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FDAC F I R E D I S T R I C T S A S S O C I AT I O N O F C A L I F O R N I A

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FDAC F I R E D I S T R I C T S A S S O C I AT I O N O F C A L I F O R N I A

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2018 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Steve Kovacs 1st Vice President Jim Comisky 2nd Vice President Frank Frievalt Immediate Past President Steve Hall Treasure Eric Walder

FDAC STAFF Catherine Smith, Executive Director Carmen Berry, Administrative Director David Blue Garrison, Creative Director Audie Whitt, Communications Director Angelique Grellus, Coordinator Rayneedae Garcia, Assistant PHOTOGRAPHY Pexels, Pixabay and Stocksnap ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY Peter Liebig, Lakeside Fire Protection District The purpose of this Association shall be: 1) to present a united position on fire protection issues; 2) to coordinate with other associations with similar views on fire protection including legislation; 3) to provide advisory services and any other services deemed appropriate by the Board of Directors that may benefit member agencies; 4) to keep member agencies informed on laws relating to fire suppression, emergency medical and other related services provided by member agencies; 5) to take an active role in the legislative process affecting public agencies providing fire suppression, emergency medical and related services. Thank you to all the authors in this issue for sharing with us their time and expertise. If you have an idea for a future article, please contact Carmen Berry at the FDAC office at cberry@fdac.org. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of FDAC. For more information on FDAC or this magazine, please contact the FDAC office at 916.231.2137 or visit the website at www.fdac.org.

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Trusted Legal Advisors to

California Fire Districts Since 1980

FBOR | Wage & Hour | Litigation | Investigations | Negotiations | Retirement

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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s we usher summer away and kids head back to school, California’s fire service remains diligent. California’s fire seasons have demonstrated destructive fire incidents continuing well into the late fall. On behalf of the FDAC Board of Directors, I want to personally thank each one of you for the valuable services provided by your fire districts, to your constituents. FDAC has had a busy summer. In July, the FDAC Board held its annual planning session to identify strategies priorities, goals and programs for the next three years. Former FDAC President and retired fire chief Mike McMurray facilitated the session, which included FDAC Board Members, staff and Cal Chiefs President Jeff Meston. A lot of exciting discussion took place and the future of FDAC remains bright and impactful! There are some challenges ahead such as district mergers, adequate funding streams and lot of retirements, but we have a plan in place to keep focused on our core priorities which are legislation, education and being the voice of California’s fire protection districts.

This summer also included the relaunch of FDAC’s very successful Certificate of Achievement (COA) program. Over 23 attendees were part of August’s Sonoma Valley COA. The COA is a traveling training program that is hosted by local fire districts with instructors being supplied by FDAC. The four modules include: Fire District Legal Aspects, Leadership, Planning and Trends and Issues. If districts in your area are interested in hosting a COA, just reach out to the FDAC headquarters (office@fdac.org) to get the conversation started. Another COA is scheduled November 2-3, 2019 in Stanislaus County. The FDAC/Cal Chiefs Legislative Task Force continues to monitor many bills which would impact our collective members. Two of our sponsored Bills, SB 438 (Hertzberg) on EMS dispatch and AB 1705 (Bonta) on Medi-Cal EMS Transport, are moving through the legislative progress. Many volunteers have provided expertise and put in a lot of time on these important bills. With this being the first year of the two-year session, the bills need to be acted upon by the mid-September adjournment. This fall, the second annual FDAC Fire Leadership Symposium is being presented on October 21-23, 2019 at the Courtyard by Marriott Sacramento Cal Expo. The inaugural event in 2018 was well received. This year’s training will build upon the success of last year with some new offerings. We are starting to work on the 2020 annual conference which will return to the Mariott Napa Valley in April. Be sure to mark your calendars to join us March 31-April 3, 2020. More details to follow! Stay safe.

Chief Steve Kovacs, President FDAC Board of Directors

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FDAC


Certificate of Achievement in Fire District Leadership Program (COA) MODESTO-NOVEMBER 2-3, 2019

Regional Fire Training Center | 1220 Fire Science Lane, Modesto, CA 95351 $300 MEMBERS | $400 NON-MEMBERS

REGISTER TODAY!

DAY TWO

8:30 am – 4:30 pm FIRE DISTRICT PLANNING (MODULE 3)

DAY ONE

8:30 am – 4:30 pm FIRE DISTRICT LEGAL ASPECTS (MODULE 1) How Not to Get Burned • Definitions of laws, regulations and codes • Knowledge of enabling legislation • Knowledge of California Government Code, Health & Safety Code, Public Resources Code and other labor laws pertaining to California fire districts • Knowledge of California code of regulations that impact fire districts • Knowledge of standards that impact California fire district leadership FIRE DISTRICT LEADERSHIP (MODULE 2) Avoiding the Backdraft • Definition of governing board of directors • Understanding board roles • Understanding perceptions and problems of organizational success • Knowledge of effective board/fire chief relationships • Understanding board meeting dynamics • Tools in how to work together as a board • Gain insight on how a board should handle a crisis • Understanding the Brown Act

FDAC VISIT

Response Route to Success • Discuss the need for planning • Discuss the 10 basic planning steps • Discuss what is a strategic plan, its components, and the process for development • Discuss standards of cover • Explore risk analysis • Define master planning and how it differs from strategic planning • Discuss business plan development FIRE DISTRICT TRENDS & ISSUES (MODULE 4) Latest Hot Stuff • Identify trends and issues related to California fire districts • Identify common operational trends in the fire service • Understanding public expectations of the fire service by fire protection districts • Gain knowledge of financial and budgeting for fire protection districts • Understand the roles and responsibilities of fire protection districts • Pros and cons of cooperative fire protection approaches • Basic understanding of legislative impacts • Identify technological issues and tools for fire protection districts 5

WWW.FDAC.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION November 2-3, 2019 | Modesto


A MESSAGE FROM FDAC EBA

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t has been a great year for the FDAC Employment Benefits Authority, and the upcoming 2020 renewal season will continue with the mission of providing cost competitive, exceptional quality benefit plans for employees, retirees and their families. What benefits and services will continue to be offered?  The Blue Shield/Health Now EPO (Exclusive Provider Organization) and PPO (Preferred Provider Organization) plans, two Premium and two Basic plan designs; EmpiRx continues as the Pharmacy Benefit Manager  Kaiser HMO Premium and Basic plans  Delta Dental PPO plans with optional orthodontia benefits  VSP Vision PPO plans  The Standard Group Basic Life/AD&D and Supplemental Voluntary Life plans

assistance with any of the plans included  An online, benefits enrollment system with consolidated billing As an added benefit at no additional cost, your District’s HR team increases in size, saving you time and money. The FDAC EBA’s benefits service team through Keenan & Associates will assist your District in many facets of your benefits program. What benefits will be changing? For each employee enrolled, in either Kaiser or the Blue Shield/Health Now medical plans the EBA will now include a Cancer policy through American Fidelity providing up to $5,000 upon diagnosis (for the employee only, does not apply for dependents). What will the rate increases be for 2020? The five-year average for the Blue Shield and Kaiser medical plans is less than 5%. We are expecting the 2020 medical plan renewals to continue with a less than 5% increase. There will be no increase to the dental, vision and life insurance rates.

Now is the time to request a proposal and compare the  Magellan EAP: 3 sessions included at no options available for your district. Keenan & Associates will cost with the option to buy-up to 5 or 8 provide a CalPERS breakaway analysis, contact us today at sessions fdaceba@keenan.com or 844-580-6856.  COBRA and Retiree Billing Administration services continue to be provided at no additional cost  A Customer Service call center for

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REGISTER TODAY!

2019 FDAC Leadership Symposium | October 21-23, 2019 Courtyard by Marriott Sacramento Cal Expo Sacramento | California

A leadership conference designed for emerging leaders in the fire services to develop essential skills and gain knowledge needed to be successful today and tomorrow. CONTENT TO INCLUDE:

ATTENDEE REGISTRATION RATES*:

• From Good to Great: A New Paradigm for Fire Service Leadership • Doing Without Enough Sleep: Proof of “Manliness” or Brain Damage in Slow Motion? • So, You Want to be a Chief Officer? • Wellness for the Tactical Athlete • A Commitment to Conscious Leadership • District Dollars: Understanding the Financial Picture • Social Media for Fire Districts: An Exploration • Do’s and Don’ts for Effective Performance Evaluations • Putting PTSD Out of Business • Hiring the Best: How to Recruit, Hire and Promote the Right People for Your Organization

MEMBERS: Full Academy Registration: $335 Additional Attendee (From the Same Agency): $285 NON-MEMBERS: Full Academy Registration: $435 Additional Attendee (From the Same Agency): $385 Sponsor/Exhibit Booth Personnel: $200 *Early bird discount of $40 is available to full conference attendees until August 22nd, 2019! To register and for more details visit www.fdac.org. Online registration closes on October 14, 2019.

2019 FDAC LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR OPPORTUNITIES

Support FDAC and network with people in the fire service industry. Don’t miss this opportunity to market, network and educate – register as a sponsor today!

FDAC

For more information, please contact Angelique Grellus at agrellus@fdac.org or visit www.fdac.org.

www.FDAC.org

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FIRE DISTRICTS ASSOCIATION OF CALIFORNIA

Legislative Article

Russell W. Noack, Public Policy Advocates, LLC

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s legislators enjoy their annual Summer Break, it is an appropriate time to take stock of what has been accomplished so far and what remains to be done when the California Legislature reconvenes on August 12. On his first full day in office, Governor Gavin Newsom announced that wildfire preparedness and response was his highest political priority. He quickly created a new Senior Advisor on Emergency Preparedness and successfully launched a 45-day plan to identify and implement fire prevention projects in high-risks areas of the state. Thirty-five projects deemed to be critical to vulnerable populations are up and running and although far from being completed, are beginning to see measurable benefits to these communities. Additionally, the Governor established a heightened funding goal for wildfire preparedness and response in his initial 2019-20 State Budget. The $214.8 billion budget, which was signed in June, contains over $200 million to implement wildfire prevention and vegetation management projects, $130.8 million for communication equipment for firefighters, $25 million for prepositioning of local government resources through the Mutual Aid 8

“...Along with your leadership, we have actively sought and obtained amendments to prevent negative impacts on local districts while realistic funding sources are obtained in the future.� System and funding for building a state of the art 9-1-1 State Emergency Telephone Number Account (SETNA) system. Recently, Governor Newsom underscored his commitment to wildfire preparedness by issuing an Executive Order N-16-19 to authorize additional funding for hiring seasonal firefighters. The Legislature also contributed to the wildfire developments by passing Assembly Bill 1054 (Holden) [Chapter 79, Statutes of 2019] on the day before their Sumer Recess. Signed into law by the Governor, AB 1054 establishes the California Wildfire Safety Advisory Board to make recommendations to the newly created Wildfire Safety Division. The bill establishes a Wildfire Fund to be voluntarily funded by the utilities to respond to utility-caused wildfires. The inverse condemnation doctrine was not modified, although a process has been set to permit utility companies to apply to the CPUC to recover wildfire-related costs, if the costs are just and reasonable and based on reasonable conduct.

On the list if items to bring home during the last month of the Session, two prominent EMS bills top the list. Senate Bill 438 by Bob Hertzberg is the bill we are co-sponsoring with the California Professional Firefighters (CPF) to statutorily ensure that local public agencies are in total control of the EMS dispatch function. Nearly 100 fire chiefs have appeared before two legislative hearings to support the bill, which has moved to the Assembly Floor for action later this month. Assembly Bill 1705 by Rob Bonta is the other sponsored bill, which would exempt public agencies from the QAF and provide for a public intergovernmental transfer program for public Medi-Cal transport providers, has been moved to the Senate Appropriations Committee. The bill has been negotiated with the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) and continues to undergo fine tuning.

FDAC


Assembly Bill 1544 by Mike Gipson is also a priority bill pertaining to EMS. This bill would establish a statewide Community Paramedicine or Triage to Alternate Destination Act based on successful pilot projects. The bill continues to move though the Legislature despite the strident opposition of the California Nurses Association. A host of bills in the areas of emergency planning and fire mitigation will be taken up in August. Assembly Bill 1516 by Laura Friedman would extend defensible space projects in very high fire severity zones. Along with your leadership, we have actively sought and obtained amendments to prevent negative impacts on local districts while realistic funding sources are obtained in the future. Several measures promote more effective alert and warning systems including Senate Bill 130 (Galgiani), Senate Bill 560 (McGuire) and Senate Bill 670 (McGuire), which specifically applies to power outages that limits the public from making 9-1-1 calls. Finally, SB 209 (Dodd) would establish a California Wildfire Warning Center to monitor and asses fire-weather threats. The Legislative Task Force has set priorities on these bills, as well as several dozen other measures, which will keep the advocacy team busy over the last 4 weeks of the Legislative Session until adjournment on September 13, 2019.

FDAC

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DIFFERENTIATING CUSTOMER SERVICE FROM STEWARDSHIP;

Rediscovering the Purpose of Public Leadership Frank Frievalt

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uring the 1980’s a popular “Reinvent Government” (REGO) movement started based on public frustration with government waste and unresponsiveness. REGO influences and intentions were, overall, positive in that they applied pressure to improve governance. Chief Alan V. Brunacini’s 1996 book, Essentials of Fire Department Customer Service, was the entry point for this thinking into the fire service. The initial results were overwhelmingly positive with the citizens because they were being treated with a newfound responsiveness and respect.

in the public and private domains, which is the reason it was so easy to import “private sector leadership thinking” into the public sector sphere during the REGO movement, which assumed all things business were superior. Advancing the relationships up a notch to citizens and customers, the differences are still negligible, and the citizen benefits were initially huge; so again, importing business thinking When considering public and (i.e., customer service) wholesale private leadership, neither is into public leadership loyalties was hardly a stretch. But the next level of leadership “We must reject the idea – loyalties now must balance well-intentioned, but dead market shareholders with community stakeholders. As wrong – that the primary However, a major and endurdeveloping leaders worked path to greatness in the social our ing weakness of REGO was on, say, fire and building that it never provided a clear sectors is to become ‘more codes, or EMS ambulance separation of public leadership standards of cover, were their like a business.” decision making from private “customer service” loyalties leadership decision making. It to the company shareholders would take nearly 30 years for this superior to the other and both or to the citizens? Today as we problem to fully mature and strongly are necessary in a representative work through complex legislation influenced public sector leadership democracy that is economically (e.g., AB 1516), are our loyalties literature and practice in the interdriven by capitalism. But mistaking to the insurance industry or the im, including the academic curric(or intentionally substituting) one State? Eventually we are talking ula that many of our future leaders for the other creates compounding about differences as wide as would be shaped by. In 2007 errors in relationship loyalties and economically driven loyalties renowned business thinker, author, decisions. Consider the inserted and politically driven loyalties. professor, Jim Collins, in his publifigure (created by the author). It Looking at the bottom part of cation, Good to Great and the Sodivides leadership into public and the model, leadership decisions cial Sectors; Why Business Thinking private domains, and then models as action, the basis of “good” is not the Answer, stated in rebuttal, them as loyalties in relationships and “bad” decisions are less “We must reject the idea – well-inand decisions as actions. We can complicated but no less separated tentioned, but dead wrong – that see that at the individual level (i.e., from each other than the public/ the primary path to greatness in the people), leadership loyalties, and private leadership relationships social sectors is to become ‘more therefor legitimacy, are identical as loyalties. Knowing where 10

like a business.’ Most businesses – like most of anything else in life – fall somewhere between mediocre and good. Few are great. When you compare great companies with good ones, many widely practiced business norms turn out to correlate with mediocrity, not greatness. So, then, why would we want to import the practices of mediocrity into the social sectors?’”

FDAC


to stand among these loyalties and decisions can, I believe, be quickly resolved if we understand, perhaps become reunited with, our true purpose as civil servants – to provide stewardship. As MerriamWebster has it, stewardship means “: the conducting, supervising, or managing of something, especially: the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care.” This seems pretty aligned with the protection of life and property, which people entrust to us through our civil servant roles. It represents systemic trust in organizational service delivery they rarely get to choose from and cannot as a “market choice” decide not to pay for. At the individual level, whether peer or citizen, Chief Brunacini had it right when he introduced customer service at the company Officer level, which was his goal. But at the Chief Officer level and above, what we are doing is orders of magnitude more significant than mere customer service; we’re doing stewardship, entrusted with the protection of people’s lives and properties as competitively selected and appointed public servants. Let’s own and fulfill that awesome responsibility with silent honor, steadfast loyalty to our citizens, and apply discretion that owes its roots to service rather than transaction.

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FIRE DISTRICT PROFILE: LINDA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT, ZONE 2 Rich Webb Linda Fire Protection District

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he Linda Fire Protection District serves approximately 30,000 residents in the southwestern portion of Yuba County. The District is approximately 52 square miles comprised of urban and rural residential, agricultural, commercial and industrial occupancies. The formation of the original 25 square mile District, serving the Linda Community, was initiated on August 23, 1948 by the Yuba County Board of Supervisors in response to numerous meetings of concerned citizens. The entire Linda area had been blanketed by smoke from burning sawdust piles at a local mill site for an extended period of time. The original fire station was opened in 1948 and is located behind the current headquarters station, in the community of Linda. In 1983, the District more than doubled its size with the annexation of the Arboga and south Yuba area. Now protecting 52 square miles of residential, agricultural and commercial properties, a second fire station was essential and built later that year in the rural Arboga community.

The District is a combination, all-risk fire agency. It is served by 16 fulltime staff, augmented by 22 paid-call members and supports an internship program with local community college fire academies. The three fire stations house 13 pieces of apparatus including five Type 1 engines, five Type 3 engines, one Type 6 fire engine, one Type 1 water tender, a rescue squad and several utility vehicles. The District is an OES Type 1 Engine assignee. In addition to fire prevention and suppression, District personnel provide Basic Life Support services, swift water rescue response on the Yuba and Feather rivers, Technical Rescue and Tactical Emergency Medical Service (TEMS) as a part of the Regional SWAT Team. The District is very active in the statewide mutual aid system with both the OES Engine as well as District owned apparatus. Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 6

In the fall of 2003, the long dormant Plumas Lake Specific Plan began to develop. The entire Plumas Lake Specific Plan has over 12,000 homes scheduled to be built. The new construction and specific plan necessitated the District to plan and build a third fire station. Construction for the new station began in March, 2006 and was completed in January, 2007.

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ZONE 3 REPORT Eric Walder, Zone 3 Director

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want to start by welcoming our new Zone 3 representative Fire Chief Brian Helmick from East Contra Costa Fire Protection District. Chief Helmick has already proven to be a valued collaborator within Zone 3 and the FDAC Board. Together Brian and I represent the Fire Districts in the nine counties of FDAC’s Zone 3. We will strive to bring the collective needs of all our Districts to the FDAC Board of Directors. A reminder to all Zone 3 Districts, if you have a need or a question, you have a valuable resource in FDAC. There is a vast array of knowledge and experience throughout the leadership of FDAC, and there has probably been a member District that has faced the same challenges as the ones your District may be facing. The entire FDAC Board of Directors and all Zone representatives want member agencies to be aware of and utilize the resources provided by FDAC. Reviewing the last Zone 3 article that I submitted we were then heading into the 2018 fire season after a record-setting disastrous 2017. 2018 proved to be an even more destructive and deadly fire season, despite the efforts of all agencies and fire districts the losses were unbelievable. We continue to look for ways to improve our response and preparedness by supporting collaborative efforts like DRiSC, which was instrumental in securing funding for pre-positioning and improvement of our mutual-aid system. 2019 has started out as unremarkable, but we all know that the risk is present, it’s just a matter of when and where the next fire will start. California’s fire service supported by Districts belonging to FDAC will continue to lead the way in prevention, and response to one of the greatest threats of our time.   Eric Walder, EFO, Fire Chief South Placer Fire District FDAC Zone 3 Representative/ Treasurer

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Fire Districts Association of California 2019 Annual Conference

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Profile for FDAC

FDAC Report Summer 2019  

As we usher summer away and kids head back to school, California’s fire service remains diligent. California’s fire seasons have demonstrat...

FDAC Report Summer 2019  

As we usher summer away and kids head back to school, California’s fire service remains diligent. California’s fire seasons have demonstrat...

Profile for firedac