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BARDSUMMERSCAPE

June 28 – August 19, 2018

OPERA • THEATER • DANCE • MUSIC • FILM • SPIEGELTENT and 29TH BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL Rimsky-Korsakov and His World


Welcome Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival present Rimsky-Korsakov and His World The life and times of influential composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908) are the subject of the 29th Bard Music Festival (BMF). Therefore, Russian culture infuses much of Bard SummerScape 2018—seven weeks of music, opera, dance, theater, film, and cabaret. Accompanying the BMF’s exploration of Rimsky-Korsakov, whose music touched hearts worldwide, are new productions in opera and theater, and a world premiere in dance. This year’s opera—Demon—by Anton Rubinstein, is performed by an all-Russian cast, conducted by Leon Botstein and directed by Thaddeus Strassberger. Leonard Bernstein’s Peter Pan, based on the play by J. M. Barrie and adapted and directed by Christopher Alden, celebrates the centennial of the birth of the legendary composer and conductor, himself a son of Russian immigrants. In dance, the 75th anniversary of the publication of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets provides the inspiration for choreographer Pam Tanowitz, composer Kaija Saariaho, minimalist painter Brice Marden, and acclaimed actress Kathleen Chalfant, who unite to create an alchemy of music, dance, poetry, and art. Rimsky-Korsakov and the Poetry of Cinema provides the catalyst for this year’s film series, and don’t forget the Spiegeltent, presided over for the fifth time by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond, compère extraordinaire. Venues include the Frank Gehry–designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, a spectacular, luminous structure on Bard’s Hudson River campus. SummerScape is made possible through the generous support of Jeanne Donovan Fisher, the Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation, the Board of The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, the Board of the Bard Music Festival, Fisher Center and Bard Music Festival members, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. This page: Set design for The Tsar’s Bride, 1899, Mikhail Vrubel. A. A. Bakhrushin State Central Theatre Museum, Moscow, Russia. akg-images. Cover: Gamayun: The Prophetic Bird, 1897, Viktor Vasnetsov. Dagestan Museum of Fine Arts, Makhachkala, Russia. akg-images


theater new production

Leonard Bernstein’s Peter Pan Music and lyrics by Leonard Bernstein After the play by J. M. Barrie Adapted and directed by Christopher Alden New orchestrations by Garth Edwin Sunderland Choreography by Jack Ferver Definitely not your grandparents’ Peter Pan! Internationally celebrated director Christopher Alden reveals a darker side to J. M. Barrie’s fantasy of childhood and the inner child in a psychologically gripping new production. By turns whimsical and sinister, it is transfigured through a joyous and shimmering score by Leonard Bernstein. Originally composed for a 1950 Broadway production, Bernstein’s Peter Pan songs are lost gems, lying dormant, waiting to be rediscovered. Now Alden (revered for his New York City Opera production of Bernstein’s A Quiet Place) restores them to thrilling life in an intimate, contemporary staging, specially commissioned for the worldwide celebration of Bernstein’s centenary year. Suitable for audiences ages 12 and up

theater June 28 – July 22 tickets $25–65 opening night reception for members Friday, July 6 pre-performance conversation Sunday, July 1 at 1 pm post-performance conversation Wednesday, July 11

The kiss we never dared We’ll dare in dreaming . . . —“Dream With Me,” Leonard Bernstein, Peter Pan

Bewitching . . . a black comic pearl . . . poses precocious existential questions [with] pensive tenderness. —New York Times on Bernstein’s score

summerscape coach from new york city July 6, 8 Major support for Peter Pan is provided by Jeanne Donovan Fisher. Leonard Bernstein, 1945. akg-images/World History Archive

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dance world premiere/summerscape commission

Four Quartets Text by T. S. Eliot Choreography by Pam Tanowitz Music by Kaija Saariaho, performed by The Knights Images by Brice Marden Featuring Kathleen Chalfant Four Quartets, T. S. Eliot’s mysterious and beautiful masterpiece, a meditation on time and

sosnoff theater Friday, July 6 and Saturday, July 7 at 8 pm Sunday, July 8 at 3 pm tickets

opening night reception for members*

Time present and time past Are both perhaps present in time future And time future contained in time past.

Friday, July 6

—T. S. Eliot, “Burnt Norton,” Four Quartets

post-performance conversation Saturday, July 7

One of the most formally brilliant choreographers around.

pre-performance conversation

—New York Times on Pam Tanowitz

$25–75

Sunday, July 8 at 2 pm

timelessness, is now prized as one of the 20th century’s most stunning literary achievements.

summerscape coach from new york city

Seventy-five years after its publication, Eliot’s poetry cycle has inspired three contemporary

July 6, 8

artists to band together in a union of dance, music, painting, and poetry. American choreographer Pam Tanowitz, legendary Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, and American modernist painter Brice Marden are creating a vast and thrilling performance from Eliot’s

Gagosian Gallery is the lead corporate sponsor of Four Quartets. Major support for Four Quartets is provided by Rebecca Gold.

Eliot’s text live. This unprecedented collaboration, the first authorized performance based on

Four Quartets is co-commissioned by the Fisher Center, the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, and the Barbican, London. Additional commissioning funds were provided by the Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation, O’Donnell-Green Music and Dance Foundation, the T. S. Eliot Foundation, and King’s Fountain. Creation and performance of the music is supported by the Thendara Foundation.

Four Quartets, promises to be one of the must-see events of the year.

*Peter Pan and Four Quartets opening night reception sponsored by Absolut Elyx, Mionetto, and Papa’s Best Batch.

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Brice Marden, Untitled (Hydra), ©2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Bill Jacobson.

contemplations on past and present, time and space, movement and stillness. Joining them is Tony Award–nominated actress Kathleen Chalfant (Angels in America, Wit) performing


opera new production

Demon By Anton Rubinstein American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger Anton Rubinstein’s operatic masterpiece, Demon, premiered to great acclaim in 1871. Although performed frequently in Russia, the work remains a rarity in the West today. Based on the renowned fantasy poem by Mikhail Lermontov, Demon boasts rich choral writing and a fiery libretto. The work vividly depicts the isolation and despair of a fallen angel doomed to eternal damnation. All is upended by his chance encounter with Princess Tamara, with whom he falls desperately in love. Tamara’s attempts to resist him, and her eventual submission, end in tragedy. The 2018 SummerScape production is conducted by Leon Botstein and directed by the distinguished American director Thaddeus Strassberger, with sets by Paul Tate dePoo lll and costumes by Kaye Voyce. An all-Russian cast is led by the sparkling-voiced soprano Olga Tolkmit (last seen at Bard in Dimitrij) in the role of Tamara, alongside baritone Efim Zavalny in his American debut in the title role.

sosnoff theater Friday, July 27 at 8 pm Sunday, July 29; Wednesday, August 1; Friday, August 3; and Sunday, August 5 at 2 pm tickets $25–105 opening night reception for members Friday, July 27 opera talk with leon botstein Sunday, July 29 at noon summerscape coach from new york city July 27, 29, and August 3, 5

Demon Seated, 1890, Mikhail Vrubel. Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia. Bridgeman Images

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Highly regarded in his homeland, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908) played a defining role in the creation of what became known as the Russian style in music. The most prolific of the so-called Mighty Five, a group of nationalist composers that also included Mily Balakirev, Modest Mussorgsky, Alexander Borodin, and César Cui, he helped forge an eminently recognizable sound whose hallmark is a mix of folk song and exotic harmonies. In the West, Rimsky-Korsakov is known largely for his opulent symphonic poem Scheherazade, the brilliantly scored Capriccio Espagnol, and, above all, his novelty hit, The Flight of the Bumblebee, which has been played on almost every pitched instrument, including the tuba. But this is the lighter side of his output, and not how he would have wanted to be remembered. Out of his 15 operas, only two or three make regular appearances on Western stages, while productions of Sadko and The Legend of the Invisible City of Kitezh, epics of Wagnerian proportions, are rare, as are performances of his songs, which are in the repertoire of every Russian singer. When Sergei Diaghilev began his ambitious program of exporting Russian culture to Paris and beyond in the early 20th century, the Russian music he presented was very much the product of Rimsky-Korsakov’s industry and ingenuity, and it proved crucial to the success of his early productions. In 1907, Rimsky-Korsakov himself was summoned to Paris to preside over the inaugural concert of Diaghilev’s Les Saisons Russes. Rimsky-Korsakov died the following year, but his version of Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov brought Diaghilev his first outstanding success, and the ballet staged to the music of Scheherazade in 1910 became the troupe’s calling card. It did much to create the stereotype of Russia as an exotic, oriental nation, and to a flourishing of orientalism in fashion and design. Rimsky-Korsakov is a pivotal figure without whom the history of Russian music in the 20th century cannot be understood. His own musical education was entirely outside of the conservatory system, but he eventually accepted an invitation to serve as director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, and in this role built the solid foundation that helped future generations of Russian composers dominate the international scene. The subsequent success of Igor Stravinsky, Sergey Prokofiev, and Dmitri Shostakovich would be unimaginable

bard music festival

without Rimsky-Korsakov. The Bard Music Festival looks at the shape of Rimsky-Korsakov’s career, from naval officer

Rimsky-Korsakov and His World August 10–12 and 17–19

to composer of great originality. His work and influence are examined in the context of compositions by the Mighty Five, as well as Mikhail Glinka, Alexander Glazunov, Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Alexander Scriabin, Sergey Taneyev, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and many others.

This season is made possible in part through the generous support of the Board of the Bard Music Festival and the Friends of the Bard Music Festival, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Additional underwriting has been provided by Jeanne Donovan Fisher, James H. Ottaway Jr., Felicitas S. Thorne, Helen and Roger Alcaly, Bettina Baruch Foundation, and Barbara Kenner. Special support has also been provided by the Mrs. Mortimer Levitt Endowment Fund for the Performing Arts. All programs and performers are subject to change.

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, 1898, Valentin Serov. Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow. Bridgeman Images

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program one

Fashioning the Russian Sound sosnoff theater 7:30 pm performance with commentary by Leon Botstein; with Andrey Gugnin, piano; Önay Köse, bass-baritone; Anna Polonsky, piano; The Orchestra Now, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director; and others Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Overture to May Night (1878–79); Russian Easter Festival, Overture, Op. 36 (1888); Dubinushka, Op 62 (n.d.); Le coq d’or Suite (c. 1908); Mikhail Glinka (1804–57), Kamarinskaya (1848); Alexander Borodin (1833–87), Three Songs (c. 1854); César Cui (1835–1918), from Kaleidoscope, Op. 50 (1893); Mily Balakirev (1837–1910), Islamey, Op. 18 (1869); Modest Mussorgsky (1839–81), Songs and Dances of Death (1875–77) Tickets: $25–60 Round-trip transportation from New York City available. See page 28 for details.

Saturday, August 11 panel one

From the Romanovs to the Revolution: Art and Politics in Russia olin hall 10 am – noon A panel discussion with noted scholars, which includes a short Q&A. Participants to be announced. Free and open to the public

program two

Amateurs and Professionals olin hall They Did Not Expect Him, 1884–88, Ilya Repin. Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia. Bridgeman Images

1 pm preconcert talk Byron Adams 1:30 pm performance Danny Driver, piano; Monika Krajewska, mezzo-soprano; Yelena Kurdina, piano; Parker Quartet; and others

weekend one

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), from Four Romances, Op. 2 (1866); Fugue in G Minor (1878); Mikhail Glinka (1804–57), Grand Sextet (1832); Alexander Borodin (1833–87), String Quartet No. 2 (1881); Mily Balakirev

Inventing Russian Music: The Mighty Five

(1837–1910), Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat Minor (1900); Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), String Quartet No. 1, Op. 11 (1871); Alexander Dargomyzhsky (1813–69), Romances Tickets: $40

program three

Music under Tsarist Autocracy Friday, August 10

sosnoff theater 7 pm preconcert talk Simon Morrison

2018 Bard Music Festival Opening Night Dinner spiegeltent

8 pm performance Orion Weiss, piano; American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director

5 pm

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Sadko, Op. 5 (1867; rev. 1869, 1892); Piano Concerto in C-sharp Minor,

Tickets include a pre-performance dinner in the Spiegeltent and a premium seat for the evening’s concert.

Op. 30 (1883); Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), Festival Coronation March (1883); Alexander Serov (1820–71),

To purchase opening night dinner tickets, contact Linda Baldwin, special events manager, at 845-758-7414.

Selections from Judith (1863); Mily Balakirev (1837–1910), Tamara (1867–82); Sergey Taneyev (1856–1915),

Please note: The Spiegeltent will be closed for regular dining on the evening of the dinner.

Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 12 (1901)

Bard Music Festival opening night toast sponsored by Mionetto

Tickets: $25–75

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Sunday, August 12 program four

The Legacy of Pushkin olin hall 10 am performance with commentary by Emily Frey; with Anna Polonsky, piano; Erika Switzer, piano; and others Works by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Alexander Dargomyzhsky (1813–69), Modest Mussorgsky (1839–81), Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), Anatoly Lyadov (1855–1914), Mikhail Gnesin (1883–1957), Dmitry Shostakovich (1906–75), and others Tickets: $40

program five

Moscow/St. Petersburg olin hall 1 pm preconcert talk 1:30 pm performance Lysander Trio; Önay Köse, bass-baritone; Anna Polonsky, piano; St. Petersburg String Quartet; and others Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Piano Trio in C Minor (1897), songs; Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), songs; Anton Arensky (1861–1906), String Quartet No. 2 in A Minor, Op. 35 (1894); Alexander Glazunov (1865–1936), String Quartet No. 1 in D Major (1882); Reinhold Glière (1875–1956), Ballade for Cello and Piano, Op. 4 (1902)

View of the Statue of Peter the Great on the Senate Square, 1870, Vasilii Surikov. State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. akg-images

Tickets: $40

weekend two

program six

The Piano in Russia sosnoff theater 4 pm preconcert talk Halina Goldberg

Rimsky-Korsakov and His Followers

4:30 pm performance with pianists Danny Driver, Fei-Fei, Andrey Gugnin, Piers Lane, and Orion Weiss Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Novelette and Scherzino from Four Pieces, Op. 11 (1876–77); Anton Rubinstein (1829–94), Moderato from Kamennoi-Ostrow, Op 10 (1853–54); Sergey Prokofiev (1891–1953),

Friday, August 17

Toccata, Op. 11 (1912); Modest Mussorgsky (1839–81), Pictures at an Exhibition (1874); Serge Rachmaninoff (1873–1943), Suite No. 2, Op. 17 (1901); Alexander Scriabin (1871–1915), Piano Sonata No. 2 in G-sharp Minor,

program seven

Op. 19 (1897); Nikolai Medtner (1880–1951), Sonata Tragica, Op. 39, No. 5 (1919–20); Vladimir Rebikov

The Folk Traditions of the Russian Empire

(1866–1920), from Les feuilles d’automne, Op. 29 (?1909); Alexei Stanchinsky (1888–1914), from Sketches,

sosnoff theater

Op. 1 (1911–13)

8 pm performance with commentary by Marina Frolova-Walker; with the Virtual Village Ensemble;

Tickets: $25–60

Monika Krajewska, mezzo-soprano; Yelena Kurdina, piano; members of the Daedalus Quartet, with

Round-trip transportation from New York City available. See page 28 for details.

Karen Kim, violin; and others An exploration of the use of folk materials in classical music, from the Lvov/Pratsch Collection (1790/1806) on Beethoven’s “Razumovsky” String Quartets, through Balakirev/Rimsky-Korsakov to Igor Stravinsky’s Petrushka. Tickets: $25–60

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Saturday, August 18

Sunday, August 19

panel two

program ten

Russia under Western Eyes

Russian Choral Traditions

olin hall

olin hall

10 am – noon

10 am performance with commentary by James Bagwell; with the Bard Festival Chorale, conducted by James

A panel discussion with noted scholars, which includes a short Q&A. Participants to be announced.

Bagwell

Free and open to the public

Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), from the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, Op. 41 (1878); Alexander Gretchaninoff (1864–1956), from the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, Op. 13, No. 1 (1897); Serge Rachmaninoff (1873–1943), from

program eight

Vespers (All-Night Vigil), Op. 37 (1915); Maximilian Steinberg (1883–1946), from Passion Week, Op. 13 (1923–27);

Domestic Music Making in Russia

and works by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Dmitri Bortniansky (1751–1825), Alexei Lvov (1799–1870),

olin hall

Mily Balakirev (1837–1910), Stepan Smolensky (1848–1909), and Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov (1859–1935)

1 pm preconcert talk Christopher H. Gibbs

Tickets: $40

1:30 pm performance Members of the Daedalus Quartet, with Karen Kim, violin; Gerard Schneider, tenor; Mikhail Svetlov, bass; members of the Bard Festival Chorale and The Orchestra Now, conducted by

program eleven

Zachary Schwartzman

The Spectacular Legacy of Rimsky-Korsakov

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Mozart and Salieri (1897) and songs; selections from Les Vendredis by

olin hall

Felix Blumenfeld (1863–1931), Anatoly Lyadov (1855–1914), Nicolai Sokolov (1859–1922), and Alexander Glazunov

1 pm preconcert talk Richard Wilson

(1865–1936); arias and songs by Alexander Borodin (1833–87), Modest Mussorgsky (1839–81), and Mily Balakirev

1:30 pm performance Nicholas Canellakis, cello; members of the Daedalus Quartet, with Karen Kim, violin;

(1837–1910); César Cui (1835–1918), from Preludes for piano, Op. 64 (1903); Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), Scherzo

Andrey Gugnin, piano; Piers Lane, piano; and others

from Piano Sonata in F-sharp Minor (1903–4) Tickets: $40

Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), Firebird Suite (1910; arr. Guido Agosti); Ottorino Respighi (1879–1936), from Cinque pezzi (1906); Claude Debussy (1862–1918), Symphony in B Minor, for piano four hands (c. 1880); Lazare Saminsky (1882–1959), Hebrew Rhapsody for violin and piano, Op. 3, No. 2 (?1924); Mikhail Gnesin (1883–1957), Requiem,

program nine

Op. 11, for piano quintet (?1914); Sergey Prokofiev (1891–1953), from Ten Pieces, Op. 10 (1906–13); Alexander

The Classical, the National, and the Exotic

Tcherepnin (1899–1977), from Bagatelles for piano, Op. 5 (1912–18); Nicolai Myaskovsky (1881–1950), Cello

sosnoff theater

Sonata No. 2 in A Minor (1948)

7 pm preconcert talk Michael Beckerman

Tickets: $40

8 pm orchestral performance Serena Benedetti, soprano; Katherine Pracht, mezzo-soprano; Rebecca Ringle, mezzo-soprano; members of the Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; American Symphony

program twelve

Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director

The Tsar’s Bride

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), Scheherazade, Op. 35 (1888); The Snow Maiden Suite (1895); From Homer,

sosnoff theater

Op. 60 (1901); Alexander Dargomyzhsky (1813–69), Bolero (1839); Alexander Borodin (1833–87), In the Steppes of

3:30 pm preconcert talk Marina Frolova-Walker

Central Asia (1880); Anatoly Lyadov (1855–1914), Eight Russian Folksongs for Orchestra, Op. 58 (1905)

4:30 pm performance Lyubov Petrovna, soprano; Nadezhda Babintseva, mezzo-soprano; Efim Zavalny,

Tickets: $25–75

baritone; Andrey Valentiy, bass; Yakov Strizhak, bass-baritone; Joel Sorenson, tenor; Gerard Schneider, tenor;

Round-trip transportation from New York City available. See page 28 for details.

Teresa Buchholz, mezzo-soprano; and others; Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; The Orchestra Now, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director; designed and directed by Doug Fitch; lighting design by Anshuman Bhatia Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908), The Tsar’s Bride (1898) Tickets: $25–75 Round-trip transportation from New York City available. See page 28 for details.

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film series

Rimsky-Korsakov and the Poetry of Cinema The 2018 SummerScape Film Series explores the influence on international filmmaking of Russian nationalism, folk music, and exoticism—in pieces by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, other members of the Mighty Five, and the pioneering Mikhail Glinka—through overlapping pairs of films. Two of the films, Alexander Sokurov’s single-shot exploration of the State Hermitage Museum and the socialist realist biopic Man of Music, use the music of Glinka to address

The Cranes Are Flying, 1957, Mikhail Kalatozov. ©Warner Bros./Photofest

questions of aesthetic continuity across the tumultuous history of modern Russia. A pair of adventurous animated films, screened during the first weekend, adapt Modest Mussorgsky’s A Night on Bald Mountain in strikingly original ways, setting the stage for the stylistic

Thursday, July 26

Thursday, August 9

Russian Ark

Man of Music

Alexander Sokurov, 2002, Russia/Germany/ Canada/Finland, 96 minutes

Grigori Aleksandrov, Mikhail Glinka (composer), 1952, USSR, 100 minutes

known as “the Thaw”). A final pair of realist films utilizes music by Rimsky-Korsakov and

Sunday, July 29

Sunday, August 12

Alexander Borodin—Terence Davies employs part of the same Borodin string quartet that

Night on Bald Mountain

The Cranes Are Flying

Alexandre Alexeieff and Claire Parker, 1933, France, 8 minutes and

Mikhail Kalatozov, 1957, USSR, 97 minutes

exuberance of the classical Hollywood features the following weekend. Nationalist concerns are central to the third weekend’s pair of films, which demonstrate the dramatic stylistic transformation that took place in the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev’s “secret speech” (The Cranes Are Flying is the emblematic film of the period

inspired the musical Kismet—to complement their nuanced, outsider’s views of American life.

jim ottaway jr. film center Thursdays and Sundays, July 26 – August 19 at 7 pm

Fantasia Walt Disney, 1940, USA, 126 minutes

Thursday, August 16

Atlantic City Louis Malle, 1980, Canada/France, 104 minutes

Thursday, August 2

tickets

The Devil Is a Woman

$10

Josef von Sternberg, 1935, USA, 79 minutes

Members may reserve up to four complimentary tickets for the film series.

Sunday, August 5

Sunday, August 19

The House of Mirth Terence Davies, 2000, UK/Germany/USA, 140 minutes

Kismet Vincente Minnelli, 1955, USA, 113 minutes

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Cabaret savior—New York Times on Mx. Justin Vivian Bond Caustic wit, witchy charisma . . . Justin Vivian Bond is one of New York’s essential performers.—Time Out New York

The Spiegeltent June 29 – August 18

Cabaret and After Hours Hosted by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond Justin Vivian Bond hosts a fifth season at the Spiegeltent, an internationally celebrated destination of magic and mayhem. Surprises are in store all summer long, with enchanted evenings of unforgettable cabaret and jazz, food and drink, and dancing under the sparkling lights of the historic tent of mirrors. Major support for the Spiegeltent is provided by Carolyn Marks Blackwood and Gregory Quinn, and by Andrew E. Zobler and Manny Urquiza.

Jazz through the Looking Glass: The Hot Jazz Age presented with Catskill Jazz Factory and the New York Hot Jazz Festival A five-concert journey through the Hot Jazz age from its beginnings in New Orleans, via its migration to Chicago, Harlem, and beyond. Featuring the artists defining the hot jazz revival sweeping the country, this series explores the music that served as backdrop to the grit and glamour of the age of Prohibition.

Spiegeltent Cabaret and After Hours performances are for mature audiences only. Cabaret admission is restricted to those over 18 years old unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. No one under 21 is permitted during After Hours.

Acrobats, 1877, Viktor Vasnetsov. ©State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia, 2018

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Mx. Bond’s House of Whimsy Friday, August 3 and Saturday, August 4 House of Whimsy returns with an alluring, edgy, and irreverent evening of divas and deviants from the downtown performance scene, selected and introduced by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond. Past Spiegeltent favorites mingle with talented newcomers in a program of variety acts that ravishes, provokes, and astounds.

Sam Amidon Friday, August 10 American folk music runs in Sam Amidon’s veins. The celebrated young composer and singer’s “highly personal approach opens a window on the American past and lets us feel it like nothing else around” (NPR). Following the 2017 release of his sixth album, The Following Mountain, Amidon takes the Spiegeltent stage for the first time with an intimate solo evening of original Americana music.

Cabaret Fridays and Saturdays at 8:30 pm unless otherwise noted Tickets start at $25

Martha Plimpton All the Presidents Mann Friday, June 29 at 7 pm and 9:30 pm In the spirit of Independence Day, Emmy winner and three-time Tony nominee Martha Plimpton (The Goonies, The Real O’Neals) pays tribute to genius songwriter Aimee Mann, dedicating songs to some of Plimpton’s most (and least) favorite U.S. presidents. With wit, charm, and vocal prowess, Plimpton leads us through a minefield of love and loss and electoral misjudgment, with the music of one of America’s greatest living songwriters.

Saturday, June 30 at 9 pm Legendary nightlife impresario and fashion icon Susanne Bartsch returns to the Spiegeltent to celebrate opening weekend with an eclectic and eccentric party extravaganza. Bartschland Follies combines the glamour of a night at the opera with the risqué magic of burlesque circus. Dazzling performances, bookended by a live DJ, promise an unforgettable experience.

Nona Hendryx presents Parallel Lives: Billie Holiday and Edith Piaf Friday, July 6 Revolutionary new-wave goddess Nona Hendryx (“Lady Marmalade”) is joined by an international roster of singers to honor two women born in the same year on different shores: Billie Holiday and Edith Piaf. Though they never met, Holiday and Piaf led parallel lives, and their heartrending loves fed the soulful singularity of their voices and defined a generation.

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Saturday, July 7 Mx. Bond kicks off the Spiegeltent season with a celebration of gender outlaw and American soft-rock poster girl Karen Carpenter. Drawing sold-out crowds in New York City and San Francisco, Down on Creation brings a revelatory glimpse into the troubled life of the ’70s icon and the music she left behind.

Julian Fleisher Sun Songs

Susanne Bartsch presents Bartschland Follies

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Mx. Justin Vivian Bond Is Down on Creation: On Top of the World with The Carpenters

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Friday, July 13 Julian Fleisher is a true Renaissance man— bandleader, record producer, singer, and actor. Now, this “Manhattan nightclub supernova” (LA Times) makes his Spiegeltent debut with an evening of light and sunshine, the perfect antidote to Friday the 13th. Backed by Fleisher’s acclaimed 10-piece “rather big band,” Sun Songs features masterful interpretations of classics from the Beatles to Joni Mitchell, fused with a savvy showmanship of bygone days.

Melanie Friday, July 27 One of only three women to perform solo at the 1969 Woodstock Festival, Melanie Safka has embarked on a half-century musical journey to earn her rightful place as one of America’s folk music treasures. From “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain)” to “Brand New Key” and “Ruby Tuesday,” Melanie brings spirit and spunk to her Spiegeltent debut.

Justin Vivian Bond. Photo by David Kimelman

BACK TO (ab)NORMAL: Angela Di Carlo’s ADD Cabaret and Billy Hough’s Scream Along with Billy Saturday, August 11 Angela Di Carlo (House of Whimsy 2016–17) returns with her hilarious songs about random observations, pet peeves, and timely topics performed at lightning pace. A cult sensation in the New York City and Provincetown underground music and cabaret scenes, Billy Hough rounds out the evening with punk-infused singing and ranting, which the New Yorker calls “poignant and beautiful.” This double-bill laugh riot is not for the faint of heart.

The Hot Sardines A Dance Party Friday, August 17 We’re opening up the Spiegeltent dance floor for the sizzling return of hot-jazz darlings The Hot Sardines. Music made famous decades ago comes alive through the band’s brassy and rollicking sound. Get ready to dance into the season’s closing weekend as the ever-pleasing ensemble effortlessly channels New York speakeasies, Parisian cabarets, and New Orleans jazz halls.

Boys in the Trees: Justin Vivian Bond Sings All the Young Dudes Saturday, August 18 After years of covering female singer-songwriters, Mx. Bond changes course for the Spiegeltent’s closing night. Rather than singing songs by the idols Vivian wants to be, it’s time for an evening of music by people Vivian wants to be . . . with! From teen idols to rock gods, Mx. Viv. “trannels” their inner witch to explore the realms of masculine rock and teen lust.

Jazz through the Looking Glass: The Hot Jazz Age with Catskill Jazz Factory and the New York Hot Jazz Festival Thursdays at 8 pm Tickets start at $25

Sidney Bechet: The Soul of Crescent City Aurora Nealand and the Royal Roses Thursday, July 5 Crescent City songstress Aurora Nealand leads her Royal Roses in a tribute to the Jazz Age recordings of New Orleans’s preeminent clarinet and soprano sax legend, Sidney Bechet. Nealand, a prominent force in the New Orleans jazz scene, is an innovative, sensitive, and daring performer, acclaimed as one of the top soprano-sax players in the country.

Get Rhythm in Your Feet: The Music of J. Russel Robinson and the Original Dixieland Jazz Band Gordon Au’s Grand Street Stompers featuring Molly Ryan Thursday, July 12 Gordon Au’s Grand Street Stompers celebrates the first commercially released jazz recording in this homage to the Original Dixieland Jazz Band’s J. Russel Robinson. Robinson is known for his blues-influenced playing style, along with his contributions to jazz and American popular music. The exceptional period jazz vocalist Molly Ryan adds to the evening’s foot-tapping, vintage sound.

Hotter Than That: Louis Armstrong’s Hot Fives Bria Skonberg Band Thursday, July 19 “The shining hope of hot jazz” (New York Times), Bria Skonberg leads her ensemble in homage to her idol, the great Louis Armstrong, with a night that calls on the seminal works of the Hot Five, Armstrong’s first jazz recording band. According to the Wall Street Journal, “If Louis Armstrong and Doris Day could somehow be the same person, they’d be Bria Skonberg.”

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The Unsung Jazz Geniuses of Prohibition Ghost Train Orchestra

Special Events

Thursday, July 26 Trumpeter Brian Carpenter leads the inspired Ghost Train Orchestra—a little big band renowned for performing almost-forgotten musical gems—in a concert of the unearthed works of the lesser-known and rarely heard composers and band leaders that served as fixtures of the dance halls, speakeasies, and nightclubs of the late Prohibition-era years of Harlem and Chicago’s South Side.

Summertime Swing Eight to the Bar

Bix & Tram: A Red Hot Retrospective Patrick Bartley Orchestra Thursday, August 2 Grammy-nominated saxophonist Patrick Bartley Jr. leads his orchestra in a celebration of the recordings of Jazz Age legends Bix Beiderbecke and Frankie Trumbauer, now recognized among the most important and influential recordings in jazz history. This concert recreates them with impeccable period authenticity, and affords a rare opportunity to hear this music note for note, as recorded close to a century ago.

Season Kick-off Events The Big Takeover Saturday, June 23 at 8 pm Tickets: $25 Since 2007, The Big Takeover, a six-piece ensemble, has been packing clubs in the city, upstate, and around the globe. Now, this fantastic Hudson Valley band makes its Spiegeltent debut with its only local show of the summer. The Big Takeover’s global blend unleashes “creativity with a celebratory grandeur.” —Poughkeepsie Journal

The Porch Sunday, June 24 at 6 pm Tickets: $20 The Porch brings Hudson Valley storytellers together for an intimate evening of stories (no notes allowed!). These true tales, each under 10 minutes, include the best yarns of past years and new voices and stories for 2018.

Sunday, July 8

Professor Cunningham & His Old School Sunday, August 5 Doors open at 6 pm, dance instruction at 6:30 pm, dancing until 11 pm Tickets: $25 End your weekend with a bang—and a swing! Spiegeltent favorites Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios return for two nights of swing dancing to the fabulous music of Spiegeltent staples Eight to the Bar and returning international swing band champions Professor Cunningham & His Old School.

Community Music Space Summer Festival Sunday, July 29 from 3 to 6 pm Tickets: $15, children under 12 free Red Hook’s own Community Music Space takes over the Spiegeltent for a special mini festival of music, and more, for all ages. Spend your Sunday afternoon in the company of burgeoning local talent, ages 10–18, for a roving set of musical delights, inside and out.

WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE Brand-new live show! Sunday, August 12 at 7 pm Tickets start at $25 The Hudson Valley–based creators and stars of the renowned podcast WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE bring their live show to the Spiegeltent for the first time. Offering a special preview of a new show before heading off on an international tour, WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE offers a community radio–style update from the deceptively eerie desert town of Night Vale, or, as NPR puts it, “the news from Lake Wobegon as seen through the eyes of Stephen King.”

After Hours Fridays and Saturdays from 10:30 pm to 12:30 am Friday, June 29 from 11 pm to 12:30 am No After Hours on Saturday, June 30 or July 14 Open to patrons age 21 and up Tickets: $12, or free with your ticket to another same-day SummerScape event.* (*not included in the Create Your Own Series) Dance away your weekend nights in the company of top DJs. Visit the website for dates and details.

summerscape gala honoring brice and helen marden SATURDAY, JULY 14 MONTGOMERY PLACE AT 6 PM

to benefit the richard b. fisher center for the performing arts gala chairs carolyn marks blackwood and gregory quinn stefano ferrari manny urquiza and andrew e. zobler fishercenter.bard.edu/events/gala or 845-758-7414 The Lake, 1900, Isaak Levitan. State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. Bridgeman Images

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6 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8 pm Four Quartets SOS 8:30 pm Nona Hendryx presents Parallel Lives: Billie Holiday and Edith Piaf SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

13 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8:30 pm Julian Fleisher Sun Songs SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

20 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

27 8 pm Demon SOS 8:30 pm Melanie SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

5 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8 pm Sidney Bechet: The Soul of Cresent City with Aurora Nealand and the Royal Roses SPT

12 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8 pm Get Rhythm in Your Feet: The Music of J. Russel Robinson and the Original Dixieland Jazz Band with Gordon Au’s Grand Street Stompers featuring Molly Ryan SPT

19 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8 pm Hotter Than That: Louis Armstrong’s Hot Fives with the Bria Skonberg Band SPT

26 7 pm Russian Ark FILM 8 pm The Unsung Jazz Geniuses of Prohibition with the Ghost Train Orchestra SPT

4 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA

11 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA

18 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA

5 pm BMF Opening Night Dinner SPT 7:30 pm BMF Program One SOS 8:30 pm Sam Amidon SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

17 8 pm Preconcert Talk SOS 8:30 pm BMF Program Seven SOS 8:30 pm The Hot Sardines A Dance Party SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

7 pm Man of Music FILM

16 7 pm Atlantic City FILM

SOS Sosnoff Theater

8 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 3 pm Four Quartets SOS 6 pm Summertime Swing with Eight to the Bar SPT 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA

15 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA

22 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 7 pm Peter Pan LUMA

29 2 pm Demon SOS 3–6 pm Community Music Space Summer Festival SPT 7 pm Night on Bald Mountain and Fantasia FILM

sunday 5

7 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 8 pm Four Quartets SOS 8:30 pm Mx. Justin Vivian Bond is Down on Creation: On Top of the World with The Carpenters SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

14 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 6 pm SummerScape Gala MP 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA

21 2 pm Peter Pan LUMA 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

28 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

saturday 4

19 10 am BMF Program Ten OLIN 1 pm Preconcert Talk OLIN 1:30 pm BMF Program Eleven OLIN 3:30 pm Preconcert Talk SOS 4:30 pm BMF Program Twelve SOS 7 pm House of Mirth FILM

18 10 am BMF Panel Two OLIN 1 pm Preconcert Talk OLIN 1:30 pm BMF Program Eight OLIN 7 pm Preconcert Talk SOS 8 pm BMF Program Nine SOS 8:30 pm Boys in the Trees: Justin Vivian Bond Sings all the Young Dudes SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

MP Montgomery Place

10 am BMF Program Four OLIN 1 pm Preconcert Talk OLIN 1:30 pm BMF Program Five OLIN 4 pm Preconcert Talk SOS 4:30 pm BMF Program Six SOS 7 pm The Cranes Are Flying FILM 7 pm WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE SPT

10 am BMF Panel One OLIN 1 pm Preconcert Talk OLIN 1:30 pm BMF Program Two OLIN 7 pm Preconcert Talk SOS 8 pm BMF Program Three SOS 8:30 pm Back to ab(Normal): Angela Di Carlo’s ADD Cabaret and Billy Hough’s Scream Along with Billy SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

RES Resnick Studio

12

11

8:30 pm Mx. Bond’s House of Whimsy SPT 2 pm Demon SOS 10:30 pm After Hours SPT 6 pm Summertime Swing with Professor Cunningham & His Old School SPT 7 pm Kismet FILM

sunday

saturday

FILM Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center

10

9

SPT Spiegeltent

2 pm Demon SOS 8:30 pm Mx. Bond’s House of Whimsy SPT 10:30 pm After Hours SPT

7 pm The Devil Is a Woman FILM 8 pm Bix & Tram: A Red Hot Retrospective with the Patrick Bartley Orchestra SPT

2 pm Demon SOS

OLIN Olin Hall

3

2

1

LUMA LUMA Theater

friday

wednesday

thursday

AUGUST

JULY friday

2 pm Peter Pan LUMA

7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 9 pm Susanne Bartsch presents Bartschland Follies SPT

thursday

1

30

wednesday

6 pm The Porch SPT

8 pm The Big Takeover SPT

7 pm Martha Plimpton All the Presidents Mann SPT 7:30 pm Peter Pan LUMA 9:30 pm Martha Plimpton All the Presidents Mann SPT 11 pm After Hours SPT

24

23

22 29

sunday

saturday

friday

7 pm Peter Pan LUMA

thursday

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JUNE


accessibility All our venues and restrooms are wheelchair accessible. The Fisher Center utilizes golf carts to assist patrons with disabilities between the parking lot and the Center. If you need any additional assistance, please call 845-758-7928. Infrared assistive listening devices are available in the Fisher Center and Olin Hall. Receivers may be borrowed on request at the box office.

summerscape dining the spiegeltent The Spiegeltent is the SummerScape festival’s oasis, a place to enjoy seasonal, local food and drink before and after performances. The lovely outdoor garden provides the perfect spot to relax in the company of friends and festival artists. To review our dining calendar, explore our lunch, dinner, After Hours, and beverage menus, and make reservations, please visit fishercenter.bard.edu/visit/eatstay. The Magic Carpet, 1880, Viktor Vasnetsov. State Art Museum, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. Bridgeman Images

If you are attending a mainstage performance, we recommend you dine with us at least an hour before curtain. spiegel picnics

tickets, transportation, and dining

These picnics are an ideal way to enjoy our spectacular Hudson Valley setting. Choose from a variety of delicious menus and a wonderful selection of wine. Bring a blanket and we’ll

how to order your tickets

provide everything else. Order online at least five days prior to your visit.

Online: visit fishercenter.bard.edu theater concessions

By phone: 845-758-7900 In person: Our main box office is located in the lobby of the Sosnoff Theater. Hours are 10 am – 5 pm, Monday–Friday, and two hours prior to each scheduled event. Ticketing fees support our box office infrastructure and apply to single tickets and subscriptions regardless

Quick concession savories, sweets, and beverages are available one hour prior to curtain and during intermission at all Fisher Center events, and at Olin Hall on August 11, 12, 18, and 19. Cash only.

of purchase method.

subscriptions and dining packages groups

Guarantee great seats in advance. Our package options make it easier than ever to

Special discounts and services are available to groups of 10 people or more.

experience SummerScape with your own preferences and schedule in mind.

Visit fishercenter.bard.edu/boxoffice/groupsales for details. subscribe and save Create your own series—buy four or more events and save 25%

getting here The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College is located at 60 Manor

SummerScape mainstage series—buy dance, theater, and opera events and save 30%

Avenue, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 12504. Our venue is accessible by car, train, and

spiegeltent dining packages

SummerScape Coach. Detailed directions and parking information will be mailed with your

Out-of-Town Package—includes mainstage ticket, round-trip bus from New York City, and

tickets and are also available online at fishercenter.bard.edu/visit. For best parking, please try

three-course meal. Save up to 25%

to arrive at least 30 minutes before show time. This will allow you ample time to park and

Night-Out Package—includes mainstage ticket and three-course meal. Save up to 15%

make your way to the theater.

Available for select performances. Ticketing fees apply; gratuity and beverages not included.

summerscape coach—$40 round-trip! Visiting us from the New York metro area? The SummerScape Coach provides transportation for select performances from Manhattan’s Upper West Side to the Fisher Center. Fresh box meals are available for advance purchase for your return trip to New York City. For details, visit fishercenter.bard.edu/transportation. 28

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For complete information and to order tickets and subscription packages, visit fishercenter.bard.edu or call the Fisher Center box office 845-758-7900. Programs, dates, times, and venues are subject to change without notice. All sales are final and normal processing fees apply. If you are unable to use your tickets we will make every effort to offer a comparable exchange, subject to availability, or issue a credit. You may also choose to donate your tickets in support of the Fisher Center.

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join us! become a friend of the fisher center and the bard music festival Individual supporters are essential to sustaining the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts as an extraordinary part of cultural life in the Hudson Valley. Our members support world-class performing arts and enjoy a variety of discounts and benefits, including: • Advance ticket access • Invitations to exclusive events • Discounts on Spiegeltent dining

Performances open to the public!

Membership benefits start at just $75. For more information about how to become a Friend of the Fisher Center and the Bard Music Festival, contact 845-758-7987 or visit fishercenter.bard.edu/support.

JULY 21, 7PM • JULY 22, 2PM

Major support for Fisher Center and Bard Music Festival programs has been provided by:

SUMMER JAZZ ACADEMY FACULTY

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Thomas and Bryanne Hamill Eliot D. and Paula K. Hawkins Thomas Hesse and Gwendolyn Bellmann Alan Hilliker and Vivien Liu Elena and Frederic Howard Barbara and Sven Huseby Anne E. Impellizzeri Jane W. Nuhn Charitable Trust Dr. Harriette Kaley Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Jane and Richard Katzman Susan and Roger Kennedy Dr. Barbara Kenner Dr. Jamie Kibel King’s Fountain Knight Family Foundation Paul and Lynn Knight Edna and Gary Lachmund Alison L. and John C. Lankenau Geraldine and Kit Laybourne Raymond J. Learsy Prof. Nancy S. Leonard and Dr. Lawrence Kramer Gary K. Lippman Chris Lipscomb and Monique Segarra Amy and Thomas O. Maggs Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation Stephen Mazoh and Martin Kline Nathan M. and Rebecca Gold Milikowsky Millbrook Tribute Garden, Inc. Andrea and Kenneth L. Miron The Morningstar Foundation Martin L. and Lucy Miller Murray Nancy and Edwin Marks Family Foundation National Endowment for the Arts New England Foundation for the Arts New York State Council on the Arts Mr. Raymond Nimrod Dr. Abraham and Mrs. Gail Nussbaum O’Donnell-Green Music and Dance Foundation Alexandra Ottaway Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ottaway Jr.

845-758-7900

Samuel and Ellen Phelan Piers and Lucy Playfair The Rebecca and Nathan Milikowsky Family Foundation Drs. M. Susan and Irwin Richman Amanda J. Rubin Ted Ruthizer and Jane Denkensohn Rene Schnetzler and Ruth Ketay David A. Schulz David E. Schwab II ’52 and Ruth Schwartz Schwab ’52 Damen Seminero Bonnie and Daniel Shapiro Stephen Simcock Denise S. Simon and Paulo Vieiradacunha Ted Snowdon Sarah and Howard Solomon Martin T. and Toni Sosnoff David and Sarah Stack Edwin Steinberg Dr. Sanford B. Sternlieb Allan and Ronnie Streichler Felicitas S. Thorne Trust for Mutual Understanding T S Eliot Society United Way of the Capital Region Illiana van Meeteren Olivia van Melle Kamp Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation Margo and Anthony Viscusi Dr. Siri von Reis Stanley and Laura Wiegand Aida and Albert Wilder The Wise Family Charitable Foundation Millie and Robert Wise XGEN 2 LLC Irene Zedlacher Bill Zifchak Andrew E. Zobler and Manny Urquiza

*Deceased List current as of March 13, 2018

OPENING PERFORMANCE FEATURING STUDENT COMBOS With Marcus Printup, Ted Nash, Vincent Gardner, Helen Sung, James Chirillo, Rodney Whitaker, and Marion Felder TICKETS: $30–$40

JULY 28, 7PM

JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA TICKETS: $55

JULY 29, 1PM

SUMMER JAZZ ACADEMY BIG BAND FINALE 42 of the top high school jazz musicians in the country will perform timeless jazz standards TICKETS: $15

venue

box office

to purchase tickets

olin concert hall at bard college

bard college, fisher center for the performing arts

fishercenter.bard.edu 845-758-7900

PHOTO BY FRANK STEWART

Jamie Albright and Stephen Hart Helen and Roger Alcaly Amphion Foundation The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation The Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Anonymous (3) Joshua J. Aronson Barbara Bell Cumming Charitable Trust Bettina Baruch Foundation Carolyn Marks Blackwood and Gregory H. Quinn Susan H. Bodine ’72 Bob Bursey and Leah Cox Lydia Chapin and David Soeiro Michelle R. Clayman Alicia Davis and Steve Ellis Ana and J. Roberto De Azevedo Gonzalo and Kathleen de Las Heras Johan de Meij and Dyan Machan Gary DiMauro and Kathryn Windley Amy K. and David Dubin Robert C. Edmonds ’68 The Educational Foundation of America Ines Elskop and Christopher Scholz Elizabeth W. Ely ’65 and Jonathan K. Greenburg The Ettinger Foundation Beverly Fanger and Dr. Herbert S. Chase Jr. Stefano Ferrari and Lilo Zinglersen* Britton and Melina Fisher Catherine C. Fisher Emily H. Fisher and John Alexander Jeanne Donovan Fisher Alan and Judith Fishman Asher Gelman ’06 and Mati Gelman Helena and Christopher H. Gibbs Carlos Gonzalez and Katherine Stewart I. Bruce Gordon Dr. Terry S. Gotthelf Matthew M. Guerreiro and Christina Mohr Hamill Family Fund of the Schwab Charitable Fund


PO Box 5000 Annandale-0n-Hudson, NY 12504-5000

Bard College

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, photo: ©Peter Aaron ’68/Esto

Tickets on sale now. Buy three or more events and save! fishercenter.bard.edu | 845-758-7900

June 28 – August 19, 2018

BARDSUMMERSCAPE

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage Paid Bard College

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