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KINDNESS ISSUE TRENDS, DESTINATIONS AND INSIGHTS FOR TRAVELLERS

BRUSSELS IN

TINTIN’S FOOTSTEPS

FEBRUARY 2017

Your personal copy

SAN FRANCISCO

FOR FILM LOVERS OKINAWA’S SECRET

TO ETERNAL YOUTH

Recasting the awe-inspiring

Moomin spirit


now, performance has a deeper meaning. the new princess s65.

PRINCESS FINLAND Tel. +358 500 667754 info@princess.fi www.princess.fi

princessyachts.com PRINCESS S65

A member of the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton family


EDITORIAL BY EIJA HAKAKARI SVP, PEOPLE & CULTURE

PRODUCER Amanda Soila

RAMI HANAFI

WWW.FINNAIR.COM

FOKUS MEDIA FINLAND

ART DIRECTOR Sirpa Ärmänen SUB-EDITOR Shelly Nyqvist VISUAL ASSISTANT Iris Mark ENGLISH EDITING Silja Kudel REPROGRAPHICS Faktor Oy COVER Tove Slotte by Laura Iisalo BEHIND THIS ISSUE Aaron Bawol, Tim Bird, Carina Chela, ­David J. Cord, Simon Fry, Laura Iisalo, Silja Kudel, Mirva Lempiäinen, Laura Palotie, Katja Pantzar, Jukka Pylväs, and Peter Weld SUBMISSIONS bluewings@fokusmedia.fi BLUE WINGS ONLINE www.issuu.com/finnair_bluewings EDITORIAL OFFICES Hämeentie 153 C, 00560 Helsinki, Finland tel. +358 40 630 8253 firstname.lastname@fokusmedia.fi ADVERTISING SALES Jaana Lindvall-Harki tel. +358 40 582 1416 PUBLISHER Fokus Media Finland PRINTED BY Punamusta, Joensuu, Finland 2017 PAPER UPM Valor 61g Cover paper Stora Enso LumiArt 200g CIRCULATION 45,000 ISSN-0358-7703

Towards new encounters

E

mbarking on a journey means anticipated but also new and surprising encounters. I always look forward to departing on a trip – whether it’s for a business meeting or a get-together with a friend in a new destination or a familiar one. Each encounter leads to exciting discoveries and enriching experiences. Finnair’s growth offers many new destinations and interesting opportunities for brand new experiences. As the Finnair team grows, many professionals are joining Finnair across the organisation.

The liveliest memories are created when we meet other people. We at Finnair believe that meaningful interactions are essential in offering great customer service and travel experiences. As Finland celebrates its centenary of independence this year, the official theme is “together.” Togetherness and meaningful encounters are key concepts for Finnair. Wishing you an inspiring journey full of unforgettable moments and encounters! Eija Hakakari SVP, People & Culture

3 tips for winter Helsinki

3

Savour coffee and pulla (Finnish cinnamon buns) at Café Engel overlooking Senate Square and Helsinki Cathedral, one of the city’s most popular sights.

2

DEBRA KOLKKA

CUSTOMER FEEDBACK www.finnair.com/feedback or by mail: Customer Relations, SL/403, FI-01053 FINNAIR. www.finnair.com, www.finnair.fi, www.finnairgroup.com

Try ice-skating in the centre of town at the Icepark by the Central Railway Station. JUSSI HELLSTEN

FINNAIR HEAD OFFICE Tietotie 9 A, Helsinki-Vantaa Airport, 1053 Finnair, Finland, tel. +358 (0)9 818 81, Postal address: P. O. Box 15, 01053 Finnair, Finland

1

KATJA HAGELSTAM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Arja Suominen arja.suominen@finnair.com

Take a winter stroll along Kaivopuisto shore with a view of the sea and then walk across the bridge to enchanting Uunisaari Island.

FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

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www.barbour.com


IN THIS ISSUE Tove Slotte has designed 73 Moomin mugs.

26

FEBRUARY 2017 26

LIFESTYLE MOOMIN MINDSET

Meet the artists who keep the Moomin spirit alive

36

DESTINATION TOP 5 LONDON RESPITE

Where to escape the rat race in the British capital

42

DESTINATION FOREVER YOUNG IN JAPAN Old age is the rage in Okinawa

48

DESTINATION BAY AREA BIJOU

Discover San Francisco’s quirky cinematic side

A plateful of greens in ­London

36

52

DESTINATION BELGIUM’S CARTOON CAPITAL A visit to Brussels is a walk down comic lane

56

LIFESTYLE LAPLAND’S BEST-KEPT SECRET Northern Finland is home to a slew of superfoods

60

DESTINATION GO WILD IN KERALA

India’s southernmost state offers more than just yoga

68

BUSINESS FLYING HIGH IN FINLAND Finnish aviation technology takes flight

Monkey see monkey do in Kerala

TAKEOFF STARTERS

Ibiza open-air installation......... 11

NEWS

Local travel flavours.................... 12

NEWS

Sauna, cactus, and skating .... 14

60

WORLD

Global goings-on...........................16

FINNISH FAVOURITES

Meet Mr. Helsinki...............................18

MAKERS OF

Tom of Finland...............................19

TWO OF A KIND

Artisan glassblowers................... 20

EVENTS

Out and about in Finland.......... 22

FLYING STORIES

Sky maps demystified................ 23

DESTINATION

NYC rooftop igloos......................24 FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

5


IN THIS ISSUE

42 48 56

San Fran’s Golden Gate Bridge is a legendary landmark.

Arctic Super Foods snack bars are available for sale on Finnair flights!

Okinawans prefer to work way past retirement age.

REGULARS

Travel Moment............................................ 8

Stefan Nilsson..........................................38 Alexander Stubb.....................................54 Finland in figures....................................98

FLY FINNAIR

Tips for takeoff........................................ 80 Inflight wellbeing.................................... 81 Entertainment.......................................... 82

Japan, p. 8, 16, 42 Ibiza p. 11 Helsinki, p. 12, 14, 18 Finland, p. 20, 22 New York City, p. 24

Inflight shopping..................................... 83 Sustainability............................................. 84 Border crossings..................................... 85 Helsinki Airport ....................................... 86 Maps and destinations......................... 88 Fleet and My Finnair............................. 92 Finnair Plus................................................ 94 6 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

Check this month’s Finnair Plus offers on page 97

London, p. 36 San Francisco, p. 48 Brussels, p. 52 Lapland, p. 56 India, p. 60


WAT C H E S & J E W E L L E RY Oy Osk. Lindroos Ab


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TRAVEL MOMENT BY TIM BIRD

LANTERN FANTASY The annual Nagasaki Lantern F ­ estival lights up the Chinese quarter and other areas of this Japanese port city from late January into February.

The fabulously colourful ­celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year comprises more than 15,000 l­anterns and hundreds of illuminated figures. FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

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YOU WILL NOT FIND A MORE LUXURIOUS BED IN THIS WORLD

We were already making beds when Henry Ford was still playing with pine cone cows. Hästens beds are the most luxurious in the world, handcrafted in Sweden from natural materials to this day. Hästens beds provide a uniquely weightless sleeping experience. Come and try our beds today and you could soon wake up in the bed of your dreams.

HÄSTENS STORE HELSINKI, Mannerheimintie 8, tel. +358 20 780 1370, hastens.com


TAKEOFF

NEWS / EVENTS / DESTINATIONS / STORIES / FAVOURITES

IBZ

Fin Ibiz nair flie a s to du once rin g s a we finn umm ek air .co er. m

MYSTERIOUS WAYS

Ibiza Stonehenge

COMPILED BY SILJA KUDEL

IS IT A UFO landing pad or the Balearic twin of Britain’s Stonehenge? All-night ravers aren’t the only ones rubbing their bleary eyes at the baffling sight of Ibiza’s newest cult attraction. This enigmatic circle of 13 basalt columns is Time and Space, a contemporary installation by Australian artist Andrew Rogers. Perched on a rocky outcrop on the southwest coast, the piece was commissioned by Canadian busker-turned-billionaire Guy Laliberté, founder of Cirque du Soleil. Crowned by a 20-metre central column topped with 23-carat gold leaf, the monument overlooks the magnetic island of Es Vedrà, a mythical site where navigational instruments and even homing pigeons are said to go haywire. FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

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TAKEOFF NEWS

WORLD OF BENEFITS Make the most of your Finnair Plus points. You can use your points for a variety of services from Finnair ­and partners. Read more about the renewed programme on pages 94–96.

COMPILED BY SILJA KUDEL AMANDA SOILA

LIVING-ROOM CONCERTS

Coming to a home near you COSY CUPPA

Mocca with Moominmamma A SIGH OF relief escapes the lips of parents arriving at Helsinki’s new Mumin Kaffe. Here kids romp and play while mums and dads blissfully sip their lattes in hygge-inspired decor. Combining a family-friendly coffeehouse with a Moomin-themed play park, the concept was created by TV celebrity and mother of three Sanna Kiiski, who came up with the idea while spending a sleepless night on a hospital bunk when her oldest child was seriously ill. “Exhausted parents need a place to relax

and have fun with the kids,” says Kiiski. The chain is also an up-and-coming design destination for tourists. Japanese Moomin fans are already flocking to the first two cafés on Liisankatu and Mechelininkatu Streets, with a third opening at Stockmann’s department store this month. A fourth café will open soon, with plans to expand to Stockholm later this year. The chain offers jobs to immigrants, mothers with young children, and job-seekers over 50. muminkaffe.com

The bleisure bandwagon

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groupmuse.com

AKU PÖLLÄNEN

BIZCATIONS

“BUSINESS OR PLEASURE?” This question is growing difficult to answer for the growing tribe of “bleisure” travellers who are injecting more fun into their business trips by bringing along friends or family and tacking on extra days at the end of their stay. According to Travel Weekly’s Consumer

Great music is raw, intimate and exposed – and many music lovers are discovering that the best place to enjoy live performances is in their own living room. Groupmuse is a Boston-based startup that is reinventing the traditional concert experience by organising chamber music concerts in private homes. And it’s not just a Boston trend: various other organisers around the world are applying the same principle in genres from indie rock to bluegrass.

Trends report, “bizcations” are slated to be a rising travel trend in 2017. The percentage of business trips with leisure add-ons has risen steadily from 11 per cent in 2012 to 17 per cent last year. Bleisure is also lucrative business: bleisure travellers spend more cash per day than “ordinary” vacationers.


www.kia.fi

Erottuva muotoilu, ylivoimainen varustelu ja markkinoiden pisin 7 vuoden takuu

Upea Kia-mallisto Kia Optima Sportswagon Optima on luokkansa tyylikkäin ja parhaiten varusteltu auto sisältä ja ulkoa. Mallisto alkaen 29 279 € Vapaa autoetu alk. 615 €/kk Käyttöetu alk. 465 €/kk CO2-päästöt alk. 37 g/km EU-yhd. alk. 1,6 l/100 km

HV 200 TO. E IV L NE

! UUS UUT yös m t Ny en etoin etuv seldie t ti! m aa a u to

Kia Sorento

Kia Sportage

Vaikuttavan näköinen ja kokoinen. Yl lli k ki t i on saatavana t Ylellinen kaupunkimaasturi myös 7 hengen versiona.

Hienostunut ja urheilullinen Sportage. Täysin uudistunut crossover on luokkansa tyylikkäin ja viimeistellyin paketti.

Mallisto alkaen 44 990 € Vapaa autoetu alk. 835 €/kk Käyttöetu alk. 685 €/kk CO2-päästöt alk. 149 g/km EU-yhd. alk. 5,7 l/100 km

Mallisto alkaen 26 990 € Vapaa autoetu alk. 585 €/kk Käyttöetu alk. 435 €/kk CO2-päästöt alk. 119 g/km EU-yhd. alk. 4,6 l/100 km


TAKEOFF NEWS

NEW BREED OF LOUNGING Sweat away your layover at Helsinki Airport with a sauna. Finnair’s Premium Lounge in the non-Schengen area is the perfect spot to relax before a flight.

COMPILED BY SILJA KUDEL

“A great sauna leaves you glowing for hours,” says Carita Harju, author of a new sauna guidebook.

ISTOCK

FIRE ON ICE

Skating up a storm STEAMY ENCOUNTER

Sauna guru

IT WOULD BE a crime – or at least a crying shame – to visit Finland without a relaxing steam in a traditional sauna. The proper way to perform the steamy ­ritual is explained in a new book in Finnish, ­English, and German, Sauna: The Finnish Way of Life (Kirjakaari 2016). Blue Wings shares mind and body cleansing tips from the book’s author, Carita Harju, executive director of Sauna from Finland. Q: What destinations would you recommend for sauna-lovers? A: Our organisation grants certificates of authenticity to high-quality saunas. Top

spots include the Sauna Tour in Kuusamo, Varjola Guesthouse in Central Finland and Metsäkyly Forest Retreat in Rovaniemi. I personally love any wood-burning sauna. Q: What defines a real Finnish sauna? A: Löyly, the water thrown on the stove. It creates moisture and heat. After a good steam, you feel clean, beautiful and reborn on the inside. Q: What should you never do in a sauna? A: Every sauna has its own house rules, but if you go to a public sauna, always ask your fellow bathers before throwing löyly.

HYDRATION ON THE GO

Cactus vs. coconut

HEALTH BLOGGERS have finally discovered what keeps cowboys looking fit – and not only when stranded in the desert. Cactus water is packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, but with a lower calorie count than “last season” coconut water.

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saunafromfinland.fi ISTOCK

At least 65,000 spectators from around the world will descend on ­Helsinki’s Hartwall Arena for the World Figure Skating Championships this March. The organisers promise a holistic experience never seen before at a sports event. “The venue will be more reminiscent of a theatre than an ice hockey arena,” says spokeswoman and former competitive figure skater Mila Kajas-Virtanen. “The opening show on ice on March 29 will feature a top ballet choreographer, two world-class ballet dancers, and other stars from the entertainment scene,” she says. “The World Figure Skating Championships gather fans from all around the world to Helsinki. We are happy to be a part of this wonderful event,” says Johanna Jäkälä, vice president for brand, marketing and loyalty at Finnair, a national partner for the event. World Figure Skating Championships March 29  –  April 2 helsinki2017.com


Unelmalomat ovat unelmat yötämme.

Sulje hetkeksi silmäsi ja muistele parasta matkakokemustasi. Haluamme, että tulevaisuudessa saat runsaasti vastaavanlaisia kokemuksia. Siksi käytössäsi on Platinum Matkapalvelu sekä Concierge-palvelu, jotka suunnittelevat matkasi ja hoitavat matkajärjestelyt puolestasi. Mihin suuntautuu seuraava löytöretkesi?

americanexpress.fi/platinumcard


TAKEOFF WORLD

ONLINE BOOKING MADE EASY Need more time to decide? Hold my Booking guarantees your flight price for up to 72 hours. Go to ­finnair.com for more information.

COMPILED BY SILJA KUDEL

CALENDAR

February events FEB 25 – MAY 29 SAN FRANSISCO. The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco will host the firstever exhibition devoted to the early career of Claude Monet. Monet: The Early Years highlights rarities including the first piece ever exhibited by the acclaimed French Impressionist, painted when he was only 18 years old. famsf.org

VENICE

Masked mystery FEBRUARY 11–28

Venice might be sinking, but when Carnevale rolls around every February, the city bursts into life with extravagant parades and enigmatic characters who parade fanciful fashion creations on the city’s narrow backstreets. Attending the Doge’s Ball comes with a high price tag – €800 – but anyone is welcome to don a mask and join in the city-wide baroque fancy dress party celebrating the approach of spring. carnevale.venezia.it/en

UNTIL FEB 25 HARBIN. Full-scale buildings made of blocks of ice, brilliant light shows, and monster-sized sculptures by artists from around the world are highlights at China’s Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival. Exhibits remain open for as long as the weather permits. icefestivalharbin.com

OKAYAMA

Lucky loincloths FEBRUARY 18

MENTON. When life gives you lemons… turn them into a float! The 84th annual Fête du Citron in the French Riviera town of Menton features colourful parades of fabulous fruity creations. Broadway and musical comedies are the theme of this year’s Lemon Festival.

Saidai-ji Eyo Hadaka Matsuri is undoubtedly one of Japan’s most eccentric holiday events. The famed “Naked Festival” takes place annually at Saidai-ji Temple, where 9,000 men in loincloths compete to catch lucky sticks thrown into the crowd by a priest at precisely midnight. A safe distance is advised: The resulting skirmish is as rough as a rugby match.

fete-du-citron.com

jnto.go.jp

FEB 13 – MAR 2

16 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


OMA SÄNKY. PARAS SÄNKY. SÄÄDETTÄVÄ VUODE NYT TAVALLISEN VUOTEEN HINNALLA!

180 x 200 cm, norm. 5.520 € NYT 3.190 €

Hyvä uni on yksi elämän tärkeimmistä asioista. Jensen on parantanut ihmisten nukkumista ja unenlaatua jo vuodesta 1947. Diplomat Dream on Jensenin säädettävien vuoteiden klassinen malli, joka sisältää kaikki olennaisimmat toiminnot. Huolellisesti valittujen materiaalien lisäksi tässä vuoteessa on Jensen® Original -vyöhykejärjestelmä, jossa on pehmeä hartiavyöhyke ja sisäänrakennettu ristiseläntuki. Headrest-toiminto mahdollistaa sen, että niskasi ja pääsi ovat aina hyvässä asennossa kun istut vuoteessa. Mukana myös muistitoiminto oman suosikkiasennon tallennukseen. Nuku aina parasta unta omassa vuoteessasi. ESPOO | HELSINKI | HÄMEENLINNA | JYVÄSKYL Ä | KOUVOL A | KUOPIO | L AHTI | L APPEENRANTA MIKKELI | OULU | PORI | PORVOO | ROVANIEMI | SEINÄ JOKI | TAMPERE | T URKU | VAASA | VANTAA


MY FINNISH FAVOURITES

100 YEARS Blue Wings salutes Finland’s centenary by spotlighting inspiring Finns throughout the year. suomifinland100.fi

TEXT BY CARINA CHELA ISTOCK

Jaakko Blomberg is the man behind more Helsinki events than he can remember. Major crowdpullers include Helsinki Cleaning Day, Dinner under the Sky, and Kallio Block Party. Sauna Day is also firmly established in Helsinki’s event calendar.

The cities are a-changin’ HARRY POTTER character ­professor Albus Dumbledore and urban a­ ctivist Jaakko Blomberg have a great deal in common. But while Dumbledore is fictional, Blomberg is for real: He’s a social innovator and Goodwill Ambassador who also has extraordinary powers to make things happen. We know because he was awarded the Citizen of the Year and Helsinki Travel Award 2016. Blomberg is all about doing things

together, about communities, co-working, recycling, and placemaking. He makes the hard work involved sound deceptively simple. “First I get an idea, then I open up a Facebook page and invite everybody,” he says. Before Blomberg there was no real tradition of self-organised events in Helsinki. “At first the authorities were very skeptical about these events but now it’s the official strategy of the city to support them and they are proud of it,” he says.

According to Blomberg, the current trend is that happenings and events are taking place in smaller cultural spaces, and they are getting more and more local. So local that the Home theatre event and the Sitting room exhibition event happen in people’s own homes. “I really want to start new things all the time and try to make them run somehow. But it’s also important that things are transforming and evolving,” he says.

3 X BLOMBERG’S FAVOURITE HELSINKI HANGOUTS SEVERI ROMSI

HELKATTI CAT CAFÉ Helsinki’s cat heaven is a perfect place to relax and pat a cat to your heart’s content. It’s the permanent residence for eight urban felines.

KOLO A meeting place and cafeteria with a laid-back atmosphere and free events in the trendy Kallio district. Also a great place for vegans.

18 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

RUPLA A creative space combining art exhibitions, a vintage dis-ndat market, and coffee from their own roastery, Rupla is a true local cultural hub.

In this series fascinating Finns share their local favourites.


GET CULTURED Break away from everyday life and check out the entertainment offerings of Finnair Plus partners. www.finnairshop.com

MAKERS OF FINLAND TEXT AND PHOTO BY LAURA IISALO

CULTURE

The man behind Tom of Finland

Actor Pekka Strang spent a good part of last year in the shoes of Touko Laaksonen, ­better known as Tom of Finland. The secret life of the gifted yet humble man whose homoerotic illustrations are iconic worldwide is now the ­subject of a feature film in which Strang plays the lead. The story takes place in post-Second World War Finland where homosexuality was illegal and Tom of Finland’s leather-clad, muscular gay men – a strictly forbidden fantasy – existed only in Laaksonen’s imagination. “It really shocked me to learn about the harsh reality for gay men back then. Laaksonen did his drawings despite such dark times, which proves great courage,” says Strang. To the outside world Laaksonen was an unassuming man who worked in ­advertising and had an interest in music and the arts. He hid his love life and drawings even from his own family, and it was not until after his death that his art was fully recognised in his home country. “Laaksonen was talented but also doubtful about his art. He just drew what he was interested in: lumberjacks, leather boots, and bus drivers in uniform,” says Strang, commenting on the pictures that ­unintentionally became symbolic of the global gay rights revolution. Although in many ways times have changed for the better, Strang points out that the film is not just about the past. It is the story of a fight that is still ongoing. “You don’t make a film just to look back at history and proclaim that ­e verything is fine now. We are far from done,” he declares. tof.fi Pekka Strang plays Touko Laaksonen in the Tom of Finland movie directed by Dome Karukoski, premiering on February 24.

In this series we meet the talents of Nordic culture.

FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

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TWO OF A KIND

DESIGN DEALS Check out the range of Finnish design icons from the renewed Finnair Shop.­ Special offers for Finnair Plus members! www.finnairshop.com

TEXT BY SILJA KUDEL

HIP MEETS HERITAGE

On the glass trail Finnish designers have been creating modern marvels with molten sand since the 1950s. Among the top spots to see contemporary glassblowers in action are Fiskars and Nuutajärvi, two creative hubs on Finland’s glass trail. NUUTAJÄRVI

ILKKA ERNIN

BLOWN AWAY

GLASS ACT

Fiskars is a postcardesque ironworks village, roughly one hour’s drive west of Helsinki. When Fiskars ­Corporation – makers of those iconic orange-­handled scissors – relocated elsewhere in the 1980s, the vacant historic buildings were filled by a lively community of ­artisans and designers. Today the village is populated by shops and studios selling glassware and cool industrial design, including the Sirius Gallery and Onoma ­Cooperative. Glassblowers can be seen plying their trade at the Bianco Blu Glass Studio run by Tarmo Maaronen, a master glassblower who has worked with legends such as Kaj Franck and Oiva Toikka. Visitors can fashion their own glass objects in one-hour glassblowing workshops taught by Maaronen for €36 per person. Special family events will be arranged as part of the Winter Holiday@Fiskars V ­ illage programme, February 23-26. fiskarsvillage.fi/en

Dating from 1793, Nuutajärvi Glass Village is Finland’s largest community of independent glass designers and glassblowers. The scenic village is home to Finland’s oldest glass factory, which currently houses freelance workspaces open to the public in summer. The local artists’ cooperative handles the sale of glass art from its gallery. Famous designers based in the village include Anu Penttinen, whose eye-popping designs have a distinctly urban feel – despite her serene rural setting. “I love the quiet yet passionate quality of our village. It’s a great place to work alongside like-minded colleagues tackling the same challenging material,” says Penttinen, who hand-blows her own designs in a large hotshop shared by local artisans. “Since Iittala moved its production away, we independent glassmakers have basically been running the village.” nuutajarvi.fi/en

20 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


The superlative-charged chronograph. 50 mm case in BreitlightÂŽ. Exclusive Manufacture Breitling Caliber B12 with 24-hour military-style display. Officially chronometer-certified.

Centralgatan 5, 00100 Helsingfors Tel: 020 7000 605


TAKEOFF EVENTS

100 YEARS Blue Wings salutes Finland’s centenary by highlighting ­interesting events throughout the year. suomifinland100.fi

COMPILED BY LAURA IISALO KAAPO KAMU

CALENDAR

Winter events JUSSI NAHKURI

FEBRUARY 21 – MARCH 5

THE NORDIC WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS bring together 250,000 spectators, 700 athletes, and 2,000 volunteers to celebrate the magic of winter sports and skiing in the city of Lahti – with the promise of the world’s biggest après-ski!

DESIGN

Sweet dreams UNTIL 6 MAY

lahti2017.fi

KOTI is a sleepover installation that transforms a simple Finnish cottage into a living exhibition at the Finnish Institutes in Paris, Berlin, London, and Brussels. Curated by designer Linda Bergroth, the project looks into the meaning of home through architecture, art, design, and societal themes. The six wooden cabins can be booked via Airbnb. Rounding out the programme is a wide range of events from concerts and talks to film screenings and pop-up restaurants.

FEBRUARY 12–15

yle.fi/rso

UNTIL 23 APRIL A FINNISH CONTEMPORARY ART exhibition fills two halls of the Rovaniemi Art Museum with artwork from the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation collection. Featured artists include Fanny Churberg, Albert Edelfelt, Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Eero Järnefelt, Tyko Sallinen, and Ellen Thesleff. korundi.fi Events subject to change.

22 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

kotisleepover.com

TOM OF FINLAND, NIMETÖN, 1984, GRAFIITTI PAPERILLE, 33X24CM. COURTESY TOM OF FINLAND FOUNDATION

THE FINNISH RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA tours Moscow, Vyborg, and Saint Petersburg and will perform Jean Sibelius’ violin concerto and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3. The concert stars Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, 2010 winner of the Jean Sibelius violin competition.

CULTURE

Bold exhibitionist

UNTIL 6 MAY The internationally acclaimed Finnish artist, best known as Tom of Finland, is spotlighted in an exhibition exploring the political, sociological, and cultural impact of his art, which is iconic within the gay community around the world. Touring Turku and Berlin, the exhibition features more than 35 artworks, photographs, and stories contributed by the artist’s family and friends. Touko Laaksonen – Tom of Finland. Of Music and Men. turku.fi/en


FLYING STORIES

FOR VALENTINE’S DAY this year, Finnair is looking for love stories in the air. To share your special moments, upload a photo to Instagram using the hashtag #feelfinnair.

TEXT BY SIMON FRY

NEW HORIZONS

Countries of the sky

While passengers looking out of the windows during a flight see the same landscape below, those at the cockpit’s controls look at something very different. Their technology displays a world of aviation districts, radio beacons, and waypoints guiding them en route, as revealed in bestselling book Skyfaring, written by pilot Mark Vanhoenacker. The book explains how the sky is divided into administrative divisions of airspace, which Vanhoenacker refers to as countries of the sky. These sometimes extend from land onto sea.

Finnair pilot Heikki Tolvanen has his beloved countries of the sky. “Maastricht Upper Area Control Centre is my favourite airspace,” he says, citing the area that covers the upper airspace of Belgium, northwest Germany, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands. “I appreciate the controllers’ high professionalism and with one or two Finns working there it’s always a pleasure exchanging a few quick words over Europe in your own language,” says Tolvanen.

Finnair p ilot Heikk i Tolvanen , in a Boe ing 757, over the Cauc asus Mountain s.

In this series Blue Wings looks into the fascinating world of flying, through inspiring people, discoveries, and inventions.

FEBRUARY 2017

BLUE WINGS

23


TAKEOFF DESTINATION

TAKE A BITE OUT OF THE BIG APPLE There are oodles of things to do in New York City and rooftoop igloos are just one of many. Make your own memories. Finnair flies to New York City daily.

TEXT AND PHOTO BY MIRVA LEMPIÄINEN

NEW IN NYC

Sky-high cocktails winter style A VISIT TO a rooftop bar is a typical summer pastime in New York, but with more of the city’s rooftops becoming winter-friendly, terrace hopping is no longer just a hot-weather indulgence. 230 FIFTH, one of Manhattan’s most popular rooftop bars, is doing its best to keep customers warm and cosy during the chillier months. In addition to providing patrons with red robes, the bar has installed igloos on the roof. These inflatable plastic domes ­fitted with electric fireplaces are located right in front of the Empire State Building and a sea of other midtown skyscrapers.

COSY ROOFTOPS 230 FIFTH Rooftop Garden Bar and Restaurant, 230 5th Avenue. The igloos are open until the end of March. 230-fifth.com Press Lounge, 653 11th ­Avenue. The glass-walled interior space offers yearround weather protection. thepresslounge.com Haven, 132 West 47th Street. The glassed-in rooftop is fitted with personal fireplaces. havenrooftop.com

24 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

“The igloo is creative and useful, and protects you from the cold. Plus it’s romantic,” says Andrea Schiffbonher of Austria, as she sits inside an igloo together with a friend, Kristina ­Efimov from Germany. The young women were happily ­surprised when they saw the igloos, especially as they happened to be ­visiting New York during one of the coldest nights of the year. There is a downside, though: The igloos are extremely popular and would-be patrons may need to queue out in the cold for their turn.


luxury travel Kemi

SnowCastle soon open in summertime too

KEMI, A TOWN ON THE NORTHERN COAST OF THE GULF OF BOTHNIA, IS AN EXPERIENCE ALL YEAR ROUND. THE NUMBER ONE ATTRACTION IS THE SNOWCASTLE, MADE OF SEAWATER. A NIGHT IN THE AWARD-WINNING SNOWHOTEL IS AN UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE.

A

nother experience not to be missed is a cruise on the Sampo icebreaker, with the chance to swim between blocks of ice. Of course, you will have the protection of a warm rescue suit!

Events all year round

As a well-known winter destination, Kemi is now making efforts to ensure that there are things to see and do in the town every season. Amongst other things, Kemi Tourism LTD. has purchased a site on the island in front of the inland port. New to the island is a Lappish hut village with hut saunas. “During the summer the island is reached by boat, and in winter by snow mobile. The scenery can be enjoyed from an Olokolo nest, our own speciality. This is a warm transparent carriage that is pulled by snow mobile”, explains Noora Barria from Kemi Tourism Ltd. The Arctic Adventure Island has a range of programmes depending on the season, including cross-country biking, fishing, berry- and mushroompicking excursions, snow-shoeing, and marvelling at the Northern Lights. The new additions to the range of accommodation are the Seaside Glass Villas, with superb views over the northern Gulf of Bothnia.

Ice sculpture in summertime too Kemi’s unique SnowCastle has charmed visitors since it first opened in 1996. This winter the snow castle was built in the new SnowCastle area. The castle is open until the 9th of April. From 2018 the exotica made from snow and ice can also be enjoyed in the summer, with LumiLinna becoming a year-round travel destination. “We’re not revealing everything yet, but the offerings will include ice sculpturing and a meal at an ice table in the summer months as well”, Noora Barria says.

Bottle messages for Santa Claus Since 2005 Kemi has been Santa’s official harbour town, and last year he opened his harbour office here. There you can enjoy festive delicacies made by Mrs. Claus, and learn seamanship from the sailor elves. Santa might drop in for a visit. If there’s no sign of Santa, you can send him a message in a bottle. ● PRODUCED BY TAKEOFF CONSULTING GROUP (PART OF CALCUS.COM )

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Long live the Moomins

26 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


The iconic Moomin spirit lives on in the work of artists and artisans inspired by the works of Tove Jansson. TEXT AND PHOTOS BY LAURA IISALO

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PAPER TO MUG

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obody could have predicted how popular Moomin porcelain mugs would become – not even Tove Slotte, the graphic designer behind most of the colourful creations. Finnish ceramics company Arabia will not reveal exactly how many mugs have been sold, but admits the figure is in the millions. The most popular, the pink “Love” mug, has been in production since 1996. Some special editions have become collector’s items fetching prices of up to €6,000 at auctions. About four new mugs are launched each year, and the design process starts two years in advance. For Slotte the creative process begins by flicking through the pages of Tove Jansson’s books – she has them all – and making collages of suitable images before drawing the design by hand. Although Slotte knew she had landed a fantastic opportunity, she remembers being very nervous when first offered the job 27 years ago. “I respected Jansson so much that I didn’t know what I could possibly do with her illustrations. In the beginning I almost didn’t dare to touch them at all,” she says. Slotte still feels the same excitement whenever she embarks on a new creation. “We promised Tove that we would always use her

original drawings but even so, I never have to repeat myself. After all these years, I still enjoy coming up with new interpretations.” PASSING THE TORCH Working from her home studio in a big garden with 20 apple trees, Slotte enjoys the peace and quiet. Many of her best ideas come to her when she is walking her dogs in the nearby woods. “I started making lots of jams and juices when we moved to the countryside 23 years ago. I had young kids back then and I could really relate to Moominmamma,” she recalls. A die-hard Moomin fan, Slotte still warmly remembers her first experience of reading Jansson’s books. “My mother gave me The Book about Moomin, Mymble, and Little My, which had little cut-outs on every page. I was fascinated and I can still quote many of the stories. I also remember drawing the characters back then,” she says. Slotte has passed on her fondness for the Moomins to her own two children, who have grown up hearing the same s­ tories. Her older daughter Hanna ­Elevant assisted Slotte last summer when her schedule grew hectic. “It was nice to collaborate with her because I’m so used to working alone. She said my job is so much fun, which felt really nice.” l

TOVE SLOTTE • Freelance illustrator and ceramist • Slotte has designed 73 Moomin mugs for Arabia based on original drawings by Tove Jansson • Lives and works in Karjalohja • Lesson learned from the Moomins: “The Moomins are always ready for new adventures, yet home is always a place to return – I like that sense of security.” arabia.fi

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MOOMIN FAIRY GODMOTHER

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he forthcoming opening of the new Moomin Museum in Tampere, Finland, is keeping conservator Eija Kangasmäki-Kurtti rather busy. The vast collection consists of about 2,000 original works by Tove Jansson – many of which have passed through the skilful hands of Kangasmäki-Kurtti. Being a conservator requires plenty of patience, an eye for detail, and a strong will. “I have to think about what’s best for the exhibit, not only what’s best for the audience. The Moomin illustrations are so popular that we often have to decline requests to loan out the works. Transportation and exposure to light, heat, and moisture can damage the artwork, and it’s my job to prevent that from happening,” says Kangasmäki-Kurtti. Maintaining the vast collection of Jansson’s Moomin illustrations, originally created for the books and later donated to the Tampere Art Museum, is a full-time job. The difficult aspect of the job is deciding which method is best for long-term preservation. “Bleaching the paper to dispel discolouration may look good for now but over time it shortens the lifespan of the artwork. It’s important that future generations get to see these creations too,” KangasmäkiKurtti explains. BODYGUARD ON THE ROAD One of the biggest challenges from a conservation viewpoint is that Jansson glued her original drawings on a highly acidic paper. Kangasmäki-Kurtti has spent hours detaching and washing the drawings to prevent brown spots from developing. Her main goal is to stabilise the work in its current condition – not

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EIJA KANGASMÄKIKURTTI

• Paper conservator at Tampere Art Museum • Conserves the original Moomin illustrations donated to the museum by Tove Jansson • Lives and works in Tampere • Lesson leared from the Moomins: “You can see a very realistic side of the Moomins in the cartoons. They remind me to be more carefree in life.” tampereartmuseum.fi

to renew or change the original artwork. “If a character is missing a detail because the paint has peeled off, I’m not going to redraw it because it wouldn’t be an original Tove Jansson anymore. What I do is reattach the existing paint to prevent further damage,” Kangasmäki-Kurtti says. The Moomins are regularly exhibited all over the world and Kangasmäki-Kurtti travels along to make sure that their journey proceeds safely. She admits that working so closely with the artwork for ten years has had an impact. Kangasmäki-Kurtti has read many of Jansson’s books to understand the history behind them, and the more she learns, the more she values them. “When I know the story behind the piece that I’m working on, it becomes much more than just an image – these are characters from real life. I suppose they have become my babies in a way,” she says.


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SNUFKIN MEETS PYTHAGORAS

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self-confessed Moomin fanatic, Anne Paso has turned her fascination into a fulfilling business. An industrial designer who enjoys combining art with logic, in 2001 Paso invented a jointing method that allows small plywood pieces to be assembled into fun little 3D figures. “I love mathematics and I used the Pythagorean theorem to create the joint. I wanted a product that can be manufactured in Finland and is made of local wood,” says Paso. The first Lovi products were wooden Christmas tree decorations of various shapes: baubles, hearts, angels, reindeers, trees, and little piglets all laid out in a neat flat format that doubled as a postcard. Paso realised the potential of her invention and patented the joint, which remains the crux of all her product development. Paso used to joke that she would start incorporating the Moomins if she ever ran out of ideas. Eventually she did – not for lack of ideas, but to re-engage the Japanese market, which she nearly lost because of the 2011 earthquake and its vast economic impacts. “I had to come up with a ground-breaking idea to get back in

32 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

the game. I have always loved Tove Jansson’s books and illustrations and I admire how her text is perfectly in tune with her drawings. The wooden characters are my own simplified interpretations but it’s important to me to capture the same spirit,” Paso explains. LITTLE WOODEN MESSENGERS The first Moomin figures were launched in 2012 and there are now seven characters altogether in the range. Little My is the top seller but Paso’s personal favourite is Snufkin – so much so that she waited a while until she felt ready to create the little philosopher using 15 carefully cut wooden pieces. “We have a lot in common. He is a free spirit who couldn’t care less what others think about him. He wanders from place to place but feels at ease wherever he goes.” Paso feels like her wooden characters are little messengers encouraging people to find out more about the Moomin way of life. “My hope is that people would read Jansson’s amazing books and dig deeper into the Moomin philosophy, which is very accepting, tolerant, and sophisticated in spirit. All sorts of things happen in life but everything will always be all right in the end,” she says.

ANNE PASO

• Industrial designer and founder of Lovi • Creates plywood 3D figures based on the original Moomin characters • Lives and works in Oulu • Lesson learned from the Moomins: “According to Snufkin you can’t ever be really free if you admire somebody too much. I agree.” lovi.fi

Laura Iisalo is a Helsinki-based writer and photographer. Working on the Moomins story inspired her to read Tove Jansson’s books and she is also planning to visit Klovharu island next summer.


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JOHAN ANDERSSON

ON THE MOOMIN TRAIL Tove Jansson’s home island, KLOVHARU, is where many of her iconic works were conceived. Located in the Pellinki archipelago near Porvoo, the small, rocky island is where Jansson spent summers with her partner Tuulikki Pietilä for nearly 30 years. The annual open house week is July 15–21 and guided tours are organised, weather permitting. pellinge.net TEATTERIMUSEO

AMANDA SOILA

MOOMINS AT THE THEATRE is an exhibition displaying Tove Jansson’s Moomins and other theatre works at ­Helsinki’s Theatre Museum. The exhibits include costumes and stage sets for a play that was written and designed by Tove Jansson and first presented in 1949 at the Swedish Theatre in Helsinki. Other artworks, original costume sketches and p ­ hotos are also featured. The exhibition runs until summer 2017. teatterimuseo.fi HAM

Tove Jansson gallery at HELSINKI ART MUSEUM (HAM) is a permanent display dedicated to the multi-disciplinary artist. The collection includes some of her most important works; the frescos Party in the City and Party in the Countryside, the oil painting Before the Masquerade and sketches for the murals at Aurora Children’s Hospital. Guided tours are available on Saturdays. hamhelsinki.fi

THE NEW MOOMIN MUSEUM opens on June 17 in Tampere Hall. Maintained by the Tampere Art Museum, the new premises display a unique collection of Tove Jansson’s original Moomin artwork including hundreds of her beloved illustrations and striking three-dimensional tableaux by her partner Tuulikki Pietilä. The museum will also have a restaurant, a Moomin library, and a shop selling plenty of Moomin products. muumimuseo.fi 34 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

MUMIN KAFFE is a new chain of coffee shops created especially for children. The cosy cafés offer plenty of Moomin books, toys, and other playthings to keep kids occupied while parents enjoy a bite to eat. The first Mumin Kaffe opened in Helsinki last November and the concept is fast spreading across the city and abroad. Read more on page 12. muminkaffe.com

Events and dates subject to change.


TOP5

London Revival

1

COVENT GARDEN HIDEOUT Only a five-minute walk from Covent Garden tube station, the colourfully quirky courtyard of Neal’s Yard has remained one of London’s best-kept secrets. This formerly dodgy backyard was transformed into a wholefood store and alternative health hub in the ’70s by Nicholas Saunders, inspired by a visit to Denmark’s Christiania. Today, Neal’s Yard is a haven for health-conscious ­visitors, hosting a thriving cluster of restaurants and cafés specialising in healthy food, a walk-in backrub studio, and a Neal’s Yard Remedies organic skincare store and therapy rooms. Neal’s Yard, London WC2H 9DP

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LH R

Fin na Lo ir flie nd s tim on fi to ve es a finn air day. .co m


CHI YU WELLNESS CENTRE

The busy streets of the British capital can be frazzling. We share our pick of soothing London spots for unwinding and recharging. TEXT AND PHOTOS BY AMANDA SOILA

2

QUICK DETOX Soho-based Detox Kitchen may look as cute as a candy store, but the goodness it offers is of a different variety. First opened in 2012, the healthy eatery and delivery service has gained a devoted customer base among Londoners. Specialising in fresh, seasonal food free of wheat, dairy, or refined sugar, the creative and colourful selection of salads, soups, and juices are not just healthy but also delicious. The location next to Regent Street is particularly convenient for shoppers or gallery-goers craving a quick, nutritious bite. Detox Kitchen, 10 Kingly Street, London, W1B 5PJ detoxkitchen.co.uk

4

POSH PORRIDGE The British capital is going nuts over everything hygge, the Nordic concept of cosiness. On the food scene, it’s the humble bowl of porridge that is at the forefront of the culinary cosiness trend, and Covent Garden-based café 26 Grains takes the formerly overlooked dish to new heights. Combining wholesome grains with traditional Nordic spices and topped with lashings of fresh berries, fruit, honey, and nuts, these hearty bowls are the ultimate comfort food. The “Nordic Pear,” a fusion of coconut milk, oats, spices, and pear, comes highly recommended. 26 Grains, 1 Neal’s Yard, London, WC2H 9DP 26grains.com

3

TRANQUIL TREATMENTS The Marylebone neighbourhood just a few blocks off Oxford Street is one of London’s wellness hotspots. A local favourite is Japanese Chi Yu Wellness Centre specialising in holistic treatments combining acupuncture, aromatherapy, massage, and other complementary therapies. “Many Londoners and travellers look for stress relief,” says Mami Tsang, founder of Chi Yu. But as we all experience stress in a slightly different way, Tsang and her team always look for a unique, tailored treament that will leave the customer feeling relaxed, energised, and ready to take on the world. Chi Yu Wellness Centre, 36 George Street, London, W1U 7DR chi-yu.co.uk

5

SECRET GARDEN The residential area of Maida Vale is home to picturesque Little Venice, best known for its canals and river boats. Tucked away between the terraced houses is London’s oldest garden centre, Clifton Nurseries. Home to an astonishing array of plants, the garden also boasts a café that has become something of a local institution. Housed in a former greenhouse, this leafy sanctuary is ideal for a wholesome, healthy brunch or lunch, or a lovely afternoon tea. Clifton Nurseries, 5a, Clifton Villas, London, W9 2PH clifton.co.uk

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EUROPEAN VOICES BY STEFAN NILSSON

Pay it forward

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s a trend hunter, I look for new and cool things that get me excited. One of the buzzwords of the moment (and the theme of this issue of Blue Wings) is “kindness.” But how exactly does the kindness trend manifest itself? There is a lot of data circling around us. This data can be used in fantastic and interesting ways. For example, look at how Spotify can generate a playlist you didn’t even know you needed. A service such as this is pretty amazing – plus a kind gesture from the brand. But sometimes the use of personal data feels a bit artificial or too much like science fiction, lacking the human touch. And there’s one thing data can never give us: real human kindness. Friendship and compassion are fine expressions of kindness. And kindness is even gaining attention on the international agenda. Since 2012, the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network has published the annual World Happiness Report, which describes how ­wellbeing is an effective yardstick for measuring the progress of nations. The report reviews the state of happiness in the world today and shows how the new science of happiness explains personal and national variations in the experience of happiness. On the corporate side, too, kindness is getting more attention, specifically the catchphrase “Random Act of Kindness” (RAK) – as the opposite of random acts of violence and cruelty. According to Wikipedia, the term was coined in 1982 when Anne Herbert wrote “practice random kindness and senseless acts of beauty”

38 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

on a placemat in Sausalito, California. RAK is of course a tool for brands to drum up more appreciation and attention, and it is mainly embraced by young online companies. The use of RAK is growing as a marketing tool, and there is even a Random Act of Kindness Week every year, this year from February 12 to 18. The RAK website (randomactsofkindness.org) offers ideas on how individuals or companies can spread kindness in everyday life. Mobile operator Verizon participated last year by letting people send free food to the needy. Donors simply had to type #whynotwednesday and send a food emoji to Verizon, and they would respond with a form to fill out for food to be delivered to the right place – pretty amazing! My final example of the trendiness of kindness is the latest fashion in greeting cards. Just look at how stationery has changed over the years. When I turned 30 (many, many years ago…) I received a birthday card saying “You’re over the hill, old fart.” Today greeting cards are much gentler and more creative – more like kind little reminders that we’re okay after all in this harsh world. When the British gay lifestyle magazine Attitude listed the hottest trends for 2017, kindness was top of their list. I like that. Or, as Attitude would put it: “Being kind: It’s a choice. Try it. It’s better than being moron.” l

STEFAN NILSSON is a a Stockholm-based

trend hunter and gallerist. Best known for his blog Trendstefan, he is also the owner of Design­galleriet and head of the Designbloggarna blog network. Check out his YouTube channel Trendstefan TV as well as his Instagram account: @trendstefan


HELSINKI – THE BEST LOCATION TO FIND THE SMARTEST WAYS.

Fly the short route between Europe and Asia via Helsinki. We take you to your destination faster and in complete comfort. Book your flights at finnair.com

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Hatagashira is the name of an old ­tradition in which young men take turns balancing a 50 kg bamboo flagpole; teams compete to see who can do it with the most style.

A K O

as ir h to a n s Fin ction th e n wi r ­con nawa rtne a i p k O d s. orl irline ew A n o an om Jap nair.c n fi

42 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


DESTINATION JAPAN

Young at heart

Want to live to the age of 100? Take lessons from the people of Okinawa, Japan’s southernmost prefecture. TEXT AND PHOTOS BY PETER WELD

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At Yachimun no Sato, a pottery village north of Naha, two women (top) break up clay to get it ready for master potter Kyōshi Matsuda (bottom).

W

e live in a world that worships youth. The musicians we l­isten to, the athletes we cheer for, and the celebrities who litter the pages of our magazines are all usually in their 20s or 30s – sometimes still in their teens. And we want to be like them: We spend billions every year trying to look and feel younger. When was the last time you heard of somebody who wanted to turn forward the hands of time? But Okinawa, the group of islands at Japan’s southern tip, is different. In the country boasting the world’s longest life expectancy, Okinawa takes the game to the next level: There are roughly 70 centenarians for every 100,000 people in Okinawa, about triple the rate in such countries as the US (and more than five times that in Finland). And there’s no shame in that. Okinawans wear their age gracefully instead of trying to Botox it away. They continue to work all their lives instead of retiring and filling their hours with 2,000-piece jigsaw puzzles and cranky reminiscences of the good old days. What’s their secret to a long, happy life? Is it the food they eat? The relaxed pace of life? Their enduring ties to the traditions of the past? Somebody had to get to the bottom of this, so I flew to Okinawa’s capital, Naha, and began my investigation.

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Above: The foundations are all that’s left of Zakimi Castle, one of Okinawa’s ancient gusuku. Below: At Shiroma Bingata, sometimes four or more people can be seen laboriously working on one swath of fabric.

Okinawans wear their age gracefully instead of trying to Botox it away, and they continue to work all their lives instead of retiring. SLOW LIVING What we know today as Japan’s Okinawa Prefecture was once the independent Ryūkyū Kingdom, and Shuri Castle, perched on a ridge above Naha, evokes those times beautifully. After touring the castle grounds, inspecting the buildings and the display cases inside, I watched a performance of ancient Okinawan dance and took advantage of a free 30-minute beginner’s lesson on the three-stringed sanshin, the local version of Japan’s more famous shamisen. That brief encounter with the islands’ time-honoured music and dance led me to a multi-day exploration of traditional art forms and the people who are keeping them alive. It began in the tiny, cluttered FEBRUARY 2017

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Above left: Lacquered bowls dry at Gō Kadena’s workshop. Lower left: Sōki soba is a favourite local lunch. Above right: In his tiny workshop, Miki Nakamine fashions a sanshin, Okinawa’s version of Japan’s musical instrument, the shamisen.

A guiding principle in the Okinawans’ eating habits is to eat only until their stomachs are 80 per cent full. workshop called Nakamine Shamisenten, where I watched Miki Nakamine as he carefully shaved the wooden neck of a sanshin he was making. He told me that he goes up to Tokyo several times a year to visit a store which sells his sanshin, but he’s always happy to get back to Okinawa, where the slow pace is much more to his liking. A few days later, Gō Kadena told me something very similar. After graduating from university, Kadena had become a salaryman up in Tokyo, but eventually 46 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

he began to wonder if he really wanted to spend his life riding everywhere on jam-packed trains. That’s when he made the decision to pursue the family business and learn all he could about lacquer. “As a kid in Naha,” he recalled, “I knew what my family’s business was, and I sometimes went to our store, Ryūkyū Lacquerware, but I never ventured upstairs from the store. Coming back from Tokyo, I finally went upstairs and saw how the items in our store were made, with layer after layer of lacquer being meticulously applied. Suddenly I knew what I wanted to do.” He said goodbye to Tokyo’s complex, crowded rail network and moved back to Naha (which has only a single train line, a short monorail with just two cars per train), where after a one-year course, he settled comfortably into the life of lacquering. LUNCH AND LEARN No story about old Okinawa would be complete without a mention of the locals’ diet, which differs significantly from that in mainland Japan: less rice and fish, more legumes, and green and yellow vegetables. One of the most popular of those vegetables is gōya, a bitter green gourd that looks rather like a bumpy-


AGE-OLD HIGHLIGHTS AROUND OKINAWA • If there’s a quintessential Okinawan art, it would have to be bingata, and the Shiroma Bingata workshop is a good place to see how it’s produced. Bingata is a technique for creating fabrics whose design is not woven into them but rather painted onto them. The results are beautiful, but they don’t come easily: sometimes three or four people are hunched over the same swath of fabric, slowly and carefully massaging the paints into the cloth with stiff brushes. • Want to try eating like a Ryūkyū king? A restaurant called Ryūkyū Ryōri Mie, occupying an atmospheric 60-year-old house in the heart of Naha, serves recreations of the recipes used by Ryūkyū royalty. It’s not cheap, but it’s worth a splurge. Call 098867-1356 for a reservation – but be ready with some Japanese translation help. • Though they haven’t been restored to their former glory, as Shuri Castle has, several other castles from the days of the Ryūkyū Kingdom are worth visiting. A total of seven of these gusuku have been inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage list. whc.unesco.org/en/list/972/ • For an overview of Okinawa’s traditional artistry, visit Naha City Traditional Arts and Crafts Centre, downtown on Kokusai-dōri, where workshops allow you to try your hand at making bingata, ­lacquerware, and more. kogeikan.jp/international/english/

Top: In Kijōka, a village in the north of Okinawa, Mieko Taira inspects a grove of banana plants. Bottom: Weaving is one of the traditional crafts which is still being handed down to successive generations.

skinned version of a zucchini. Fried with some egg, tofu, and pork, it makes gōya champuru, a dish which is about as easy to come by here as burgers are in the west. Other local favourites include sōki soba – a slice of pork on a bowl of wheat noodles – and taco rice, a dish which dates back only to the American occupation of Okinawa in the post-Second World War era. Gōya champuru, sōki soba, and taco rice, as tasty as they are, probably don’t explain the Okinawans’ long lifespans, but the Longevity Lunch just might. At Emi no Mise, a restaurant in the north of the island, owner Emiko Kinjō prepares dietary staples from her garden in traditional ways. Varying from day to day, the Longevity Lunch might include deep-fried tapioca, vinegary sweet potato leaves, shrimp tempura with fennel, lime-flavored cold noodles, turmeric, multiple varieties of seaweed, and more – but all of it in small portions, for in addition to consuming a healthy diet loaded with vegetables and low in sugar, a guiding principle in the Okinawans’ eating habits is to eat only until their stomachs are 80 per cent full. Emi no Mise lies several hours’ drive north of

Naha, but it’s not the only reason to make an expedition up there, for the nearby hamlet of Kijōka is where bashōfu has been lovingly brought back to life. Bashōfu involves weaving fabric out of the fibres of banana plants. It’s a very labour-intensive skill, and in the island’s lean years after the Second World War, bashōfu almost died out as people focused on food production and simply wore whatever mass-produced clothes were available. A lady named Toshiko Taira was bashōfu’s ­saviour, single-handedly bringing it back from the brink of extinction and training a new generation of weavers, and in recognition of her decades of weaving and teaching, in 2000 Japan’s government conferred upon her the title “Living National Treasure.” Even today, Taira continues to make bashōfu and to work tirelessly for the organisation she founded, the Kijōka Bashōfu Preservation Society – at the sprightly age of 95. Despite all I’d seen, eaten, and photographed in Okinawa, I can’t say I was much closer to the secret of long life when I returned home. But I was ten days older than when I’d left, and that fact didn’t bother me in the least. l FEBRUARY 2017

Peter Weld is a Tokyo-based photographer and writer who has spent several ­decades exploring Japan. His last previous visit to Okinawa was in 1987, when he was a lot younger.

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DESTINATION SAN FRANCISCO

SILVER SCREEN

CITY

An exploration of San Francisco’s cinematic haunts offers a vibrant look at the mysteries and oddities that have inspired Hollywood. TEXT BY LAURA PALOTIE PHOTOS BY AARON BAWOL

S

an Francisco, located a one-hour flight north of Hollywood, has often played the edgier, quirkier cousin to its sunny southern neighbour Los Angeles. It’s here that Clint ­E astwood roughed up the audience in Dirty Harry, Jimmy Stewart dove into the Golden Gate Strait to rescue Kim Novak in Vertigo, and Robin ­Williams swatted off a pickpocket with a purse in Mrs. Doubtfire. Since the 1920s the city has been depicted in hundreds of films.

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“San Francisco provided Hollywood with a look and feel totally different from Los Angeles while being only 400 miles away – one could truck a film cast and crew up here for a couple of weeks without ­breaking the bank,” says Eddie ­Muller, local author and founder of the popular Noir City Film Festival. “Directors have loved that so many diverse ‘looks’ are right next to each other; point the camera east and you get a shot of skyscrapers shining in the sun, point it west and you’ve got tract homes on steep hills getting swallowed up in fog.” l

Laura Palotie and Aaron Bawol relocated to the Bay Area from Brooklyn in 2016. Laura, a content strategist and writer, loves debating all things film, while Aaron enjoys documenting changing cities through his lens.


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Fin n San air fli thr Fra es to ee nc t in t imes sico he aw finn summ eek air er. .co m

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STRAIGHT UP “They used to say you were nobody in San Francisco unless you were kicked out of the Zam,” says San Francisco Movie Tours guide and actress AJ Davenport. Opened in 1941, Zam Zam became renowned for its dry martinis and owner Bruno Mooshei, who died in 2000. “If you started telling him how to make a martini, you were out of there,” Davenport adds. Recently it appeared in Woody Allen’s film Blue Jasmine (2013). Pick a seat at the curved bar, put away your smartphone, and listen to locals reminisce about the way tech millionaires have changed the city. 1633 Haight St.

FILM IMMERSION X 2 MISSION POSSIBLE Alamo Drafthouse, focusing on both quality films and a quality movie experience (food and drinks are served, the chairs are cosy and no onscreen ads are shown), has several locations around the US. Before or after the movie, pay a visit to Lost Weekend Video in the lobby. It’s a local institution whose cinephile employees can help you pick out a new or classic film – or a book on movies. 2550 Mission St. drafthouse.com/sf

SPLENTOURSTIC San Francisco Movie Tours offers a three-hour cinematic ride through the city’s varied neighbourhoods – scenes from dozens of films are featured, from Daydreams (1922) to Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014). “This has evolved into a city tour that just happens to have 70+ film locations in it,” says owner Bryan Rice. “I appreciate how similar the city looks compared to [the way it was depicted] 50 years ago. Maybe it used to be edgier, but San Francisco is still a place where anything goes.” sanfranciscomovietours.com

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The historical restaurant of John’s Grill appeared in Dashiell ­Hammett’s novel The Maltese Falcon that inspired the iconic film starring Humphrey Bogart. Rubbing elbows with tourists and old-timers, one can listen to the clinking of dessert wine glasses and the blast of the hot milk steamer from behind the bar. Order a dozen oysters and a serving of liver with smoked bacon and caramelized onions – in old Hollywood style. Reservations are recommended. 63 Ellis St. Johnsgrill.com

PAUL GRANDSARD

CHASING THE FALCON

RULENUMBERONE2

AUTHOR EDDIE MULLER’S FOUR TIPS TO A CITY OF SUSPENSE

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“The most photographed intersection in San Francisco, at least where movies are concerned, is the corner of Union and Montgomery streets on Telegraph Hill. Stand in one spot, turn 360 degrees, and you’re seeing locations used in Dark Passage, Vertigo, The Sniper, House on Telegraph Hill, The Midnight Story, Dirty Harry... and the list goes on.”

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“Bix is a nice, if pricey, old school supper club with a great 1930s vibe.” 56 Gold St.

ESSENTIAL SAN FRANCISCAN FLICKS VERTIGO (1958)

MRS. DOUBTFIRE (1993)

On screen the Golden Gate Bridge has been mauled by Godzilla, scaled by apes and levitated by a super-villain, but perhaps its most memorable turn is bearing witness to Kim Novak’s suicide attempt in Alfred Hitchcock’s acclaimed film. The city’s inclines, shadowy corners and plunging shorelines play up Vertigo’s disorienting mood.

This story of an actor disguising himself as his children’s nanny to cope with his divorce has disturbing undertones, but Robin Williams’s deeply felt performance gives this comedy its heart. After his death in 2014, the stoop of the family’s fictional home at 2640 Steiner Street became a place for locals to pay their respects.

THE CONVERSATION (1974) Francis Ford Coppola’s portrait of ’70s paranoia depicts San Francisco as dense and claustrophobic. As Gene Hackman’s private investigator becomes obsessed with a secret conversation held in the bustle of Union Square, the viewer is driven to decode the character’s demons.

INSIDE OUT (2015) A preteen girl’s move to San Francisco sets the stage for Pixar’s animated hit about the emotions – Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust – that guide our lives. The film depicts both the curiosities of the city (crooked, winding streets, and broccolitopped pizza!) and its majesty (a drive across the gleaming Golden Gate Bridge).

bixrestaurant.com

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“Stookey’s Club Moderne is dedicated to classic cocktails and is gloriously designed and decorated: think bartenders in white jackets.” 895 Bush St. stookeysclubmoderne.com

4

“If you plan way in advance, you might be able to get Don Herron to give one of his walking tours that hits all the spots detailed in Dashiell Hammett’s book The Maltese Falcon.” donherron.com

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DESTINATION BRUSSELS

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BRUSSELS’ WONDER WALLS TEXT AND PHOTOS BY SIMON FRY

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russels, the birthplace of Tintin creator Georges Remi (Hergé) and Smurfs creator Pierre Culliford (Peyo), prides itself as the capital city of the comic strip (bandes dessinée) art form. Its Comic Book Route stretches across the city, with more than 50 massive murals featuring bandes dessinée frames from Tintin and Asterix as well as lesser-known comics such as Lucky Luke, Spirou, and Benoît Brisefer (Benedict Ironbreaker). Many are located within its central Pentagon, but the journey to Stockel Metro Station is particularly recommended for its two breathtaking murals featuring 140 Tintin characters. The route began with a

single mural in 1991 and additions are made regularly (with some murals disappearing). As it has no particular start or finish, you are free to explore. This citywide canvas delighting young and old alike takes visitors – literally – into Brussels’ residential, less-touristy districts, providing a fascinating insight into the city’s social history, an experience enhanced greatly when walking with a guide. This said, much enjoyment comes from stumbling accidentally upon a mural (particularly one newlycreated), while bicycle and even Segway tours are also available. l visitbrussels.be/comics

VISIT BRUSSELS

TELLING STORIES Housed in an art nouveau former department store, the Belgian Comic Strip Centre tells the story of cartoons from cave paintings to comics. Children will love seeing Tintin on the Moon and being photographed in a Smurf toadstool. Onsite are more than 5,000 original drawings, objects, and re-enactments plus a global comics gift shop. cbbd.be

MOOF IT! Rediscover your childhood at the Museum of the Original Figurine (MOOF) where innumerable cartoon characters come in 3D form. Find Asterix and Obelix on their chariot, the Smurfs and their village, Snowy as an Egyptian mummy, and even a mock-up of the Belvision studio, complete with film, machinery, and cinema. moofmuseum.be

FESTIVAL FUN Brussels hosts the annual Comic Strip Festival, which runs from September 1-3 this year. Last year’s event saw 40 publishers and 25 authors participate in signings, talks, exhibitions, and games while two parades featured balloons depicting worldwide comic strip characters and over 80 real-life vehicles from Tintin’s pages. Expect more of the same in 2017. comicsfestival.brussels FEBRUARY 2017

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EUROPEAN VOICES BY ALEXANDER STUBB

How to increase happiness

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have always felt the way we m ­ easure It ranks 157 countries, based on six factors: the wealth of nations is old-fashGDP, life expectancy, generosity, social supioned. The notion of Gross Domestic port, freedom, and corruption. The top ten Product (GDP) was all good and well happiest countries are Denmark, Switzerland, during the industrialisation of the Iceland, Norway, Finland, Canada, The Neth1900s, but in the new millennium it erlands, New Zealand, Australia, and Sweden. focuses on the wrong metrics. The unhappiest countries are Burundi, Syria, That’s why I was very excited to meet the Togo, and Afghanistan. Minister of Happiness of the United Arab This list shows that we cannot exclude Emirates (UAE), Ohood Bint Khalfan Al economic welfare and basic needs as foundaRoumi. She and I discussed the wellbeing of tions of a happy nation. The top ten countries nations. are not only rich, but they can be considered Naturally it’s difficult to measure the hapto be modern welfare states with a relatively piness of a nation or what a country should equal distribution of income. The bottom four do in order to boost it. The feeling of happihave been, or are, plagued by inequality, war, ness is personal and by and poverty. HAPPINESS DEPENDS ON definition subjective. We are fortuWe get satisfaction nate to live in a time OURSELVES MORE THAN from different things. where war, famANYONE ELSE. The Greek philosoine, and disease do pher ­Aristotle not kill the majorwas correct in p ­ ointing out that hap- ity of the world’s population like they used piness depends on ourselves more to. This is not to deny that all three still exist than anyone else. The US Conand cause death. But governments are freer stitution talks about “life, liberty, to focus on other aspects of the well-being of and the pursuit of happiness.” The their citizens. point here is that government Governments or ministers do not create does not secure happiness; rather individual happiness, but they can focus on it provides the conditions under at least five things that create the right condiwhich an individual can pursue tions for individuals to thrive: security, health his or her dreams. care, education, equality, and infrastructure. Bhutan was the first country It is important that countries start to look to start thinking about measurebeyond the economy for happiness and wellments beyond GDP. In 1972 they being. Cynics might scold the idea of a Minisestablished the four pillars of Gross ter of Happiness, but I think the UAE has got National Happiness (GNH): sustainit right. able development, preservation and proCurrently the UAE ranks number 28 in motion of cultural values, conservation the World Happiness Index, which is the best of nature, and establishment of good score in the region. I predict they will climb governance. the ladder fast. If you do not believe me take a A World Happiness Report has direct Finnair flight to Dubai, and check it out been published since 2012. It argues for yourself. l that happiness is a better measure of human welfare than income, poverty, education, health, and good government measured separately. Perhaps, but how do you measAlexander Stubb, former prime minister of ure it? Finland, believes in happiness, wellbeing, and The annual World Happiness positivity. He has been writing a column for Index provides a partial answer. Blue Wings since 2005.

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NEW ROUTE SAN FRANCISCO F LY T H E N O R D I C WAY

EXPERIENCE THE BEST OF CALIFORNIA NEXT SUMMER IN SAN FRANCISCO – THE CITY OF SUNSETS, STEEP STREETS AND GORGEOUS VIEWS.

Finnair will operate three weekly direct flights between Helsinki and San Francisco from 1st of June to 28th of September. Book your flights at finnair.com

Finnair operates flights in cooperation with fellow oneworld alliance partners.


A sprinkling of Arctic Power Berries completes a bowl of muesli.

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AN APPETITE FOR SUPER FOODS

Packed with great taste and goodness, natural foods from northern Finland are much more than flavour of the month.

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TEXT BY TIM BIRD AND PHOTOS BY ARCTIC POWER BERRIES AND TIM BIRD

inns have always known about the wholesome properties of the natural foods on their doorsteps. The expeditions into the forest to forage for berries and mushrooms, packed with nutrition concentrated by the short but lightfilled Nordic growing season, are long established highlights of the lakeside summer cottage sojourn. As long as you’re not trespassing, these goodies are available for everyone. Since it’s estimated that only a tiny percentage of the berries that grow in Finnish forests are ever actually collected, the store of natural foods is virtually limitless. The successful conversion of these foods to packaged products without sacrificing their intrinsic values of nutrition and flavour means that you can enjoy them anywhere and at any time. This was a primary aim of Jari Kurtti, the founder, CEO and “Flavour Master” of Arctic Forest Foods Oy when he moved to Levi in Finnish Lapland with his hotel-manager wife in December 2014. “I had plenty of knowledge about the potential of ingredients,” says Kurtti, who boasts a prestigious

15-year CV as a chef including Chaine des Rôtisseurs recognition and a spell at the Michelin star-rated G.W. Sundmans restaurant in Helsinki. “When we got to Levi, I thought about what to do next and I wanted to do something new. In September 2015 it occurred to me that we live almost in the middle of the forest, breathing the world’s clearest air,” he says. His self-set challenge to develop a product 100 per cent comprised of natural Finnish ingredients culminated in 2015 with the first in a series of snack bars. “Nothing similar was on the market at that time,” he says. “I wanted to combine different ingredients in new ways. With the launch of Arctic Super Foods as a brand, I wanted all the ingredients to be genuine super foods. The feedback has been very positive and people seem to like the flavours.” At present the brand includes three snack bars. The Wild Blueberry & Birch Leaf variety is now available for purchase on all Finnair flights in the Sky Bistro menu, and has been joined by Sea Buckthorn & Spruce Sprout and Lingonberry, Cranberry, & Nettle bars. The products, insists Kurtti, are uniquely natural, gluten-free, milk-free, and without added sugar. Each

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Flavour Master Jari Kurtti in his element.

“I wanted all the ingredients to be genuine super foods.” 30-gram bar contains about 130 calories, approximately the same number as a banana, and 60 berries are packed into the Blueberry & Birch Leaf bars. “It’s not a protein bar. It’s clean energy, healthy and great tasting, ideal for a coffee break, a cycling trip, a trail food snack – something to snack on instead of chocolate,” he says. NO PASSING FAD Arctic Super Foods bars are currently retailed at more than 180 outlets across Finland, from Helsinki in the south to Kilpisjärvi in the far north, and interest is growing from abroad. “Wellness experiences connected with nature are very popular right now but I believe this trend will last and that people everywhere will value these benefits in the longer term,” he says. “In Asia, Arctic food is getting a lot of attention. But first I’m concentrating on the Finnish market. In China the scale is huge so you need to make sure you have a solid base before venturing into it.” Jari Kurtti isn’t the only entrepreneur to have recognised the potential of natural Finnish super foods and the brand is operating in the face of increasing Finnish competition. Love Arctic’s Organic Nettle Tea and Organic Roasted Ground Milled Flaxseed & 58 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

Lingonberry, for example, and Roberts Berrie’s juices, both from Finland, are also making their cases to be present at your healthy dining table. In the meantime, London-based Anna ­Ojutkangas and Eve Suoyrjö, childhood friends from Lapland and the combined driving force behind Arctic Power Berries, have proved the international demand for these products. “We never thought about working in the food industry or running our own business,” says Ojutkangas. “At the time the idea popped into our heads, Eve was studying fashion marketing, hoping to make it ‘big’ in the fashion world, and I was studying sports therapy. One evening the idea came to our minds, and we called it a ‘light bulb moment,’” she recalls. As the two discussed how Finnish nature is full of amazing products that have not been branded or exported outside Finland, they saw an opportunity. “Eve had just arrived from a trip home and she had berry powders sitting on top of her suitcase. We always brought them back for ourselves from Finland, because the berries in the supermarkets in London don’t compare to the berries we’re used to eating back home. Eve grabbed one of those berry powder bags – ‘Like these!’ – and we looked at each other with crazy determination. Let’s do it!” says Ojutkangas. POWER TO THE POWDER The powders in question are made from dry blackcurrant, blueberry, lingonberry, and cranberry, with up to 700 grams of fresh berries dried and ground down to just 70 grams in each tub. That’s equivalent to a handful of berries to zest up your porridge, smoothie, yoghurt, or baking. The products are sold in some of


the top stores in the UK retail business, from Harrods and Selfridges to Waitrose and Whole Foods Market. “We happened to start the business at a good time, when people were getting into health and really paying attention to what they eat,” says Suoyrjö. “Many foods started appearing in a powdered form, so at least we didn’t need to be the first to tell people why they should eat powdered foods.” Nevertheless, she admits it’s been difficult at times. “We have to do a lot of explaining about why and how to use our products. Luckily the feedback is mostly positive and very supportive,” she says. Finns may be more conservative than Brits but they are more understanding about the virtues of natural forest foods. “That’s something we need to explain to the English a bit – to make clear that the berries from wild Arctic nature are actually a lot better than those cultivated berries from Chile! We are also proud to say our air-dried products are 100 per cent pure and fully raw, so they are suitable and handy for many diets that are getting more popular, for vegans and vegetarians, or those following FODMAP and Paleo diets,” she says. Arctic Super Foods and Arctic Power Berries are planning new products. Both are keeping their plans under wraps for now, but Suoyrjö hints at “a completely new eating occasion for Nordic berries.” Be prepared for more tasty surprises emanating from the forests of the north. l

BLUE POWER ��� Blueberries have been central elements of the diet for Nordic and North American natives for centuries. • Blueberries can be frozen without significantly reducing their nutritional value. • Blueberries are rich in antioxidants, vitamins C and K, manganese and fibre, and low in calories. • Studies have suggested that blueberries benefit blood sugar balance, eye health, and cognitive functions.

Tim Bird is a frequent contributor to Blue Wings who believes that no bowl of morning porridge is complete without a generous sprinkling of blueberries.

LUT eMBA [ Yksilöllinen valinta ] Vaihtoehtoisia teemaopintoja alkamassa Tietojohtaminen 7.3.2017 alkaen Lahdessa Hankintojen johtaminen 16.3.2017 alkaen Lahdessa LUT eMBA -ohjelman yhteiset opinnot käynnistyvät marraskuussa 2017.

LISÄTIETOJA:

LUT Täydennyskoulutus

Asiakkuuspäällikkö Sari Valkeapää sari.valkeapaa@lut.fi

lut.fi/mba

Rohkeat ajattelevat toisin. Ole yksi meistä.

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DESTINATION INDIA

KERALA’S ANIMAL MAGIC

Wild elephants, giant squirrels, sambar deer, and monkeys are among the menagerie you can encounter when exploring the parks and wildlife sanctuaries of India’s southernmost state. TEXT AND PHOTOS BY TIM BIRD

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Bonnet macaques in the Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary

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A wild elephant near Gavi on the edge of the Periyar Tiger Reserve

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here is a commotion on the road about 20 kilometres from the town of Munnar in the Indian state of Kerala. Cars are parked along a bend overlooking a slope leading down to the jungle. Boys are pointing at the trees and honking buses creep past so their passengers can get a view of what’s causing all the fuss. Even in Kerala, where estimates of this animal’s population vary from between 3,000 and 6,000, the sight of an Indian wild elephant stirs up excitement. “The elephant is actually very dangerous since it’s alone,” warns one of the boys. The elephant, a male as identified by its tusks, is 100 metres or so away from the road and seems intent on uprooting a tree, pausing to scratch its rump against a stump and using its trunk to scoop up dirt which it then tosses over its back. Road signs warn of elephants crossing and of penalties for poachers, but residents are not too worried about the damage an elephant might do to a plantation of waist-high tea bushes. After all, Munnar, a former British hill station, wrapped in mist at dawn and framed in frequent crimson sunsets, is the centre of Kerala’s tea production. Tea plantations dominate the landscape. It’s as if millions of green velvet cushions had been individually arranged in a meticulously patterned carpet, draped across the hills. But on the higher reaches of

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the mountains and in clusters of jungle and rugged bush in the valleys, an enthralling variety of wildlife remains, of which the wild Asian elephant is only the most conspicuous example. GOAT OF THE GHATS Not far from the tea and spice stores lining Munnar’s streets is the entrance to the Eravikulam National Park, covering 100 square kilometres of the s­ oaring Western Ghats, the range that spans the border between Kerala and its neighbouring state, Tamil Nadu. Buses ferry visitors up the slopes of the Ghats, with the last kilometre of the road covered on foot, a short expedition rewarded with fabulous panoramas across the valley and hills to the west. The highest mountain in India south of the Himalayas, all 2,650 metres of it, looms above E ­ ravikulam. This is Anamudi, meaning “elephant’s forehead,” and elephants inhabit the upland pastures and scrub, along with macaques and langurs, sloth bears, sambar deer, leopards, the very occasional tiger, and the cheerlessly-named grizzled Indian giant squirrel, as well as 133 species of birds. Yet the most likely encounter is with the park’s iconic creature, the endangered Nilgiri Tahr, a gentle and unassuming species of mountain goat that ventures down to the scrubland on either side of the visitors’ trail. In addition to the Nilgiri Tahr, another attraction is the highly infrequent – once every 12


Inland Kerala’s ­spectacular scenery includes mountains and tea plantations

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Tea picker on a ­Munnar plantation

A Malabar giant squirrel in the forest at Gavi 64 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


Patience, hush, and observance are rewarded with sightings of elephants on hilltops.

years, in fact – but spectacular blooming of the vivid blue Kurinji flower. The next display will not be until 2018. Blooming more regularly are the flame trees that provide shade for the plantation workers as the road heads north to, then passes through, the Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, directly on the border with Tamil Nadu and adjoining the Indira Gandhi National Park. Craggy hills and forested valleys shelter grizzled giant squirrels, tufted grey langurs, sambar and spotted deer, elephant, leopards, and gaur (known locally as bison). Log houses, tree houses, and trekking huts are available for more intrepid visitors in the company of guides and cooks. The five-hour road trip south from M ­ unnar plunges through more expanses of tea plantations before descending to pineapple and cardamom estates, more evidence of Kerala’s exceptional tropical abundance. Syrian Orthodox and Catholic churches rub amicable shoulders with mosques and Hindu temples, while hammer and sickle banners are reminders of the enduring political presence of the Communist Party in the state they call God’s Own Country. TIGERS AT A PREMIUM At the end of this drive, just beyond the regional ­cardamom capital of Kumily, lies the entrance to the Periyar Tiger Reserve at Thekaddy. In spite of its name, and because it is the biggest tiger reserve in India, the chances are slight of spotting one of the 50 creatures whose name it bears that live here. But there are ample other wildlife rewards. Periyar is popular with day-trippers who head straight for the quay on the reservoir, from which a constant flotilla of boats embarks. An hour’s cruise around the water often yields views of grazing gaur or bison, as well as handsome sambar deer and even, as dusk approaches, herds of bathing elephants. Bird-spotters will appreciate the variety of winged attractions here too, from cormorants and herons to painted storks and lapwings. The secluded Kerala government-run Lake Palace hotel, tucked away on a forested island, offers the best viewing prospects, while the grounds around the 1930s “heritage” hotel, Ananya Nivas, provide close evening encounters with some very bold monkeys, wild boar, and the chocolate-brown and black Malabar giant squirrel. The latter grows to up to a metre in length, hanging head-down to feed on fruit, and is easily spotted in and around Periyar.

A Nilgiri black langur.

A chital, or spotted deer, in the Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary

A brown fish owl at Thattekad

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Dirt bath time for a wild elephant in the hills near Munnar

Accessible and well-served with amenities, Thekaddy can get a little overrun with visiting tourist groups, and a quieter adventure option awaits in the forests around the ­village of Gavi, site of an eco-tourism camp and information centre, about an hour’s jeep drive away. Patience, hush, and observance may be rewarded with sightings of elephants patrolling the hilltops, of black long-tailed Nilgiri langurs snarling from the trees, and of Malabar squirrels snoozing in morning sunlight. COOL CATS Tiger sightings in the area that is set aside as their reserve, on the other hand, are extremely rare. “I have to admit that I have never seen a tiger here,” says Kerala Forest Department ecotourism guide Jegan. He gestures across the vast canopy of the jungle from a hilltop vantage point reached by means of a special permit granted by the tribal villagers who reside here. “The animals have lots of room. They’re very sensible. They know it’s wise to be careful of people, so they move around at night,” he says. The leopards and panthers share the jungle with their striped big cat cousins, and are equally reticent when it comes to encounters with humans. 66 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

As the sun climbs, the morning visit continues with a rowing boat ride on the river near the Green Mansion at Kochu Pampa. C ­ ommon and brown-breasted kingfishers dart across the water, a cormorant spreads its wings on a rock, and serpent and black eagles swoop over the boat. Jegan points up at what looks like a white sponge in the treetops: a flying ants’ nest, he explains, home to an extremely venomous insect. On the subject of venom, he adds, the cobra is as common here as it is over most of India. On the road back to Kochi on Kerala’s coast, an icon of Ganesh, the Hindu elephant god, the remover of obstacles on journeys, sits on the dashboard while its wild cousin continues its unfettered stomp through the Kerala jungle. l

VISITING KERALA

Finnair flies regularly to Delhi from which many domestic flights operate to Cochin, probably the best entry point for wildlife watchers. ­Kerala is India’s most southerly state so ­reaching it by train from Delhi, though possible, takes the best part of two days.

Tim Bird is an English writer and photographer and a regular visitor to India, where he has experienced a variety of wild festivals as well as witnessed fabulous natural wildlife.


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Flying under the Polar Star Finland’s unique location in the world makes it fertile ground to develop aviation technology. TEXT BY DAVID J. CORD ILLUSTRATION BY JUKKA PYLVÄS

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t’s not easy to get around some parts of Finland. Much of the country is forested, thousands of lakes give road-builders headaches, and deep snow covers the land in the winter. Yet these supposed obstacles can actually be a benefit if travelling by air. Finland’s extreme weather conditions, undeveloped wilderness, and forward-thinking regulators have made it a source for aviation innovations. While Anssi Rekula was a Finnair pilot he heard many of his colleagues suggest travelling to lakefront summer cabins by seaplane. This sounded like such a great idea that he decided to do something about it. The result is Atol Avion, a company which makes two-seat amphibious Light Sport Aircraft. They have an endurance of nine hours and are popular among recreational and private pilots. “Finland is a fairy-tale land for this type of aircraft because we have so many lakes,” Rekula says. “But the Atol 650 LSA also has conventional landing gear and you can even equip it with skis. You can go from water to land to snow on the same flight.” Atol Avion first built amphibious planes back in the 1980s, but the company was on hiatus before Rekula teamed up with original founder Markku Koivurova to start production again. The result is a new, modern aircraft with a history. While Finland’s geography spurred the creation of such a light sport air-

craft, some of its natural resources by means of wood composite went into its construction. “Finnish wood is perfect for this because it is light, but it also has strength and density because of our slow-growing trees,” explains Rekula. The plane is no simple wooden flyer, though. As one might expect from a Finnish aircraft it is packed with innovative technology, from an electric water steering system to telemetry which sends information back to the owner and Atol Avion headquarters. “We like to innovate a little further,” he says. “Aviation has been the same for too long.”

“We like to innovate a little further. Aviation has been the same for too long.”

RUNWAY SENSORS The basic concepts behind modern aviation may not have changed much, but a lot is different behind the scenes. “In the early 1970s pilots were informed about runway conditions by different coloured lights on a wooden board,” says Jon Tarleton, head of transportation marketing for Vaisala. “It is very sophisticated today.” Vaisala is a world leader in airport weather systems. Finnish winter weather can be a challenge to airport operators, but modern technology can help make things run smoothly. The trick is having the right information at the right time. “With our Runway Weather Information System we put sensors in the runway,” Tarleton points out. FEBRUARY 2017

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Daivd J. Cord is a Helsinki-based journalist. His father and brother are private pilots, so flying is in his blood. The interviewees were delighted that he shares their passion for aviation.

“The sensors determine the temperature and whether the surface is wet or dry. Sensors use electricity or fibre optics to detect the amount of chemicals on a treated runway.” Tarleton says that this system is common at practically all airports which experience cold weather conditions. It is apt that Vaisala is based close to Helsinki Airport, which has been praised in the international press for how well it deals with winter weather. “The data from the runways can be combined with data from atmospheric weather stations and forecasts so the airport operations staff has the best information,” he says. “They know the situation of the runway from one end to the other.” NO PILOTS NEEDED Finland’s geography and climate may spur innovation in aviation, but authorities are also encouraging. The Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation Tekes has a special campaign for the unmanned aircraft industry. “Finland is an excellent place for drone companies,” says Piia Moilanen from Tekes. “The legislation is very liberal and authorities are cooperative. We also have many ICT specialists in the workforce who are interested in these new business areas.” More than 1,000 companies which specialise in unmanned aircraft call Finland home, and most are startups. Mosaic Mill does aerial surveys, Arbonaut does natural resource management, and Pohjoinen Group has created a small drone which can be carried in a backpack and operate in extreme temperatures. “I have seen all sorts of great business ideas,” Moilanen continues. “There are companies which use drones to measure air emissions, inspect trees growing in power lines, do geological surveys for mining companies, and even use thermal cameras to find leaky pipes.” She points out that Finland’s wilderness areas make it a perfect place to develop long range drones. In August 2016 the Avartek company flew an unmanned vehicle from Finland to Estonia. This was a test of technology – switching ground bases mid-flight – as well as cooperation between national aviation 70 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

authorities. “Beyond Visual Line of Sight unmanned aircraft are going to be a big industry,” says Moilanen. “But before it can happen we have to test the technology as well as how authorities can work together. What better place to do it than Finland?” l

AVIATION THROUGH TIME

Finland has a great future in aviation, but it also has a rich past. The Aviation Museum close to Helsinki Airport contains about 80 aircraft, from passenger planes to hot-air balloons. Many are products of the Finnish aircraft industry, like the Sääski seaplane, Viima basic trainer, and Polyteknikkojen Ilmailukerho gliders. The museum also includes items such as a rotary engine from the 1910s, birch wood propellers, and parts from Winter War planes. We can’t forget old airline uniforms, meteorological instruments, and antique chairs from the Helsinki Airport terminal. If you want a hands-on experience, book a time in one of the museum’s three simulators. You can virtually fly a vintage twin-engine Piper Aztec, a modern Diamond DA 42, or a Messerschmitt BF 109 fighter. To help commemorate Finland’s independence centenary the Finnish Aviation Museum will organise an air show with vintage and new planes over the Helsinki seafront on June 9, 2017. The museum is open from 10 am to 8 pm on weekdays and until 5 pm on weekends. Full price tickets for adults are €10 and some services cost extra. ilmailumuseo.fi


Financing the Future

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LEASING

– driving growth and change

FOR YOUR BUSINESS TO SUCCEED, YOU WILL NEED TO KEEP YOUR EYES FIRMLY ON THE FUTURE, WHILST WORKING HARD IN THE HERE AND NOW. YOUR CUSTOMERS WILL EXPECT YOU TO CONTINUALLY REFINE AND UPDATE YOUR EXPERTISE AND TO HAVE ACCESS TO THE LATEST PRODUCTION AND SERVICE FACILITIES.

“A

whole host of Finnish businesses, including builders, factors, logistics specialists and product manufacturers, work hard making sure that our society runs smoothly. All of them will need to continually invest in their tools and other equipment. That is the only way for them to make sure that, as a business, they can continue to grow and thrive,” Toni Halme, Head of Business Line at Ikano Bank, points out. When you are running a business, your attention is inevitably directed at the everyday activities, focusing on production, customer service, tenders and development monitoring within the sector. “Finnish businesses tend to focus a little bit too much on purchasing when they plan their investments. Companies need new alternatives for ownership to make sure that they can grow and change more quickly.”

The cost of leasing is tax deductible. Leased assets are not classed as fixed assets. “What matters is that by leasing you are free to invest the remaining cash in your core business activities.”

Less worries Leasing solutions often include a range of services, such as insurance, maintenance and planning, designed to make your everyday life a little bit more convenient. When you lease, you

Toni Halme, Head of Business Line at Ikano Bank.

invest in knowing that you will have access to equipment and machinery that works and meets your business needs. Leasing finance is straightforward to obtain. “Ikano Bank is a responsible financing partner and we always undertake an assessment of what you can afford. To get things moving, just give us a call. Instead of being asked to complete endless forms, you will be given proper customer service by real people, who will take a genuine interest in you and your business,” Toni Halme promises. ●

To find out more about the leasing services offered by Ikano Bank, visit www.ikanobank.fi/yrityksille/leasing

Pay to use, not to own Through leasing you can gain long-term access to fixed assets without ownership. It allows you to immediately obtain the equipment you need without using your own capital in the investment. “Leasing makes financial planning easier, as the cost of the agreement is split equally across the entire period. As the instalments are fixed, it also allows you to continually assess the return on your investment,” Halme says. PRODUCED BY TAKEOFF CONSULTING GROUP (PART OF CALCUS.COM )


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Financing the Future

Would you like to pay by

CARD OR INVOICE?

PAYING FOR YOUR SHOPPING BY INVOICE IS NOW AS QUICK AND EASY AS USING A CARD OR CASH.

“I

t has taken years to develop a finance and payment system that is fully integrated to retail systems,” Jonas Lindholm, Euroloan partner and board member, explains. He is confident Euroloan has what it takes to establish itself as a leading merchant system provider – and to achieve increasingly rapid growth along the way. “Our solutions have no manual features. In practice, that means that the opportunities for exponential growth are limitless. That is why I chose to personally invest in Euroloan.” A few years ago, the financial services provider moved into developing payment solutions for high street and online retailers. “The entire financial services sector is undergoing the biggest change since the computer was invented.” The more traditional operators, like the big banks, are slow to introduce changes and struggling as a result. A nimble and flexible service provider like Euroloan that updates its systems every couple of weeks now finds itself in a very

advantageous position as the market is currently being carved up,” Lindholm says.

The entire financial services sector is undergoing the biggest change since the computer was invented.

When buying means win-win “Currently, a third of all online purchases are made through invoicing or paid in instalments, and the market share of this type of payment method is growing,” Euroloan Customer Service Director Petra Mengelt explains. Furthermore, spending has been shown to rise by around a third when consumers are offered the option to pay for their purchases by invoice or in instalments. For many businesses, bricks-and-mortar and online shops remain separate operations, and the payment options available are not sufficiently convenient for consumers. At Euroloan, the team decided to turn their attention to how the transaction process could be improved for consumers. The answer was to remove all unnecessary steps – a move that brings benefits to both customers and retailers. Euroloan’s easily integrated system has already been adopted by hundreds of online retailers.

“This is truly a win-win for all involved. The customer can see the sample prices upfront, while the retailer benefits from increased sales and their brand becomes associated with rapid transaction processing.”

Invoice payments coming to high street stores Euroloan will be introducing the option of invoice payments as an alternative to card payments on Verifone payment terminals. The invoices can conveniently be converted to

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Financing the Future

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PICTURES BY SINI PENNANEN

payment by instalments and Euroloan carries the risk involved. The customer’s identity is verified at the check-out and their personal identity code is entered into the terminal. In practice, this means that all parties can forget about long-winded form-filling, and retailers have the option of offering a convenient new payment method alongside cash, cards and contactless payments. “This is a safe and secure payment method. Your invoice will be sent to your official home address,” Mengelt explains. ●

Jonas Lindholm, Euroloan partner and board member.

Petra Mengelt, Euroloan Customer Service Director. PRODUCED BY TAKEOFF CONSULTING GROUP (PART OF CALCUS.COM )


Female Leader 2017

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Enfo grows through

TALENT

“VARIOUS THREATS ARE PART OF IT BUSINESS. THERE IS NO NEED TO BE AFRAID OF THEM,” SAYS MINNA NOUSIAINEN, VICE PRESIDENT OF ENFO.

E

nfo is an IT and business solution provider established in 1964 with operations in Finland and Sweden. The company employs one thousandIT, financial and digital specialists. “To be honest, the growth in the past ten years has been quite rapid,” says Minna Nousiainen.

IT solutions rest on user friendliness ”Enfo’s roots are in Kuopio in eastern Finland,” says Nousiainen, who herself proudly hails from the same area. Most Finns think they can detect the broad Savonia accent. “It never really caught on me.” She describes how she first entered the world of IT just when the bubble was about to burst 16 years ago

when she started as a trainee at Enfo. “I have witnessed at first hand the changes that the field has gone through and lived through its expansion. When I first started in this business, IT held a leading position in many organisations; nowadays it is seen more as a business support and digital enabler.” According to Minna Nousiainen, Enfo nurtures talent. The company takes care to recruit the most suitable persons based on customer needs. Nousiainen, who studied information technology, is a prime example of this policy. She is responsible for the interface between service delivery and customer service in the IT Transformation business area. “This is one of the most traditional areas in IT business. Most of the service delivery staff work in my division.”

Behind Minna Nousiainen’s beaming smile is solid experience and an impressive career path from a trainee to director. “The development has been immense and there has been no shortage of twists and turns. Change comes quite naturally to me,” Nousiainen says. “Back in the day when I was still studying IT, the user had to learn the language of the machine. Now it is the reverse, technology is now driven by ease of use and user friendliness. We bring added value to our customer’s business. Our work is based on mutual trust between the customer and us,” Minna says. She has confidence in the future of IT and refuses to be afraid of the threats the field is facing. “In practice, the world revolves around IT. These threats are part of our normal daily work, and individual users are the greatest of these threats. Threats are also an opportunity for us, since it is our job to safeguard companies’ operations even when something unexpected happens,” she says. Her guiding principle is to keep moving. “Self-leadership is the word of the day. I also want to lead others to discover their ability to take leadership of themselves and their careers. When I think of my colleagues here at Enfo, the most important thing for me is that every one of us is in a good position and happy to face the changing world. Combining different working cultures is necessary in today’s workplace and the changing world also changes us.” ●

I have witnessed at first hand the changes that the IT field has gone through and lived through its expansion.

Minna Nousiainen, Vice President of Enfo.

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Financing the Future Ari Pauna calls on Finland’s political decision-makers to take action to promote urbanisation and stabilise house prices.

Politicians have the tools

needed to control house prices

HIGH HOUSE PRICES ARE A HOT TOPIC IN FINLAND. ACCORDING TO HYPO CEO ARI PAUNA, THE GOVERNMENT AND LOCAL AUTHORITY DECISION-MAKERS WOULD DO WELL TO PRIORITISE THE ISSUE IN THEIR POLITICAL AGENDAS.

“A

t the moment, there is no parliamentary mandate for our planning policies in Finland. We are also failing to make the most of the positives brought about by the inexorable urbanisation process, which is a shame because, by doing so, we could manage this significant structural shift at the national level. The current government, too, is enjoying the benefits of urbanisation and construction, despite the fact that urbanisation is not given a single mention in its legislative programme,” Pauna argues. Recently, we have at last begun building enough new homes and we must maintain this into the future to ensure that supply and demand meet across all our growth centres. In Helsinki, for example, the only way to ease the

upward pressure on house prices is to increase supply. “Local authorities play a key role in what we build and where. I now look to the government to provide a realistic vision for house building and jobs for the coming decades to ensure that the financial and regulatory environment is aligned with the changes taking place in society,” Pauna adds, and points out that action will also need to be taken to ensure sufficient social and health care service provision, to respond to the trend towards smaller households and oversee the regulatory arrangements for parking facilities, population shelters and accessibility issues. The market has responded to the prevailing circumstances by offering extended loan periods and long payment holidays, which only serve to increase the value of their loan portfolios. For Pauna, increasing levels of consumer borrowing at a time when interest rates remain so low is risky. “Five years ago, the Finnish Financial Supervisory Authority came up with a very sensible repayment stress test: if the monthly instalment on a 25-year mortgage term at 6% interest represents less than 45 per cent of the total income, it can be green-lighted without hesitation. If your bank does not

perform this calculation for you, it is worth doing it yourself,” Pauna says.

Young people remain keen on property ownership At this moment in time, individual consumers have limited opportunities for influencing the cost of living. However, it is possible to ensure that future generations are in a better position when the time comes for them to think about getting on that first rung of the property ladder. Hypo, Finland’s oldest credit institution and the only one to specialise in property finance, offers a range of savings accounts designed for children and young people. “Switched on parents and grandparents will make sure that children begin accruing a nest egg for their first property purchase from early on. For example, at Hypo, demand for our ASP mortgages, which are aimed at first-time buyers, has tripled in just three years. Despite media reports, many young people still have their hearts set on a home of their own but these days they are after something that is compact and reasonably priced. What is affecting consumer behaviour at the moment is that fewer people have the opportunity to acquire a property due to not having a sufficient deposit,” Pauna concludes. ●

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FINNAIR NEWS

H(APP)INESS Finnair’s mobile app is now available to everyone who has a Finnair booking. Log in with either your Finnair Plus member ID or your booking reference number and surname. Go to finnair.com to learn more.

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LOCAL ACCESS

February ♥ Helsinki @BMFARCHIVE2016

Brave new waves One of Europe’s ONBOARD TRANSACTIONS

Finnair launches Alipay THE WORLD’S first airline to introduce Alipay mobile payments onboard, Finnair is partnering with Finland’s leading e-payment platform ePassi to offer Alipay as an official payment method onboard flights connecting Shanghai and Helsinki. The app will be trialed in a one-month pilot that runs to February 28. As the number of travellers from Asia to Northern Europe grows, the need for a familiar and convenient payment platform has never been greater. “China is one of Finnair’s key markets and the rapid developments in China’s mobile internet industry has led to a massive change in the spending and payment habits of consumers,” says Robert Öhrnberg, Finnair’s General Manager for

Greater China. “I am very happy to work with the world’s largest online payment platform and look forward to the contribution that this can provide for Finnair’s customer experience,” he says. Alipay is at the forefront of the cashless world with 400 million users in China alone. Flights connecting Shanghai and Helsinki as well as the Finnair lounge in the non-Schengen area at Helsinki Airport will accept Alipay and passengers will be able to make payments for purchases through the app, enabled through a QR scan code. A possible rollout of Alipay on all of Finnair’s China flights will be made after the trial. finnair.com

most important music events Musica nova Helsinki takes place every other year and presents a fresh mix of new and old musical gems, including Finnish and international stars: Feb 1–12. ISTOCK

Whoosh! The speed skating junior

world championships take place Feb 17-19 at the Oulunkylä Ice Rink complex. JUSSI HELLSTEN

100 YEARS

Finnair marks Finland’s centenary As Finland celebrates 100 years of independence throughout 2017, Finnair will mark the special anniversary in a number of ways including special menus onboard flights, a focus on Finland in Blue Wings magazine, and a dedicated bookazine 100 stories about flying, which will be published in May.

76 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

Candy throwers Helsinki’s graduat-

ing students celebrate their last school day by parading through the city on pick-up trucks and throwing candies to passersby. The parade can be best viewed from along the Esplanade at about 1 pm on February 16.


U UTU

KAUPUNKIELÄMÄN PARHAITA PALOJA Valitse seuraava lomasi uudesta Kaupungista kokemuksia -lomakokoelmastamme ja lomaile aidon kaupunkicharmin ympäröimänä. Lue lisää ja varaa seuraava matkasi nyt aurinkomatkat.fi

US!


FINNAIR NEWS

JÍNIÁN JÍXIÁNG According to the Chinese zodiac, 2017 is the Year of the Rooster. Finnair wishes everyone a Happy Chinese New Year!

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Finnair crew tips

Reykjavik will become a year-round destination.

What’s the first thing pilot Olli Iisalo does in a new destination? Visit the local market!

GLOBAL GOURMET

Top 3 markets

1

 Stockholm’s Östermalm Market Hall is the place for Swedish treats such as Toast Skagen or an honest serving of homestyle meatballs – both embody the “keep it simple” philosophy of their delicious cooking.

EXPANDED NETWORK

More European options OWING TO DEMAND, Finnair will be adding capacity on several of its popular European short-haul routes this year. A fifth weekly frequency will be added to the summer season on the new Reykjavik route, which starts up on April 11. The route will become a year-round destination with three weekly flights during the winter season and further codeshare options with partner Icelandair. For Denmark, an additional daily flight will be added to the Helsinki-Copenha-

FEELFINNAIR ON INSTAGRAM

Travel host @davidsbeenhere took a dip in an icy Lapland lake! instagram.com/feelfinnair

gen route, and larger aircraft will be used on the Billund route. As of May 14, five weekly frequencies will be added yearround to the Copenhagen route including a morning flight from Copenhagen to Helsinki, which will enable convenient day trips for business passengers. European destinations including Vilnius, Warsaw, Dublin, and Alanya (Gazipasa) will also see increased service.

TWEET OF THIS MONTH

finnair.com

FINNAIR ON FACEBOOK

Signature Menus by top chef We promise to offer you Eero Vottonen are served in memorable experiences business class for long-haul around the world! flights leaving from Helsinki. twitter.com/finnair

78 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

facebook.com/finnair

2

 Barcelona’s legendary Mercat de La Boqueria on La Rambla is the top spot for all food lovers. Wander through the corridors full of Manchego (cheese), Jamón (dry-cured ham), and an array of sweets before treating yourself to a super-fresh seafood platter at one of the stalls.

3

 London’s outdoor food court Borough Market is a much better option on a Saturday afternoon than tourist-saturated Oxford Street! Here you’ll find a range of delicious food and drink from around the world. Last time I was there I enjoyed a delicious ostrich burger.


FLY FINNAIR

Your complete guide to travelling with us

WELCOME ABOARD We want you to enjoy your flight. This guide contains all the information you need for stress-free travelling. We have even included tips for inflight wellbeing and entertainment. So sit back, relax, and enjoy your travel experience.

In this guide 80 81 82 83 84 85 88 92 94 98

TIPS FOR TAKEOFF INFLIGHT WELLBEING ENTERTAINMENT INFLIGHT SHOPPING SUSTAINABILITY HELSINKI AIRPORT MAPS FLEET AND MY FINNAIR FINNAIR PLUS FINLAND IN FIGURES

FEBRUARY 2017

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FLY FINNAIR TIPS FOR TAKEOFF

FINNAIR in a nutshell

Established in 1923, Finnair is one of the world’s oldest operating airlines. Finnair’s route network includes 17 destinations in Asia, 4 in North America, and some 74 in Europe. In 2016 Finnair carried more than 10.8 million passengers. More than 1.6 million passengers fly between Asia and Helsinki each year.

TRAVEL TIPS KAKI LAU Gate Service Agent, Finnair “Winter is here and so are all the great opportunities for winter ­activities. One of the unique Finnish things to do is to dip into a freezing lake or roll in cold snow before running back to a hot sauna. For many Finnair customers, winter means packing up skis and snowboards and flying towards ski slopes in exciting destinations. But before the journey, it’s a good idea to check that your baggage allowance ­covers skis and/or snowboards. Visit finnair.com to pay an extra baggage fee before your journey. By doing this you save money and time at the airport.” Check out our new video packing tips for ski equipment from finnair.com.

SAFETY

YOUR FAVOURITE TRAVEL APP DOWNLOAD FINNAIR’S app on your mobile and enjoy an even smoother travel experience. Check-in, get flight alerts, and store your boarding passes all in one place. As a Finnair Plus member, you can view your profile and points balance, and even purchase services such as extra bags or an Economy Comfort seat. You can access the app with your Finnair Plus member ID or by using your booking reference number and surname. Learn more at finnair.com.

80 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

FLIGHT MODE: CABIN SAFETY SAFETY INFORMATION is presented by the cabin crew at the start of each flight. This information is also listed on the safety instruction card in your seat pocket. Safety belts must remain fastened when the “Fasten safety belt” sign is on. For safety reasons we recommend keeping them fastened even when the sign has been switched off. Handheld devices can be used throughout the flight (including takeoff and landing) in airplane-mode. Laptops and larger devices must be stowed away during takeoff and landing, but can be used when the “Fasten safety belt” sign has been switched off.


FLY FINNAIR INFLIGHT WELLBEING

FOOD AND DRINK

EAT WELL

Business class passengers on ­ long-haul flights can enjoy Signature menus prepared by chefs from top restaurants. The menus offer passengers a taste of Nordic flavours.

Foods to fuel on European flights FANCY A SNACK ONBOARD? Then take a look at the Sky Bistro menu card in your seat pocket. For a small fee, you can choose from a tasty ­selection of food and ­beverage options combining the best of Europe and Asia. Coffee, tea, water, and Finnair’s ­signature blueberry juice are always served free of charge on all Finnair flights.

WELLBEING

MINDFULNESS

INFLIGHT EXERCISES

Sit back and relax

These moves keep you fit while flying. Hold each movement for a few seconds and repeat five times per side.

Mindfulness instructor Aleksi Litovaara's exercises will help you feel calm and rested during your flight.

1

BE AWARE: The basic idea of mindfulness is that you have arrived. The aircraft is already taking you where you need to be so just sit back and relax. Watch, listen, and feel your present environment.

CIRCLES

LIFT

RAISE

LOWER

Lift one foot and draw circles with your toes. Reverse direction.

Lift one knee up and then lower your foot back down to the floor.

Keep heels on the floor and lift your toes upwards, then release.

Keep toes on the floor and lift your heels upwards, then release.

2

TACKLE ANXIETY: If you experience nervousness or restlessness, try holding an object in your hand. It will help bring your attention to that simple physical sensation instead of getting caught up in your own thoughts.

3 SHRUG

NOD

ROTATE

TURN

Lift your shoulders up towards your ears and release.

Lower your chin slowly towards your chest and lift back up again.

Gently rotate your head from side to side. Keep your shoulders relaxed.

Slowly lower your left ear to your left shoulder and then back up again.

THINK POSITIVE: This is a good ­moment to choose nice words towards yourself and other passengers — if only in your mind. You can also ask yourself: what do I need right now? It may well be reading a book or getting some rest instead of working on your computer. aleksilitovaara.com

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FLY FINNAIR ENTERTAINMENT

BE ENTERTAINED AND CONNECTED Experience the Nordic Sky entertainment system and the Nordic Sky Wi-Fi portal onboard Finnair A350 XWB aircraft.

THE NORDIC SKY inflight ­entertainment system is available onboard Finnair A350 flights. Not only will you stay entertained with a wide range of movies and TV series, you can stay up to date on what’s happening during your flight, from when dinner is served to updated arrival information and the local weather. With the Nordic Sky Wi-Fi portal, you can enjoy a host of fantastic services via your own mobile device. You can use the portal free of charge to access finnair.com and Finnair services such as destination information, pre-order shopping, and customer care. You can also rent a car, order a taxi, or book a tour.

Here’s how to get started: 1. Turn your device to flight mode and ­enable Wi-Fi. 2. Join the Wi-Fi ­network Nordic Sky”. 3. Open the browser of your choice. 4. Start exploring.

Want to know more about your destination? Nordic Sky offers travel tips to make your landing even easier.

PICK OF THE MONTH Drama

HELL OR HIGH WATER A divorced father and his ex-con older brother resort to a desperate scheme in order to save their family’s ranch in West Texas.

82 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

WHAT’S PLAYING

ON SCREEN Latest films and TV series

MOVIE INFERNO. Robert Langdon must race across Europe, against the clock, to foil a deadly global plot.

MOVIE DOCTOR STRANGE. In Marvel Studios’ Doctor Strange a surgeon on a healing quest is led to a place of powerful magic.

MOVIE THE ACCOUNTANT. As a math savant uncooks the books for a new client, the Treasury Department closes in on his activities.

TV SERIES THE LEAGUE. An ensemble comedy that follows a group of old friends in a fantasy football league.

TV SERIES THE BIG BANG THEORY. Penny moves into an apartment across the hall from two brilliant but socially awkward physicists.

RADIO SOUNDS OF CHINA. Sit back, relax, and immerse yourself in the beautiful sounds of China.

PLUG IN!

Most Airbus A340 aircraft and all Airbus A330 aircraft are equipped with an electricity socket, which you will find under your seat. On the Airbus A350 aircraft, you will find a USB port located in the seatback monitor in Economy class and directly from the seat in B ­ usiness class.


FLY FINNAIR INFLIGHT SHOPPING

LOVE(LY) GIFTS FOR FEBRUARY LANCÔME JUICE SHAKER Berry in Love 283 lipstick Available in pre-order shopping catalogue €18

15% OFF when you pre-order

Five reasons to pamper yourself or a loved one this month. Check out other special offers in the pre-order catalogue. And remember you can always shop via the Nordic Sky Wi-Fi portal while onboard the A350.

YVES SAINT LAURENT Mon Paris, EdP 150 ml Available in pre-order shopping catalogue €72

THIS MONTH ONLY get 15% off when you pre-order before any Finnair flight ­between ­February 1–28, 2017! Finnair carries a wide ­selection of ­cosmetics, fragrances, gift items, confectionary, and jewellery, all of which can be p ­ urchased before your flight. On most Intercontinental flights and flights to and from destinations outside the EU, wine and spirits are available for purchase. You also earn Finnair Plus points with every purchase.

AVIATOR SMART WATCH Available in pre-order shopping catalogue €199

BARTON & GUESTIER HÉRITAGE Dry red wine, .75 l Available in pre-order shopping catalogue €29.50

PRE-ORDER

for stress-free shopping BOTTEGA PROSECCO DOC Extra dry organic, .75 l Available in pre-order shopping catalogue €12

Ordering in advance is always a good idea. You can save up to 60 per cent compared to city prices. There’s no minimum order and your ­purchase will be waiting at your seat on your next flight! www.finnairshop.com

FEBRUARY 2017

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FLY FINNAIR SUSTAINABILITY

BETTER PLANET A few examples of Finnair’s societal involvement in action: THE UNITED NATIONS Global Compact is a corporate responsibility initiative aiming to make human rights, fair labour standards, environmental responsibility, and anti-corruption core parts of the participating companies’ operations. Finnair has been a member since 2013. The airline also signed the United Nations Women’s Empowerment Principles in 2011.

FINNAIR has received 7 of 12 forthcoming Airbus A350 aircraft, which cut back on fuel consumption and emissions by 25 per cent.

LAYING ROOTS FOR PRESERVATION SINCE 2012 Finnair has supported rain forest reforestation in Madagascar in ­cooperation with the Finnish Association for Nature Conservation. The initiative, entitled Project ­Manondroala, aims to patch together fragmented sections of forest in the eastern part of the island in close collaboration with local environmentalists. In 2016 alone, more than 30,000 seedlings were planted and 25 hectares of forest restored.

WORK WITH US

DO GOOD Finnair makes it even easier to donate to charity. Passengers can now make a donation to UNICEF Finland when they book their flights on the Finnair website. Donations are possible in sums of five, ten, or twenty euros. Finnair also collaborates with many other environmental and ­humanitarian organisations.

84 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

Madagascar’s ecosystem has taken a serious hit from slash-and-burn ­agriculture, timber logging, and fuelwood production. It has been estimated that up to 80 per cent of its original forests have been destroyed as a result of human intervention. Conservation in the area is crucial for preserving biodiversity, as up to 90 per cent of the nation’s flora and fauna is only found in Madagascar.

Finnair Plus members can ­donate points to the following ­charities at finnairplusshop.com: • The Finnish Association for Nature Conservation • The Association of Friends of the University ­Children’s Hospitals • The Cancer Society of Finland • The Finnish Red Cross • UNICEF Finland • Hope • WAU ry • UNWomen

FINNAIR was one of the first airlines in the world to receive an IATA Environmental Assessment (IEnvA) certification; this environmental management system is a set of processes and practices that enable an airline to reduce its environmental impacts and increase its operating efficiency.

THE AIRLINE supports the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) goal of zero emissions trading scheme. Finnair is dedicated to reducing its carbon dioxide emission revenue as much as 20 per cent per tonne-kilometre from 2009 to 2017. Another ambitious goal is to reduce the total amount of de-icing fluids by 40 per cent from 2006 to the end of 2016.

FINNAIR CONDUCTS an annual employee well-being survey, participates in campaigns promoting equal opportunities at the workplace, and places a strong focus on occupational safety and continuous training.

IN 2015 FINNAIR joined the Climate Leadership Council, an initiative bringing together leading Finnish businesses to combat climate change and foster business eco-technologies. The airline is also included on the CDP’s (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project) 2016 Nordic Disclosure Leadership Index (CDLI), which comprises organisations that have scored within the top 10 per cent in the region in their efforts to disclose carbon emissions and energy data.


FLY FINNAIR HELSINKI AIRPORT

HAPPY LANDINGS

Arriving and departing Helsinki Airport

PASSENGERS at Helsinki Airport can use the 30 automated border control gates. Fifteen of these are located in the departure hall. The Finnish Border Guard’s automated border control helps serve growing passenger volumes at Helsinki Airport. EU, EEA, Japanese, and Swiss nationals with biometric passports can take advantage of the automated border control gates. Other foreign nationals, who are exempt from the visa ­rrequirement equirement and hold a biometric passport, may also use the automated border control upon departure. This service is available for ­A ustralian, Canadian, Japanese, Australian, New Zealand, South Korean, and U.S. citizens. The automated border control is monitored by a border guard ensuring secure border crossings. Please note that passengers travelling with an infant, baggage trolley or wheelchair must use the manual border control lane.

AUTOMATED BORDER CONTROL Place your passport with the info page face down on the reader. Please wait while your passport is being read for biographical and biometric data. When the scan is complete, the gate will open. ヘルシンキ・ヴァンター空港シェンゲンエリアで は、入出国審査の際に自動化ゲートをご利用頂けま す。対象となるのはICパスポートをお持ちのお客様 です。

대한민국 전자여권을 소지한 승객께서는 유럽에서 한국으로 입국 시, 헬싱키 공항에서 자동출국심사 서비스를 이용 하실 수 있습니다.

① パスポートの顔写真ページを読み取ります。該当 ページを読み取り機の上に置いて下さい。個人情報 と生体認証データを読み取ります。

우선, 전자여권의 사진 페이지를 인식장치에 올려주시기를 바랍니다. 이 과정에서 여권정보가 시스템에 자동 인식됩니다.

② ゲートが開いたら中に入り、右を向いて下さい。 パスポートの顔写真と照合します。バックパック・ 帽���・眼鏡などは外して下さい。足跡マークの上に 立って画面を正面からまっすぐに見て下さい。 ③ 二番目のゲートが開いたら、入国審査官のカウン ターにお進み下さい。パスポートを確認した後、入 国または出国スタンプを押印致します。シェンゲン エリア居住許可証をお持ちの方は、入国審査官にご 提示下さい。

finnair.com/jp

첫 번째 게이트가 열리면 안으로 들어가 오른쪽에 위치한 카메라로 안면인증을 거치게 됩니다. 이후 마지막 게이트에서 출입국관리 직원의 출국확인도장을 받으시면 됩니다. 보다 간편하고 빠른 본 자동시스템의 많은 이용 바랍니다. 대한민국 전자여권은? 2008년 8월 25일 이후 발급된 여권으로 표지 하단부에 전자칩과 안테나가 내장 되어 있는 여권입니다.

finnair.com/kr

Enter through the gate and turn right. Please remove your backpack if you’re wearing one and stand on the footprints on the floor. Remove your glasses and hat. Stand still and look directly at the screen keeping your face visible. The camera will compare your facial image with the biometric feature scanned from your passport. Wait until the second gate opens. The border check for EU, EEA, and Swiss nationals is completed when the gate opens. Other foreign nationals must move towards the border guard, who will check your entry stamp and mark your passport with an exit stamp.

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FLY FINNAIR HELSINKI AIRPORT

WELCOME TO HELSINKI AIRPORT HOW TO TRANSFER Check your gate and departure time on the airport monitors. All Finnair and Nordic Regional Airlines (Norra) departures are located in the same terminal. If you do not have a boarding pass for your connecting flight, please contact the transfer service desk. Most passengers transferring from non-EU countries to EU countries must go through security and passport control. Please note that liquids are restricted in carry-on baggage. If your baggage has not been checked through to your final destination, collect it from the baggage claim area, and go to check-in and security control. AUTOMATED BORDER CHECKS are available to passengers with biometric passports. The service is available for ­Australian, Canadian, EEA, EU, Japanese, ­New ­Zealand, South Korean, Swiss, and U.S. citizens. See more ­information on page 85.

34 35

SHOP

33

32

32a

31a-e 30

31x 31

Security control

SHOP

Border control

SHOP

NON-SCHENGEN AREA

Bo con

TRANSFER SERVICE 3

2ND FLOOR 36

FINNAIR LOUNGE FINNAIR PREMIUM LOUNGE BUS GATES

37

NONSCHENGEN AREA

Border control

FINNAIR TRANSFER SERVICE desks in Helsinki Airport T2 ­terminal are ready to help you with any inquiries related to your connection flights.

38

2ND FLOOR

37a-d

GROUND FLOOR

TRANSFER SERVICE

BUS CONNECTION The Finnair City Bus to the Helsinki Railway Station leaves from Terminal 2 every 20 minutes, stopping also at Terminal 1. Travel time is about 30 minutes. Price: €6.30

CHECKING IN Checking in to your Finnair flight is easy. You can save time by checking in at a self-service kiosk at the airport, online 36 hours before departure, or by text message. For flights to the US, online check-in opens 24 hours before departure.

TRAIN CONNECTION The Ring Rail Line connects Helsinki Airport to downtown Helsinki. There is direct access from the corridor ­between T1 and T2 terminals to the train station by two lifts and three escalators.

FLIGHT DISRUPTIONS In case a flight is delayed or cancelled, Finnair will make every effort to keep you updated. Please make sure that you have provided Finnair with your email address and phone number.

86 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

SHOP

SERVICES AND FACILITIES SHOP SHOPPING Receive special offers for airport services when you show your Finnair Plus card. You will recognise our partners by the Finnair Plus symbol. Helsinki Airport features more than 30 shops and boutiques and various restaurants and cafés.

WIRELESS INTERNET Helsinki Airport offers free Wi-Fi throughout the airport. CHILDREN Children’s playrooms offer videos, microwave ovens, and baby care facilities. NON-SMOKING Smoking at Helsinki Airport is prohibited outside of designated smoking rooms.

SHOP


FLY FINNAIR HELSINKI AIRPORT WALKING TIME GATE 24–30: 7 MIN

T2 29

28

LOST AND FOUND Restaurant & Deli Fly Inn

27

26 SHOP

SCHENGEN AREA

SHOP

SHOP

GATE AREA

Security check

24

25 TRANSFER SERVICE 2

SHOP

23 SHOP

FINNAIR LOUNGE

Security

order ntrol

CHECK-IN 240–270

P

SHOP

SHOP

FINNAIR check CHECK-IN/ SERVICE DESKS 201–229

22

GROCERY

21

INQUIRIES Lentäjäntie 1 (next to T2, street level) Open Mon–Fri 09:00–17:00 and Sat 09:00–15:00 Tel 0600 41006 (1,97€/min + local network charge)

3RD FLOOR

PHARMACY TOURIST INFO

SH

OP

20

1ST FLOOR

SHOP

19 18 17 16

TRANSFER SERVICE 1

15

CHECK-IN 101–114

GROUND FLOOR

T1

14

Security check

BAGGAGE STORAGE

13

SHOP IN-LOUNGE Looking for that something special from Finland? The Finnair lounge in the nonSchengen area near gate 36 now stocks a select variety of gifts for purchase. The product selection ranges from Marimekko Lokki mugs and Iittala Ultima Thule glasses to fun gifts for kids (or adults) from the Moomins and Finnair! Opening hours are from 6 am to midnight.

GATE AREA

2ND FLOOR

12

11

SHOP

1ST FLOOR FEBRUARY 2017

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FLY FINNAIR FLIGHTS WITHIN EUROPE KARTAT Great Circle Estimated FROM HELSINKI AMSTERDAM ALANYA/GAZIPASA ALICANTE ARRECIFE ATHENS BARCELONA BERGEN BERLIN BIARRITZ BILLUND BRUSSELS BUDAPEST CATANIA CHANIA COPENHAGEN CORFU DALAMAN DUBLIN DUBROVNIK DÜSSELDORF EDINBURGH EILAT EKATERINBURG FRANKFURT FUERTEVENTURA FUNCHAL GDANSK GENEVA GOTHENBURG HAMBURG HERAKLION IBIZA INNSBRUCK KAZAN KOS KRAKOW LAS PALMAS LISBON LJUBLJANA LONDON MADRID MALAGA MALTA MANCHESTER MENORCA MILAN MINSK MOSCOW MUNICH MYTILENE NAPLES NICE OSLO PALMA DE MALLORCA PAPHOS PARIS PISA PRAGUE

Distances km

Great Circle Estimated Distances Flight km Times

Flight Times

1525 02:35 2722 03:45 3034 04:25 4518 05:55 2490 03:40 2632 03:55 1112 03:30 1123 02:00 2581 03:45 1060 01:50 1651 02:40 1481 02:20 2636 03:45 2756 03:50 895 01:40 2329 03:25 2639 03:40 2030 03:10 2027 03:00 1512 02:25 1717 02:40 3457 04:45 2098 03:05 1543 02:35 4578 06:05 4310 05:45 768 02:00 1994 03:00 785 01:25 1172 02:00 2777 03:55 2897 04:00 1701 02:35 1521 02:30 2620 03:45 1186 02:00 4700 06:10 3369 04:50 1713 02:40 1863 03:10 2950 04:25 3357 04:35 2822 04:15 1817 03:00 2688 04:05 1953 03:05 740 01:25 876 01:40 1577 02:30 1471 03:35 2283 03:25 2202 03:25 766 01:30 2777 04:00 2898 04:00 1900 03:05 2093 03:20 1322 02:10

TÄHÄN KARTTA

8 WINGS DECEMBER 88BLUE BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY2014 2017

PREVEZA PULA REYKJAVIK RHODES RIGA RIMINI ROME SALZBURG SAMARA SANTORINI SKIATHOS SPLIT STOCKHOLM ST. PETERSBURG TALLINN TARTU TEL AVIV TENERIFE NORTE TENERIFE SUR VARNA VENICE VERONA VIENNA VILNIUS VISBY WARSAW ZAKYNTHOS ZÜRICH

2397 03:25 1865 02:55 2429 3:50 2668 03:45 382 00:55 1993 03:00 2235 03:25 1592 02:30 1698 02:35 2660 03:40 2353 03:30 1956 02:55 400 01:00 301 01:00 101 00:30 245 00:50 3230 04:25 4691 06:10 4745 06:10 1911 02:55 1847 02:55 1903 02:55 1462 02:30 633 01:15 481 01:25 940 01:40 2526 03:55 1781 02:45

SCHEDULED DESTINATIONS LEISURE DESTINATIONS PARTNER-OPERATED CODE-SHARE OR MARKETING DESTINATIONS SEASONAL ROUTE  EW SCHEDULED N SEASONAL ROUTE  NEW SCHEDULED DESTINATION IN 2017

Atl Oc antic ean

DOMESTIC FLIGHTS New

FROM HELSINKI IVALO JOENSUU JYVÄSKYLÄ KAJAANI MARIEHAMN KEMI/TORNIO KITTILÄ KOKKOLA/PIETARSAARI KUOPIO KUUSAMO OULU ROVANIEMI TAMPERE TURKU VAASA

quay

931 01:35 360 01:00 235 00:50 464 01:20 282 00:55 609 01:35 823 01:25 391 01:10 335 01:00 667 01:15 514 01:05 697 01:20 143 00:35 150 00:35 348 00:55

Bay of B isca ya


Arct ic

Ocea n

FLY FINNAIR IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Nor weg ian S ea

Nort

h Sea

on

on-D

tov-

Ros

Heraklion

Medit erranea n Sea DECEMBER 2014 BLUE WINGS89 8 FEBRUARY 2017 BLUE WINGS


rctic

Arctic Ocean

FLY FINNAIR FLIGHTS INTERCONTINENTAL Circle Estimated KARTAT Great Distances Flight FROM HELSINKI

km

GREENLAND

Times

BANGKOK 7912 09:45 BEIJING 6325 07:55 CHICAGO 7139 09:15 CHONGQING 6736 08:40 DELHI 5229 06:50 DUBAI 4537 05:55 FUKUOKA 8060 09:30 GOA via Dubai 6739 10:15 GUANGZHOU 7693 09:30 HAVANNA 8718 12:05 HÔ CHI MINH CITY (Saigon) 8510 10:50 HONG KONG 7821 09:35 KRABI 8350 10:20 MIAMI 8342 11:10 NAGOYA 7780 09:40 NEW YORK 6626 08:45 OSAKA 7751 09:30 PHUKET 8312 10:05 PUERTO PLATA 8417 11:15 SAN FRANCISCO 8724 10:45 SEOUL 7050 08:40 SHANGHAI 7410 09:05 SINGAPORE 9272 11:30 TOKYO 7849 09:45 XIAN 6421 07:50

Atlantic Ocean

Havanna

FINNAIR PLUS members earn Plus points from travelling on any ­scheduled flight with a oneworld airline. The oneworld alliance flies to more than 1,000 destinations.

Pacific Ocean

Ocea n Atlantic Ocean

8 BLUE WINGS DECEMBER 2014


Arctic Ocean Arctic Ocean

FLY FINNAIR IMPORTANT INFORMATION

GREENLAND

Atlantic Ocean

an

Agadir Agadir

Taiwan Taiwan

Pacific Ocean

Indian Ocean Indian Ocean

Atlantic Ocean

n

DECEMBER 2014 BLUE WINGS 8

Pa


FLY FINNAIR FLEET

AIRBUS A350-900 Number 7+ 12 on order Seating capacity 297 Length 66.8 m Wingspan 64.75 m Cruising speed 903 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 13,000 m AIRBUS A340-300 Number 1 Seating capacity 257 Length 63.6 m Wingspan 60.3 m Cruising speed 870 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,500 m AIRBUS A330-300 Number 8 Seating capacity 289/263 Length 63.6 m Wingspan 60.3 m Cruising speed 870 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,600 m AIRBUS A321 (ER) Number 11 Seating capacity 196–209 Length 44.5 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m AIRBUS A320 Number 10 Seating capacity 165 Length 37.6 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m AIRBUS A319 Number 9 Seating capacity 138 Length 33.8 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m EMBRAER 190 Operated by Norra Number 12 Seating capacity 100 Length 36.2 m Wingspan 28.7 m Cruising speed 850 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,300 m

92 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


FLY FINNAIR MY FINNAIR

MY FINNAIR EVERY SEAT HAS A STORY It’s the customers who make Finnair and that’s why we’ve dedicated this page to your travel stories.

#FEELFINNAIR Share your Finnair moments on I­nstagram using @feelfinnair. And if you want to get featured use #feelfinnair.

MEET THE FREQUENT FLYER Which Finnair Plus ­benefit do you use most: When possible I use my points for a travel class upgrade. What’s your all-time favourite destination? It’s a toss up between Paris, Kyoto, and Bali!

juoksuaarjessa Helsinki Airport

How do you stay busy onboard? I of course read Blue Wings and then use my time to read back issues of The New York Times and listen to NPR and Slate podcasts.

Dana Freling has been a Finnair Plus member since 1997. Finnair Plus tier: Silver Avg Finnair Plus flights per year: 24 Next destinations: Paris and Milan

What’s the most impressive ­airport you’ve visited? I would say Singapore Changi Airport, ­although Hamad International Airport in Doha, which I passed through recently, is a rather remarkable airport, too. marika.my Somewhere above Russia.

APP & AWAY

QUESTIONS? Twitter: @FinnairHelps Facebook: facebook.com/finnair Finnair on chat: Live chat is available on weekdays from 7 am to 10 pm, on Saturdays from 9 am to 6 pm, and on Sundays from 10 am to 10 pm (Finnish time).

Find Finnair on WeChat! Scan and follow Finnair’s official WeChat account.

Finnair’s mobile app is now available to everyone who has a Finnair booking. Log in with either your Finnair Plus member ID or your booking reference number and surname. Go to finnair.com to learn more.

charlene22 Tallinn Old Town

FEBRUARY 2017

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FINNAIR PLUS RENEWED FREQUENT FLYER PROGRAM

JOIN NOW

A world of benefits for ­frequent flyers

THE FINNAIR PLUS PROGRAM allows you to earn both tier points and award points when travelling with Finnair or a ­oneworld airline and from ­services provided by Finnair Plus partners. As a Finnair Plus member you get instant access to valuable benefits including:

· A head start on special flight sales · Exclusive members prices on offers · Earn and use points on Finnair, oneworld, and partner airline flights · Earn and use points on numerous worldwide partner services

RENEWED FINNAIR PLUS With our latest changes, it’s easier to reach tier ­membership. You can also enjoy simpler ways of ­earning and using points for Finnair flights. Read more about the changes: finnair.com/plus

DID YOU KNOW? JOIN FOR FREE by filling in the Finnair Plus form attached to this magazine or online at finnair.com/plus

NEW WAYS TO USE POINTS AS A FINNAIR PLUS MEMBER you can

use your Finnair Plus award points for additional ­Finnair services such as seat selection, meals, and extra baggage payments online. The number of points you pay depends on your flight and the chosen service. You can pay for additional services at the time you book your reservation, or later through the ­Manage Booking tab. finnair.com/plus

94 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017


FINNAIR PLUS RENEWED FREQUENT FLYER PROGRAM

FINNAIR PLUS MEMBERSHIP

FINNAIR PLUS TIERS AND BENEFITS JUNIOR Children aged 2–17 can join the Finnair Plus Junior program. The points earned can be spent on award flights as well as for fun reward items. BASIC · F lights awards · Additional  baggage charges with points · Extra  services for flights with points · Partner  service purchases with points · Waiting  list priority based on tier SILVER · One  extra bag (max. 23 kg) free of charge · F innair lounge access* · P  riority Lane · 1 0% points bonus · 10%  discount on ­Finnair tax-free purchases outside of the EU * Chargeable from August 1, 2016

All tier benefits are valid on Finnair flights (AY operated and AY marketed)

GOLD · Special  baggage free of charge · T ravel class upgrades · F innair and oneworld Business Class and Frequent Flyer lounge access + 1 guest · P  riority Lane · 1 5% points bonus · 10%  discount on Finnair tax-free purchases outside of the EU PLATINUM · G  old card giveaway · Special  baggage free of charge · T ravel class upgrades · Travel  upgrades for family members · F innair and oneworld Business and First Class and Frequent Flyer lounge access + 1 guest · P  riority Lane · Points  do not expire during tracking period · 2 5% points bonus · 10%  discount on Finnair tax-free purchases outside of the EU

Remember to keep your Finnair Plus card with you at all times to make sure you don’t miss out on opportunities to earn points!

EQUIVALENT ONEWORLD TIERS Finnair Plus oneworld Basic --Silver Ruby Gold Sapphire Platinum Emerald

FEBRUARY 2017

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FINNAIR PLUS NEWS THIS MONTH

TIPS FROM FINNAIR’S CUSTOMER LOYALTY TEAM Carita Saari Retail Marketing Manager

EARN THOUSANDS OF EXTRA POINTS Now you can earn anywhere from 5,000 up to 20,000 extra Finnair Plus award points, depending on how many partner services – other than airlines – you use within the campaign period. Finnair Plus partners include restaurants, hotels, spas, car rental agencies, and more. Each

partner can only be used once regardless of whether you earn or use points for their service. The campaign runs until March 31, 2017. We’ll also draw extra prizes among all the participants, so join the campaign and start collecting partners now!

PARTNER BENEFITS

Now all of our online shopping opportunities are under one roof in the Finnair Shop. Here’s how to get the best shopping experience: 1. SHOP ONLINE for tax-free products for your flight, or shop for home delivery items, Finnair Plus award vouchers, and Finnair gift cards. You can even pay with your Finnair Plus points. 2. THIS MONTH enjoy 15% off every purchase when you pre-order before your February flight. 3. EARN FINNAIR PLUS points for all purchases made for home delivery or for pre-order.

ADOPT YOUR OWN TREE

SHOP AND EARN POINTS

AS A FINNAIR PLUS member you can adopt your own HaliPuu (hugging tree ) from the Arctic forest in Lapland. Redeem an award voucher with your Finnair Plus points or with a combination of money and points. Visit the Finnair Shop for more details.

PLANNING a visit to Helsinki? Stockmann is a landmark and icon in the city centre and offers a great shopping experience. As a Finnair Plus member and loyal Stockmann customer you can earn and use your Finnair Plus points for shopping.

www.finnairshop.com

Activate your card at stockmann.com/finnair

96 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

www.finnairshop.com


FINNAIR PLUS TOP PICKS THIS MONTH

USE YOUR POINTS WISELY FOR THIS SEASON’S BEST! NOW YOU CAN FIND Finnair gift cards, partner services, and award vouchers as well as Finnair Shop brands all under the same roof. Simply login using your frequent flyer number, place your order, and pay with Finnair Plus points, money, or a combination of both. Shop for the always affordable 1,000 Point Special Offers and your Plus points can be worth hundreds of euros! www.finnairshop.com

TOP 5 PARTNER SERVICES THIS MONTH 1. RUKAKESKUS & PYHÄTUNTURI award voucher: from €69 + 1,000p 2. AURINKOMATKAT award voucher: €94 + 2,000p 3. FINNJÄVEL award voucher: dinner for two €164 + 2,000p 4. FINNAIR TAX FREE voucher: from €14 + 1,000p 5. MOTIVUS award voucher: from €75 + 3,500p Gift vouchers can be redeemed with points or a combination of money and points.

1 ,000 POINTS SPECIAL OFFERS MARIMEKKO SIIRTOLAPUUTARHA DUVET COVER & PILLOW CASE, 2 SETS €197.80 Member offer €159 + 1,000p

KALEVALA KORU KORONA NECKLACE, SILVER €159 Member offer €99 + 1,000p

KALEVALA KORU KORONA EARRINGS, SILVER €139 Member offer €89 + 1,000p

IITTALA KASTEHELMI FINLAND 100 CELEBRATION SETS IITTALA KASTEHELMI PLATE 24.8 CM, 4PC SUOMI 100 €139.60 Member offer €119 + 1,000p

IITTALA KASTEHELMI GLASS 30 CL, 8PC SUOMI 100 €99.80 Member offer €82 + 1,000p

SAMSONITE LITE-CUBE DLX SPINNER CABIN BAG, 55 CM €449 Member offer €359 + 1,000p

Several colour options!

IITTALA KASTEHELMI PLATE 17 CM, 4PC SUOMI 100 €62 Member offer €51 + 1,000p

FEBRUARY 2017

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FINLAND IN FIGURES

CULTURE Visits to museums in Finland have increased by nearly 30 per cent in the past decade.

FINLAND

ECONOMIC STRUCTURE

IN FIGURES

Employed persons by industry, 3rd quarter 2016 (per cent of total)

AREA • 390,905 sq. kil­o­me­tres, of ­which 9% is fresh water; land area is 303,900 ­sq. kil­o­me­tres. There are 188,000 lakes. 6% of the l­and is ­under cul­ti­va­tion. Fo­rests (main­ly ­pine and s­ pruce) cov­er 68% of the country. GOVERNMENT • Sove­reign par­lia­men­tary re­pub­lic ­since 1917. • The pres­i­dent is elect­ed eve­r y six years. The current president of Finland, Sauli Niinistö took office in March 2012. The 200 mem­bers of Par­lia­ment are elect­ed for fouryear terms. • Finland has been a member of the European Union since January 1995. ECONOMY • GDP 2015: 209 billion euros, the annual change in volume 0.2% • Annual inflation rate as of November 2016: 0.7% • Currency: Euro

Construction and energy 9%

Miscellaneous services

13%

35%

Manufacturing

14% 4% Agriculture

10%

16%

Financial and business servces

Trade and hotel

Transport and communications

GDP

47%

Other manufactured goods

24%

Forest products

16%

Food prod. and textiles

13%

Nominal

Adjusted for Purchasing Power Standard

67.100 47.800 45.600 39.600 38.200 37.100 32.800 28.900

46.700 36.200 35.600 31.600 31.200 36.000 30.300 28.900

Foreign trade 2015 exports by products by activity: 53.829 MEUR (per cent of total) Forest industry products

21.5%

Other industries

19.5%

Chemical industry products

18.8%

Metals and metal products

14.7%

Machinery and equipment

13.5%

Electronics

12.1%

*preliminary

MONTHLY TEMPERATURES IN HELSINKI 2015

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Mean˚C -0.9 0.9 2.4 5.3 9.3 13.3 16.4 17.5 13.7 6.4 5.6 3.3 Max˚C 6.0 8.3 11.1 13.2 17.1 21.9 26.9 24.6 18.9 17.2 13.4 10.5 Min˚C -14.0 -7.2 -7.5 -1.1 1.2 6.8 10.3 9.6 6.0 -3.4 -4.2 -7.1

More information: finland.fi, goodnewsfromfinland.com, findicator.fi

98 BLUE WINGS FEBRUARY 2017

Metal and engineering products

EXPORTS BY PRODUCTS

Gross domestic product per capita 2015* (EUR)

Norway Denmark Sweden UK Finland Germany France EU28

Manufacturing

Source: Statistics Finland

POPULATION • 5.5 mil­lion • Life ex­pec­tan­c y: men 78.2 and women 83.9 years • Av­er­age house­hold ­size: 2.1 persons • L anguages: 89% s­ peak Finn­ish; 5.3% Swedish; 1.3% Russian • Religion: 74% Lu­ther­an; 1% Orthodox; 24% census register or unknown • 83% of the pop­u­la­tion aged 25 to 64 ­have com­plet­ed upper secondary or tertiary ed­u­ca­tion and 39% ­have uni­ver­sity or other tertiary qualifications.


Where we are going, trees can fly.

Find out what a tree can do

Sports too, will become more enjoyable to watch, when we know that competitions can be sustainably organised again and again. As the presenting sponsor of the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Lahti, Stora Enso therefore challenges competition organisers and sponsors of future events to pursue the ambition of creating 100% sustainable and renewable events. Because everything that’s made with fossil-based materials now, can be made from a tree in the future. Today, trees make the cups that hold our drinks, to entire stadiums that host the fans. Tomorrow, it’s about the solar panels from which we power the games, to the planes on which our champions arrive. 100% for renewability. 100% for sports. Join the journey: storaenso.com/renewablefuture This magazine cover is printed on LumiArt by Stora Enso.


WAT C H E S & J E W E L L E RY Oy Osk. Lindroos Ab Helsinki Airport Schengen, gate 27 Helsinki Airport Non-Schengen, gate 33 www.lindroos.fi


Blue Wings Kindness issue February 2017