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FDAC F I R E D I S T R I C T S A S S O C I AT I O N O F C A L I F O R N I A

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2017 Board of Directors

President Steve Hall 1st Vice President Steve Kovacs 2nd Vice President Jim Comisky Immediate Past President Richard Pearce Treasure Eric Walder FDAC STAFF Catherine Smith, Executive Director Carmen Berry, Account Coordinator David Blue Garrison, Communications Specialist Additional Photography Pexels, Pixabay and Stocksnap Additional Conference Photography Pete Liebig, Lakeside Fire Protection District Board The purpose of this Association shall be: 1) to present a united position on fire protection issues; 2) to coordinate with other associations with similar views on fire protection including legislation; 3) to provide advisory services and any other services deemed appropriate by the Board of Directors that may benefit member agencies; 4) to keep member agencies informed on laws relating to fire suppression, emergency medical and other related services provided by member agencies; 5) to take an active role in the legislative process affecting public agencies providing fire suppression, emergency medical and related services. Thank you to all the authors in this issue for sharing with us their time and expertise. If you have an idea for a future article, please contact Carmen Berry at the FDAC office: cberry@fdac.org Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of FDAC. For more information on FDAC or this magazine, please contact the FDAC office at 916.231.2941 or visit the website at www.fdac.org.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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H A L L

It’s hard to believe 2017 is almost half-over – where has the year gone? This letter comes at a time of transition for the FDAC Board – passing the torch if you will. In taking on the presidency, I reflect back over the past couple of years on the numerous projects and initiatives we’ve taken on, as well as the goals we’ve accomplished as an association and as fire districts. These successes are all due to the dedicated professionals that make up the Fire Districts Association of California. With that, I’d like to thank Richard Pearce for everything he’s done over the past several years, all of which has greatly contributed to the success of the FDAC. Moving forward, we still have a lot to do and it’s going to take all of us to keep the momentum moving in the right direction. With an energetic Board of Directors, engaged committee members, an ongoing successful relationship with the FDAC/CalChief’s Legislative Task Force and the unwavering partnerships with FAIRA, FASIS, and FDAC EBA, we will continue to support you and your voice – the voice of Fire Districts throughout the State. This year, my goals for FDAC will be to continue focusing on legislation, working with Ralph Heim and Russ Noack of PPA, keeping well-informed on issues impacting the fire service; to further develop our membership and identify additional alliances that could provide value-added benefit for our members; to continue improving upon our annual conference structure – providing the most current, relevant, and “needed” topics in support of our members; and to provide additional educational outreach to our Fire District Chief’s and Board Members through FDAC’s Certificate of Achievement (COA) program. As you read this quarterly report, I hope you will reflect on our past successes as an association, and energize you for the future of FDAC. For those of you who have tirelessly committed time and energy to the success of this association – and to the successes within your respective districts – I thank you. For those that are new, I welcome you to the Fire District’s Association of California, and look forward to working with each of you in the future.

Steve Hall FDAC President

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Monterey: A Pleasant Change for FDAC! Brian Wilkes, Battalion Chief, Murphys Fire Protection District

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udos to FDAC for taking a chance on something new and hosting the FDAC annual conference at the beautiful Monterey Tides. For many years FDAC held the event in Napa Valley. Looking for something different, the association looked to a hotel on the coast. As we all know, change is difficult and risky at times but overall, I felt that the conference was a huge success. The venue was a bit smaller, a little older, sleeping rooms a bit tighter but the view out the window, at every turn, was the Pacific Ocean. It was evident the moment you walked up to the registration desk that there was a lot of pre-planning and thought that went into making this destination friendly venue work for attendees. It makes it very difficult to find anything to complain about when attendees could look at amazing views of Monterey and many attendees were lucky to catch a glimpse of whales and dolphins right outside the conference window. The hotel staff was very helpful and friendly, and the meals were tasty and filling. Another plus was being just a short 15-minute ride to Cannery Row and Fisherman’s Wharf. The Uber coupon for a reduced fee was an extra bonus. Many of us used this coupon to venture out after the conference to explore this beautiful area of the coast. If you didn’t head to the wharf, the hotel offered many opportunities to meet, network and enjoy local cuisine. Can’t forget to mention the fire pits on the hotel patio which were a big hit as well! A nice destination hotel is always a plus but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the high quality educational sessions and powerful keynote speakers that were part of the conference. This year’s closing speaker, Mike Madrid, gave a fascinating data-driven look into California’s political landscape and what challenges lie ahead. I understand that Monterey Tides is in the running for next year’s conference. If you are on the fence about attending, I would encourage you to go; experience the Monterey Tides and walk away with up-todate information on fire service issues and ways to better serve your constituents. See you in 2018!

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The Room Where It Happens

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Jim McClure, Principal Firehouse Design and Construction

lthough I am a frequent contributor to the FDAC Report, I did not ask for this assignment. I was asked by FDAC to share my experience as an exhibitor to the recent FDAC annual conference. So, before I go on, I have to set the background first.

attendees don’t use. I think my eye is a little different. And lastly, my current work and my previous experience, means that I look at all buildings from a functionality standpoint. I can be really critical; as you’ll see a few paragraphs down. Some of you probably heard me talk about this when we’re in Monterey.

any work done if it we do.” That was confirmed when I walked into the conference room. Actually, I was surprised that the conference center was on the top floor and had ocean views. I had expected the meeting rooms to be on the first floor and all the hotel rooms above it.

I am an East Coast guy. I spent The only thing that would have my first 28 years growing up I cannot speak to the sleeping made the view better was if outside of Philadelphia. As like rooms at all. I have friends that certain booths were not allowed many others from that area, I live five minutes away and I to have their pop up banners. spend a lot of summers on the hadn’t seen them in a while, I’m looking at you PG&E. Just Jersey shore. Eighteen (18) so I spent the night at their joking of course. Maybe next of my first 28 summers year the window tables were spent at the beach are restricted to people “...I was really happy to before I moved west. who don’t have pop-up see it actually was on the Now I know as soon as banners. All in favor? you see the words Jersey beach.” I must admit I was Shore you think of that surprised that the exhibit stupid TV show. That was not my place. I did not hear anyone hall was smaller compared experience. That is North Jersey; complaining about the guest to the one we had Napa the basically a New York City rooms but I will leave it to the last four or five years. My suburb. I was in south Jersey. rest of you who stayed at the impression was that we were Why is this important? Because hotel to chime in as you wish. really squeezed in there. With when I saw we were going to When I saw the first notification the table so close I was afraid Monterey my first thought was for the conference, I jumped that conversations between “I’m going to the beach!” on Google Earth to see if the vendors and attendees would The second point you need to hotel was really on the beach drown each other out. To my know is before my career as a because I couldn’t remember surprise, that was not the case. professional firefighter and a which one it was. I don’t know When the first major break firehouse consultant, I was in a how all of you reacted but I was came and the room filled up, the hotel and restaurant business. really happy to see it actually only word I can think to describe So I look at restaurants and was on the beach. My first it was synergy. With that many hotels a little differently than thought was “I wonder if we people in the room there was most, I tend to look at them will have an ocean view from a definite energy which I did from the back of the house; how the conference room - probably not remember in Napa. I don’t they function, how the building not.” Most conference centers know how many of you have works for its staff and customers. are windowless. My second heard the soundtrack from the A methodology most of the thought was “I’m not going get Broadway show Hamilton. If

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The Room Where It Happens continued you don’t know, it is a play about the Founding Fathers done in a Rap style. There is a number called The Room Where it Happens. It refers to being in the place where the action is, where the decisions are made. It would be good track for the exhibitor room. An interesting compare and contrast experience. Sometimes the only way to compare two objects is to experience both of them. The only other hiccup I remember in the exhibit hall were when the lights dimmed during the first presentation next door in the meeting room. Both my hotel background and my firehouse building background kicked in and my jaundice eye took over my brain. My first thought was ‘Oh no, don’t tell me all the lights on the ocean side conference center are on a single switch?’ My next thought was what the hey was the hotel thinking when they did this? Did they miss it on the plans? Did the contractor cheap the installation? Did the electrical

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contractor low ball the bid and get away with it?’ Luckily, none of those turned out not to be the case. The separate dimmer switches were found and the lights went down in the Pinot & Alones Rooms and the lights stayed up in the exhibit Hall. Lastly, the food was great! I thought there was more than enough choices for the breakfast buffet, my favorite meal, and the lunches were creative and delicious. I thought the wait staff was professional and attentive. Almost too attentive but it wasn’t their fault. Some of us were talking more than we were eating and we were a little slow to clean our plate. As a consequence, the waiters and waitresses would stop by more than once to ask if we were finished and by we, I mean me. The afternoon break desserts were delicious and probably could’ve put several of us into a diabetic coma. Maybe next year I’ll rent a surfboard and a wet-suit. Is it too late for 68-year-old to learn how to surf?

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Welcome New FDAC Board of Directors!

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is excited to welcome three new fire district leaders to the Board of Directors. Elections took place at the 2017 annual meeting held in April. Jennifer Sheetz serves on the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District Board of Directors. She graduated from California State University Sacramento with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and worked as an emergency nurse at a Level II trauma facility from 2001-2014. In 2014, took a position as a patient care coordinator for ER and Trauma Neuro ICU. Sheetz now serves as the Emergency Department Supervisor at Kaiser South in Sacramento. For four years, she was a flight nurse where she worked side-by-side on scene calls with local fire departments. Sheetz entire career has been in emergency medical services and she decided to get more involved in her community and was successfully elected as the Division 5 representative on the Sac Metro board. Michael Urquides began his fire service career after high school graduation in 1987 working three seasons for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. He entered the ranks as a volunteer firefighter with the Monterey County Regional Fire (formerly Salinas Rural Fire) in 1989. Chief Urquides was promoted to paid firefighter in 1990, and rose through the ranks of lieutenant, captain, division chief and promoted to fire chief in 2006. He has managed multiple fire district consolidations within his agency. Chief Urquides has a Bachelor’s degree in Human Relations, and Master’s in Public Administration both from Golden Gate University. He is a certified chief officer. Eric Walder has served with the South Placer Fire District for 26 years. He worked his way through the ranks starting as a volunteer firefighter, reserve firefighter, firefighter, engineer, engineer paramedic, captain, division chief, battalion chief, deputy chief and now fire chief. Chief Walder is the Placer County Operational Area Coordinator, OES Region IV Coordinator, First Alternate, vice president of the Western Placer County Fire Chiefs Association and is on the board of the Fire Agencies Insurance Risk Authority (FAIRA). He has a Bachelor’s degree in Public Safety Administration and extensive fire/paramedic training.

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FDAC Certificate of Achievement Program Looking for local or regional training for your area? Look no further!

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offers a “mobile” training program specifically designed for fire protection district board members and professional fire leadership. Governing a fire protection district has similar aspects to other special districts but yet unique requirements which is why FDAC offers the Certificate of Achievement (COA) program. Hosting a COA is easy! FDAC needs 25-30 committed attendees for the four-module training. A local district to provide a meeting room and AV as well as provide on-site assistance with registration and logistics. FDAC will provide instructors, oversee marketing efforts, coordinate registration, send all necessary materials as well as arrange for coffee service and lunches if needed. Registration fees are kept as low as possible to allow attendees from small districts and larger district to participate. The COA program offers four four-hour module training on: • District Legal Aspects – How Not to Get Burned! • Health and Safety Code: Fire District Law • Ballot Measures • Workers’ Compensation and Labor Code • Ethics • Collective Bargaining • Fire Code Adoption • EMS: Title 22 • Overlapping Jurisdiction with Cal Fire /SRA • LAFCO, Consolidations and Annexations Fire District Leadership - Avoiding the backdraft • Finance: budgets/property tax • Audits • Financial Reserves • Open Meetings and the Ralph M. Brown Act • GASB 34 and GASB 45 • Prop 13, AB 8 and Property Tax Distribution • Board Meeting Dynamics • Effective Governance, Board Roles & Responsibilities • Agendas

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Looking for local or regional training for your area? Look no further! FDAC Certificate of Achievement Program continued Fire District Planning - Response route to success • Strategic Planning • Standards of Cover • Business Planning • Succession Planning • Risk Analysis • Technology Fire District Trends & Issues - Latest Hot Stuff! • Current Events and Pending Legislation • Hiring a Fire Chief • Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) • Recruitment/Retention • Generational Diversity • Firefighter Bill of Rights • Fire Fighter Safety • “Your District Issues” • Associations and Fire Service Affiliation FDAC’s COA was designed by experienced fire service professionals for today’s fire district leaders. Years of collective fire district experience was tapped to develop each module to ensure important issues are covered and attendees walk away better prepared to serve their communities. Contact FDAC (Carmen or Catherine) at (916) 231-2941 or cberry@fdac.org and casmith@fdac.org to start coordinating a COA in your area. FDAC comes to you!

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OPPORTUNITY CREATED FOR THOSE COMMITTED TO FIRE PROTECTION Dennis L. Canfield, Logistics Volunteer, Lakeside Fire Protection District

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n July 2011, the Lakeside Fire Protection District initiated a senior (50 years-and-over) volunteer program where selected persons assist firefighters and district staffers with those functions specific to logistics. They are valued fire district workers and perform the needed tasks of the Operations Section and the Command Staff every single day.

The Logistics Section performs functions that support operations personnel (firefighters) with supply chain management, transportation of equipment and personnel, and many other logistics functions such as incident support. Some functions may include picking-up medical equipment at local hospitals, facilitating the movement of district material and documents between facilities as well as the classic function of logistics, which is to support the firefighters at an incident with cold drinks and a shady place to sit down for a few minutes. Logistics Volunteer Group (LVG) members drive district vehicles, visit district fire stations, represent the district when necessary, and answer questions of the public as a member of the Lakeside Fire District. They support district daily activities, district special events, assist with fire prevention programs, and attend open houses. This unique organization currently consists of 13 dedicated volunteers. The very keys to the success of this program are selfmotivation, self-direction and self-discipline. Volunteers receive guidance and training from the fire district, but operate somewhat independently with a minimum of direct supervision. They comply with a chain of command that includes a volunteer leader, a fire captain, and division chief. This novel program works because of great latitude and trust from the Fire Chief and all other department employees but there is no administrative or department personnel individually assigned, dedicated or allocated to the program. During the development of this volunteer program, great care and precautions were taken so as not to interfere with or replace any duties assigned to firefighters. The Firefighters Association concerns were minimized early by issuing LVG’s different colored uniform shirts, no badges, and with daily demonstrations of the promise of nothing but logistics support. For example: Logistics Volunteers do not get to spray water, go Code 3, and don’t even roll up firehose.

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Minimum funding is provided for uniforms and supplies associated with logistics. The volunteers are responsible for two incident support vehicles, and an Annex building with meeting and storage facilities. These vehicles are used for daily mail and supply delivery, but are equipped and ready for incident support.

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The volunteers have their own schedule maker who assigns two individuals each day of the week and one person on weekend/holiday standby duty. Shift changes or adjustments are common with volunteers and the schedule allows for changes without department involvement. The changes are placed on the daily activity calendar to provide fire chiefs and fire captains with a daily point of contact. All assigned “shifts” consist of a 24-hour readiness commitment but volunteers return home for this standby role after completion of daily duties which last four to six hours each day. Each volunteer is equipped with a pager and gets summoned by dispatch for response to incidents by an on scene Incident Commander. This dispatch summons all available volunteers who then respond to the Annex, and proceed to the scene after radio check in with the Incident Commander. Lakeside Logistic Volunteers have responded and assisted with more than 40 incidents, mostly structure and wildland fires, since it was established six years ago. Duties vary at each incident, and range from hot coffee on a cold night. They are in surrounding communities and and other agencies for special In calendar year 2016, the LVG’s duty, and in 2015 they logged areas such as Prevention, Support, Special Event, and hours are spent in an on call for a very unique volunteer fine reputation of reliability District and their Mutual Aid

non-medical rehab assistance to simply providing also summoned for various incidents cooperate with requests from Cal Fire events and wildland fire training. logged over 4200 hours on 4800 on duty hours in various Training, Administrative Incident support. Many more standby mode which makes group that has earned a for Lakeside Fire Protection Partners.

As previously mentioned in this article, there is no department personnel taken away from regular duties to manage this program, but there is a certain amount of administrative work involved. This is especially true during initial indoctrination, background checks, an interview, and the like. The Logistics Volunteers provide their own initial and basic training through the use of a mentor program. This program is reinforced with a policy and procedures manual, a task book, and an operations manual. Instruction in important functions such as driver training and safety are taught by district personnel. Other needed instruction is provided through the use of Target Solutions. All volunteers participate in all functions and operations, but individual members provide specialization in certain Areas of Responsibility and provide service in several specialized assignments by committee with a leader. Areas of Responsibility include capacities such as Special Events Coordinators, Assistance and Training for new volunteers, Firefighter Rehab, Scheduling, Firehouse Computer entries, Support Vehicles, Smoke Detector installation program, Fire Hose inventory, and CERT. Lakeside Fire Protection’s Mission Statement: As volunteers, we intend to supplement and support our Lakeside Firefighters by assisting them to achieve the highest level of service in our community. We intend to have an organization that our citizens will be proud of by upholding the traditions of Lakeside Fire Protection District. We will continue with the high respect and values the public has of this department. Our quality logistic support will be provided with honesty, integrity, and respect at all times.

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SRA Fees and Fire Protection Districts

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INTRODUCTION

In July 2011, Governor Jerry Brown enacted emergency legislation to offset the increasing costs of managing California’s wildfires through the passage of Assembly Bill X1 29. The law approved a new annual fire prevention fee to pay for fire prevention services within State Responsibility Areas (SRA). SRAs are lands where the State of California is financially responsible for the prevention and suppression of wildfires. The SRA fee (“fire tax) is applied to all habitable structures within an SRA. A habitable structure is defined as a building that can be occupied for residential use within the SRA. SRAs do not include lands within incorporated city boundaries or in federal ownership. These fees are ostensibly earmarked to fund fire prevention activities within SRAs and is the latest measure in a series of similarly failed measures. Since the enactment of Bill X1 29, it has generally been observed that the focus of these efforts is on funding fire prevention activities by CalFire in areas protected primarily by the state, wholly or largely removed from the lands upon which the fee is imposed. Many local fire districts continue to face increasing challenges yet receive little or no benefit from the SRA fees imposed on their constituents. BACKGROUND Assembly Bill X1 29 established Section 4214 of the Public Resources Code and set into motion a new annual fire prevention fee to pay for fire prevention services in locations throughout the state designated as SRA. This bill imposed a $150 fee upon property owners for all habitable structures within SRA lands. Those property owners receiving fire protection from a local agency receive a $35 reduction in that fee. Lawmakers approved the fee in 2011, during the recession, as a means to help prevent budget cuts to Cal Fire. These fees were intended to fund a variety of important fire prevention services in SRA. The State has made a case that since those living within the SRA impose a greater economic burden in providing fire prevention and suppression, they should, in turn, bear the costs for the State’s provision of those services as stated in Article 1 of the bill’s text: “Individual owners of structures within the (SRA) receive a disproportionately larger benefit from fire prevention activities than that realized by the state’s citizens generally.” Arguably, it could be said that while there is measurable progress being made by CalFire in prevention activities in remote areas of the State. Funds have been expended to address significant challenges, such as tree mortality, since its inception date. Yet, hundreds of thousands property owners paying the SRA fee are not receiving the services and direct benefits initially proposed by the legislation. It appears funds collected through the SRA fee are being spent on services and programs that benefit the general public, not the payers.

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SRA Fees and Fire Protection Districts continued. Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (“Jarvis”) has filed a class action lawsuit that claims local agencies are deriving little, if any, benefit from the SRA fee and therefore, it is an illegal tax that should be repealed. The SRA fee has not only placed an increased financial burden on those living within the SRA, but has also caused local fire districts to face criticism in response to how these fees are expended. These funds primarily serve to fund fire prevention activities performed by Cal Fire with local fire districts receiving only approximately 5 percent of the funds generated by this legislation. Grant programs funded by the SRA fee appears to be distributed in no more of an equitable fashion than the services supposedly funded by, and deliver to, SRA property owners. PROPOSED SOLUTION: Due to prior failures of similar measures, it has been widely speculated that a significant proportion of these funds have simply been retained by the State, evidently in the event of successful litigation against the constitutionality of the fee. This then is the crux of the argument which Jarvis is making. Property owners paying the SRA fee are receiving little or no benefit in proportion to what they are paying. Fire districts and other local government fire prevention providers are realizing little assistance from the SRA fees collected as well thus dollars are not being utilized in local agency jurisdictions for fire prevention services. In support of Jarvis’ claim, fire districts can provide information as to how SRA fees are being allocated within each of their counties. This data should include: Description of types of fire prevention services your jurisdiction may, or may not, be receiving from Cal Fire; • Inspection records, or lack thereof, from Cal Fire/CCC; • Synopsis of the working relationship between your agency and Cal Fire regarding prevention activities and/or grant history; • Assessment of the number of parcels within your agency’s jurisdiction subject to the SRA fee. This last bullet will assist in determining the relative cost/benefit relationship between the funds collected versus the funds distributed. Please email supporting information to FDAC Executive Director Catherine Smith at: casmith@fdac.org.

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Fire Districts Association of California Legislative Report

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Russell W. Noack, Public Policy Advocates, LLC

he first quarter of the 2017-18 Legislative Session has been dominated by political sparring between the California Legislature and Governor Brown on the one hand, and the Trump Administration in Washington, DC on the other. Governor Brown’s State of the State address, entitled, “California is Not Turning Back, Not Now, Not Ever,” set the tone. Tension on immigration policies between state and federal officials, maintaining California’s version of the comprehensive Affordable Care Act, and re-affirming an expansive climate change strategy were identified as vital issues to preserve in California and the Democratic-controlled Legislature has spent much of the first three months protecting these State goals. The major legislative accomplishment to date was the passage of Senate Bill 1 (Beall), an infrastructure tax measure that will generate $52.4 billion over the next decade to repair our roads, freeways and bridges. The long-sought transportation system funding reform was achieved with ⅔ votes of both houses of the Legislature, and with all but one vote coming from Democratic members. Senator Anthony Cannella was the only Republican to vote for SB 1. Immediately following the vote, Orange County sources began to secure signatures for a recall effort against Senator Josh Newman a newly elected Democratic member who supported the bill. Legislators have found the time to introduce an extensive number of bills covering a broad scope of topics of significance to fire districts. From Cannabis regulation growing out of the passage of Proposition 64 on the November 2016 ballot to a multitude of efforts to streamline housing projects without diminishing fire and life safety concerns, from emergency medical service activities to State Responsibility Area repeal or reform, the FDAC is monitoring approximately 150 pieces of legislation. Some of the bills that have received early attention and are currently moving through the legislative process include: Assembly Bill 64 (Bonta) to establish the regulatory components of the new Adult Use of Marijuana Act. Position: WATCH Assembly Bill 78 (Cooper) to improve safety on waterways by permitting the use of distinctive blue lights on fire district vessels. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 211 (Bigelow) to expand the SRA fire prevention fee reporting requirements. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 289 (Gray) to update the OES State Emergency Plan. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 561 (Voepel) would exclude sales and use tax from the purchase of engines and equipment in excess of $800,00 and allocate the amounts to employee retirement plans. Position: SUPPORT

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Fire Districts Association of California Legislative Report continued Assembly Bill 579 (Flora) would develop a statewide firefighter pre-apprenticeship program. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 708 (Quirk-Silva) would streamline the notification requirement for Cal/ OSHA accident reporting. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 911 (Wood) would exempt bomb squad members from certain training requirements designed for X-ray technicians. Position: SUPPORT Assembly Bill 1116 (Grayson) would create a peer support and crisis referral team to provide assistance to emergency service providers and firefighters. Position: WATCH Assembly Bill 1650 (Maienschein) would extend the Community Paramedicine Program in the Emergency Medical Services Authority for four years. The bill is moving despite the vigorous opposition of nursing groups. Position: PENDING Senate Bill 188 (Jackson) would extend the Emergency Management Assistance Compact until 2023. Position: SUPPORT Senate Bill 229 (Wieckowski) would expand the floor space for accessory dwelling units. Position: OPPOSE Senate Bill 347 (Jackson) would strengthen the regulation of drones. Position: WATCH Senate Bill 423 (Cannella)/Senate Bill 496 (Cannella & De León) would restrict indemnity agreements by public agencies covering design professionals. Position: OPPOSE Senate Bill 523 (Hernandez) modeled after his SB 1300 from last year that was vetoed by the Governor, this bill would impose a quality assurance fee for each emergency medical transport provided by public and private providers in accordance with a prescribed methodology. The bill would require the Director of Health Care Services to deposit the collected quality assurance fee into the Medi-Cal Emergency Medical Transport Fund. Position: PENDING Finally, Assembly and Senate Budget Subcommittees have been meeting regularly, but the upcoming release of the Governor’s May Budget Revision will prompt hearings in earnest and leadership discussions with the Governor to finalize and pass the 2017-18 Budget by the June 15th constitutional deadline.

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“The hero is the man who lets no obstacle prevent him from pursuing the values he has chosen.” - Andrew Bernstein

You serve others and LCW is honored to serve you. At LCW we are not solely lawyers. We are your trusted partners, helping you avoid legal problems and navigate issues. Fire Districts serve others, and we are honored to serve them for over 35 years in all areas, including: • Employment Law • Negotiations/ Labor Relations • FBOR • Investigations

• • • • •

Discipline Litigation Long-Term Leaves Wage & Hour Retirement

To learn how we can help your District stop by our booth, or visit: www.lcwlegal.com/expertise/public-safety FDAC

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THANK YOU TO PAUL LEIBIG FOR HIS ADDITIONAL CONFERENCE PHOTOGRAPHY!

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Nuggets for Leadership Human Behavior

H

Steve Kovacs, Chief, Murphys Fire District

uman Behavior alone is one of the most interesting yet frustrating things all leaders need to deal with. One can either embrace it or fight it. I’m sure you can figure out which one must be chosen to survive. Point #1: You cannot change anyone that does not want to be changed. This is a common misconception with some supervisors and leaders. As a leader, one must find and utilize the appropriate motivation to provide an environment where the other person feels the need to change. What makes someone want to change? This comes from within, based on outside factor and influences. They must first recognized the need to change and this is often answered by asking the question: “What’s in it for them?” Then, they must believe it in their best interest to change. Point #2: You can’t motivate anyone to do anything. So, why can’t we motivate individuals? Motivation is internal and again, they must believe what they are going to do, is in their best interest. If your current techniques and communications are not connecting to create that motivation and eventual change, then it’s time to employ a different tactic. We may not always be able to connect by walking through the front door of life, but rather the side or back doors. People want to know they are needed and important, so treat them as you want to be treated. Below are some important words to remember: • The six most important words: “I admit I made a mistake.” • The five most important words: “You did a good job.” • The four most important words: “What is your opinion.” • The three most important words: “If you please.” • The two most important words: “Thank you,” • The one most important word: “We” • The least most important word: “I” Author unknown Being an effective Leader is not about you…..It’s about them!! Don’t be afraid to think outside the box, try a new technique and be thirsty for leadership knowledge. Lead by example, operate from low level emotion and high level advice. Leadership through life is a thankless and exhausting journey, but the positive results are rewarding and worth the time and effort.

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w w w. f d a c . o r g

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FDAC Report April 2017  

FDAC Report offers an insight to the Fire Districts Association of California and their success.

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