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F E AT U R E S

PHOTO BY SARAH JANE SANDERS

BUSINESS UPDATES ..........................................................................................4 SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS ..............................................................................5 EXAMINE THE NEW GROCERY OPTIONS......................................................6 HOW TO DEEP FRY CORN ..............................................................................10 ALL ABOUT THE KIDS ......................................................................................12 HEALTH NEWS AND EVENTS ...................................................................14-15 SENIOR EVENTS ...............................................................................................17 CALENDAR OF EVENTS ............................................................................18-20 HOME AND GARDEN ......................................................................................21 REAL ESTATE ...............................................................................................22-23

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B U S I N E S S U P DAT E S success wouldn’t be possible. We take great pride in our team and look forward to continued growth by serving our customers and community.” Ying (Vivian) Liu has been named senior vice president and chief financial officer of Lexmark International. Bill Quenemoen has been named chief executive officer of Denham-Blythe Co. of Lexington. The Orange Leaf location at Romany Road has closed. Three other Orange Leaf locations, including the one 3090 Helmsdale in Hamburg, remain open. Cork & Barrel, a bourbon and wine shop, recently celebrated its grand opening at the Bluegrass Airport. It will operate seven days a week, and stock a selection of wines and more than 100 varieties of bourbon from an array of distilleries. NEWS GreenBox, a Lexington HVAC and plumbing company, has made the 2017 Inc. Magazine’s 5,000 list of the fastestgrowing private companies in America. The list represents the most comprehensive look at the most important segment of the economy - America’s independent entrepreneurs. Gwen Riley, president and founder of GreenBox Heating and Air, Plumbing, and Remodeling, started GreenBox in 2010 with a people centric model. “It is an honor to be recognized on the Inc. 5,000 list with so many of America’s innovative and successful companies and entrepreneurs. Our mission is to serve and honor God and building lifelong relationship with our clients and coworkers. We strive to exceed expectations in providing complete and professional home solutions. Without any of this, our

UK HealthCare and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have agreed to to resume pediatric heart care services in Lexington. Under the agreement, the two organizations will work together and give patients from Kentucky the opportunity to have surgical procedures, diagnostics and therapeutic interventions performed in Lexington. This will allow some patients to stay closer to home. BUSINESS CALENDAR

THURSDAY, SEPT. 7 School Sushi will hold a grand opening at its new location at 163 W. Short Street.

SATURDAY, SEPT, 9 The 24th Annual Conference of the Hemp Industries Association will be held Sept. 9-11 at the Lexington Convention Center. Experts, policy makers, farmers, researchers and entrepreneurs from around the world will convene to “Share the Vision,” in what is expected to be the largest crowd in the 24-year history of HIACON. For a more information as well as a complete list of sponsors and exhibitors and conference registration, visit www. thehia.org/event-2535421.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 12 The next @330 Series event, which will be held Tuesday, Sept. 12, beginning at 3:30 p.m. in Commerce Lexington Inc.’s first floor conference room will examine how to “Build Your Brand on Social Media.” Nate Spry (Zipie) and Ryan Worthen (Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance) will share the key steps and strategies to establish and grow your company’s presence on social media. The topics will include how to get started with social media to best practices when managing multiple accounts. Organizers will also talk about how to “boost” social media posts with platform advertising, and the underlying metrics of those ads to get the most bang for the buck.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 14 The Don Franklin Lexington Nissan Automall will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, Sept. 14 from 4 until 5 p.m. The automall is located at 3360 Richmond Road.

Kentucky American Water announces new hires and promotion Kentucky American Water has announced the appointment of two new employees and the promotion of one employee. Dorothy Rader has been named water quality manager, effective Aug 14. In this role, Rader will oversee the company’s water quality department which oversees all water quality testing, monitoring and reporting and includes a team of Dorothy Rader water quality specialists. She will report to Kentucky American Water Vice President of Operations Kevin Rogers. Rader was most recently the water quality and environmental compliance supervisor of Tennessee American Water in Chattanooga, Tenn. With over 19 years of experience working in the drinking water industry, Rader began her career in 1998 as a water plant operator for a utility district in Knoxville, Tenn. In 2001, she joined the City of Alcoa, Tenn., in the field of water treatment and distribution, and in 2014

joined Tennessee American Water. She has been an active member of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) and was elected to the Kentucky/Tennessee Section American Water Works Association Executive Board in 2012, serving as the section chair in 2016. Rader holds a degree in chemical and environmental engineering technology, a grade IV water plant operator license, a grade II distribution operator license, and a backflow testing certification from the state of Tennessee. She is a graduate of the Leadership Blount Class of 2012, served on the board of the Little River Watershed Association, and was active with the United Way of Blount County campaign board. Rader and her husband, Jamie, will be relocating to the Bluegrass area. Jasmine Mungo has joined Kentucky American Water as superintendent of field operations for the Central Division, based in Lexington. In this position, Mungo will supervise the company’s field operations in Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Harrison, Jessamine, Nicholas, Scott and Woodford counties and report to Senior Manager of Field Operations David Treece. Mungo began her career with New Jersey American Water in 2008 as a meter

management specialist and has served in various roles in both field services and distribution and moved into a supervisory role in 2011. Most recently, she led the coastal south New Jersey American Water distribution department. Mungo earned a business administration Jasmine Mungo degree from Rowan College and is currently pursuing her advanced water and wastewater license. Kentucky American Water has also announced the promotion of Amy Caudill to superintendent of customer advocacy, overseeing the customer advocate office and serving as the primary local customer service manager. Caudill most recently served as human resources business partner for Kentucky American Water and Tennessee American Water She joined American Water in 2014 and focused on employee relations, labor relations, performance management and career development as a human resourc-

es business partner. Caudill has over 15 years of human resources experience including recruiting, training, performance management, career development, diversity program development, employee relations, labor relations, benefits, compensation, payroll, safety, and compliance issues. Amy Caudill Caudill studied HR management at Midway College and holds a professional human resource certification (PHR). She is actively involved in diversity and inclusion community outreach initiatives that include serving on the board of the Urban League of Lexington, serving as the KY/TN Section AWWA diversity committee co-chair, membership on the Bluegrass Society for Human Resource Management diversity committee and as a member of the National Diversity Council of Georgia. Caudill resides in Lexington and has two sons.


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Best and brightest small businesses honored

Commerce Lexington Inc. began honoring the contributions that small businesses have on our economy in 1986, and since that very first Salute to Small Business, the impact of small businesses on the global economy has become greater than ever before. The Salute to Small Business Awards Luncheon, presented by Forcht Bank, was held Thursday, Aug. 24 at the Keeneland Entertainment Center to recognize the “thoroughbreds” of the small business community in variety of categories and help celebrate the naming of a new Commerce Lexington Inc. Small Business of the Year. Forcht Bank President Tucker Ballinger is pictured congratulating the winners.

McDonald began devoting time to build the business. The main goal of the business is to help nonprofit and small business clients make a lasting impression on their audiences through marketing and events. The Impressions team works with clients on specific projects to help them meet goals, and often supplements the internal marketing team at organizations on an https://www.facebook.com/ BarbaraPann ongoing basis. This helps nonprofits access support in a more cost effective way. During its nearly five years in business, Impressions Marketing & Events has seen consistent growth, with plans to increase employees and contractors on the team within the next year.

GREEN INITIATIVE AWARD

BULLHORN CREATIVE Bullhorn is a branding agency that builds confident brands with language and design. It was started in the fall of 2008 with no clients and little experience by Brad Flowers and Griffin VanMeter. In 2010, they hired a project manager and a designer, and later a web developer, videographer, and the company’s first salespeople. Its clients range from local nonprofits and businesses to national and even international companies. The staff at Bullhorn takes pride in its culture and has built the business around values that every employee embraces - empathy and honesty, dissatisfaction and improvement, and creativity and decisiveness.

GREENBOX

WINNER: BUSINESS SUCCESS AWARD GreenBox was founded in 2010 by Gwen Riley. Specializing in heating, cooling, air quality, plumbing, and remodeling, GreenBox simplifies new system installation, retrofit projects, seasonal maintenance, and repair. By combining a full range of residential and commercial services, the business offers a one-stop shop, answering the many challenges of running a smooth household and successful business.

OMNI ARCHITECTS WINNER: SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR WINNER: LEGACY AWARD Since 1975, Omni Architects has been designing buildings that respond to its clients’ needs and aspirations, while enhancing the lives of the people who use them. Omni has crafted thoughtful designs that elevate the missions of our clients in the markets they serve, including higher education, healthcare, worship, civic, workplace, and P-12.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF THE BLUEGRASS WINNER: INNOVATION AWARD

Locally, JA of the Bluegrass was incorporated in 1963 when a group of entrepreneurs, including Warren Rosenthal, W.T. Young Sr., O.A. Bakhaus and Alex Campbell, saw the need for this program in our local schools. Today, JA of the Bluegrass plays an active role in 107 schools throughout Fayette and the surrounding counties utilizing 945 volunteers.

SYNERGY COACH

WINNER: MINORITY BUSINESS AWARD Led by owner Larry Jackson, Synergy Coach is a wellness incubator that focuses on individualized program design for health seekers, business development for entrepreneurs in wellness, and coaching coaches who are growing their clientele in the areas of health and wellness. Its mission is to become the ultimate guide to resolving pain, preventing injury, and optimizing tactical and athletic performance.

YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR AWARD

IMPRESSIONS MARKETING & EVENTS

While Impressions Marketing & Events officially incorporated in 2010, it wasn’t until October 2012 that Laura

LEXINGTON HISTORY MUSEUM

WINNER: PHOENIX AWARD The core mission of the Lexington History Museum is to preserve, protect and present the history of Lexington and Fayette County to all persons of every age through all media. The organization was founded in 1998 at the request of then Mayor Pam Miller. The museum itself was located in the old Fayette County Courthouse until 2011 when it was forced to evacuate due to the discovery of lead paint dust and mold.

WINNER: NONPROFIT AWARD

CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER OF THE BLUEGRASS

The Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) of the Bluegrass works to reduce the trauma experienced by sexually abused children by providing services to them in a nurturing, friendly and safe environment. The organization was created in 1991, following a review of the way child sexual abuse cases were being handled in Fayette County, and the Center opened its doors in 1994.


Bring it to me

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Do new grocery delivery options really deliver the goods? BY BRIAN S. POWERS

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erhaps sensing the likes of Amazon breathing down their necks, retailers are attempting to harness the power of mobile devices to deliver new customer experiences. These attempts to capture the mobile device zeitgeist are now reaching the most stalwart of the brick-and-mortar retailers, grocery stores. In Hamburg, there’s now a variety of options.

“The app also provides a list of items you purchased previously, which was kind of like seeing all my poor life choices set out in black and white.”

Some of these services, like Kroger’s ClickList, are home-grown jobs, tying into existing infrastructure and keeping the customer experience in one location. Others, like Instacart and Shipt, are ambitious third parties looking to capitalize on the success of the “sharing” economy, so named because 100 percent of payroll tax liability is “shared” with the person doing the work.

relegating the act of grocery shopping to the peasants? Or will you steadfastly remain the shopper who’s counting cart items to see if you can hit the express checkout? The answer will ... probably not surprise you.

Instacart and Shipt work with retailers such as Meijer, Costco, Whole Foods and Kroger to deliver groceries directly to your door for a fee, possibly another fee, and maybe a slight fee. To find out whether these services really deliver the goods, I attempted to test a few out in the name of both science and laziness. Will these new services have you

A Whole New World From the outset, it should be noted that all of these services require something that regular grocery shopping does not: decisiveness. If you’re someone who can’t decide between paper and plastic, this could be a pro or a con. One of the oddly challenging aspects of setting up test runs of these services was the amount of deliberation that

went in to ordering a list of items. Whereas I’m the kind of person who walks into a store with a list that says, “Cheese, bread, drinks, toothpaste,” defining a grocery list for someone else to shop requires a level of specificity usually reserved only for engine components of luxury cars. “Cheese” becomes “Kroger brand cheddar, 8 oz., finely shredded,” while “bread” creates a list of near-infinite variety. I had to actually go into the bathroom and see which brand, flavor and strength I usually purchase in toothpaste, and I still eventually just gave up on it. Luckily, when it comes to overindulging on high fructose corn syrup, I know my brand of caramel-colored poison like the back of my hand, so adding a drink to the list was simple. Still, this style of shopping eliminates the “I know it when I see it” aspect of my usual shopping trips. It also seems to require more effort somehow, which cuts against the convenience inherent in not having to do the actual shopping. The silver lining to this deliberative shopping cloud is that there is less chance of impulse buying. Here’s where I proudly state that I am absolutely putty in the hands of the grocery marketing gods. I will enter a grocery store to buy deodorant and some seltzer water, and I will emerge $64 later with exotic fruit, a reduced price family pack of t-bone


HAMBURGJOURNAL.COM steaks, two different kinds of ice cream (it was on sale!), buy one get one candy bars, store brand beef jerky and some discounted Star Wars figurines. And I’ll have forgotten the deodorant. When you pick out each item by brand, variety and quantity, you have to know what you want going in. There’s very little to browse, although the apps do try and get you to do so. You’ll wind up actually just getting the two items you wanted, rather than wondering what guayaba nectar is and if you should bring some extra home, just in case the kids like it. With these initial caveats in mind, we now turn to the experience of using the services. CLICKLIST Besides being a potentially embarrassing semi-spoonerism, ClickList is a little bit of a mess. ClickListIt’s is located inside the Kroger app, and I have high praise for the non-ClickList section of the app. I was able to add several e-coupons to my Kroger Plus card, and VOILA, they were there at checkout. The app also provides a list of items you purchased previously, which was kind of like seeing all my poor life choices set out in black and white. It was a pretty cool experience, so I figured ClickList would fare similarly. It did not. First things first, finding ClickList in the app is a bit of chore, and I’ll be honest that I’m still not quite sure how it works. I think you have to have a store selected as your primary store that offers ClickList, but that’s only because I’m near-positive ClickList actually disappeared as an option in the app a few times. It’s embarrassing to admit this because I’m usually the person who you don’t want to talk to at parties when it comes to technology (or anything else, but let’s stay focused), but ClickList had me flummoxed, and that will play out into what happened later. My first attempt at ClickList failed because of my well-known chicken addiction. I noticed my usual Kroger would have a sale on rotisserie chicken one day, so before leaving work that day, I pulled up the app and made a chicken-centric picnic food playlist that would make Yogi Bear drool until dehydration. Then the app asked me to pick a different store, as my usual joint did not have ClickList. Upon picking the next-closest store, the app kindly informed me that the chicken would not be available at a discount. Obviously, this was unacceptable. Discount chicken: 1, ClickList: 0. My next attempt somehow fared worse. Thinking, unrealistically, that it might be ready in an hour or so, I chose a location I would be driving past so I could swing by. My optimism was misplaced – my order would not be available until the next day. I dutifully picked a time for pickup and submitted the order anyway, before realizing that the location I had chosen would be roughly an entire city away from where I wanted to be at the appointed time. Luckily,

SEPTEMBER 2017 | 7 the app allowed me to edit my order, and sure enough, I could change the location where I wished to pick up the order. I submitted the change, happy in the knowledge that everything worked as it should. I arrived slightly late to the intended destination the day at the specified time. No order waiting for me. Not on the list at all. So I called the original store, which also did not have an order waiting. They checked for my order number – yes, they had an order waiting for me, ready for the next day. In other words, wrong place at the wrong time. I’ll concede that my attention to detail would allow for a slip-up of days, so it may be that the wrong date really is the date I entered. There is no stack of Bibles high enough, however, to prevent me from

have to actually drive to the store, which precludes beer runs from drunken partygoers INSTACART AND SHIPT Instacart and Shipt are similar to Uber and Lyft and any other “sharing” app where you summon an anonymous stranger to perform tasks at your whim, this time for grocery shopping. Instacart will shop at several major retailers, including Meijer, Costco, Kroger and Whole Foods, depending on which ones are in your particular area. Shipt recently partnered with Meijer to provide their official grocery delivery service for the Lexington area. There are two big differences between Instacart and ClickList off the bat. First,

“The silver lining to shopping in the cloud is the limits to impulse buying. I will enter a grocery store to buy deodorant and some seltzer water, and I will emerge $64 later with exotic fruit, a reduced price family pack of T-bone steaks, two different kinds of ice cream (it was on sale!), buy one get one candy bars, store brand beef jerky and some discounted Star Wars figurines. And I’ll have forgotten the deodorant.” swearing that I changed the location on my order in the app. I know this, because once I did make the change, the app wouldn’t let me modify the items in the cart unless I changed the pickup store back to the original location. The nice person on the other end of the phone canceled the order at my request, but I still got a notice reminding me to come pick up my order the next day. Nope. I may have punched in the wrong date somehow, but I definitely changed the location. Goodbye, ClickList. Had I used ClickList beyond an introductory set of orders, the fee would be $4.95 to have someone else shop and bring the groceries out to my car. While that’s lower than the other delivery services, it’s still nearly five bucks you have to pay for the convenience of still having to drive to the store. Pros: Lower fee; earn Kroger Plus points; no tipping drivers who come to your house Cons: unnecessarily confusing app; still

Instacart is an actual delivery service, as opposed to a “delivery across two rows of the parking lot” service. Second, Instacart will bring your groceries to you the same day and even maybe in the same hour, instead of making you wait. (To be fair to ClickList, it did say that some locations had same-day service now.) With Instacart, I opened the app, picked out the store I wanted foodstuffs from, made my list and a little over an hour later a guy showed up at my door with two nights’ worth of dinner (and one solid night’s worth of heartburn – I should have had him bring antacid as well). Instacart adds an extra layer of control to the proceedings as well – for each item, you can make notes, pick substitute items in case the store is out of stock, and even choose not to get the item if it’s not in stock. While my particular shopper was shopping, I got a text saying the store was

out of the particular specified hoagie rolls I had requested, and the shopper proposed a substitute. Click the link in the text to pull up the app, approve the substitution, and PRESTO! Quick and easy changeout. All in all, Instacart was a pretty solid all-around experience, with one caveat: the fees. Naturally, it would cost more to have someone bring you the groceries, rather than driving to the store yourself, but Instacart has a pretty elaborate fee structure. First, there’s a “delivery” fee you pay that depends on how soon you want the order and how many items you have. This starts at $5.99, but there’s also an “Instacart Express” option that costs $149 a year and works in much the same way Amazon Prime does. But that’s not all in terms of fees. Next comes the “Service Fee,” which is confusing – it’s automatically applied, but you can opt out of paying it, and there’s some language in there about splitting it among different folks who do the shopping and the driving. So it’s sort of like a tip, but for someone other than the driver. Then there’s the tip for the driver. You always tip the driver. Always. So that’s three separate fees, and that’s on top of any sly markup that may or may not take place on the grocery items themselves. Shipt works a little differently, fee-wise, using a fee system similar to a gym membership. You can pay a monthly fee or get a discount on paying up for the year, and orders of $35 or more don’t have a delivery fee. Like Instacart, there is a little markup in every item ordered that covers expenses. At the same time, paying $14 a month just to for the possibility of having the odd grocery order delivered also comes across as a little steep (and prohibitive to giving it a test run). Pros: SUPREME LAZINESS; can have Cheetos delivered while intoxicated; no need to stop binge-watching “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” Cons: the fees; inability to earn precious shopping reward loyalty points; the embarrassment of some random person knowing your deodorant scent, your favorite flavor of ice cream, your dire need of Immodium A-D, and your predilection for wearing cut-off Wrestlemania t-shirts when lounging around binge-watching “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” at home; the fees; also, the fees. In conclusion, while I am certainly lazy, I’m also cheap, and the cost of these services adds up quickly. There are those for whom this sort of shopping would be a boon — imagine if you’re wealthy, and have a broken foot — and there are times when the added costs may be worthwhile, such as when buying the ingredients for Thanksgiving dinner, or during a flu season. Sometimes it’s worth any amount of money to beat the crowds. Still, it’s hard to beat the siren call of wandering around Meijer or Costco or Kroger on an impulse buy spree. And that guayaba nectar really is delicious.


Sweet Success

HAMBURGJOURNAL.COM

8A || SEPTEMBER AUGUST 20172017

Lexington pastry whiz has a new book W

ould you eat Girl Scout cookies all year round if they were available? (They do lose a little something if you try to store a case in the freezer.) How do you feel about Hostess cupcakes or Little Debbie’s oatmeal cream pies? The new book from Lexington’s Stella Parks, BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts, just may convince you to try making these at home. The book, released in August, was in the making for more than five years, but if you’ve always wanted to know how to make your own Thin Mints or rainbow sprinkles or homemade Snickers bars, it’s well worth the wait. There’s an entire section devoted to “Classic American Brands” where she painstakingly re-creates homemade versions of Fig Newtons, Animal Crackers, Twinkies, and even Wonder Bread — footnoted, “Homemade versions of the brand-name product referred to are my own recipes, not provided or endorsed by the owners of those brands.”

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arks is a Culinary Institute of America trained pastry chef and a senior editor at Serious Eats, whose restaurant work in Lexington earned her a nod as one of 2012’s best new pastry chefs in Food and Wine magazine. On the Lexington food scene, she quickly became famous for menu items like macarons and homemade sprinkles. Her brown sugar, pear and pistachio layer cake landed her on the pages of Garden and Gun Magazine, and a Thanksgiving cake decorating segment at Fox and Friends. Her Serious Eats colleague J. Kenji López-Alt describes his first experience eating one of her confections at a Lexington restaurant in the introduction to the book. “The des-

COVER PHOTO BY SARAH JANE SANDERS


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“PARKS ADDS A REMARKABLE NEW VOICE TO THE WORLD OF BAKING BOOKS. COMBINE SMARTS WITH WHIMSY AND YOU GET DELICIOUS RESULTS.” —WASHINGTON POST sert was a play on Lucky Charms, complete with crunchy, diamond-shaped, multicolored marshmallows and a delicate panna cotta made to taste just like cereal milk. If you ate your Lucky Charms the right way (cereal bits first, semi-soaked marshmallows next, oat-flavored cereal milk to wash it down), you already know what this dessert tastes like in your mind. What’s incredible, though, is that if you were to go home right afterward and pour yourself a bowl of Lucky Charms, you’d find them to be unpalatably sweet, the marshmallows more Styrofoam-like than crunchy. Stella had managed to make a bowl of Lucky Charms that tasted more like Lucky Charms to me than actual Lucky Charms.” So, the recipes in the book are definitely not recipes provided by the brand. They’re actually better. Lopez-Alt cites Parks’s superpower as “her ability to tap directly into those parts of our brains that store our childhood taste memories, unlocking them and stimulating desires that we never even knew we had, hidden away like the creme in the middle of a Devil Dog.” As Parks once pointed out in a blog devoted to a Dairy Queen Oreo Blizzard, “The nature of a Copy Cat recipe is that it takes a lot of subtle factors to re-create a taste we all know and love; if you substitute or deviate from the recipe, it just won’t turn out the same,” but she also spells out the why and the why not (why wouldn’t you use free-range organic eggs? The custard might be delicious, but it won’t resemble Dairy Queen’s soft serve even remotely.) In reviewing the new book, the Washington Post says, “there is a lot to be said for being able to make the perfect version of whatever your childhood guilty pleasure was — and a lot more to be said for one book that delivers them all. Parks adds a remarkable new voice to the world of baking books. Combine smarts with whimsy and you get delicious results.”

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raveTart is also the title of Parks’s blog, which regular followers have long known as the source for everything from homemade Pop Tarts to ice cream sandwiches (which were not invented by Jerry Newberg). An irresponsible wiki entry once suggested that they were, prompting Parks to write a 2013 post which gets at the essence of both the blog and the book: “It may not be the most sinister example of misinformation in the media, but it’s a bummer to watch our culinary heritage get washed away by an urban legend, [because] it’s not just ice cream sandwiches. There’s hardly a dessert in America whose history hasn’t been hijacked by apocryphal claims and corporate fairy tales, and that’s why I hope I can write more than just another cookbook.” There’s no fake food news in the new book, which is part cookbook and part anthropology. At the time, she explained her approach as “buried in 19th century newspapers and trade journals, vintage cookbooks, and the United States Patent Gazette.” She wrote of her methodology, “I’ve watched hours of retro tv commercials, and combed ebay for antique biscuit crates, candy tins, and even a Nabisco employee training manual or two. These little bits and pieces tell a very different story about our favorite desserts, surprisingly sweet slices of American history.” When introducing the book to Serious Eats readers, she said, “I wouldn’t say BraveTart is strictly a cookbook. While my work on Serious Eats focuses on science, my book explores the secret history of classic American sweets. Not the corporate fairy tales we hear time and again, but stories that haven’t been told before—the true meaning of the word ‘Oreo,’ the weirdly vindictive origin of graham crackers, and the marketing-driven machinations that led to Key lime pie.” Hardly any cookbooks offer a cultural, culinary “whodunnit” alongside the recipes, which helps make this one a standout.

Lofthouse Sugar Cookies


10 SEPTEMBER A | |AUGUST 2017 2017

FOOD

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How to (deep) fry corn BY TOM YATES

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n my book, summer kicks off when roadside corn trucks dot the rolling country roads and flat bed trucks, stacked high with corn, back into stalls of the farmers market. Caught up in the corn frenzy, wispy silks fly through the air and float gently to the ground as people tear back husks to inspect the hidden jewels. Tender, sweet, and fresh enough to eat raw, few things top the arrival of locally grown corn. By Labor Day, we’ve tried it all. Boiled, steamed, grilled, creamed, or fried, fresh summer corn kindles memories of cookouts and summer picnics. Back in the day, my grandmother fried her garden corn. She’d heap spoonfuls of leftover salty bacon fat in a large cast iron skillet and fry the cut-off kernels until they caramelized and crunched like popcorn. While she creamed a few batches from time to time, boiled whole cobs rarely hit the table. She was the fry queen. As summer moved along, my grandmother instinctively morphed into her ‘depression era’ saving mode, canning the remaining bounty of corn for the leaner times. While her straight up canned corn lost its luster after overwintering in the dusty grim cellar, her preserved corn relishes survived bright and piquant. When my family settled into our own home on the far side of the family farm, my parents took a more modern approach with our garden corn. Bacon fat wasn’t invited to the party. Picked fresh from the garden, it was either meticulously shucked and de-silked before a quick steam or cut from the cob, milked, and briefly sauteed. Salt. Pepper. Butter. Corn. Heaven. During peak season, the endless extra hauls of corn got shucked, cut off, milked, blanched, and frozen. A family history of fresh garden corn. Different generations. Different takes. All fabulous. Nowadays, I’m all over the place when the corn starts rolling in. I love it bacon-wrapped, chargrilled, boiled, steamed, creamed, pureed, pan fried, sauteed, or souffled, Few things can beat corn pudding, spoonbread, or corn bread made with fresh peak season corn. And fried? I take it one step further and toss whole ears of corn into a deep fryer. The intense heat of the fryer quickly caramelizes the corn while simultaneously steaming the inside of the kernels. Slathered in butter, it takes me back to my grandmother’s table, sans the extreme crunch and leftover bacon fat. Deep Fried Corn. Simple. Quick. Fantastic. Lime Chive Butter. I brought 5 tablespoons of unsalted butter to room temperature before adding 1/2 teaspoon white pepper, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice, and 3 tablespoons snipped garden chives. I set the butter aside and cranked a deep fryer to 350 degrees. Typically, I fry whole ears of corn. For more manageable smaller corn bites, I cut them down a notch. After shucking and cleaning six ears of Wayne County bi-colored corn, I trimmed the ends before slicing the ears into 1 1/2” discs.


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Working in batches, to not overcrowd the deep fryer, I carefully lowered the corn into the hot oil for about 3-4 minutes. When they started to crisp around the edges and caramelize, I tumbled them onto a parchment paper-lined sheet pan, slathered them with the chive-flecked lime butter, and stabbed them with toothpicks before finishing with flaky sea salt, a splash of lime, and additional chives. Kissed by the hot corn, the lime-infused butter slowly melted through the crevices of the crispy caramelized kernels, puddling underneath for easy dipping and swiping. While the lime countered the rich buttery fat with subtle bright acidity, the snipped chives and salt provided fresh grassy crunch. Dip. Swipe. Repeat.

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

FRIDAY, SEPT. 1 The Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library will host Baby Jam every Thursday and Tuesday in September starting at 10:15 and 11 a.m. This lapsit story time develops pre-reading skills with books, songs, and activities, and promotes

budding social skills and child-caregiver interaction. This event is designed for children ages 0-24 months. The final Friday Family Nights summer event of the year will be held Friday, Sept. 1 at the Hamburg Village gazebo starting at 5 p.m. There will be entertainment and

crafts for the entire family. For more information, go to www.HamburgPavilion.com The Arboretum will host an Insect Safari 7 to 9 p.m. The annual family-friendly night of insects, spiders and science provided by UK’s Department of Entomology. Be sure to bring a flashlight.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2 Sow it Saturday will be held at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. at the Arboretum. Help Kentucky Children’s Garden staff maintain the gardens and plant a seed to take home Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True Storytime will be held Saturday Sept. 2, at Barnes and Noble in Hamburg, starting at 11 a.m. There will a storytime and activities featuring the sequel to Uni the Unicorn. Follow Uni and the little girl who believes in unicorns, as they finally meet and work together to save a magical land and its inhabitants.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 5 Kids are invited to paint a T-shirt using fidget spinners Tuesday, Sept. 5 from 6 until 7 p.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. This event will designed for kids grades 7 through 12. All materials will be provided. Registration is required and can be made by call 859.231.5500.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 6 Barnes and Noble in Hamburg will host children’s storytime each Wednesday at 10 a.m. Stop by the the children’s section at the back of the store for a fun-filled storytime with a craft/activity to follow.

Preschool Storytime will be held each Wednesday, starting Wednesday, Sept. 6, at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. There will be fun stories, songs, and activities that promote literacy, math, and science skills. This event is designed for ages 3-5.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 7 Toddler Time will be held each Thursday, starting Thursday, Sept. 7. at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. The focus will be on books, music, and activities that encourage literacy, math, science, and social skills followed by an art activity or story-related project. This event is designed for ages 2-3. The Arboretum will host “Handprint Butterflies” on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Use recycled materials to create a butterfly craft to take home and learn about butterfly coloration.

SATURDAY SEPT. 9 Barnes and Noble in Hamburg will feature a storytime Saturday, Sept. 9 “How to Catch a Monster Story,” starting at 11 a.m. Parents and children will love this fun, inventive picture book, which reminds us that things aren’t always as scary as they seem. Activities will follow.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 12 The Teen Advisory Board of the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library will meet Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 6 p.m. This is an invitation to be part of the group that makes teen events happen at the library. This meeting is open to teens in grades 7 through 12.


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ALL ABOUT KIDS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 13

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Wild Thyme Cooking will host Chef’s In Training Knife Skills Workshop for ages 7-14 on Wednesday, Sept. 13 from 4:45 to 6:15 p.m. Whether you are a top chef or an athome beginner this knife skills workshop will show you how. This hands on class will teach you classic culinary techniques, knife cuts, as well as properly cutting and dicing an onion.

SATURDAY SEPT. 16

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14 The Arboretum will host “Worm Painting” on Thursday, Sept. 14 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Learn all about worms while creating a worm painting.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 15 The Child Care Council of Kentucky will host the annual Kids Matter Golf Tournament Friday, Sept. 15, starting t 1 p.m. This year’s tournament - Fore to Forty - celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the University of Kentucky’s 1978 NCAA Championship. Kyle Macy will be this year’s host and will be joined by several teammates from the 1978 team plus team managers and others with names like Jack Givens, Rick Robey, Jay Shidler and many more. For more information, go to www.childcarecouncilofky.com/golf-tour-

“Princesses Wear Pants” storytime will be held Saturday Sept. 16 at 11 a.m. in the children’s section of Barnes and Noble in Hamburg. In their debut children’s picture book, Savannah Guthrie and Allison Oppenheim team up for a savvy, imaginative story that celebrates fashion and girl power. Activities will follow.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 The Lexington Children’s Theatre will present “Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook” Sunday, Sept. 17 at 2 and 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 23 at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Sept. 24 last 2 and 4:30 p.m. Based on the beloved books by Barbara Park, find out what happens when our favorite kindergartener learns the difference between what

it means to take and what it means to give. For more information, go to lctonstage.org.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 23 There will be a drop-in craft project Saturday, Sept. 23 at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. This event is designed for all children. Check out few books and make a small craft to take home.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 The Arboretum will host “Fingerprint Fireflies” on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Learn about insects that produce light and create a fun firefly craft.

SATURDAY, SEPT 30 The Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library will host “Lego Lab” Saturday, Sept. 30, starting at 10 a.m. Put your imagination to work for some free-builld Lego fun. Plan, create, and build at your own pace or work with friends. This event is designed for children in grades K through 5.


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H E A LT H N E W S A N D E V E N T S

Early diagnosis at UK advanced eye care gives infant a future with sight BY CHRISTINA BRIGGS Kenley Overton’s parents didn’t know much about retinoblastoma when they took their infant Kenley in for her four-month wellness checkup, but that quickly changed. Kenley was born Aug. 24, 2010, to Jason and Kendra Overton. Kenley was a welcome addition to the family by her big sister Jaylen. When Kenley was a few weeks old, the Overton’s noticed her right eye would cross frequently. They brought it up to their local pediatrician during a wellness checkup and were told that this was not abnormal for newborns and they shouldn’t worry. However, when they brought her in for her four-month wellness checkup and her right eye was still crossing, the pediatrician suggested Kenley see an eye doctor as it was likely she would need glasses to fix the issue. In a whirlwind of appointments, Kenley saw an optometrist who believed she had a detached retina and referred her on to Dr. Peter J. Blackburn at UK HealthCare Advanced Eye Care Clinic who, after some testing, diagnosed Kenley with retinoblastoma – a form of eye cancer that begins in the retina. Thirteen days after her wellness check, Kenley was scheduled for surgery with Blackburn to evaluate the situation and decide on a plan for moving forward. When Blackburn came out of surgery, he told the Overton family it was the best-case scenario, and that the cancer was only in Kenley’s right eye. He was pleasantly surprised because at such a young age, he had suspected the cancer would have been in both eyes. The decision was made to enucleate Kenley’s right eye that day. As a precaution, in the years following the surgery, Kenley was regularly monitored to make sure the cancer hadn’t spread to her left eye. As she continues to grow and show no signs of the retinoblastoma in her left eye, Blackburn became more confident that it would be contained to the one eye. Retinoblastoma is a rare disease and only 200 – 300 children are diagnosed with it each year in the United States. About three out of four children with retinoblastoma have a tumor in only one eye. In about one case in four, both eyes are affected. Overall, more than nine out of 10 children with retinoblastoma are cured, but the outlook is not nearly as good if the cancer has spread outside the eye. Blackburn says that while there are no known avoidable risk factors for retinoblastoma, some gene changes that put a child at high risk of retinoblastoma can be

Kenley Overton (center) and her family.

Dr. Peter J. Blackburn of the University of Kentucky HealthCare Advanced Eye Care Clinic. passed on from a parent. Children born to a parent with a history of retinoblastoma should be screened for this cancer starting shortly after birth because early detection of this cancer greatly improves the chance for

successful treatment. Kendra Overton looks back on this difficult time in Kenley’s life and remembers how tough it was on her marriage and parenting. While taking care of Kenley, she

and Jason also cared for Jaylen, who was 4-years-old at the time and could see the anguish in her parents. But through the stress, she remembers Blackburn and the care he provided for Kenley. “Dr. Blackburn was a very confident in the information he delivered about Kenley and her treatment plan and he had a wonderful bedside manner,” she said. Something about Blackburn she remembers most fondly is that he took the time to pray with her family before Kenley’s surgery. “At a time when we were falling apart, we really needed that and you don’t normally hear of doctors doing that.” Kenley is now a thriving 6-year-old. Overton describes her daughter as naturally funny and someone who never meets a stranger and just has a love for people. “Everyone who comes in contact with her says she is just so amazing.” UK Advanced Eye Care includes all subspecialties of ophthalmology that enables providers to treat all ocular diseases from neonates to geriatrics.


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H E A LT H N E W S A N D E V E N T S TUESDAY, SEPT. 5 The Lexington/Fayette County Health Department will host the “Eat, Move, Lose” weight-support group Tuesday, Sept. 5 at noon at the Health Department South, 2433 Regency Rd. Free weight-loss support group appropriate for anyone wishing to lose weight or maintain weight loss. Share struggles and ideas with others. For more information, call 859-288-2446. The Lexington/Fayette County Health Department will host a diabetes prevention program Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 5;30 p.m. at the Health Department South, 2433 Regency Rd. This program will help people learn to eat healthy, be active, problem solve and change lifestyles. For more information, contact health educator Tara Mason at 859.288.2347. Kentucky Cancerlink and the Fayette County Health Department will host the classes “Freedom from Smoking” Tuesday, Sept. 5, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. These classes offer support and tips for quitting smoking. These classes will continue every Tuesday in September. Registration required and can be made by calling Kentucky Cancerlink at 859-309-1700.

MONDAY, SEPT. 11 The Lexington/Fayette County Health Department

will host a diabetes support group for senior citizens Monday, Sept. 11 at 9 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. For more information, call 859.288.2446.

for lifesaving treatments and pioneering the most promising cancer research anywhere. For more information or to start a team at www.ltn.org/ky

The Lexington Hearing and Speech Centers Sol and Glow Golf Event will be held Monday, Sept. 11 from noon until 10 p.m. at the Keene Run Golf Course. The day will include lunch, an 18-hole day scramble, dinner and reception, and the popular 9-hole “glow ball” night scramble.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 21

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14 Hearing Loss Association of America Lexington Chapter will hold a meeting Thursday, Sept. 14 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. The chapter is a self-help organization dedicated to education, advocacy and support for people who do not hear well. They offer emotional support, camaraderie, tips and techniques for living with hearing loss, and technical information about hearing assistance devices. The meetings are free. For more information, email infolex@hlaa-ky.org or go to the www.hlaa-ky.org/lexington website.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 The Light The Night Walk will be held Sunday, Sept. 17 at Legends ballpark, starting at 5:30 p.m. to benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The event funds treatments that are saving the lives of patients. LLS is making cures happen by providing patient support services, advocating

The Lexington/Fayette County Health Department will host a breastfeeding basic class Thursday, Sept. 21 from 7 until 9 p.m. This group will meet every third Thursday of the month at Babies R Us. This class covers newborn baby behavior, how breastfeeding works, managing challenges in the early weeks and pumping and storing mother’s milk. The class is taught by a lactation consultant with the health department. For more information, call 859.288.2348

TUESDAY, SEPT. 26 Understanding your Medicare options will be focus of a class Tuesday, Sept. 26 at the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library, starting at 6 p.m. This presentation is designed to help new beneficiaries and their caregivers a better understand of the Medicare program. Even those who currently have Medicare coverage could benefit from this detailed overview. Topics will include an introduction to Medicare including what Medicare covers, supplemental Medicare Health plans including Medicare Supplements, Medicare Advantage plans, and Part D prescription drug coverage.


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SENIOR EVENTS AND NEWS FRIDAY, SEPT.1 The Lexington Senior Citizens Center will be accepting Thanksgiving food basket applications through Wednesday, Sept. 13. You are eligible if you live in Fayette County, are age 60 and older and meet the following income guidelines: Household Size 1, Monthly Income (before deductions) $1,307; Household Size 2, Monthly Income (before deductions) $1,760; Household Size 3, Monthly Income (before deductions) $2,213; or Household Size 4, Monthly Income (before deductions) $2,665

MONDAY, SEPT. 11 The Lexington/Fayette County Health Department will host a diabetes support group for senior citizens Monday, Sept. 11 at 9 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. For more information, call 859.288.2446.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 15 The conference “Living the Good Life!” will be held Friday, Sept. 15 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Office, 1140 Harry Sykes Way. The Next Best Years of Your Life can be the best years if you take the time and effort to recognize needs and seek answers. In its 22nd year, The Next Best Years of Your Life Conference is an opportunity for citizens 55+ to meet, connect, share and learn. The keynote speakers include Ben Chandler, Foundation for Healthy Kentucky, and Amy Goyer, AARP’s National Family and Caregiving Expert. Attendees will receive relevant advice on personal and financial safety in addition to community resources.

The Flat Out Fun Dancers will also perform. Call the Fayette County Extension Office at 859.257.5582 to register. The registration fee includes exhibits, continental breakfast, lunch and materials.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27 “Stand Up to Falling Seminar” will be held Wednesday, Sept. 27 at the Fayette County Extension Service from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Stand Up to Falling: A Fall Prevention Program Stand Up to Falling introduces the seriousness and consequences of falling, especially for adults age 65 and older. The program highlights four preventable risk factors: lack of exercise, unsafe home environments, vision problems, and medication usage. When these risk factors are properly addressed, the likelihood of falling can be lowered and even prevented. This fall prevention program offers a toolkit of resources and curriculum to help people stand up to falls. These materials include: fall prevention curriculum, extension publications, information releases, radio scripts, and a post session evaluation. This program continues Thursday, Sept. 28 and includes lunch. For more information, call 859.257.5582 or go to www.fayette.ca.uky.edu/

THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 Stop by the Lexington Senior Citizens Center on the fourth Thursday of every month at 10 a.m. for discussions of all things related to aging, life after retirement and tips on staying brain and heart healthy in your golden years. Share tips and tricks with the group, get to know fellow participants and enjoy a monthly meeting devoted to anything and everything you want to discuss. Call Amanda Patrick at 278-6072 to suggest a topic for discussion.

Lexington Senior Center hosts monthly aging support group Stop by the Lexington Senior Center for an aging support group that is for, by and about seniors. This group will be primarily lead by Amanda Patrick, social worker at the Lexington Senior Center. Everyone at the senior center has some insight into life after retirement. The staff recognizes the importance of having a safe environment to share thoughts on aging, share tips and resources, and meet others that are in similar situations. To join in on the discussion, stop by the Lexington Senior Center on Thursday, Sept. 22 and each fourth Friday of the month at 10 a.m. For more information, call 859.278.6072.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

somewhere

FRIDAY, SEPT. 1

The final Friday Family Nights summer event of the year will be held Friday, Sept. 1 at the Hamburg Village gazebo starting at 5 p.m. There will be entertainment and crafts for the entire family. For more information, go to www.HamburgPavilion.com

THE HAMBURG JOURNAL CALENDAR OF EVENTS

LUKE BRYAN

The Bluegrass Classic Dog Show will continue through Monday, Sept. 4 at the Kentucky Horse Park. This show will include competition for more than 150 breeds, best-in-show competition, junior showmanship classes, and obedience and rally. AKC Owner-Handler Series, Canine Good Citizen Test, and a Meet the Breeds event will also take place Saturday and Sunday, plus a 4-H Dog Club Musical Program on Saturday. Dock Diving will be featured this year. The Lexington Fest of Ales will be held Friday, Sept. 1 from 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. at Cheapside Park. This is the ninth annual Lexington Fest of Ales. There will be over 150 beers to sample from over 60 breweries, including a special area featuring Kentucky breweries. Red, White & Boom will be open Friday, Sept. 1 at Legends ballpark, starting at 5 p.m. Luke Bryan, Brett Eldredge and more will open up the country music festival on Friday, Sept. 1.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2 Budding or experienced writers are invited for a dropin writing session with the Eagle Creek Writers Group Saturday, Sept. 2 at 10 a.m. in the Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library. Bring your current project to work on or use a prompt to begin something new. Open to all writers. Man O’ War Harley-Davidson will host a Labor Day Grill Out and Chill Out Saturday, Sept. 2 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.. There will be a free grill out, live music from The X’s, kids activities, and more. The public is invited to attend.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 3 Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate, will host Jazz on the Lawn Sunday, Sept. 3 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. This year’s

musical group will be C The Beat under the direction of Lee Carroll. The cafe will be open for dinner and West Sixth Brewing and Sav’s Chill Truck will be on site. Event is free, but there is a $5 parking charge per car. Bring your lawn chair or blanket and enjoy an evening of fun.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 5 The Lexington Ski and Sports Club trip preview and sign-up will be held Tuesday, Sept. 5 from 6 until 8 p.m. at Roosters, 124 Marketplace Drive. Join an organization of individuals who love skiing and snowboarding. Everyone is welcome to come and for a meeting to experience the fun discussing the trips offered to resorts in the U.S. and overseas.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 7 Disney on Ice returns to Rupp Arena for a new show “Dream Big” for performances through Sunday, Sept. 10. Join eight Disney Princesses – Ariel, Belle, Cinderella, Rapunzel, Tiana, Jasmine, Aurora and Snow White – as they embark on incredible adventures, determined to make their dreams come true. For more information, go to www. rupparena.com.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 8 The March of Dimes Little Princess Ball will be held Friday, Sept. 8 at Griffin Gate Marriott from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Little Princess Ball is a daddy and daughter dance to benefit March of Dimes. There will be dancing,


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

MARTINA MCBRIDE

WILDCAT FOOTBALL HOME OPENER

food, and photos with Princesses Elsa and Belle. For more information, go to the Facebook page for the March of Dimes - Central/ Eastern Kentucky & West Virginia. The Kentucky BASH will be held Friday, Sept. 8 at the The Club at Kroger Field, starting at 6:30 p.m. Organizers are celebrating 44 years of the Kentucky Bash. Stop by the evening before the first University of Kentucky homegame, music, a sophisticated tailgate menu, Kentucky spirits and a live and silent auction. Contact Lauren Monnet at 859.246.8811 or lauren. monnet@cardinalhill.org for more information or to reserve a spot. Country music star Martina McBride will perform Sept. 8 at the Norton Center for the Arts. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. For more information, go to nortoncenter.com

SATURDAY, SEPT. 9 The Lexington Humane Society Doggie Paddle will be held Saturday, Sept. 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Woodland Park Aquatic Center. Enjoy pet-related vendors, games, food, and drinks; shop for LHS merchandise; and mingle with fellow animal lovers. The first 300 dogs to register will receive a free bandana at check-in. Visit AdoptLove.net for more information. The Waveland Art Fair 2017 will be held Saturday, Sept. 9 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Waveland Historic Site. Come browse, shop and meet some of Kentucky’s top artist and their work. Enjoy the tour of Waveland’s main home, former slave quarters, smoke house and ice house. Have lunch and taste wine from local Kentucky food and wine vendors. Children’s activities will be offered throughout the event. The University of Kentucky football team kicks off the home schedule with a contest against Eastern Kentucky Univer-

ROCK PAINTING

some rocks with the Bluegrass Rock Painters. Rocks and paints provided for first-time painters. Children old enough to paint unsupervised are welcome. For more information, call Vicki Curry at 859.948.7279.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 13 sity at Kroger Field. Kick-off is scheduled for noon Saturday, Sept. 9.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 10 The annual Bluegrass Autism Walk will be held Sunday, Sept. 10 at Legends ballpark from 2 until 5 p.m. It will be a day of fun while raising money for a great cause. There will be entertainment, activities for kids and families, vendor/agency fair, silent auction, food, and more. Proceeds will be used for education, advocacy and support for central Kentuckians on the autism spectrum and their families, caregivers and professionals.

MONDAY, SEPT. 11 Do you like to cook? Are you interested in learning more about nutrition and food preparation? Do you have time to volunteer to help others? Then come and learn about joining the Champion Food Volunteer Program. There will be an informational meeting Monday, Sept. 11 at 1:30 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Service. The classes include kitchen readiness, a just start on nutrition, a rainbow of colors, carb conscious, center of the plate. For more information, call 859-257-5582 or email liz. kingsland@uky.edu The Lexington Hearing and Speech Centers Sol and Glow Golf Event will be held Monday, Sept. 11 from noon until 10 p.m. at the Keene Run Golf Course. Get out your miner lights, glow sticks and golf game

for Lexington Hearing & Speech Center’s 14th annual Sol & Glow Charity Golf Event. The day will include lunch, an 18-hole day scramble, dinner and reception, and the popular 9-hole “glow ball” night scramble.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 12 The Dress for Success Lexington’s Fifth Annual Recycle the Runway will be held Tuesday, Sept 12 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Grand Reserve. Guests will enjoy a unique “recycled” fashion show, silent auction and luncheon where local designers unveil runway-ready fashions made out of “unsuitable” garments. Their oneof-a-kind creations will be featured on the runway and judged by local fashion savvy judges. For inquiries regarding sponsorship or designer opportunities, donation of silent auction items, or volunteer opportunities, contact Candace French at candacefrench11@gmail.com. Court Appointed Special Advocates of Lexington’s Volunteer Fall Training will be held Tuesday, Sept. 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 1155 Harry Sykes Way. Organizers are seeking caring and passionate individuals to be the voice for abused and neglected children in our community. No experience necessary. Contact CASA for more information 859-246-4321. The Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library will host Bluegrass Rock Painters for a special event Tuesday, Sept. 12 from 6 until 9 p.m. Come by and paint

This year’s Jefferson Street Soiree will be held Sept. 13 from 6 until 10 p.m along Jefferson and Short Streets to Maryland Ave. Tee Dee Young Band will be performing with The Kentucky Hoss Cats. The Lexington Bourbon Society’s September Social Sipper will be in attendance to provide seating and water, and a place to consort with other bourbon lovers to enjoy the sights and sounds with a VIP basecamp.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 15 The Festival Latino de Lexington will be held Friday, Sept. 15 from 5 to 11 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 16, 4 to 11 p.m. at the Robert F. Stephens Courthouse Plaza. Celebrate Latin American art and culture in the heart of downtown Lexington at the Festival Latino de Lexington with live music, dance, visual arts and authentic cuisine. For more Information, call 859.288.2927 The latest Gallery Hop will be held Friday, Sept. 15 from 5 until 8 p.m. at various participating galleries in the downtown area. During the LexArts HOP, thousands of locals and visitors alike converge on downtown Lexington to celebrate art throughout the evening with new gallery exhibitions, special events, and food and drinks at supporting venues. With dozens of galleries and non-traditional exhibit spaces, the LexArts HOP is arguably Lexington’s most anticipated visual arts celebration. Pick up your HOP guide at ArtPlace, 161 North Mill Street, or visit GalleryHopLex.com for venue information and an interactive map.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS SATURDAY, SEPT. 16 The McDazzle Red Tie Gala will be held at the Hilton Downtown Lexington on Saturday, Sept. 17 from 6 p.m. until midnight. McDazzle features a live and silent auction, gourmet dinner, live music and dancing along with a special tribute to our 2017 “Elizabeth Carey Nahra Legacy of Love.” For more information, contact Sarah Jordan at sjordan@rmhclexington.com

DOGGIE PADDLE

SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 The Light The Night Walk will be held Sunday, Sept. 17 at Legends ballpark, starting at 5:30 p.m. to benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The event funds treatments that are saving the lives of patients. LLS is making cures happen by providing patient support services, advocating for lifesaving treatments and pioneering the most promising cancer research anywhere. For more information or to start a team at www.ltn.org/ky Man O’ War Harley-Davidson invites everyone to the 19th annual Burgers and Bikes celebration Sunday, Sept. 17. There will be a bike show with awards given in both H-D and open classes. There will also be prize giveaways, raffles, silent auctions, police motorcycle demos, kettle corn, live music, and good food. All proceeds benefit Special Olympics KY. For more info, contact Heather Arnold at 859.619.4836 The Lexington Children’s Theatre will present “Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook” Sunday, Sept. 17 at 2 and 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 23 at 2 and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Sept. 24 last 2 and 4:30 p.m. Based on the beloved books by Barbara Park, find out what happens when our favorite kindergartener learns the difference between what it means to take and what it means to give. For more information, go to lctonstage.org.

MONDAY, SEPT. 18 The Eastside Branch of the Lexington Public Library will offer a free beginner’s level Spanish class that starts with the alphabet and builds up to basic conversational phrases. Registration is required. To register or for more information, contact Lindsay Mattingly at 859.231.5514 x1144 or email lmattingly@lexpublib.org

TUESDAY, SEPT. 19 The Bluegrass Chapter of the Kentucky Restaurant Association will host its inaugural Harvest Lex in partnership with Manchester Music Hall. Lexington’s finest restaurants, wineries, breweries and distilleries will be offering up tastes of their best

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

GARRETT HOUSTON FOUNDATION RIDE harvest. This event will be held at the Manchester Music Hall from 6:30 t0 9:30 p.m. Proceeds will benefit Kentucky ProStart and FoodChain Lexington.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 20 A special tour, “Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckley,” explores the relationship between Mary Lincoln and African-American dressmaker Elizabeth Keckley. Although both women were born in 1818, Mary Lincoln was born into an affluent slaveholding family, while Elizabeth Keckley was born into slavery. This event will be held Wednesday, Sept. 20 from 5 until 8:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 21 The Neil Simon classic Lost In Yonkers will be presented at the Singletary Center for the Arts on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8:30 p.m. and continuing with various performances through Sunday, Oct. 8. For more information, go to the Singletary Center for the Arts Facebook page.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 23 Man O’ War Harley-Davidson will take part in the Garrett Houston Foundation Ride Saturday Sept, 23 at 11 a.m. This event will be a chance to support a great cause that provides kids fighting cancer with care packages. Their families with utility, rent, funeral and anything needed to help stay with their child while they are fighting. Garrett was the 15 year old son of Shawna Houston-Ruth and older brother of Leighvi, Rylee and Bennett who passed away March 4, 16 after fighting for 315 days. His mom started the Garrett Houston Foundation to help other kids and their parents. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/GarrettHoustonFoundation/

The UK football team will take on Florida State Saturday, Sept. 23 at noon at Kroger Field.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 26 Kentucky Proud Evenings presents Bill Best of Kentucky Heirloom Seeds: Growing, Eating, Saving on Tuesday, Sept. 26 at the Fayette County Extension Office, 11140 Harry Sykes Way.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27 The Lexington Opera House welcomes An Evening with Rufus Wainwright Wednesday, Sept. 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. The Troubadour Concert Series presents vocalist, composer, and songwriter — Rufus Wainwright. Wainwright has released eight studio albums, three DVDs, and three live albums. Legendary folk-rock musician and songwriter Gordon Lightfoot perform Wednesday, Sept. 27 at the Singletary Center for the Arts. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 The seventh-annual Harry Dean Stanton Fest will take place Sept. 28 through 30 and will include a red carpet premiere of Harry Dean’s new film Lucky. Both John Carroll Lynch and John Doe will join patrons for the festivities and there will be lots of films screenings, discussions, and more. Speed Networking for Designers will be held Thursday, Sept. 28 from 6 until 7:30 p.m. at Pivot Brewing, 1400 Delaware Ave. Boost your career in literally the most fun and painless way possible. Join organizers

for a monthly speed networking event at Pivot Brewing. RSVP on Facebook.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 An Evening in a Magic Garden will be held Friday, Sept. 29 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at The Apiary. This is a fund raising event to benefit Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center. The Lexington Bluegrass NAWIC Chapter # 367 will be hosting its second annual scholarship golf scramble Friday, Sept. 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kearney Hills Golf Links. This event is open to all women and men. The Air1 Positive Hits Tour will hit Rupp Arena on Friday, Sept. 29 starting at 7 p.m. Food for the Hungry presents this tour with Skillet and special guests Britt Nicole, Colton Dixon, Tauren Wells and Gawvi.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 30 The Black Jacket Symphony returns to the Lexington Opera House to perform Pink Floyd’s “Wish You Were Here” on Saturday, Sept. 30 at 8 p.m. at the Lexington Opera House. The Black Jacket Symphony offers a unique concert experience by recreating classic albums in a live performance setting with a first class lighting and video production. For more information, go to www.blackjacketsymphony.com. The 2017 Lexington Walk to Defeat ALS will be held Saturday, Sept. 30 at Rupp Arena, starting tat 8:30 a.m. The Walk to Defeat ALS is an opportunity to bring hope to people living with ALS, to raise money for a cure, and to come together for something you care about. For more information, go to www.alsa.org.


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HOME AND GARDEN FRIDAY, SEPT. 1 The Arboretum will host an Insect Safari 7 to 9 p.m. The annual family-friendly night of insects, spiders and science provided by the University of Kentucky’s Department of Entomology. Be sure to bring a flashlight. There will be a guided Garden Tour of the Home Demonstration Garden Friday, Sept. 1 from 11 a.m. to noon. at The Arboretum. To register, call 859.257.6955. For more information, go to www.arboretum. ca.uky.edu/home

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2 Sow it Saturday will be held at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. at the Arboretum. Help Kentucky Children’s Garden staff maintain the gardens and plant a seed to take home

THURSDAY, SEPT. 7 The Arboretum will host “Handprint Butterflies” on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Use recycled materials to create a butterfly craft to take home and learn about butterfly coloration.

16 from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. The group will travel by bus and on foot to visit the beautiful and ancient trees of Lexington. For tickets or more information, go to www.venerabletrees. org

TUESDAY, SEPT. 19 The Fayette County Extension Service will host a class on peonies on Tuesday, Sept. 19 at 6:30 p.m. There are few perennials that you can plant and forget but peonies certainly qualify. Peonies often exist in cemeteries without care for decades. Stop by and learn about herbaceous peonies and take home three of these plants for your own garden. To register or for more information, call 859.257.5582

THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 The Arboretum will host “Fingerprint Fireflies” on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Learn about insects that produce light and create a fun firefly craft.

The Fayette County Extension Service will host a workshop on autumn crocus and colchicums on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 6:30 p.m. Although these colorful blooms look shocking amid the fallen leaves it is refreshing to have such color when everything else is winding down. The extension service will provide bulbs for home gardens. For more information, call 859.257.5582 or go to www. fayette.ca.uky.edu/

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14 The Arboretum will host “Worm Painting” on Thursday, Sept. 14 at 10:30 to 11 a.m., 1 to 1:30 p.m. and 3 to 3:30 p.m. Learn all about worms while creating a worm painting. Saving Flower Seeds will be the focus of a class Thursday, Sept. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at the Fayette County Extension Service. It is very easy to save and store seeds. This class will cover cross pollination hazards, hybrid versus open pollinated, how to dry and store for longest life. This class is free but must attendees must register in advance to reserve a seat. To register or for more information, call 859.257.5582

SATURDAY, SEPT. 16 Join Venerable Trees for a tour of Lexington’s most amazing trees on Saturday, Sept.

Kentucky Proud Evenings presents Bill Best of Kentucky Heirloom Seeds: Growing, Eating, Saving on Tuesday, Sept. 26 at the Fayette County Extension Office, 11140 Harry Sykes Way.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 An Evening in a Magic Garden will be held Friday, Sept. 29 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at The Apiary. This is a fundraising event to benefit Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center. The funds raised from this event will help purchase a healing garden for patients and their families at the new Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center


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HAMBURGJOURNAL.COM

REAL ESTATE SOLD IN 40505 AND 40509

40505 Jul 31................... 2129 PATCHEN LAKE LN.......................... $403,000 Jul 26................... 166 SWIGERT AVE.................................... $330,000 Jun 29.................. 2319 CABOT DR........................................ $134,000 Jul 24................... 179 E LOUDON AVE.................................. $115,000 Jul 27................... 491 WANSTEAD WAY................................ $112,500 Jul 25................... 2277 ALLEN DR......................................... $110,000 Jul 21................... 544 SOUTHRIDGE DR............................... $110,000 Jul 28................... 1761 BREWER DR..................................... $107,000 Jul 24................... 470 MOSS DR............................................ $104,000 Aug 01................. 614 JUDY LN.............................................. $100,000 Jul 20................... 2311 ALLEN DR.......................................... $95,000 Jul 28................... 914 DARLEY DR........................................ $95,000 Jul 27................... 846 E LOUDON AVE.................................. $85,000 Jul 31................... 999 CARNEAL RD...................................... $79,000 Jul 25................... 1647 KILKENNY DR................................... $77,600 Jul 31................... 538 ROGERS RD....................................... $74,000 Aug 03................. 858 CARNEAL RD...................................... $61,000 Jun 28.................. 114 BLUE GRASS AVE.............................. $60,000 Jun 16.................. 638 HYDEN CT.......................................... $59,500

Jul 19................... 1956 GREENLEAF DR............................... $59,055 Jul 21................... 1131 SPARKS RD...................................... $53,000 Aug 02................. 256 E LOUDON AVE ................................. $15,000 40509 Jul 28................... 1804 PASCOLI CV..................................... $629,681 Jul 31................... 1555 N CLEVELAND RD........................... $613,067 Jul 21................... 3692 HORSEMINT TRL.............................. $542,000 Jul 28................... 2433 ASTARITA WAY................................. $454,000 Jul 21................... 3285 TRANQUILITY PT............................. $384,000 Jul 24................... 1332 N CLEVELAND RD........................... $380,000 Jul 07................... 785 LOCHMERE PL................................... $359,563 Aug 01................. 1744 SANDHURST CV............................. $355,000 Aug 01................. 337 JANE BRIGGS AVE............................. $335,000 Jul 28................... 2413 SAN MILANO PL............................... $352,000 Jul 27................... 1086 HADDRELL PT.................................. $327,500 Jul 20................... 2265 SUNNINGDALE DR........................... $323,500 Jul 31................... 4044 BOONE CREEK RD.......................... $317,000 Jul 14................... 3510 TRANQUILITY PT............................. $314,900


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Jul 28................... 2085 FALLING LEAVES LN........................ $310,000 Jul 31................... 2632 FLYING EBONY DR UNIT 02............ $300,000 Jul 21................... 3191 BAY SPRINGS PARK........................ $297,607 Jul 14................... 1049 AUTUMN RIDGE DR......................... $290,000 Jun 26.................. 3716 ST ANDREWS WALK....................... $289,000 Jul 24................... 3657 PHEASANT RUN............................... $287,900 Jul 21................... 265 RICHARDSON PL............................... $287,500 Jul 24................... 3216 WINGED FOOT CIR.......................... $287,000 Jul 31................... 3153 CAVERSHAM PARK LN.................... $280,000 Jul 26................... 3357 LAWSON LN...................................... $279,000 Jul 18................... 3612 TRANQUILITY PT............................. $263,824 Jul 17................... 4360 WALNUT CREEK DR........................ $260,000 Jul 24................... 2232 POKEBERRY PARK.......................... $237,000 Jul 24................... 4613 MARCUS TRL................................... $235,100 Jul 24................... 1025 STONECROP DR.............................. $220,000 Jul 14................... 941 SUGARBUSH TRL.............................. $218,000 Jul 19................... 492 LANARKSHIRE PL.............................. $215,000 Aug 04................. 2304 ICE HOUSE WAY.............................. $189,500 Jul 21 .................. 3676 BEATEN PATH.................................. $180,000 Jul 21................... 3345 SCOTTISH TRCE ............................. $179,900 Jul 24................... 3502 DORAL PL......................................... $179,000 Jul 19................... 2300 INDEPENDENCE CT........................ $176,500

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Jul 27................... 1272 COLORADO RD................................ $176,000 Jul 26................... 1213 TELLURIDE CIR................................ $176,000 Jul 21................... 2125 MILLSTONE WAY.............................. $172,000 Jul 31................... 3024 OLD HOUSE RD............................... $171,000 Jul 20................... 1779 TIMBER CREEK DR.......................... $168,000 Aug 03................. 624 REPUBLIC CT .................................... $165,000 Jul 28................... 824 RIDGEBROOK RD.............................. $156,900 Jul 28................... 1429 PLEASANT RIDGE DR..................... $152,000 Aug 04................. 2464 CHECKERBERRY DR....................... $150,000 Jul 24................... 1445 PLEASANT RIDGE DR..................... $150,000 Jul 07................... 709 WHISPERING BROOK TRCE............. $145,000 Jul 24................... 672 MORGAN HILLS DR........................... $143,000 Jun 30.................. 3109 NAVAJO CT....................................... $136,000 Jul 05................... 2848 ASHBY GLEN PL............................... $135,000 Jul 14................... 1336 RED STONE DR................................ $135,000 Jul 12................... 605 SHIRETOWN RD................................. $128,000 Jun 30.................. 3054 BONANZA DR UNIT 7-4.................... $103,000 Jul 17................... 467 DABNEY DR....................................... $100,000 Jul 17................... 213 SHADOW WOOD PL........................... $100,000 Jul 10................... 301 WOODCROSS PL............................... $85,000 Jul 31................... 3569 POLO CLUB BLVD............................ $67,500 Aug 03................. 299 HEDGEWOOD CT............................... $35,000


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HAMBURGJOURNAL.COM

Hj september 2017  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for the Hamburg area of Lexington, Kentucky.

Hj september 2017  

Lifestyle and entertainment magazine for the Hamburg area of Lexington, Kentucky.