His view of hunting has changed over the years. The hunting element of it is more important now. When he was young, it was more important to shoot an animal. Today, a successful hunt

doesn’t have to result in a fallen animal. And his dogs are a key part of the joy of hunting nowadays, working together with them is one of the reasons he is passionate about hunting.   “I love the excitement, the moments when my pulse rises and all my focus is concentrated on taking the perfect shot. A good hunt is about outwitting nature and the animal. You have to be smarter. Animals have a clear advantage with their amazing senses – smell, hearing and sight. You have to make the right decision, either by being fast or by persevering for longer. You can’t cheat, animals are too smart for that,” he emphasises.   Oscar is proud of contributing towards Sweden’s game preservation.   “Nature is not like Disney, nature is not an ideal where all the animals have fun and hang out with each other. A year with a lot of foxes means that a lot of roe deer will be killed. Foxes will kill up to half of all the roe deer kids locally,” says Oscar. “When a winter is really cold, there can be a lack of food, which creates fluctuations in the different species’ populations. One animal’s death is another’s bread in nature. This is why we feed out to the game animals in really cold conditions – to reduce big fluctuations, and we hunt more foxes when they are having

a good year.   “Nature isn’t ‘natural’, it looks like it does today because people have been managing it. Just like we plant and cut down forests in Sweden according to our needs. And we have to continuously adapt, from year to year,” says Oscar.   Oscar works for the Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management as marketing manager. He has been in the role for five years and his primary task is to increase membership. Before taking on the job, he had, according to himself, not much of an idea of what the association worked with. Today, the thought of Sweden without the association is frightening.   “If all the hunters in Sweden knew how much the association does and the responsibility it takes for hunting in Sweden, everyone would be a member. Even people who don’t hunt!”   His goal is to get the message out about the various types of work the association does, so more people get an understanding of what goes on.   “Sweden is a fantastic country to hunt in, it has amazing variation. The more I travel abroad to hunt, the more I realise how great things are here in Sweden.”   Oscar is a hunter with a whole lot of moral courage. If he sees something that is not right 33


Nature isn’t ‘natural’, it looks like it does today because people have been managing it.

pürsch hunting with oscar von stockenström


Name:

Oscar von Stockenström

Lives:

Berga Säteri, Åkers styckebruk

Family:

Wife, two children, two dogs

Profession: Marketing manager at the Swedish Association for Hunting and Wildlife Management Favourite type of hunting: Ptarmigan hunting in the mountains Dream hunt:

Is going on one of them in September; ibex hunting in the mountains of Kirgizstan

on a hunt, he won’t hesitate to say something. Just one person’s actions can destroy so much for so many. He tells us that Swedish hunting legislation is very liberal. In paragraph 27, you can read: You shall not allow animals to suffer unnecessarily. These are the words that dictate all hunting in Sweden. They place a big responsibility and high demands on the Swedish hunter. And hunters also place high demands on each other. It is a good foundation for self-regulation.   “If I don’t say anything when I see something not quite right happening – who will say something? I have to say something”, he says, looking determined.   Berga Säteri has been Oscar’s home since he was born. He hasn’t worked with the daily running of the estate, but he is involved in hunting issues. Issues that come up repetitively on estates that work with farming and forestry include how much game damage can be tolerated, and this is a big part of deciding how many animals will be hunted.   “For example, if wild boar damage increases and is detrimental to the farming side of things, then we increase the number of boars we hunt to try to get damage down to an acceptable level. And what is acceptable differs from landowner to landowner.   I want to live here with my family and live this life – it’s a lifestyle. But we have to ask ourselves how much money this kind of life quality is allowed to cost each year," he says.   The boy who was passionate about hunting and got his licence already as a twelve year old has stayed true to his passion and grown up to have hunting as his career. And things born from passion usually work out well in the long run. When he is someone’s grandfather in the future, he plans to responsibly share both knowledge about hunting and the joy it brings with the next generation. Even if this means that he will be woken up by a little person at four in the morning. 35


carry comfortably, move freely


Carry comfortably, move freely Backpacks for versatile hunting

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Compact, durable, sustainable and smart.

Designers looking to develop the ultimate carrying system for active hunting have high demands placed on them. They need sound, in-depth knowledge of ergonomics, movement, materials and sustainability. And long experience of hunting, forestry, terrain and weather conditions. Not to mention a good eye for design. New Lappland Hike 15 is the result of a lot of hard work and even harder field tests.   The main fabric used is G-1000 HeavyDuty Eco S – our very own, essentially indestructible outdoor fabric made from tightly woven recycled polyester and organic cotton. The base and side pockets are reinforced with waterproof

500d nylon. Its narrow profile gives it a perfect, close-fitting shape, which minimises the risk of it fastening in branches and scrub. Its innovative back plate is made from hard-pressed, undyed spill wool – a heat regulating and sustainable alternative to the synthetic materials such as foam and plastic that are usually used. On the outside you will find loops and straps used to attach equipment such as a radio, GPS, extra storage, ammunition bags, etc. – all making Lappland Hike 15 the obvious hunting companion for many years to come.

lappland hike 15

Art no: 90648. Volume: 15l. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco S: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 500d: 100% polyamide. 100% wool. Height – Width – Depth: 47 – 24 – 17 cm Weight: 1000 gr. Rain cover included. Rec. price: 199,95 €

Organic cotton

lappland hike 15

Recycled polyester

PFC-free impregnation

Adaptable

*) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin


Inwhan on Lappland Hike 15 “I tested the prototype for over two months. I’ve taken it deer stalking, on hunts using baying dogs and on bird hunts, in all kinds of weather. It fits really well and being able to comfortably have my gun over my shoulder when wearing it is a huge bonus. It’s spacious enough for everything I need on a day hunt. The loops on the shoulder straps are at a perfect height so my radio antenna is away from my face and I can read my GPS by just glancing down. I fastened the extra pocket to the hipbelt so I

could easily reach my peep sight and magazine. I’ve been waiting for Fjällräven to make a smaller backpack suitable for day hunts and Lappland Hike 15 is as good as it gets, if you ask me”. Inwhan Svensson, member of Fjällräven’s test team, professional hunter and reindeer keeper. Works in the forest and open terrain on a daily basis – from Karesouando in the far north to Ystad in the deep south.

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Flexible design

The stow-away hip strap has a detachable pocket for e.g. a range finder or extra ammunition.

Recovered wool comfort

A unique stabilizing back plate makes use of hard-pressed, recovered wool – a sustainable alternative to the more commonly used foams and plastics. Versatile pocket

The hip strap pocket can also be attached to the front of the pack.

Weather ready

Attachment points

Loops on shoulder straps for securing a radio or gps close at hand.

lappland hike 15

A rain cover makes you ready for sudden showers (colour d ­ epending on main fabric colour).


Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius, senior designer at Fjällräven

We all know that when you are out hunting you need to be able to focus on the task at hand and any disturbance will just get in the way of this. The most important goal with the design of Lappland Hike 15 was that you wouldn’t be able to feel it on your back. Of course it is impossible to reach the goal of not feeling it at all, but high ambitions are important. It fits really close to the body, has a slim profile and when you put it on and move your arms about or walk or run like you usually do, you will forget it is there after a while. Its slim profile also helps when pushing through dense bush, as it won’t get caught on branches to the same extent. Its specific hunting features are also important – it has an attachment for a radio and GPS and it can be adapted to suit your plans with accessories and extra pockets. The shooting support feature is just a detail but it speaks volumes on how we think about how it can be used. All in all, we are very proud of Lappland Hike 15 and hope it will be taken along on many hunts in the future.

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Light and well-ventilated all the way Lappland Friluft backpack lets you move freely and comfortably carry everything you need on a long-distance hunt. The front pocket can be used for securing your gun to the pack, and can also be detached and used separately as a small backpack – maybe by a hunting companion or for shorter scouting excursions. There’s even a bird net, which together with a reversible camouflage rain cover makes this an unusually versatile hunting pack.

Scaled down Without the front pocket the backpack has a slimmer silhouette.

Gun holder The front pocket functions as a gun holder during long approaches.

Carrying comfort

Smart front pocket

Fixed-length, well-ventilated back panel and ergonomically shaped shoulder straps, supple enough to use with a gun.

The front pocket can be detached and used separately as a minimalistic backpack.

lappland friluft 45

Art no: 27220 (men) / 27221 (women). Volume: 45L. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco S: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 500d: 100% polyamide. Height – Width – Depth: 68 – 32 – 30 cm. Weight: 2130 gr. Rain cover included. Rec. price: 299,95 €

Organic cotton

lappland friluft 45

Recycled polyester

PFC-free impregnation

Adaptable

*) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin


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stubben


The smartest seat in the forest Have a seat! Sitting down for a while when outdoors is something we all enjoy doing. With Stubben backpack, the perfect tree stump (”stubben” is Swedish for tree stump) is always close by. The internal frame ensures both carrying comfort and a sturdy seat. Made from waxed fabric with vegetable-tanned leather details, Stubben is highly water resistant and will only get more attractive with time. Stubben is made from extremely robust G-1000 HeavyDuty Eco in recycled polyester and organic cotton.

Ergonomic frame

Stubben Side Pockets

An integrated frame and padded seat make it as comfortable to carry as it is to sit on.

Side pockets for Stubben in waxed material with leather trim. Toggle attachments.

Rec. price: 39,95 €

stubben

Art no: 90560. Volym: 27 l. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 840D Jr Ballistic: 100% polyamide. Height – Width – Depth: 50 – 28 – 28 cm. Weight: 2200 gr. Rain cover included. Rec. price: 259,95 €

Organic cotton

*) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin

Recycled polyester

PFC-free impregnation

Adaptable

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The Outdoor Hunter Text & photo: Anette Andersson

T

he mountain cabin’s log burner is in the middle of the room and is our only source of heat. The fire is crackling away happily and above it, every inch of the homemade drying rack is covered with damp long johns, socks and gloves, all slowly drying. The dogs are resting on their mats just inside the door; their tired legs have run dozens of kilometres today. The guns are leaning against the wall in the corner. The cabin’s six bunk beds are placed against the walls, and one corner has a simple kitchen with a gas burner. The lisa lindblom

counter is cluttered with dinner preparations. It is dusk, and you can still see the outline of the mountains against the evening sky, but it will soon be dark. The barren mountains are shrouded in cloud, as they have been all day, and it looks like a damp layer of cotton wool has been placed over the landscape. We are in the middle of the mountains, far from any cell phone coverage or other modern comforts. It is refreshingly simple and feels very close to nature. A group of hunters are sitting around the large table placed in front of the cabin’s only big win-

dow talking about the day’s ptarmigan hunt. One of them is Lisa Lindblom. Hunting and outdoor life have always been a natural part of her existence. She spent countless nights in a tent in the mountains as a child.   “I grew up very close to nature, both where we lived and the way my parents chose to live their lives. I didn’t think about it much then, but my parents were really good at making use of what nature brought them. There were always vegetables from our garden and meat from moose, birds and fish that the family hunted


There were always vegetables from our garden and meat from moose, birds and fish that the family hunted or caught on our table.

or caught on our table. Sometimes I think it can sound a bit virtuous or pretentious, but it wasn’t at all. If you wanted jam, you picked some berries. And in this way, hunting became a natural part of life. I understood quite early on that I would also choose to live like this.”   If you are born and bred in Jämtland, northern Sweden, chances are you started hunting as a child. This was definitely the case for Lisa. But it’s not the moments when an animal was shot that she primarily remembers, it’s the preparations the night before, how she’d get all her layers of

clothing ready so she’d stay warm. It’s the smell of scorched coffee in the morning in the cabin and the dogs wagging their tails in the hallway. And her father’s stern look when she carefully tried to sneak to the stand but managed to step on a branch that snapped within his earshot. And the flasks of warm drinks and the baking! When after an endless period of waiting she was allowed to drink her hot chocolate and eat a cinnamon bun. As quietly as possible of course.   Lisa’s interest in hunting has only grown stronger over the years, as has her understan-

ding that hunting is primarily about wildlife preservation, and that each species needs a strong but also reasonably sized population.   “Today I would say that the experiences that hunting brings with it are at least as important as the actual hunting,” says Lisa and she looks out the cabin’s window where dusk is quickly turning into night.   After a long day in the mountains ending with a sauna and dinner, the hunters are weary and the little cabin is quiet by 9pm. A candle’s flame flickers comfortingly and throws dim shadows 47


You could say that I hunt nature experiences more than anything else on the walls. Today’s hunt brought us no birds. It is October and the beautiful autumn-coloured leaves are long gone from the trees. This makes the birds feel exposed so they take extra care. But the long hours of walking were good for the body and soul, despite our lack of results. Lisa tells me how it isn’t the game she brings home that keeps her interested in hunting.   “Sometimes people talk about unsuccessful hunts but I’ve never been on one of those. I am more disappointed if I come home empty handed from mushroom picking than I am from moose hunting. Our moose hunting team is such good company – there is such a feeling of belonging between us even if we aren’t really that close to each other. We share our days in the forest with each other, but we sometimes only see each other for a few minutes over a cup of coffee in the morning.   On a typical moose-hunting day, it is the morning that is most exciting for Lisa. When her hopes are high as she quietly makes her way to her stand. Then she sits there quietly to watch, listen and just be. This is when she becomes really aware of what is happening around her, she is fully present in the moment in an almost meditative way that she doesn’t get to experience otherwise.   “It is a really strong contrast to the rest of my life. And this is how hunting is so much more to me than just shooting an animal. To get the chance to sit passively and observe nature is a pure joy.”   Lisa stresses that taking an animal’s life is lisa lindblom

a big responsibility. So it is very important to be prepared, to spend a lot of time practicing at the shooting range and she always chooses the right moment carefully. Everything has to fall into place before she will pull the trigger: right animal, right location, right distance and the possibility to make a fast kill with as little suffering as possible.   “With all that on my mind, the feeling of

shooting the first bird or moose is a mixture of joy and relief.”   The following morning we wake up to a winter wonderland. The first snow of the season has fallen. The trees are spectacular in their frosty coats and everything is blanketed in ten centimetres of white fluffy snow. We still have

a few hours on us before we have to return to civilisation, so as soon as breakfast is finished everyone gets ready to head out into the snow. It is a few degrees below zero and our breath is visible in the cold morning air. The dogs’ eagerness is written all over their faces and clearly audible. We make our way towards the low mountain birches right on the treeline. Lisa releases her dogs Nikez and Ditzie who instantly take off at high speed in opposite directions. They run in loops, systematically searching the area for birds. Sometimes they disappear from sight for longer periods, and then we stop and wait for them, to avoid the risk of scaring away birds before the dogs have had a chance to find them. Suddenly Nikez stops in his tracks. Shortly after, Ditzie arrives and stops 20 metres behind, both of their noses pointing in the same direction. Everyone holds their breath and moves carefully forward, one step at a time.   Lisa loads her gun and slowly walks up to the dog in front. She carefully places her hand on his back and encourages him forward. In well-practiced coordination, all three of them move forward together. It feels like time stands still and the tension in the air is tangible. Suddenly a ptarmigan flies up and Lisa follows its flight with full concentration and pulls the trigger. Her shot is true. On command Nikez retrieves the fallen bird, and I swear I can see a look of pride in the dog’s eyes.   Our hunt is drawing to a close. As we trek through the snow with all our gear, Lisa tells me how she is looking forward to hunting


moose using game calls one day. It is a form of hunting that primarily takes place in the mountains, and this appeals to her. In part for the surroundings, in part because of the excitement and the possibility to observe an animal at close quarters in its true environment.   “Hunting is an important part of my outdoor life and I only see how these two things complement each other. When I go out into the forest or up into the mountains of course

I am ready to shoot and carry out what I kill, but if shooting were the primary attraction, I would have stopped hunting long ago. We have fantastic nature here in Sweden and game animal populations that we need to protect, so I think it’s important and a good thing that there are people with different interests who learn how to take responsibility for what we have here.”   Lisa hunts moose and birds, which is her contribution towards taking responsibility,

but they are also forms of hunting that she appreciates as they provide her with great nature experiences. It doesn’t make any difference if she comes home from the forest with an entire moose or 20 little berries – she is equally happy either way.   “You could say that I hunt nature experiences more than anything else,” says Lisa with a smile

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Protect your firearms Product developer Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius has created three different cases that will all protect your rifle or shotgun well. But Fjällräven’s gun cases do a lot more than just protect your firearms from bumps and bangs.

Why do you need a good gun case? “A well-padded and well-constructed gun case doesn’t only protect your firearm from damage when it is being transported, there are other important aspects too. A rifle with a large scope is more sensitive to knocks and if a well-sighted rifle is bumped and unaligned, this increases the risk of injuring game. In this way, a gun case can therefore reduce the unnecessary suffering of game animals.” How do I choose the right case? “All our cases are well padded and will protect

Rifle Case

Rec. price: 259,95 €

protect your firearms

your gun well. The difference between the Rifle Case and Rifle Zip Case is in the details, the openings and the pockets. Rifle Case is a little more lavish and has leather details and a large pocket under the flap. The rifle can also be held in place with straps so that its scope is kept away from the zipper. Shotgun Case has the same design as Rifle Case but has been adapted for shotguns.”

to enhance water resistance. They can all be opened up completely and laid out flat, so they can be used as comfortable seat pads with back support. The handles and the shoulder strap make them easy to carry and handle the gun, and I really like the leather details on the Shotgun Case and Rifle Case.”

What do you like best about your gun cases? “Primarily the quality of the cases, and the thick layer of padding. All of them have G-1000 HeavyDuty Eco on the outside and can be waxed

Shotgun Case

Rec. price: 229,95 €

Rifle Zip Case

Rec. price: 139,95 €


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Bolt Case Rec. price: 59,95 €

Ammo Case Rec. price: 89,95 €

Equipment Belt

Rec. price: 129,95 €

Game Strap

Rec. price: 59,95 €

Cartridge Bag

Rec. price: 119,95 €

Bullet Case Rec. price: 99,95 €

leather you can trust


Leather you can trust.

Rifle Leather Strap Rec. price: 99,95 €

Year after year.

How to take care of your leather products leather is a natural material and vegetable tanned leather should be treated with a natural leather oil/conditioner to keep it flexible and strong and to ensure it ages beautifully.   Due to being exposed to sun and wind, light leather will darken and dark leather will lighten in colour. This is a natural process that no one can do anything about.   Warm, dry air can dry leather out if it isn’t treated regularly, and when really wet leather has dried it should be treated with leather oil. Instructions: 1) Wipe off any dirt with a clean, damp sponge or cloth. You can also use a special leather-cleaning product if the dirt is difficult to remove. Just remember to use as little as possible. 2) A fter cleaning the leather it is important to use a natural transparent or colourless leather oil/conditioner. The fats in the oil/conditioner will impregnate the leather and protect it from getting wet and dirty. Use natural oils for leather without strong chemical agents, and apply it to the outside, just like you would with a pair of shoes.

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Ted’s tips to become a better shot D  ry training - rifles Shoot a lot at home without using ammunition. Practice the movements, let your body learn them and get to know your gun. Dry training - shotguns Train holding your gun against your cheek so your shotgun always comes to exactly the same place. This is needed to shoot well. Get used to the recoil One of the most common mistakes made when shooting with a rifle is to let your body react before the recoil comes, which will result in a bad shot. Training shooting regularly will help you get used to the recoil. Regular training Train as much as you can, your shooting skills will decline as soon as you stop training! Vary your hunting Don’t get stuck into one sort of shooting – try all different sorts, it will make you a better shot and hunter. Sweden is a fantastic hunting country with countless different forms of hunting available. If you practice different kinds of shooting, you will be well-prepared when the chance comes along to try a new form of hunting.

ted lagrelius


Ted Lagrelius, shooting instructor

You might be a really good shot, but if you lack judgement everything falls apart

they say it takes 10,000 hours of training to get really good at something, regardless of what kind of activity it is. Ted Lagrelius passed that landmark a long time ago. He started shooting as an 11 year old, with his mother’s shotgun. He practiced at the local shooting range in Sövde in southern Skåne during the summer months when it was open. Day after day and weekend after weekend. And now he is helping both experienced and new hunters to become better shots. Since 2009 he has been the Swedish Association of Hunting and Wildlife

Management’s national shooting instructor, based in Öster Malma in Sörmland.   After you have passed your hunting licence exam, you have the right to buy a firearm. And then you can start practicing. Many hunting teams today require their members to pass an annual shooting test before they can hunt moose. And once the moose season starts, the leader of the hunt wants to see that all of his/ her team members have their certificate. There is a similar system for bears and wild boar too that is used by some hunting teams.

“This is not mandatory and it’s up to every hunting team and landowner to decide if they want to use it or not, so we could describe it as a voluntary mandatory test,” says Ted.   “There is a word that describes a really good shot in hunting circles, and it is discerning,” says Ted. “You might be a really good shot, but if you lack judgement everything falls apart. Then you’re not a good shot at all. It is every hunter’s responsibility, for the sake of the game animals, to be discerning in their decisions ”

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the swedish association of hunting and wildlife management


The Swedish Association of Hunting and Wildlife Management

Gustav the iii’s mistake that made everything right For almost 200 years, the Swedish Association of Hunting and Wilderness Management has taken responsibility for Swedish wildlife and looked after the interests of hunting and hunters. Year after year they have played the role of mediator between different strong interest groups, ensuring that outcomes are always in the best interest of nature. This has become an integral part of Swedish culture. And when seen from an international perspective, it is nothing short of a winning concept.

Text & photo: Anette Andersson

U

ntil the end of the 1700s, only members of the royal family and aristocracy were legally permitted to hunt in Sweden. In 1789, in order to save his own head and prevent a revolution, King Gustav III gave commoners who owned land the right to hunt. The direct result of this was that game was hunted almost to extinction. This is why the Swedish Association of Hunting and Wildlife Management was founded in 1830 with its main objective being to save the small amount of wildlife that remained in our forests. One hundred years later, when parliament passed a new hunting law, the association as it is known today was formed. In brief, the law passed made practical wilderness preservation easier and focus was placed on adopting a

more responsible form of hunting. Parliament delegated responsibility to the association for, among other things, practical game management work. Today, the task is formally known as the Hunting and Wildlife Preservation Task and comes from the Ministry of Rural Affairs. This means that the association, from holistic social and nature perspectives, organises wildlife preservation and hunting.   “When I tell my kids what my job is, I usually tell them that I am the boss of the wild animals,” says Daniel Ligné and laughs.   Daniel’s official job title is State Game Preservation Consultant. There is only one person with that title in Sweden and Daniel is the fifth person to hold it since 1938. He is accustomed 57


The Swedish Association of Hunting and Wildlife Management • F  inanced by membership fees and grants from the Game Management Fund. • 154 000 members • 2  2 County Hunting Management Societies • 320 Hunting Management Clubs • O  rganises search activities in Sweden, which can include up to 5000 people. • H  ead Office is in Öster Malma, Sörmland, Sweden

Daniel Ligné, State Game Preservation Consultant

to appearing on TV and travelling all around the world spreading knowledge of how Sweden works with wildlife preservation.   “All of us affect nature whether we want to or not. And we always have. You can either sit there and watch it happen with your arms folded and think that you aren’t making a difference, or you can take responsibility and realise that you are, and that you have to do so in the most sustainable way possible.”   That landowners have the hunting rights to their land is tricky, Daniel tells us. If they want to have game to hunt in the future, they have to look after it and keep it at a healthy level. It goes hand in hand. The Scandinavian countries all have this system. It can also be found in Germany, England and parts of France. But in the US and Canada, for example, licences are balloted out, which means that you hunt in different areas every year, and caring about the future doesn’t seem to come into it.

“There is no perfect English word for vildvård – a loose translation would be game preservation – and that’s pretty telling,” says Daniel.   “The primary aim of the association is to preserve wildlife. And this preservation approach is so important in Sweden. Both in the

“When I tell my kids what my job is, I usually tell them that I am the boss of the wild animals. law, when allocating funds and in the attitudes of individual hunters. Many think wrongly that the association only works with game animals – the wild animals that can be hunted – but this isn’t true, we are just as concerned

the swedish association of hunting and wildlife management

with giving advice to the public on how small birds can be fed in winter. Or what to do if you hit an animal with your car. Or our work with educating the public. The association is active in a wide range of areas.”   Today, wildlife preservation is more difficult than it used to be as there are more species to take into account. In the 1980s there was a moose boom in Sweden due to hunting strategies that allowed the population to dramatically increase. Then came mange to the fox population in the 1990s, which led to a decline in the fox population and a resulting rapid increase in the number of roe deer. Sweden used to have more wild animals in the forests historically, but the challenges today are different. Daniel’s daily life is often spent weighing up the interests of different parties against each other. Forestry owners don’t want their young saplings eaten by moose, wild boars have a negative effect on farming and wolves upset


Östermalma, Sörmland

reindeer herding.   “But the Swedish government and international conventions have decided that we should have healthy populations of our indigenous species, so it isn’t always easy to please everyone. Even when I get it right, there is someone who is unhappy,” says Daniel with a despondent smile.   Swedish hunting culture isn’t written in stone either, just like society as a whole it is constantly changing and developing. A challenge for the association is to find new arenas to reach hunters; the traditional way of educating people by holding meetings in village halls is losing traction. Ten years ago, most of the association’s members lived in rural Sweden, now the majority of them live in cities. And the type of member is also changing - a new kind of hunter is joining up now. Hunting is suddenly in Vogue. Many of today’s new hunters didn’t grow up hunting. Daniel emphasises the importance of being there for new hunters to hold their hands a little

during their first years as they gain experience.   In surveys conduced by the association, they can see a change in the responses as to why people hunt. Earlier it was to do with companionship and the excitement of it, now reasons are much more diversified. Many younger hunters want to know what they are eating and they like having control over the entire chain of events taking their food from the forest to the table. Working together with dogs is also important for many. Another common answer is that they want to be part of nature, part of the cycle of life.   Another change is that hunters hunt more now. “We are life-style hunters, we go ‘all in’,” says Daniel.   Ten years ago, the average annual number of hunting days per hunter was 17-18 . Today it’s 30. Hunting has gone from a traditional autumn event to a year-round activity. And we shouldn’t underestimate the Zlatan effect either. “Finally I’m fashionable and in style, I have to

make the most of it,” says Daniel with a laugh.   The Swedish model of game preservation is used as an example internationally. Many international guests come and visit to learn more about how things are done in Sweden. ”Wildlife preservation is something that we are really good at. It’s something to be proud of. The entire northern hemisphere has problems with wildlife preservation, for example no other country has successfully managed to halt the increase in wild boar numbers like we have. We have control of things here in Sweden. The association can contact our 33,000 registered hunt leaders instantly by e-mail, no other country has such good communication with the people who are actually out there hunting.   “You could say that we are the advocates for the wild animals,” finishes Daniel with a touch of pride in his voice

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pierre karlsson


Dad, restaurant manager, hunter For most of us, hunting is something grand that happens a few times a year. With preparations far in advance and dreams of the perfect shot and the perfect moose game. But it can also be something grand that happens every other night and on weekends. Ask Pierre. Text & photos: HĂĽkan Wike

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“...the first hour it’s a bit hard to stay still but then I almost go into a trance and the hours just fly by.

pierre karlsson


D

espite stockholm being Sweden’s capital, nature is never far away. For Pierre Karlsson, it is the possibility and much-needed vent to sometimes get away from the hustle and bustle that is often at full volume in the big city.   “I can go hunting for just an evening or a morning, without having to spend too much time away from my family,” says Pierre. “One of my favourite places to hunt is less than an hour's drive away - when it's not rush hour that is.”   Pierre is a chef at a restaurant on the inner-city island of Djurgården. His job entails planning and preparing for the week ahead, but also hectic days in the kitchen when the number of visitors to the nearby museums is high.   “To a large extent I am my own boss, so I can organise my own time and prepare a few days in advance if I want to go out on a night hunt for wild boar, for example, and get to work later the day after."   His interest in hunting doesn’t stem first and foremost from his interest in raw produce from a chef ’s perspective. It is primarily that two of his four uncles in Östergötland have inspired him. ”They have some excellent hunting grounds but nowadays I'm only there for the annual moose hunt and a weekend now and again during the season.”   A mix of hunting and spending time with family, in the forests that Pierre played in as a child. But it isn’t just the family land and the uncles who have led to his decision to become a hunter, even if Pierre naturally saw this as giving him the possibility to hunt.   “I have been out with them ever since I was young, but I made the decision to get my hunting licence together with a friend – 15 years ago. We just decided to do it.”   We talk about how he sees hunting and raw produce from a chef ’s perspective. Animal faming ethics and the meat industry. As a conscious chef, he has distanced himself from industrially produced meat that is sold in some restaurants for low prices. Eating good meat is more important than just eating meat for the sake of it, but he isn’t so principled that he only eats wild game meat. Farmed animals can also have a good life, he claims, and previously

he ran a company that bought and delivered farm-slaughtered meat and game to environmentally conscious restaurants.   Game meat is a fixed feature in the family’s freezer, which is never empty. There are meat hooks in the garage and a big fridge for both wild boar and venison. During the cold months of the year, you might find a pig or three hanging from the ceiling as it is easy to regulate the temperature even though the space is large. The family doesn’t think anything of game carcasses hanging in their garage. Vera and Sally – two and six years old – are aware that there are different kinds of meat. And if they eat a Falu sausage from the supermarket or wild boar fillet from the forest depends mostly on how much time the family has.   “What kind of animal is this?” asks Sally as she collects the minced meat coming out of the meat grinder in the kitchen. Potatoes are boiling on the stove top.   She just nods as she gets the answer – fallow deer. She has eaten it before and she likes it. Life and death and food is not a strange equation for

these two small girls who have a dad who hunts. Even if they don’t go with him so much yet, they are interested and curious, as children can be.   Pierre also has two grown children from an earlier relationship, who have had time to experience a little more of what their dad gets up to in the evenings. But for the most part he goes out by himself to get some time away from it all.   “I had children really early – I was only 18 when I became a father – so easy, nearby hunts were my way of getting a little bit of adventure in my life.

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Father of four, self-employed and frequent hunter with his head full of projects. pierre karlsson

As soon as I get in the car I feel at peace.”   He tells us a few hunting anecdotes about when he has had his older kids with him out in the forest. Sometimes they have been out hunting wild boar, stopped for supper with their flashlights in the dark, made cosy huts to nap in when they get tired. Exciting but not necessarily dramatic adventures for both big and small.   “There is something I appreciate more and more as the years go by; taking others with me, both hunters and non-hunters, and sharing with them what I experience when I’m out in nature. Being a mentor and a role model has become more important to me.”   Being responsible and reliable has led to him taking on the role of gamekeeper for private landowners he has got to know. Both those who own farms and forests but also those who grow crops and need to protect them from wild boar. Wild boar are a particular problem for farmers and land owners in southern Sweden and for many hunters it is these animals that give them the chance to hunt all year round.   “Stalking is what I like the most,” says Pierre. Stalking something or sitting still as dawn breaks and actually hearing a deer breathing ten or fifteen metres behind me. Or just seeing the silhouette of a boar against the snow in


the moonlight.   He loves sitting still, taking in his surroundings. Feeling all of nature’s seasons on his skin. Being a part of it and one of all the animals moving about out there. Never knowing what will happen next. And the days when nothing is shot are just as giving – nature’s peaceful vibrations all around him are award enough. “It’s a bit like meditation,” says Pierre, “The first hour it’s a bit hard to stay still but then I almost go into a trance and the hours just fly by.” But he always has to be ready for action and be able to make fast decisions when out in the forest.   When it comes to hunting wild boar alone, he often puts his sights on the smaller animals. Everyone who has tried knows that it isn’t so easy to drag a fully-grown boar weighing 150 kg out of the forest. Pierre isn’t there to shoot the biggest or as many animals as he can, but rather to look at it holistically and always think of the consequences of his actions. And if he finds himself in position for the perfect shot, he needs to know that nothing will go to waste.   “I often give game meat away and it is a really appreciated present,” says Pierre. ”Many of my chef colleagues get bones to make stock and friends with dogs take what’s left over.”   Interest for practical hunting is both the same as and different from his interest for precision

shooting. In his cellar he has a weapon cabinet filled with casings, gunpowder, primer, measuring instruments and other diverse items to make the perfect ammunition. Statistics and ballistic tables are schematically written down. When hunting is all about making conscious choices, animals and nature, long-range shooting is mostly routine, analysis and tables to reach the perfect pattern on a paper target.   “And I have good use of this even when hunting because I know that my equipment is in order and my shot will go where I aim”, says Pierre. “The feeling of spending a lot of time at it and getting as good at it as you can is important to me, but I can understand that others might think it’s a bit nerdy.”   He says that he has never just wounded an animal, and on the wall is a paper target with five shots all within the area of a coin. Shot from 300 metres. Just a few tenths of a gram mistake when weighting the gunpowder, a casing that is turned wrong, or a lost thought to tomorrow’s day at work and everything is lost. Focus, attention to detail and concentration are key.   “The road to the goal is still a little more fun that getting there,” says Pierre. “It is the challenge of seeing if you can that is the most attractive.” And it’s true – the paper targets hanging on the wall don’t leave much to be desired.

  “There are probably other things that I could be totally stuck on too. Fishing and climbing are examples, but so far I have managed to keep them at a more reasonable level.”   With the same precision and decisiveness as he constructs the optimal ammunition, he and his partner Annika have renovated the 1950s house they live in. It is almost finished – with the exception of Pierre’s cellar where he has all his hunting and shooting gear. He has even prepared a few of the trophies on the benches in his hunting room himself, and there is a plan in place to turn the cellar into a really nice hunting room.   “It would be good to get things finished down here too… now that the rest of the house is finished.”   A father of four, self employed and frequent hunter with his head full of projects. For Pierre it isn’t a question of time either – he takes time for what he thinks is important. Without taking anything away from his other roles – career and family responsibilities – of course.   Soon we will find him sitting under yet another beautiful fallow deer head. Sitting low in a carefully renovated Chesterfield armchair, he might even let himself dream a little about that adventurous Marco Polo sheep hunt in Kirgizstan

.

65


Lappland Fleece Scarf

Lappland Fleece Hat Rec. price: 29,95 €

Rec. price: 79,95 €

Sörmland Reversible Beanie

Safety Cap Rec. price: 39,95 €

Rec. price: 69,95 €

Rec. price: 34,95 €

Rec. price: 59,95 €

Värmland Heater

Pintail Cap

Sörmland Reversible Beanie Rec. price: 59,95 €

our accessories


Sörmland Felt Hat

Rec. price: 99,95 €

Forest Flat Cap Rec. price: 59,95 €

Övik Blanket  Rec. price: 199,95 €

Lappland Balaclava Cap Rec. price: 49,95 €

Värmland Hand Warmer Rec. price: 79,95 €

67


Lappland Hybrid Jacket M Rec. price: 329,95 €

Sörmland Padded Vest W Rec. price: 199,95 €

Lappland Eco-Shell Jacket W

Högvilt Jacket

Värmland Eco-Shell Jacket M

Värmland Padded Jacket M

Rec. price: 439,95 €

Lappland Eco-Shell Poncho Rec. price: 379,95 €

Rec. price: 699,95 €

Rec. price: 569,95 €

Rec. price: 249,95 €


Sörmland Padded Jacket W Rec. price: 389,95 €

Lappland Hybrid Jacket Camo W

Lappland Hybrid Trousers Camo W

Lappland Pyrsch Trousers W Rec. price: 259,95 €

Lappland Pyrsch Jacket W Rec. price: 369,95 €

Rec. price: 329,95 €

Rec. price: 229,95 €

Fire Brigade Frame HB Rec. price: 219,95 €

69


Measurements & sizes women Body Size, average ** **) height 168 cm (5’6)

32

34

36

38

40

Chest (1)

76

80

84

88

Waist (2)

60

64

68

72

Seat (3)

84

88

92

Inseam raw length: short / regular (4)

83 / 88

84 / 89

Inseam fixed length: short / regular (4)

74 / 79

75 / 80

Fjällräven / US Letter size

XXS

42

44

46

48

92

96

100

104

108

76

80

84

88

92

96

100

104

108

112

116

85 / 90

86 / 91

87 / 92

88 / 93

89 / 94

90 / 95

91 / 96

76 / 81

77 / 82

78 / 83

79 / 84

80 / 85

81 / 86

82 / 87

XS

S

M

L

XL

men Body Size, average ** **) height 180 cm (5’10)

40

42

44

46

48

50

52

54

56

58

60

Chest (1)

80

84

88

92

96

100

104

108

112

116

120

Waist (2)

68

72

76

80

84

88

92

96

100

104

108

Seat (3)

88

92

96

100

104

108

112

116

120

124

128

Inseam raw length regular / long (4)

88 / 93

89 / 94

90 / 95

91 / 96

92 / 97

93 / 98

94 / 99

95 / 100

96 / 101

97 / 102

98 / 103

Inseam fixed length regular /long (4)

77 / 82

78 / 83

79 / 84

80 / 85

81 / 86

82 / 87

83 / 88

84 / 89

85 / 90

86 / 91

87 / 92

Head measurement (6)

XS (53)

Fjällräven / US Letter size

XXS

S (54-55) XS

M (56-57) S

M

german d - size

L

XL (60-61) XL

X X L  (62-63)

XXL

XXXL

5

Men’s Trousers

24

25

26

27

Waist (2)

90

94

98

102

Inseam raw length (4)

93

94

95

96

Inseam f i xed length (4)

82

83

84

85

measurements & sizes

L (58-59)

5


WOMEN

WOMEN

WOMEN

Shirt fits chest Women Size S

chest Men  Size M

REGULAR Regular

AR

SLIM

Comfort

SLIM COMFORT

COMFORT

MEN

MEN

SLIM

Slim

REGULAR

REGULAR

Regular

REGULAR

COMFORT

Comfort

COMFORT

COMFORT

MEN

OMEN

100 cm

SLIM

104 cm

108 cm

REGULAR

REGULAR

112 cm

116 cm

COMFORT

COMFORT

Trousers fits seat Women Size 38

waist height High waist

Mid waist

Low waist

23-26 cm

20-23 cm

17-20 cm

21,5-25 cm

19,5-21,5 cm

17-19,5 cm

seat Men Size 48

Regular

Comfort

Curved

Regular

Comfort

99-103 cm

103-107 cm

101-105 cm

109-113 cm

113-117 cm

lower leg width Narrow

Bottom of leg width

Regular

Curved

leg endings

Regular 43-47 cm

43-47 cm

36-41 cm 36-41 cm

41-45 41-45cm cm

39-43 cm

Narrow

39-43 cm

Comfort

47-51 cmcm 47-51

45-48 45-48cm cm

Fixed Length

Raw Length

71


Index

Drev Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90333. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 359,95€ Forest Parka M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90570. Material*:  G-1000® Silent / G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Fill: Supreme Microloft: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 579,95€ Grimsey Vest M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90501. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Fill: 100% polyester. Rec price: 149,95€

Högvilt Jacket W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90334. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco / G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Fill: Supreme Microloft: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 439,95€ Lappland Eco-Shell Jacket M  Size: S-XXXL. Art no: 90000. Material*: Eco-Shell 3l Ripstop Stretch: 100% polyester. Membrane: 100% polyester. Rec price: 569,95€ Lappland Eco-Shell Jacket W  Size: XXS-XL. Art no: 90001. Material*:  Eco-Shell 3l Ripstop Stretch: 100% polyester. Membrane: 100% polyester. Rec price: 569,95€

Lappland Eco-Shell Poncho  Sizes: S/M-L/XL. Art no: 90600. Material*:  Eco-Shell 2.5l Ripstop Stretch: 100% polyester. Membrane: 100% polyester. Rec price: 379,95 € Lappland Hybrid Jacket Camo M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90172. Material*:  100% polyester. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 329,95€

Jackets Brenner Pro Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90310. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 100% polyamide. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 389,95€ Brenner Pro Padded Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90309. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 100% polyamide. Fill: Supreme Microloft: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 449,95€ Brenner Pro Padded Jacket W Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90165. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 100% polyamide. Fill: Supreme Microloft: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 449,95€

index

Lappland Hybrid Jacket Camo W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90173. Material*:  100% polyester. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 329,95€ Lappland Hybrid Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90170. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 329,95€ Lappland Hybrid Jacket W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90175. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 329,95€ Lappland Hybrid Vest M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90171. Material*:  G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€

Lappland Hybrid Vest Camo M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90174. Material*:  100% polyester. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€ Lappland Pyrsch Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90820. Material* 59% polyester, 26% wool, 12% polyamide, 3% polyurethane. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Membrane: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 369,95€

Brenner Pro Trousers W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90653. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 219,95€ Brenner Pro Winter Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90576. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 269,95€

Lappland Pyrsch Jacket W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90810. Material* 59% polyester, 26% wool, 12% polyamide, 3% polyurethane. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Membrane: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 369,95€

Brenner Pro Winter Trousers W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90646. Material*:  G-1000® Silent: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 269,95€

Sörmland Down Shirt Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90840. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Fill: 95% goose down, 5% feather. Rec price: 299,95€

Drev Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90337. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Lining: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 219,95€

Sörmland Padded Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90700. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco / G-1000® HeavyDuty: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining:  100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 389,95€ Sörmland Padded Jacket W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90699. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco / G-1000® HeavyDuty: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 389,95€ Sörmland Padded Vest M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90705. Material*:  100% polyester. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Rec price: 199,95€ Sörmland Padded Vest W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90698. Material*:  100% polyester G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Rec price: 199,95€ Värmland Eco-Shell Jacket M Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90580. Material*:  Eco-Shell 3l Ripstop Stretch: 100% polyester. Membrane: 100% polyester. Rec price: 699,95€ Värmland Jacket M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90581. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Liner:  100% polyurethane. Rec price: 469,95€ Värmland Padded Jacket M  Sizes: XS-XXXL. Art no: 90583 Material*: 100% polyester. Lining:  100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Rec price: 249,95€

Lappland Hybrid Trousers Camo M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90192. Material*:  100% polyester. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€ Lappland Hybrid Trousers Camo W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90193. Material*:  100% polyester. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€ Lappland Hybrid Trousers M Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90647. Materal*:  G-1000® Silent Eco / G-1000® HeavyDuty: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€ Lappland Hybrid Trousers W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90648. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco / G-1000® HeavyDuty: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Stretch: 63% polyamide, 26% polyester, 11% elastane. Rec price: 229,95€ Lappland Pyrsch Trousers M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90821. Material*: 59% polyester, 26% wool, 12% polyamide, 3% polyurethane. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 259,95€ Lappland Pyrsch Trousers W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90811. Material*: 59% polyester, 26% wool, 12% polyamide, 3% polyurethane. G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 259,95€ Sörmland Tapered Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90651. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 149,95€

Trousers

Sörmland Tapered Trousers W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90652. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 149,95€

Brenner Pro Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90575. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 219,95€

Sörmland Tapered Winter Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90701. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Rec price: 189,95€


Sörmland Tapered Winter Trousers W  Sizes: 34-48. Art no: 90702. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyester. Rec price: 189,95€

Koster Sweater M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90487. Material*:  100% wool. G-1000® Original: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 169,95€

Lappland Friluft 45  Sizes: 45 L. Art no: 27220. Material*:  G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco S: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. 500D, 100% polyamide. Rec price: 299,95€

Värmland Eco-Shell Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90590. Material*:  EcoShell 3l Ripstop Stretch: 100% polyester. Membrane: 100% polyester. Rec price: 499,95€

Lappland Flannel Shirt LS M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90830. Material* 98% polyester, 2% elastane. Rec price: 99,95€

Lappland Hike 15  Sizes: 15 L. Art no: 27230. Material*:  500D, 100% polyamide. G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco S: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 199,95€

Värmland Padded Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90593. Material*:  100% polyester. Lining: 100% polyester. Fill: G-Loft Supreme: 100% polyester. Rec price: 229,95€ Värmland Trousers M  Sizes: 44-60. Art no: 90591. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: 100% polyamide. Liner: 100% polyurethane. Rec price: 299,95€ Värmland Woolterry Long Johns M  Sizes: XS-XXXL. Art no: 90842. Material*: Wool terry: 52% wool, 35% polyester, 13% polyamide. Wool rib: 95%, wool 5%, elastane. Rec price: 139,95€ Värmland Woolterry Long Johns W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90841. Material*: Wool terry: 52% wool, 35% polyester, 13% polyamide. Wool rib: 95%, wool 5%, elastane. Rec price: 139,95€

Fleeces, sweaters & shirts Canada Shirt LS W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90835. Material* 70% wool, 30% polyamide. G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 159,95€ Canada Shirt M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90631. Material*:  45% acrylic, 25% polyester, 25% wool, 5% other fiber. G-1000® Original: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 159,95€ Forest Flannel Shirt M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90565. Material*:  100% cotton. Rec price: 119,95€ Forest Fleece Jacket M Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90572. Material*:  100% polyester. Rec price: 229,95€ Granit Shirt M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90339. Material*:  45% acrylic, 25% polyester, 25% wool, 5% other fiber. Rec price: 139,95€ Keb Fleece Hoodie M  Sizes: XS-XXL. Art no: 81878. Material*: 73% polyester, 20% wool, 7% elastane. G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 199,95€ Keb Fleece Hoodie W   Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 89765. Material*: 73% polyester, 20% wool, 7% elastane. G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 199,95€

Lappland Merino Henley LS M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90188. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 149,95€ Lappland Merino Henley LS W Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90189. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 149,95€ Shepparton Sweater M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 80092. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 109,95€ Sörmland Crew Sweater M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90199. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 169,95€ Sörmland V-Neck Sweater W  Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90177. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 139,95€ Sörmland Zip Cardigan M   Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90837. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 199,95€ Värmland T-neck Sweater M  Sizes: S-XXXL. Art no: 90176. Material*:  100% wool. G-1000® Original: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 179,95€ Värmland Woolterry Half Zip W Sizes: XXS-XL. Art no: 90839. Material*: Wool terry: 52% wool, 35% polyester, 13% polyamide. Wool rib: 95%, wool 5%, elastane. Wool interlock: 100% wool  Rec price: 159,95€ Värmland Woolterry Half Zip M  Sizes: XS-XXXL. Art no: 90838. Material*: Wool terry: 52% wool, 35% polyester, 13% polyamide. Wool rib: 95%, wool 5%, elastane. Wool interlock: 100% wool. Rec price: 159,95€

Backpacks & bags

Rifle Case  Sizes:  ONE SIZE. Art no: 90205. Material*:  G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 259,95€ Rifle Leather Strap  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 90208. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 99,95€ Rifle Zip Case  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 90207. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 139,95€ Shotgun Case  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 90206. Material*: G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Lining: G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 229,95€ Singi Bino Bag  Art no: 77344. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 129,95€ Stubben  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 90560. Material*:  G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 259,95€ Stubben Side Pockets  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 90561. Material*:  G-1000® HeavyDuty Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 39,95€ Värmland Thermo Bag  Art no: 69010. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 279,95€

Pintail Cap  Sizes: S-XL. Art no: 78217. Material*:  85% polyester, 15% polyamide. Rec price: 69,95€ Safety Cap  Sizes: S-XL. Art no: 98444. Material*:  100% polyester. Rec price: 39,95€ Singi Belt 2,5 cm  Sizes: 75-110 cm. Art no: 77280. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 59,95€ Singi Belt 4 cm  Sizes: 75-110 cm. Art no: 77281. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 69,95€ Singi Two-Pin Belt  Sizes: 75-110 cm. Art no: 77356. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 79,95€ Sörmland Felt Hat  Sizes: S-XL. Art no: 77341. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 99,95€ Sörmland Reversible Beanie  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77384. Material*:  50% wool, 50% acrylic. Rec price: 59,95€ Värmland Hand Warmer  Art no: 69011. Material*:  G-1000® Silent Eco: 65% polyster, 35% cotton. Rec price: 79,95€ Värmland Heater  Sizes: S-XL. Art no: 77340. Material*:  100% polyester. Synthethic fur: 100% acrylic. Rec price: 79,95€ Övik Blanket  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77276. Material*:  G-1000® Eco: 65% polyester, 35% cotton. Rec price: 199,95€

Equipment Bag  Art no: 77343. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 129,95€ Equipment Belt  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77342. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 129,95€

Bolt Case  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77054. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 59,95€

Forest Flat Cap  Sizes: S-XL. Art no: 77299. Material*:  50% wool, 50% polyester. Rec price: 59,95€

Bullet Case  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77052. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 99,95€

Game Strap  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77324. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 59,95€

Fire Brigade Frame HB  Art no: 13000. Material*: 100% aluminium. Rec price: 219,95€

Lappland Fleece Scarf  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77325. Material*:  100% polyester. Rec price: 34,95€

Accessories

Ammo Case  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77053. Material*:  100% leather. Rec price: 89,95€

Cartridge Bag  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77051. Material*: 100% leather. Rec price: 119,95€

Lappland Fleece Hat  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77326. Material*:  100% polyester. Rec price: 29,95€

Lappland Balaclava Cap  Sizes: ONE SIZE. Art no: 77385. Material*:  100% wool. Rec price: 49,95€

*) Contains non-textile parts of animal origin

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© Fjällräven 2018 production: Fjällräven. photo: Anette Andersson, Fredrik Lewander, Håkan Wike, RedWolf Studio AB. text: Fjällräven, Anette Andersson, Oscar Askelöf, Håkan Wike. print advisor: Digaloo. print: Ruter AB. Fjällräven does not take responsibility for printing errors and cannot guarantee accurate reproduction of colour in online/printed material. Products can be sold out and prices may vary.


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Fjallraven Hunting Catalog FW18  
Fjallraven Hunting Catalog FW18  
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