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Acronyms 101

As technology and education converge, the acronyms fly! Get the 411 to better understand the federal policies, programs, and agencies that impact classroom programs and practice.

COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998) FTC rule took effect: 2000 Last updated: 2012 (amendments effective July 2013) Rundown: If apps, websites, or online services want to collect or use personal information from young kids (under 13 years), they have to get permission from their parents. COPPA doesn’t prevent them from creating a site or app for young kids. It just says they need parents’ permission to collect, use, or disclose children’s personal information.

Implications: The law keeps parents as the main decision maker in the digital lives of kids under 13. Resources: • Federal Trade Commission on COPPA: www.ftc.gov/opa/2012/12/coppa.shtm • COPPA and Your Child’s Privacy: www.commonsensemedia.org/coppa • Common Sense Media response to COPPA: www.commonsensemedia.org/about-us/news/press-releases/statement-fromcommon-sense-media-ceo-james-steyer-on-the-ftcs-updates-

E-rate (Schools and Libraries Program of the Universal Service Fund) Took effect: 1997 Last updated: 2001 Rundown: Eligible schools and libraries receive federal discounts to help ensure affordable access to modern telecommunications services and the Internet.

Implications: Schools and libraries must comply with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) in order to receive E-rate funding.

Resources: • Common Sense Media E-rate and CIPA Toolkit for Administrators: www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/erate-admins • Common Sense Media E-rate and CIPA Toolkit for Teachers: www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/erate-teachers

CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act) FCC rule took effect: 2001 Last updated: 2011 (amendments effective July 2012) Rundown: A law that mandates certain Internet safety policy and filtering requirements for recipients of E-rate discounts. Schools and libraries must block or filter Internet access to child pornography and to visual depictions that are obscene or harmful to minors (on computers accessed by minors). In addition, they must educate students about appropriate online behavior. The FCC is responsible for enforcing this act.

Implications: This act and the E-rate program are co-dependent. Schools receiving E-rate funding must follow CIPA, and

those who follow CIPA are eligible for E-rate funding. Under CIPA, these schools must educate students on appropriate online behavior, including interacting with individuals on social networking sites and cyberbullying awareness and response.

Resources: • Common Sense Media E-rate and CIPA Toolkit for Administrators: www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/erate-admins • Common Sense Media E-rate and CIPA Toolkit for Teachers: www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/erate-teachers

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NCIPA (Neighborhood Children’s Internet Protection Act) Took effect: 2001 Last updated: N/A Rundown: For libraries receiving E-rate funding, NCIPA prohibits certain activities, pertains to the universal service discounts only, and requires libraries to adopt and implement an Internet safety policy addressing a variety of specific issues – essentially an acceptable use policy – and to do so with local participation.1

Implications: The technology protection measure mandates the inclusion of blocking or filtering in the Internet safety policy. One of a number of elements of the Internet safety policy is the use of blocking or filtering technology, as part of a technology protection measure.

Resources: • American Library Association on CIPA and NCIPA: www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=ifissues&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=164253

FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) Took effect: 1974 Last updated: N/A Rundown: FERPA protects the privacy of student education records and gives parents certain rights with respect to these

records. Parents have the right to inspect and review the records maintained by the school; the right to ask a school to correct records they believe to be inaccurate or misleading; and the right to contest uncorrected records in a formal hearing and with a formal statement placed with the record.

Implications: Schools can disclose certain personally identifiable “directory” information about students, but they must notify parents and allow them a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose this information.

Resources: • U.S. Department of Education FERPA: www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html

After Congress passes new laws, independent federal oversight agencies often take on the responsibility of implementing and enforcing these policies. The two key regulatory bodies for media policy are the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

FTC (Federal Trade Commission) is an independent government agency created in 1914 that has both

consumer protection and competition authority in broad sectors of the economy. One of the FTC’s three strategic goals is to protect consumers by preventing fraud, deception, and unfair business practices in the marketplace — online and offline.2

FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is an independent government agency created in 1934 that regulates interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable in the U.S. The agency’s responsibilities include: promoting competition, innovation, and investment in broadband services and facilities; ensuring an appropriate competitive framework for the unfolding of the communications revolution; and revising media regulations so that new technologies flourish alongside diversity and localism.3

1

“CIPA Questions & Answers,” 16 July 2003, American Library Association, Web, 20 February 2013.

2

Federal Trade Commission, “About the Federal Trade Commission” (5 January 2012), available at www.ftc.gov/ftc/about.shtm.

3

Federal Communications Commission “What We Do” (undated), available at www.fcc.gov/what-we-do.

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Tech Readiness Rubric

Is your site truly ready for a 1-to-1 rollout? Use the following rubric to assess how robust your site’s current information technology infrastructure is. It shows Excellent, Good, and Not Recommended positions to deploy a 1-to-1 program from an infrastructure perspective.

Assumptions: The matrix below was crafted for a school with about 30 classrooms, multiple buildings, or data closets (IDFs) within a single site, with an average of 20-25 students in a classroom.

Note: This matrix is not meant to be all-inclusive or all-encompassing. It was designed to highlight key components of the network infrastructure your organization needs to consider when designing a 1-to-1 infrastructure. For example, it does not cover the configurations of your router, firewall, content filtering system, or other networking equipment, because they vary from school to school. However, these components are important to take into account so they are not the bottleneck in your network design.

Criteria/Tech Areas

Excellent

Good

Not Recommended

Network cabling can handle extra traffic

CAT6, 1 Gbps capable wiring

CAT5e, 100 Mbps capable wiring

CAT5, <100 Mbps capable wiring

IDF to MDF connections are higher by one increment. If you are starting from 100 Mbps connections, move to 1 Gbps. If you are starting from 1 Gbps, move to 10 Gbps.

10 Gbps uplinks to MDF

1 Gbps uplinks to MDF

100 Mbps uplinks to MDF

IDF/MDF Network Architecture is optimized for increase bandwidth

2 port bonded / etherchannel connections from IDF to MDF

1 port to 1 port IDF to MDF uplink ratio

Daisy-chained switches at IDF

Expand DHCP (and/or VLAN, if needed) scope

2-3 IP addresses per student

1 IP address per student

Shared IP pool of addresses

Adjust DHCP renewal

24-hour renewal time

12-hour renewal time

< 12-hour renewal time

Internet bandwidth can handle exponentially increased upload and download traffic.

75-100 Mbps

50-75 Mbps

<50 Mbps

At least 800-1000 Gbps per switch (this will depend on total number of users)

Between 500 - 800 Gbps per switch

Between 250-500 Gbps per switch

(Whatever you think you need, take that number and double it. This is your goal. Do not underestimate how much the school will be uploading.) Core/MDF switches are rated to handle your exponentially increased traffic volume. Note: Each network architecture is built for the volume of connections, users, and traffic. These numbers do not reflect this. Consult with your network architect/engineer.

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Criteria/Tech Areas

Excellent

Good

Not recommended

Closet/IDF switches are rated to handle exponential increase in traffic volume

At least 150 Gbps per switch

100-150 Gbps per switch

<100 Gpbs per switch

Wireless access points are rated to handle extra device load simultaneously

802.11n

Wireless access points have proper coverage to handle a class full of devices downloading or uploading simultaneously (building for surge, not average use)

One/two 802.11n WAPs per classroom

One 802.11n WAP per classroom

Shared WAPs (1 WAP for 2 classrooms)

(depends on site)

(depends on site)

(depends on site)

Support staff can handle increased volume of simultaneous calls. (Make sure support expectations are clearly communicated to faculty.)

< 1:100 ratio (1 staff to 75 users) without central DMS, device management system

1:150 ratio without central device management system;

> 1:150 ratio without central device management system 1:200 or higher with DMS

> 750 Mbps volume

1:150 ratio with DMS

1:150-200 ratio with DMS

Device Management System (DMS) or MDM – mobile device management. This significantly depends on how your 1-to-1 program is designed. Do students own their iTunes accounts, devices, etc.? Who is responsible for purchasing apps, restrictions, etc.? In some cases, you may choose not to use an MDM at all. The best way to think about an MDM is to ask yourself what you want to control or manage – then find a product that has those features.

Fully-fledged MDM (these are currently undergoing rapid development).

Lightweight MDM (reduced features).

None

Wireless printing infrastructure

Wireless printers available

Wired printers connected to central print server

Wired printers only

App/software purchasing system.

Volume purchasing account with plan / schedule for purchasing and distribution.

Student managed app purchasing

No app purchasing or distribution plan

iTunes accounts: You need to decide how you are managing iTunes accounts. Are they student/family owned (remember age 13 limit), school-owned, shared, or other?

Student/family owned (this really depends; less management but less control).

School-owned (this model requires extra work by IT staff).

No plan

Web filter/Internet connection monitoring

Robust Web filter that blocks by packet data and URL

Standard URL-based filter

None

iPad printing: Consider how much you really want to print. There’s an opportunity with a 1-to-1 program and digital workflow to reduce printing significantly.

Airprint capable printers or no printers.

Print “server” software. Allows iPad to print through computer with installed software.

N/A

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTERS

Facilitator’s Guide

Have teachers work collaboratively in grade-level, discipline, or interdisciplinary groups to share their goals, ideas, and concerns. Depending on your working session, you can ask groups to work on the same conversation starter or different ones. Encourage teachers to share out their thoughts at the end of each session.

Hopes & Fears Give teachers the opportunity to offer their input on what may or may not work as your school transitions to 1-to-1. Conclude your discussions on a high note by outlining actionable goals and next steps, based on the feedback they have provided.

Problems

Solutions

Obstacles are inevitable, whether rolling out a new instructional program or implementing behavior change. And change takes time! In the interim, acknowledge some of the potential problems ahead, and brainstorm possible solutions. After all, it’s better to be proactive than reactive.

Sharing Best Practices Best teaching practices need to be shared. Technology can aid this process, allowing teachers to more easily share inspirational ideas and classroom work samples. What procedures can you

Transforming with Technology What’s the difference between using technology in isolated cases and integrating it into your

in the classroom from “Enhancement” to “Transformational.”

Excitement & Innovation Celebrate the ambitious project you all are undertaking! Ask teachers to envision the potential even the smallest ones.

Common Sense Says … add their voices to the discussion about rolling out your 1-to-1 program. If you include them from the get-go, they will see themselves as valued stakeholders. Collect and keep your teachers’ feedback from these conversations. At the end of the year, revisit the comments Be ready for trepidation as well as excitement! Emphasize the importance of open and ongoing dialogue, and set up a support system to make this possible. This will help manage expectations and reactions from the get-go.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTER

Hopes & Fears

In rolling out such an ambitious program, it is customary for teachers to be both excited and hesitant. Voice your fears so that collectively, you can anticipate any potential hiccups and brainstorm about solutions. Additionally, outline your optimistic expectations for the program as a way of setting some benchmarks for the school community.

What are your hopes and fears? Hopes

Fears

Now choose two items from each column. What are some concrete steps you can take to address or realize each item?

Items

Steps

Fear 1 Fear 2 Hope 1 Hope 2 Essentials Program

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTER

Sharing Best Practices

Constant communication is a key to a successful program. Yet technology changes at such a rapid pace,

What are some ways you can regularly share best practices and new finds?

Ways to Share

Example:

Example: “Appy Hour” 1x/week to talk about new app finds

Put a star next to an idea that represents a new way for you all to swap ideas. What steps will your school or team need to take to put this method in place?

1.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTER

Problem

Solution

Each school community is unique. Knowing your stakeholders, your district’s infrastructure, and your student population, you may already anticipate some stumbling blocks for implementation.

What might be an obstacle for successfully rolling out 1-to-1 program in your school or district?

Problem End Goal

End Goal

End Goal

What are some possible solutions that you can put in place before this issue occurs?

Possible Solution Essentials Program

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTER

Transforming with Technology

Dr. Ruben Puentedura, founder and president of Hippasus, devised the following approach to integrating technology in teaching and learning. He originally presented the SAMR model in 2006. Using this model, think about where your classroom practices currently lie, and then imagine what you can do to progress to that next stage.

How will you approach each stage to make the transition from “Substitution” all the way to “Redefinition”?

ENHANCEMENT

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

SAMR (Puentedura)

Actionable Ideas

Tech allows for the creation of new tasks, previously inconceivable

Tech acts as a direct tool substitute, with functional improvement

Tech acts as a direct tool substitute, with no functional change

Puentedura, Ruben R. SAMR and TPCK: An Introduction. Ruben R. Puentedura’s Weblog. 20 Mar. 2013. Web. 29 Mar. 2013. <http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/2013/03/28/SAMRandTPCK_AnIntroduction.pdf>. Essentials Program

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONVERSATION STARTER

Excitement & Innovation

Technology offers such promise for these 21st-century skills: communication, creation, collaboration, and critical thinking. The newest and latest tools afford innovation in such exciting ways.

What are you most excited about regarding technology’s potential in your classroom? Lingering Questions:

Idea 1

...

Idea 2

...

Idea 3

...

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Cyberbullying What to Know

Online cruelty, also referred to as cyberbullying, takes place whenever someone uses digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else, often repeatedly. While spreading rumors and bullying is nothing new for kids, online tools can magnify the hurt, humiliation, and social drama in a very public way. Cyberbullying can take a variety rumors, or posting cruel comments or images online. The feeling of being anonymous or “removed” from a target in an online environment can encourage a kid who normally wouldn’t say anything mean face-to-face to act irresponsibly or unethically.

Why Teach It Help your students … consider ways to create positive online communities rooted in trust and respect. learn to identify, respond to, and limit the negative impact of cyberbullying and other unethical or harmful online behaviors. recognize their own role in escalating or de-escalating online cruelty as upstanders, rather than bystanders. When kids misuse online or mobile technology to harass, embarrass, or bully others, they can do real and lasting harm. Nothing

Teachers and parents can help kids think about the consequences of their online actions — before they even occur. When guiding students, it’s important for them to understand that they have a choice in all of their online relationships. They can say something positive or say something mean. They can create great community support around activities or interests, or they can misuse the public nature of online communities to tear others down.

Key Vocabulary cyberbullying: the use of digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone drama: the everyday tiffs and disputes that occur between friends or acquaintances online or via text Note: Unlike cyberbullying, which involves repeated digital harassment toward someone, drama is broader and more nuanced. That being said, kids and teens sometimes use the term drama to distance themselves from emotionally difficult behavior. Digital drama can still feel very real to students, lead to hurt feelings, and even – either verbal or physical.

hate speech: making cruel, hostile, or negative statements about someone based on their race, religion, national origin, ability, age, gender, or sexual orientation

target: a person who is the object of an intentional action offender: a person who has a malicious intent to hurt or damage someone bystander: a person who does nothing when they witness something happening upstander: a person who supports and stands up for someone else escalate: to increase or make more intense de-escalate: to decrease or make less intense

Essentials Program

For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at www.commonsense.org/eeducators/scope-and-sequence

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Creative Credit & Copyright What to Know

We live in a digital culture that empowers young people to access information instantly, rework media easily, and share their online material without thinking about where it comes from or to whom it belongs. Viewing the Internet as a “free-for-all” leads to problems of copyright infringement, plagiarism, piracy, and a general lack of respect for the hard work and creativity of others. The basic fact is this: Even if something is posted on the Internet for all the world to see, someone, somewhere, created that picture, song or article – and it belongs to that person. The Four Points of Fair Use:

Use a small amount Schoolwork and education

Add new meaning and make it original

News reporting Criticizing or commenting

Rework and use in a different way

Comedy and parody

Use for nonprofit purpose

Why Teach It Help your students … about their rights to their own copyrighted work. how they can use copyrighted work without permission through public domain and fair use. that piracy and plagiarism are forms of copyright infringement that are unethical and unlawful. By focusing on young people’s roles as digital creators, you can encourage your students to take responsibility for positively online into schoolwork without citing it is plagiarism. They may not understand that illegally downloading and sharing music, videos, and software is a form of stealing called piracy. With your guidance, your students can learn to respect the copyrights of others, as well as how to protect, receive acknowledgement for, and share their own original creations.

Key Vocabulary a law that protects a creator’s ownership of and control over the work he or she creates, requiring other people to get the creator’s permission before they copy, share, or perform that work using someone else’s ideas or words without crediting the source and pretending they’re your own the unauthorized use, reproduction, or sharing of copyrighted or patented material – typically music, movies, and software creative work that’s not copyrighted and therefore free for you to use however you want and education, news reporting, criticizing or commenting on something, and comedy/parody) editing together clips of video, sound, images, and text by “remixing” or “mashing” different parts together to create something new a kind of copyright that makes it easy for people to copy, share, and build on someone’s creative work –

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For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Privacy & Security What to Know Just as in real life, it’s important for young people to know whom they can trust with their information online. While security programs and privacy settings can help block some issues – such as computer viruses or cookies – kids should also learn how to create strong passwords and protect their private information. Starting in elementary school, kids can learn the importance of looking at sites’ privacy policies with their families and asking them permission teens can learn concrete strategies for identifying scams, as well as limit the types of information that companies collect about them through apps and websites.

make your passwords eight or more characters, using combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols. (These are harder to crack than regular words because there are more combinations to try.) include any private identity information in your password. (People may easily guess passwords that include your name, address, birth date, etc.) change your password at least every six months. (This way, even if someone does guess your password, they won’t be able to get into your account for long.) share your password with your friends. (Even if you trust them, they might unintentionally do something that puts you or your information at risk.)

Why Teach It Help your students … identify strategies for creating and protecting strong passwords. spot and avoid online scams. understand the concept of online privacy, why companies collect information, and how to understand privacy policies. Kids may not realize they’re putting their information in jeopardy, because the warning signs aren’t always obvious. With your safe sharing from oversharing. These skills are crucial to the security of the digital devices your students use as well as the information those devices store. Otherwise, your students may expose themselves and their families to serious issues such as computer viruses or data and identity theft.

Key Vocabulary computer virus: a software program that can damage other programs on the computer cookies: small computer text files placed in your computer by the sites you visit that collect information about your computer system and the Web pages you view – often to identify repeat customers and personalize visitors’ experiences

identity theft: phishing: when people send you phony emails, pop-up messages, social media messages, texts, calls, or links to fake privacy policy: a legal document that explains how a website gathers and uses your private information private information: information that can be used to identify you, such as your full name, Social Security number, postal address, email address, and phone number

scam: an attempt to trick someone, usually with the intention of stealing money or private information target: when companies tailor content to you based on the information they’ve collected about you track: when companies collect information about you based on your online behavior

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For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Self-Image & Identity What to Know

Why Teach It understand consider

you

Key Vocabulary avatar: anonymous: double standard: ethics: gender code: identity: image:

“People are really more free to be themselves or what they actually want to be. So, I’ve sort of learned how people reacted to certain things I say and sort of built myself around it.”

inhibited: persona: stereotype: a popular belief about a group of people, based

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Relationships & Communication What to Know

Whether we’re reading an online review, posting something on a social network site, texting a friend, or sharing a photo through an app, we’re participating in a world where we can be instantly connected to thousands of people at a moment’s notice. When kids connect with each other from a distance or through a screen name, it can impact the way they behave. For example, their actions can feel removed from consequences or free from discovery. When something happens anonymously, it’s easier for people to behave irresponsibly, cruelly, or unethically. Others may also misinterpret the tone and context of messages or posts. world. They should be empowered to be good digital citizens, in addition to being good citizens in general.

Why Teach It Help your students … recognize that different audiences require different types of communication and online etiquette. develop constructive solutions to online interpersonal dilemmas that exemplify ethical behavior. imagine the motivations, feelings, and intentions of others as they relate to a variety of online exchanges. Anything your students say or do with their phones or through quick messages may seem to disappear when the devices shut down, but the impact on others remains — whether good or bad. As a teacher, you can guide your students to think critically about different forms and norms of digital communication. Guide them to choose their words wisely. Help them develop the habit of self-reflecting before posting or texting, asking themselves questions like “Who is my audience?” and “What’s the

power to connect.

“My role as a member of the online world is to be an asset to the community. Just like offline! Respecting everyone’s different opinions is important. As far as friends go, online and offline are sooooo connected you could never really separate them. I keep in touch every day online with people I see once or twice a week… All my friends are a nice combination of online and offline.” Maybel, age 13

Key Vocabulary community: a group of people with a common background or shared interests emoticon: a graphic used to symbolize emotion online internet meme: an idea — whether a phrase, expression, image, or video — that gains widespread recognition online internet slang: common terms, abbreviations, and acronyms used online norm: standards and expectations responsibility: an obligation or duty you have to yourself or others tone: the way something sounds and the feelings it expresses viral: the rapid spread of information, particularly online

Essentials Program

For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at www.commonsense.org/eeducators/scope-and-sequence

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Information Literacy What to Know

Today’s digital landscape offers young people unprecedented access to tools and resources for learning. The information that kids encounter, however, is not always accurate or high-quality. Foundational information literacy skills, such as conducting strategic online searches, judging the legitimacy of online sources, sifting out misinformation, and recognizing advertising, can help set keywords. They also can learn that sponsored links (which commonly appear at the top of the search result list) are forms of ads and therefore not always the best resources. When young people also get in the habit of checking out an author’s credibility or bias, questioning whether a photo has been digitally altered, or cross-referencing sources, they can avoid being misinformed or duped.

Why Teach It Help your students … learn effective techniques for evaluating the quality and credibility of websites. think critically about the intentions of commercial websites and advertising. apply different search strategies to increase the accuracy and relevance of online search results. Too often, students who are looking for information online — particularly for their schoolwork — how they search and what and quality information — whether conducting online research for school projects or exploring their personal interests.

“I trust most websites to be true, but it can be hard to tell.”

“We do an activity where students evaluate bogus websites. They look great to students at first, but what the sites are actually referencing — if you take the time to read them — is completely ludicrous.”

Matt, age 12 middle school teacher, San Francisco

Key Vocabulary strategy: keywords: the words you use to search for information about a topic plagiarism: using some or all of somebody’s work or idea and saying that you created it citation: a formal note of credit to an author that includes their name, date published, and where you found the information digital photo manipulation: using digital technology to change the content or appearance of a photo retouching: to improve a photo by adding or changing small details synergy: two or more things working together to produce something that each could not achieve separately collective intelligence: knowledge collected from many people toward a common goal advertisement: a message that draws attention to a product and encourages people to buy it banner ad: an online ad that looks like a bar or button on the website advergame: an online ad that is also a game you can play video ad: an online ad that is a video and might look like a TV commercial pop-up ad: an online ad that “pops up” over the content of the website sponsorship ad:

Essentials Program

For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at www.commonsense.org/eeducators/scope-and-sequence

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Digital Footprint & Reputation What to Know

In a world where anything created online can be copied, pasted, and sent to thousands of people in a heartbeat, privacy starts to mean something different than simply guarding personal information. On the positive side, this culture of sharing holds tremendous online disclosure also poses risks for young people. A decision made in the spur of a moment — a funny picture, a certain post — can resurface years later. Something originally sent to a friend can be sent to a friend’s friend, and so on. That’s how secrets future employers, or the public at large.

Why Teach It become themselves, depending on the content, context, and audience. celebrate a “culture of sharing” through digital media while considering some possible harmful effects of over-sharing. learn to respect the privacy of others online when tagging, posting, or copying other’ personal information.

online, as well as respect the privacy of others. If students aren’t careful about what, how, and to whom they disclose information Internet so they can begin to build a positive digital presence.

Key Vocabulary digital footprint: all of the information online about a person either posted by that person or others, intentionally or unintentionally

self-disclosure: persistent: lasting a long time, if not forever, such as information that one posts online that does not go away because it is passed on and spread

consequence: the effect of something that happened earlier sexting: sending or receiving sexually explicit photos or videos by text message or other digital technologies reputation: the general impression of a person held by others and the public over-sharing: giving out too much information

“I wanted everybody to know what I’d done because I thought it was so cool… There were people that I didn’t even know reading about it and commenting on it… It’s just that when you’re online, you think more like, you’re not going to see these people again. So I wasn’t worried that what I’d said was going to come back and really do damage. I pretty much broadcast it to the entire world.” Brittney, age 14 Essentials Program

For K-12 lessons on this topic, check out our Scope & Sequence at www.commonsense.org/eeducators/scope-and-sequence

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TEACHER BACKGROUNDER

Internet Safety What to Know

The term “online predator” often conjures up the image of a creepy older man at a computer screen waiting to lure an unsuspecting

Thinking Beyond “Online Predators” 1. Teens, not children, are most likely to receive online sexual solicitations.

2. A teen is more likely to be solicited online by another teen or a young adult.

3. The “predator-prey” label gives the wrong impression.

Not as risky Very risky

warning signs, and more broadly, why romantic relationships between teens and adults are unhealthy.

The Truth About Risky Online Relationshops

strangers

What Should Kids and Teens Know if Online Strangers Contact Them? Elementary School

Middle School and High School

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to

are normal.

Teaching Strategies for Sensitive Topics Setting Ground Rules

communicate blame.

Provide Supportive Resources

www.thatsnotcool.com)

www.athinline.org)

Research

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