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social justice

OUR ALUMNI PUT THEIR DEGREES, A N D C O M PA S S I O N , TO WO R K


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SOCIAL JUSTICE | 2017

Find Inside... FOCUS Winter 2017

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell Art Director Audrey Ma Photographer Jacqueline Pilar Copyeditor Frances Goodrow

FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 FIELDING.EDU

Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu Š 2017 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

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4 New Urban

7 Fielding Facts

11 Protecting

16 Nurturing

5 White House

8 12 17 Board of Trustees Shaping Stories Master’s &

Leadership Degree

HBCU Initiative

FPO

6 Our Schools & Programs

& Figures

Culture

9 14 Map: Where Our Spotting Injustice Alumni Live

10 Investigating Trauma

15 Coaching in Inclusion

Survivors

Certificate Graduates

18 Doctoral

Graduates


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

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“It is in the act of trying that we triumph Social Justice over the at Fielding conditions that demean and diminish us.” KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President

Social justice is the positive act of seeking to redress harms for all beings. Fielding Graduate University encompasses countless examples, large and small, of students, faculty, staff, and alumni seeking to live out our lives with meaning and purpose through the act of calling out injustice when we see or experience it. As human beings, our attempts are often flawed and inadequate; yet we persevere. It is in the act of trying that situations do improve and that in the long arc of human history, we triumph over the conditions that demean and diminish us.

What brought me to Fielding years ago was the promise of a learning community that sought to confront issues of social injustice by placing that goal at the forefront of a graduate education focused on quality, community, and flexibility. As the writer Alice Hoffman noted, “Everyone, at one time or another, has been at the fringe of society in some way: an outcast in high school, a stranger in a foreign country, the best at something, the worst at something, the one who’s different. Being an outsider is the one thing we all have in common.” In these pages, you will read how Fielding alumni have interpreted social justice in their own ways to make a positive difference in their communities. We honor them for their contributions — and in the telling of their stories, we hope to inspire and challenge others to take up the call.•


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externally funded initiatives, and other opportunities for shared scholarly, educational, or communty service activities. Partnerships like this increase opportunities for our students to do scholarly work applying research to social problems in ways that reflect the real complexities of living in a rapidly changing world. We look forward to increasing access to these opportunities for our students as the program comes to fruition in September of 2018. Standing L-R: Fielding Trustee Leonard Haynes, Provost & SVP Gerald Porter, VP Orlando Taylor Sitting L-R: Fielding President Katrina Rogers, UDC President Ron Mason, Tulane President Emeritus Eamon Kelly

More about our partners:

Fielding & Partners Create Urban Leadership Degree BY PRESIDENT KATRINA S. ROGERS AND PROVOST & SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT GERALD PORTER

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artnerships with other institutions of higher education have always been an important component of Fielding’s history. As president and provost, part of our roles are to search for partners that help Fielding recruit more students, raise funds for faculty and students through research and scholarship, and enhance our reputation through affiliations with institutions of similar vision and mission.

helped to expand our reach to diverse audiences, particularly in the human and organizational development doctoral programs and in educational leadership for change. Most recently, the ODC program created such an agreement with Goddard College in Vermont. Our faculty have long been champions for these relationships as have our alumni and students, many of whom refer institutional leaders to us for further discussion.

It is with great pleasure that we announce Fielding has signed a memorandum of understanding with the University of the District Columbia (UDC) and Tulane University’s Payson Center for Global Development to develop a doctoral degree program in urban leadership and entrepreneurship. This degree will be conferred by UDC with certain courses and expertise provided by Fielding faculty.

This new partnership was made possible by Fielding Trustee Dr. Leonard Haynes, who introduced us to the leaders of UDC and Tulane. A recently retired senior specialist from the Federal Department of Education, Dr. Haynes is a stalwart advocate for our distinctive learning model.

The proposed program will be based on Fielding’s proven doctoral model for transformative education, with online learning opportunities, periodic national and regional residencies, and cluster meetings in Washington, D.C., and New Orleans, as well as individualized academic mentoring from faculty. Our partnerships with institutions such as Royal Roads University in Victoria, Canada, and Lincoln University in Philadelphia, have

Dr. Lenneal Henderson, an Educational Leadership for Change faculty member in Fielding’s School of Leadership Studies and a distinguished scholar in urban studies, will work with faculty to develop the curriculum. Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding’s vice president for strategic initiatives and research, is helping to create a local advisory group of distinguished leaders in the DC area. While a degree program is the first objective of the partnership, we foresee that collaborative projects could develop, such as joint research projects around shared interests,

The University of District Columbia is a multiracial, multinational land grant university that is designated as a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). The only public university in the nation’s capital, it is a pacesetter in urban education that offers affordable and effective undergraduate, graduate, professional, and workplace learning opportunities, and seeks to build a diverse generation of civically engaged scholars and leaders.

Tulane University is a private research university in New Orleans, LA. It is a member of the Association of American Universities, a select group of leading research universities with “preeminent programs of graduate and professional education and scholarly research.” The Payson Center for Global Development seeks to educate and train individuals for work in the higher education and development fields; research the role of technology transfer in sustainable human development; improve social and economic development; and develop and test innovative approaches to education and social change.•


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Trustee Guides White House HBCU Initiative

Fielding Trustee Leonard Haynes at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC. Photo by Jeff Malet

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ielding Trustee Leonard Haynes was instrumental in drafting President Trump’s executive order to move the federal initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) from the Department of Education into the White House. The order establishes a President’s Board of advisors on HBCUs and makes the schools “an absolute priority,” according to Trump.

Also, “it increases the ability of the HBCU community to leverage federal support with the private sector in areas of mutual interest,” says Dr. Haynes, who served as executive director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs from 2007 to 2009. “The historic relocation means future Presidents of the U.S. will find the initiative front and center in their domestic policy agenda.” Linda Honold, immediate past chair of the Fielding board, added, “These are historic opportunities, both for elevating the prominence of HBCUs on the national stage, and for Fielding to establish partnerships with respected institutions that are aligned with our mission. We are fortunate to have such a leader as one of our trustees.” Dr. Haynes recently retired from the Department of Education as senior director of institutional service for the Office of Postsecondary Education — but he doesn’t intend to stop working for the benefit of students. “My plans are to continue to do what I can to advance the cause of the HBCU community in particular, and higher education in general,” he says, “so that the common good benefits.”•

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Schools & Programs School of Leadership Studies DOCTORAL DEGREES EdD, Leadership for Change PhD, Human Development PhD, Infant & Early Childhood Development PhD, Organizational Development & Change MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Collaborative Educational Leadership MA, Digital Teaching and Learning MA, Infant and Early Childhood Development MA, Organizational Development and Leadership CERTIFICATES Academic Leadership Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development and Leadership Reflective Practice/Supervision

School of Psychology DOCTORAL DEGREES PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD, Media Psychology MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Media Psychology CERTIFICATES Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement) Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

Doctoral Concentrations (excludes Clinical Psychology)

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity and Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, and Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership

Centers & Initiatives The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable, and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development. The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society. The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society. The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues in education, healthcare, the environment, violence prevention, and globalization.


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

About Fielding Fast Facts RACE AND ETHNICITY

1% 4% 16% 10% 49% 4% 6% 10%

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

Hispanic or Latino

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS

Enrollment

1,046 Women

76% Men

24% Age Range

22–80

Two or More Races

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

International Students

We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Vision We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Values Academic Excellence: We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

FACULTY

Total Faculty White

Mission

187

Total Staff

81

Students-to-Faculty

6:1

Community: We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect. Diversity: We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community. Learner-Centered Education: We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students. Social Justice: We commit to advancing equality and justice in our university, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. Transformational Learning: We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

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Linda Honold, PhD Principal, Strategic Vision In Action, Milwaukee, WI Charley Jordan, MBA Founder & President , Charles Jordan & Co., LLC New York, NY

Board of Trustees Gary Wagenheim, PhD Chair Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University Vancouver, BC Karen Bogart, PhD Vice-Chair President, Smith Bogart Consulting Santa Barbara, CA Kevin Fickenscher, MD Treasurer Director, Biomedical Innovation & Healthcare Strategy, Center for Transforming Health, The MITRE Corp. Kittery, Maine Keith Earley, PhD, JD Secretary Adjunct Faculty, Georgetown University Washington, DC Nancy Baker, PhD Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA Karin Bunnell, PhD Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

Judith Katz, EdD Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group Washington, DC Tomás Leal, MS Senior Director, Research & Development Inclusion Strategy Lead, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA Otto Lee, EdD President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA Patricia Marin, PhD Assistant Professor, Dept. of Educational Administration, College of Education, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI Wayne Patterson, PhD Professor, Computer Science, Howard University Washington, DC Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA Sushma Sharma CEO, Resonate Consulting, New Delhi, India Sandra Taylor, JD President & CEO, Sustainable Business International, LLC Washington, DC Mary-Frances Winters, MBA CEO and Founder, The Winters Group, Bowie, MD Patricia Zell, JD Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Christine Clark, MA Student Member, Portland, OR

TRUSTEE EMERITI

Anthony Greene, PhD Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Michael Goldstein

Garry Hare, PhD Faculty Member, Kentfield, CA Leonard Haynes, PhD Retired Member of the Senior Executive Service, US Department of Education, Washington, DC Mānuka Hēnare, PhD Associate Professor, University of Auckland Business School Auckland, New Zealand

Russ Goodman Bo Gyllenpalm E. Nancy Markle Fred Phillips Connie Shafran Nancy Shapiro


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FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Where Our

Alumni Live AS OF MARCH 2017

188 84 1417

16 20

49

33

2

19 108

159

3 10 13 30 16

79 217

34

64

244

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30 36

232

104

150

89 109 21 17 103 14 27

17 59

31

6 18 210

108 29

158 21

AFGHANISTAN 1 ARGENTINA 2 AUSTRALIA 6 BARBADOS 1 BELGIUM 1 BERMUDA 2 BRAZIL 5 CANADA 202 CAYMAN ISLANDS 1 CHINA 8 CZECH REPUBLIC 2 DENMARK 1 ETHIOPIA 1 FINLAND 5 FRANCE 3 GERMANY 8

GHANA 1 GRENADA 1 GUAM 1 GUATEMALA 1 HONG KONG 5 HUNGARY 1 INDIA 4 INDONESIA 2 IRELAND 1 ISRAEL 5 JAMAICA 9 JAPAN 11 NETHERLANDS 2 NIGERIA 1 PANAMA 1 PHILIPPINES 1

PUERTO RICO 2 QATAR 1 SAUDI ARABIA 1 SINGAPORE 3 SOUTH AFRICA 1 SOUTH KOREA 3 SWEDEN 3 SWITZERLAND 3 TANZANIA 1 TRINIDAD & TOBAGO 1 TURKEY 1 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 2 UNITED KINGDOM 8 US VIRGIN ISLANDS 1 VENEZUELA 1

142 14 47 140 12 123


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Investigating Trauma

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hey travel hundreds of miles from their homes in search of work, education, and a better life. They leap onto freight trains and cross rivers, enduring extreme weather, hunger, illness, injury, and sometimes violent crime. They are children — and they’re alone.

These are the thousands of unaccompanied minors, ages 5 to 17, who migrate regularly from Central America to the United States. Inspired by their resourcefulness and endurance, 2016 Fielding Clinical Psychology alumnus Andres Tapia, PhD, devoted his dissertation to learning about how they process their traumatic experiences. “I’m the son of immigrants from Mexico,” says Dr. Tapia, who grew up in Texas, on the Mexican border. “I did migrant work in the fields, picking cherries in the northern U.S. with my parents. The immigrant experience was very near to my heart — but I definitely wouldn’t compare it to the challenges these kiddos face. A lot of them are exposed to pretty traumatic things: rape, robbery at gunpoint, extortion by Mexican officials, Mexican cartel recruitment, and human trafficking. Some watch people get murdered, some fall off trains from exhaustion.” Dr. Tapia first encountered these children while doing clinical work in an immigration shelter in the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas. “I was just amazed by their experience— their journey, their resilience,” he says, “that someone so young would leave their

native land and risk all of these things to come to a country that’s not always welcoming, in pursuit of ideals and dreams they have about America.

“Sometimes they flee a bad situation back home, but it’s still a pretty high price to pay. Sometimes they don’t have anybody here waiting for them. A lot of them come looking for what they see on TV.” He wanted to help them, but he needed research training so he could study them, and learn from them. He chose Fielding for his doctoral studies because of the diverse background and geography of its students and faculty, and because of the university’s social justice mission. “It seemed that students were really incorporating it into their research,” he said. “When I spoke to faculty, it was about making my interests happen, with guidance on how to make a sound and feasible study. My research interests were celebrated by faculty all along the way.”

Currently serving as a postdoctoral fellow for the University of Texas McGovern Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry in Houston, Dr. Tapia is sharing his findings with school districts and agencies who work with migrant children. He was also invited to share his work with the Houston Mayor’s task force on human trafficking. “I want to continue to research this area further,” he says. “I feel like I contributed something important to this population, and to the research community.”•

His dissertation looked at how migrant children process and make meaning from the traumas they face on their journeys. He discovered they often rely on their faith in religion, duty to family, and strong desire for education and work to help them cope. “I admire them so much,” Dr. Tapia says. “Even though they go through so much, they find a way to attribute a positive meaning to it and use their experience to move forward. Understanding how they naturally do this for themselves could help clinicians all over the country.”

ANDRES TAPIA

PhD, Clinical Psychology, 2016


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

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Protecting Culture

BERNADETTE TODACHEENE

Bernadette Todacheene, at right, and four others being sworn into the Navajo Board of Education. Navajo Times photo.

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ernadette Todacheene grew up on the Navajo Nation Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico. Though she attended parochial and public schools, her native culture was never far out of reach.

At home, in her traditional Navajo household, her family ate mutton stew and fry bread. They conversed in the Navajo language and learned the names of native plants and wild animals. She visited her grandparents’ hogan huts, learned proper etiquette during traditional ceremonies, and heard stories of the coyote, of the holy people, and of ancestors who had survived “the long walk.” The Navajo culture is an indelible part of her.

“It is who I am. It is where I came from,” says Dr. Todacheene. “We’re connected with Mother Earth, Father Sky, and everything around us — the weather, the rain, the water. It’s part of our being.” So when, as an adult, she became an educator in Shiprock herself, she was disturbed to find that today’s Navajo students were not only falling behind national averages in reading, math, and other core subjects — they were far less familiar with Navajo language and culture.

In fact, one study showed that 20 years ago, 80 percent of Shiprock’s students spoke the Navajo language when they entered school. Today, less than 10 percent do. The issue is more than a matter of nostalgia. “If we lose our language and culture, we are no longer a tribe and the United States government can take away all of our aboriginal holdings and land,” says Dr. Todacheene, adding that a tribe in Alaska lost their last speaking member a few years back. “We would have a black cloud hanging over us.” So she set out to make a difference. “I knew what I wanted to do,” she says. “I wanted to look at leadership roles and community involvement, and see how I could use my background and culture to improve education.” She came to Fielding with a huge plan: “My idea was to design a whole Navajo Nation education system,” she says. “It’s a very big system to think about!” Faculty members helped her narrow the scope of her dissertation to a qualitative research study on improving Navajo schools, based on interviews with members of the community and products of the school system.

EdD, Educational Leadership for Change 2002

“I just love the professors there,” says Dr. Todacheene, who worked closely with Dr. Kathy Tiner and Dr. Anna DiStefano. “They understood a lot of the issues and allowed us all to use our culture and knowledge to come up with our own thinking and theories.” A mother of five and grandmother of four, Dr. Todacheene is now serving her second fouryear term as a member of the Navajo Nation Board of Education — and says she often uses Fielding’s lessons in systems thinking and the various types of leaders in her work. “It’s helped me to see where the areas of change need to happen. I enjoy that,” she says. “I use it to help make good decisions and choices for our educational system.”

Among those decisions, Dr. Todacheene and the board passed a resolution to support the schools in following the Navajo Nation learning standards, which include teaching about Navajo culture, language, and government. “It’s a big job,” she says — but it’s a crucial one. “Our young students and children need to know their culture, their tribe, their land, and how they’re bound to it,” she says, “and the meaning of why we are who we are.” •


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SOCIAL JUSTICE | 2017

Larry Drake, front and center, with students from LEAD

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Shaping Stories

arry Drake is a storyteller. Get him talking about his Pittsburgh childhood and he’ll tell you about his first job at age 11, pumping gas. “I always had some kind of hustle,” he says, “shoveling snow, cutting grass.”

You’ll hear how he was homeless and on his own for seven months at age 16, sleeping in hallways and studying in libraries at night. And how his grandmother challenged him to go to college — so he took a full class load at Georgia State University five nights a week while working days to support his young family.

who earned his PhD from Fielding in 2015. “When I think about a kid who was homeless and then ultimately ran a $5 billion enterprise, it was kind of incredible to be a part of that.” Now Dr. Drake is president and CEO of LEAD: Leadership, Education and Development, a nonprofit that provides education access and experiential learning in business, computer science, and engineering for high school and middle school students — many of whom would never have the opportunity to do so otherwise. In many ways, LEAD is helping them change their own stories.

You’ll discover that he worked his way up at “Many kids from under-resourced commuthe Coca-Cola Company from trucks and nities don’t believe they can get into Penn, factories (“I did all the dirty work; there was Duke, or Stanford, so they never apply,” says nothing glamorous about it”) to division Dr. Drake. However, more than 15,000 president for Africa — with stints in between kids have completed LEAD’s rigorous at PepsiCo and Cablevision. “I’ve lived or academic program since 1980 — and all worked in about 60 countries,” says Drake, but one have graduated college, most in four

years. “Forty percent of our students come from places like I came from: poor, underresourced neighborhoods. We don’t believe in the myth of exceptionalism — that Larry was this exceptional kid, who grew up to become a Fortune 500 divisional CEO and got to experience all these amazing things. There are a lot of people like him, but we have to expose them to positive images and narratives while also giving them the opportunity to see themselves in the possibilities.” Dr. Drake knows that we absorb what surrounds us. It’s a concept he explored in-depth while earning both his masters and doctorate in Fielding’s Media Psychology program from 2010 to 2015. “For me, Fielding and my field of study represented a glimpse into this intersection of cognitive science, applied psychology and media innovation,” he says. “I was particular-


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ly interested in the fact that, as a black man, my whole life has been shaped by the images I’ve seen, and all of the categories and labels we place on people in an attempt to make sense of the world.” Dr. Drake recently co-authored a paper with Fielding faculty member Dr. Karen Dill-Shackleford and Texas A&M professor Srividya Ramasubramanian about the stories the media tells about black men. It’s being published this summer as part of the National Academy of Medicine’s book Perspectives on Health Equity and Social Determinants of Health. He now incorporates media literacy into the curriculum used during LEAD’s Summer Institutes, when approximately 300 students spend a month living on prestigious campuses like Stanford and Northwestern universities. The media literacy course puts into context what these students see and hear every

day. “It’s about understanding how to use that information in your life: the career you choose, the way you vote, the way you present yourself and raise your family, and the people you choose to be around,” he says. “It’s about not believing who they say you are, but who you say you are.” LEAD aims to be a transformative experience for young scholars. “I tell them, ‘If you’re only here to learn how to make money, you’re in the wrong place,” says Dr. Drake. “But if you’re here to learn how to become excellent at the things you do — whether that’s a businessman or a scientist or anything else — so that you can make meaningful change in the world, then this is the place for you.’”

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“We should seek help wherever we find it. We need to use every resource we have, in other words we have to utilize all the talent we have,” says Dr. Drake. “If we want to be a nation of innovation and growth, we’d better be deliberate about raising up innovators—and we’d better be raising up future leaders now: In less than 20 years, this country will be more black and brown than it will be Caucasian. “We need to think about how we’re preparing all of our citizens to deliver on the promise of America.”•

In his first term at Fielding, Dr. Dill-Shackleford told him, “Don’t wait until you are drowning to call for help.” Her words were prophetic, he says.

LARRY DRAKE

MA, Media Psychology, 2013 PhD, Media Psychology, 2015


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Spotting Injustice It only took Pamela Kennebrew 14 months to earn her doctorate degree at Fielding. “I was kind of focused,” she says, with a laugh. Indeed, when Dr. Kennebrew sets goals, there’s no stopping her — and more often than not, those goals are focused on bringing injustices to light, and correcting them. Growing up “a proud Jersey girl” with politically active parents, she was raised with the understanding that “ things weren’t always the way they should be, and we had an opportunity — or even an obligation — to address those issues in whatever way we could,” she recalls. “It was my responsibility to speak up on behalf of others who may not have the opportunity to speak up on behalf of themselves.” Case in point: While working in administration at Princeton University’s Plasma Physics Laboratory, she noticed inequities there in the types of students who were being represented in science. So she helped set up programs to bring underrepresented students to the lab for summer studies. Later, while working as a housing counselor at the Philadelphia Unemployment Project, she became focused on economic injustice after seeing her clients suffering undue fallout from the foreclosure crisis. “It wasn’t necessarily related to bad decisions they had made,” she says.

Empowerment, a think tank of scholars, researchers, activists, and those directly impacted who focus on the impact of criminal convictions on the financial security of African American women. And in 2013, she came to Fielding to study it further. “It’s the perfect place for looking at the interconnectedness of issues,” Dr. Kennebrew says. “If someone’s able to see the connection between topic A and topic B and how they’re influencing outcome C, then you can study that. And people won’t look at you like you’re crazy. It has to be theoretically sound, of course—but it can work! “And then my colleagues at Fielding will say, ‘… but have you considered this?’” Dr. Kennebrew is now a Fellow at Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation, where her Within While Out project aims to mitigate emotional trauma and employment discrimination, and to reduce recidivism, for African American women who have been convicted of crimes, but not yet sentenced. “One of the takeaways that I learned from Fielding is the ability to look at theories and patterns and apply them in different situations,” she says. “That’s why I am able to be successful at my social justice work. That’s the secret sauce, if you will, of Fielding.” •

Then the unthinkable happened. Her 27-year-old son was murdered by two 19-year-old African American men — and her focus turned to crime. “I saw how poverty leads to hopelessness, which leads to violence,” says Dr. Kennebrew, who asked that the murderers not spend life in prison, because it wouldn’t bring back her son. In fact, the entire ordeal made her see life from a new perspective: that of someone who’s been convicted of a crime and then haunted by that crime forever after. Many of her housing clients were women with a conviction in their past — even their distant past — who were about to lose their homes. “It didn’t seem to matter what type of job they had or whether they were working hard,” she says. “Their economic status was very tenuous. The conviction keeps you back from housing, employment, and education opportunities. It threatens your stability.” Of course, there are supposed to be consequences for committing crimes. But Dr. Kennebrew says these consequences extend far beyond their intent. “According to the law, punishment should be over after probation — but it doesn’t stop there,” she says. “It’s a perpetual punishment machine. It just keep going and going and it never ends. Even though the state may say, ‘It’s a clean slate—you haven’t even spit on the sidewalk,’ 20 years later people are still being impacted.” In 2009, she founded the Black Women’s Center for Carceral

PAMELA KENNEBREW

EdD, Educational Leadership for Change, 2015 Institute for Social Innovation Fellow


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

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Coaching in Inclusion As an executive coach, Terry Hildebrandt works with leaders in every imaginable industry: healthcare, construction, government, higher ed, high tech, and more. He travels to Germany, Israel, Singapore, Malaysia, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, and beyond to help execs become better at leading their teams. “My work is fundamentally about changing people’s minds,” he says, including, “how we see ourselves in the context of the social system we’re in, and how we see other groups and people.”

His work focuses on inclusion — not only as a moral imperative, but as a business strategy. “If you’re not inclusive in this day and age, you’re not going to be a great leader,” says Hildebrandt, who has two certificates, two master’s degrees, and a PhD in Human & Organizational Systems from Fielding. “We have an incredibly diverse workforce that’s becoming more so every day. There are more women in higher-ed programs than there are men, and people of color are projected to soon be the majority in America. It’s important to know how to lead people from many different backgrounds.

He coaches his execs to truly consider the culture within their organizations: “Do we want to live in this place that we’re creating? We need to treat people with respect and everyone needs to have a place at the table. If you have people in the margins who don’t feel like they can participate, it creates instability — as opposed to folks working together to create a better world for everybody.” Great leaders are those who help develop those around them, he says, and build environments where people can succeed. “That’s what’s so powerful about Fielding,” Dr. Hildebrandt says. “With organizational development, we know how to create an environment where people can be their best, and with human development, we know how to help people grow as human beings. “Not many schools have that knowledge. It’s a pretty unique place that brings all that together.” •

“Diversity breeds creativity and innovation, which is critical to survival with the people I work with.”

Dr. Hildebrandt has seen the value of inclusive leadership firsthand. He was working at Hewlett Packard in Colorado in 1992 when the state passed an amendment that prevented cities and counties from recognizing gay and lesbian individuals as a protected class. He began internal advocacy at the company and was instrumental in getting them to formally change their nondiscrimination policy. He also co-led an employee resource group for LGBTQ issues there — which is the oldest employee resource group in the entire global company. In 1998, he came to Fielding to earn an MA in Organizational Design & Effectiveness. “What drew me there were the flexibility, the focus on community and social justice, and the lifelong learning/scholar-practitioner model,” he says. “I thought that was really useful because you’re bringing information out into the world — it’s not just theory, it’s practice.” Hildebrandt received Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation Scholarship Award for his dissertation research on the journeys of heterosexual evangelical Christians from anti-gay to pro-gay. He later published his research in a book and has spoken on LGBTQ spiritual, moral, and workplace equality at international conferences. In 2008, he left Hewlett Packard to be a full-time executive coach, work he finds satisfying because of the tremendous impact that he can personally have — just by helping one vice president or chief executive officer. “Executives go out and share that information with everyone in their network,” says Dr. Hildebrandt, who co-authored the book Leading Business Change for Dummies. “I’m having an impact not only on that person, but on everybody they lead.”

TERRY HILDEBRANDT

MA, Organizational Design & Effectiveness, 2000 Certificate, Integral Studies, 2008 Certificate, Evidence Based Coaching, 2009 MA, Human Development, 2010 PhD, Human & Organizational Development, 2012


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Nurturing Survivors

Zieva Konvisser with her family at Fielding graduation, 2006

For most of her career, Zieva Konvisser had to keep her nurturing side under wraps. Educated as a pharmaceutical chemist, she spent 25 years as a manager and executive with Chrysler’s Mopar parts division, where she was the first woman to occupy most of her positions. “I still have scars from the glass ceiling,” she says. When she retired in 2001, she had no idea what would come next. “I wasn’t looking for a PhD program,” she says. “I didn’t know I wanted one.” But while attending a focus group with Fielding alumni who wanted to learn about the automotive industry, she was immediately enthralled. “They started talking about Fielding’s values and mission, social justice, transformative learning, and the importance of people,” she said. “By the first break, I said, ‘This is what I want to do and this is where I want to do it. I want to go for a PhD in human development at Fielding.’ It just spoke to everything about me that I didn’t know what to do with—all the things that had been floating around in my head and my heart.”

Now Dr. Konvisser’s inner nurturer—and her outer scholar—are thriving. At Fielding, inspired by the few members of her own

family who survived the Holocaust, she began interviewing survivors of terrorism in Israel and helping them tell their stories. Since she graduated in 2006, Dr. Konvisser has documented the oral histories of more than 100 survivors of terrorism, the Holocaust, and combat, as well as 30 stories of innocent people who have been exonerated after wrongful convictions. Her book Living Beyond Terrorism: Israeli Stories of Hope and Healing is a collection of stories from ordinary people whose lives were torn apart by acts of terror—and who found the strength and courage to live next to their feelings of grief, pain, and helplessness, overcome suffering, and move forward with new purpose and insight.

the people I work with. I didn’t have those skills before,” says Dr. Konvisser, who is now a Fellow at Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation and an adjunct assistant professor of criminal justice at Wayne State University. “I’m fulfilled. I feel like I’m contributing to the health of individuals and to the betterment of society,” she says—and that’s unlikely to change anytime soon. “I’m 74, I’m not looking to stop anything that I’m doing.” •

“I didn’t know that I could listen empathically in a way that people would benefit from. I didn’t know until the first interview I did in Israel. And then I knew who I was,” Dr. Konvisser says. “It’s my passion to give them voice, to let them tell their stories. It’s magical just to be there and listen. Once you meet these people, your life is changed.” Telling their stories, she says, helps the victims re-identify as survivors and create meaning from their experiences. It also brings public awareness to the issues themselves, and helps the world humanize these tragedies. “Fielding gave me the ability to create a transformative journey for both myself and

ZIEVA DAUBER KONVISSER

PhD, Human & Organizational Development, 2006; Institute for Social Innovation Fellow


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Master’s & Certificate Graduates November 1, 2016 – May 1, 2017

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

CERTIFICATE IN NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP

MASTER OF ARTS IN COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Victoria Greene Laurie Lea Brown Joseph MacPhee Keysha M. Monette Marcy Reed Linda M. Rosso

Allison L. Heiduk Gabriel Sandoval MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP

Stevie Frakes Katharine E. Franklin Carmen Y. Fu Dane C. Hewlett Kelly Costa Huller Susan T. Mahoney Michael W. Perri Adrienne Serrao Lulu Strongheart Karen J. Walker Tingting Zeng MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

Thomas A. Jentsch CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING

Jennifer L. Adams Kymberly R. Akouris Lisa M. Ciccomascolo Tanya M. Finks Hermien A. Hakze Julie Hodges Richard D. LeBoon Audrey C. Ordenes Janet L. Ottersberg Sheila A. Porter Martin Royal John K. Schmidt Leah Starkovich Angela Uhl

CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP

Angel R. Rivera-Reyes Ali Wolf

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Lisa P. Fagg Catherine A. Fleming Bardha Gerdovci Carlos A. Gonzalez Velazquez Stephanie A. Jiroch Nicole E. Landis Matthew W. McHolland Angela Patterson Aline Pinheiro-Ozga Christopher A. Reyes Anthony N. Smith CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA NEUROSCIENCE

Christopher B. Sample Reginald C. Sawyer Yvette Yonan CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Claudia A. Degrati Margaret Jones Chrystal C. Maher POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Deon Allen Michelle L. Bancroft Nicolette D. Camacho

Leilani R. Chavez Joann Chebotareva Craig D. Crawford Fiona J. Cunningham Lindsay Fava Diane L. Gilstrap Lecsy T. Hernandez Andrew G. Hicks Sonya W. McCrea Kathryn M. McGuire Shana Midgette Leana Norman Heather L. Sorensen Dawn Stanton April R. Stone Alisa C. Wiles Michelle L. Woods


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SOCIAL JUSTICE | 2017

Doctoral Graduates

November 1, 2016 – May 1, 2017 SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Stephanie Martin Anthony, EdD Key Knowledge from Behavioral Health Professionals Regarding Treatment of AtRisk Individuals… Karen S. Barker, EdD The Evaluation of the Gateway Paramedic Technician Program: An Action Research Project Timothy Benally, EdD Toward True Educational Sovereignty for the Navajo Nation: Structure, Politics, Currirculum, and Quality Amanda M, Brey, EdD Faculty Motivation to Participate in Program Learning Outcomes Assessment at a Research University William E. Champagne, EdD Release, Renew, Recover, and Restore: Strategies for Building Healthy Father- Child Relationships … Patricia Gentle-Wilemon, EdD Voices of Women: Facing Intersectional Experiences of Oppression Nelda Lapahe, EdD Navajo Nation Takes Control of Education: The Views of Navajo Educators William Jay Overton, EdD Are New Teachers Getting What They Need or Want for Success? Dorothy Jones Valentine, EdD Community Networks and Effective Change in Proprietary Colleges and Universities: A Systems Perspective Sycora A. Wilson-James, EdD The Impact of Appreciative Education on the Retention of Latina Students in the First Year of Higher Education

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Carrie L. Arnold, PhD The Silenced Female Leader: A Mixed Methods Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis Dohrea Bardell, PhD A Kantian Normative Model for Peace Holly A. Bardutz, PhD Women, Exercise and Neurological Changes: A Qualitative Study Cathy A. Flite, PhD An Exploration of Values and Ethics: A Content Analysis of a Health Care Code of Ethics Amanpreet K. Gohal, PhD The Lifeworlds of Urban Women Farmers in Sustainable Agriculture Heather M. Quimby, PhD Aggression and Adaptation: An Online Psychodynamic Discourse Analysis of Ego Defense in the Body Positive Community Rebecca L. Stafford, PhD When Public Leaders Whistleblow: Biopsychosocial Trajectory for Trauma and Transformation in Posttraumatic Growth Tracy C. Winter, PhD Being Seen: SelfConcept Development in Highly Gifted Adults HUMAN AND ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

Marvin Lee Barnes, Jr., PhD Turnover in Retail Service Sector Franchise Organizations: Exploring How and Why Low Wage Service Workers Quit Sherryl L. Berg-Ridenour, PhD Exploring the Perception of Value in Weak Ties by Management in Social Entrepreneurial Ventures Claudine S. Bradley, PhD Regulator Safety (Oversight) Culture: How a Regulator’s Culture Influences Safety Outcomes in High Hazard Industries

Heather M. Caltagirone Karpacz, PhD Career Transitions of Women Leaders: An Exploration of Why Women Leave Senior Leadership Positions Eileen J. Cleary, PhD Older Workers’ Experience of Stereotype Threat Joan E. Conger, PhD The Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness Distorts Modern Leadership Study and Practice Marcia A. Docherty, PhD Situated Competence: Towards a Holistic Definition of Physician Competence Gwen A. DuBois-Wing, PhD Creating and Sustaining a Generative Mode in a Boardroom Lark A. Ford, PhD Homeless Families Return to Mainstream Society Kathleen M. Gillespie, PhD How Do Airline Acquisitions Impact Customer Service? A Case Study of Southwest Airlines’ Acquisition of AirTran Teresa Harrison, PhD Male Offenders in Treatment for Intimate Partner Violence: A Correlational Study of Satisfaction Perceptions … Susan L. Herrmann, PhD Explorations of Global Consciousness: From Emergence Toward Integration Donald E. Khouri, PhD The Mindset of Senior-Level Knowledge Workers When Evaluating Requests for Their Time Matthew W. Lankenau, PhD Police Legitimacy: Experiences and Perspectives Susan A. Miele, PhD The Connection Between Friendship and Self-Esteem in Middle Adolescent Girls Tommy W. Moore, PhD Positive Deviance as Experienced Firsthand in an Organizational Setting: A Phenomenological Study


FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Gayla S. Napier, PhD Beyond Community: Understanding the Experience of Communitas Among Information Technology Road Warriors Lorraine S. Nemeth, PhD Power, Capital, and Commitment: An Exploration of Change in Work Group Dynamics Maritha Peens, PhD No Best Before Date: Thriving at Work During Late Career Penny M. Potter, PhD Becoming a Coach: Transformative Learning and Hierarchical Complexity of Coaching Students James E. Rankin, PhD The Conspiracy Theory Meme as a Tool of Cultural Hegemony: A Critical Discourse Analysis Rebecca M. Reese, PhD The Effects of a Simulation Game on Mental Models About Organizational Systems Sergej Van Middendorp, PhD Embodying Metaphors in Systems

Amber D. Shelton, PhD The Lived Experience of Hearing Mothers of Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants Gina M. Veloni, PhD Effects of Online Reflective Supervision/Practice Groups

Heidi M. Mattila, PhD The Social Construction of Stay-at-Home Fathering Across Social Spaces and Places

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE

Manuela T. Mondloch, PhD Attachment to God and Self-Control: The Moderating Effect of Religiousness

Hilary A. Curry, PhD Transactional Cross-Cultural Interactions: A Qualitative Study of British Expatriates and Service Providers in Dubai Julie S. Huffaker, PhD Me to We: How Collaborative Leadership Culture Developed in an Organization Kimberly N. McGee, PhD The Influence of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender on Advancement in Information Technology

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Michelle L. Adams, PhD Prison Is a CrazyMaking Place: Does Social Support Help?

Valerie E. Weber, PhD The Voices of the Megachurch Volunteers in Short-Term Misions (STM) Work: A Phenomenological Study

Athena J. Arthur, PhD Attachment Insecurities and Substance Use Disorders

Angela L. Zimmermann, PhD A Park Striving to Bridge: The Disparity Between Placemaking Ideals and Realities

Stella Bhawanie, PhD The Effects of Childhood Neglect on Depression and Suicidal Ideation

INFANT AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Carrie Alvarado, PhD The Sensoriaffective Interactional Attunement Scale: Development and Preliminary Validation of a Measure … Joleen R. Fernald, PhD Psychometric Properties of the Selective Mutism Sensory Processing Questionnaire Crystal Merrill, PhD Joint Hypermobility in Young Children: Exploring Associations with Behavioral Profiles

Yisroel M. Loeb, PhD The Relationship Between Mentalization and Sensitivity to Perceived Religious Affronts Amongst Early Emerging …

Jason H. Boothe, PhD Exploring the Relationship Between Years of Practice and What Psychologists Report Learning from Their Clients Colin M. Browne, PhD Paternal Predictors of Emotional Empathy and Anger in African American Men Jessica B. Buick, PhD Conscientiousness as a Moderating Factor in the Relationship Between Daily Hassles and Burnout in Graduate Students … Charla H. Clark, PhD Association Between Bedtime and Eating Behavior in College Students Robert B. Eberwein, PhD Fathers’ Accounts of their Emotional Connection with Adopted Adolescent Children

Sheryl A. Roach, PhD Transformational Leadership: Leading Through Trauma Manuela Waddell, PhD Women’s Identity Development: Investigating Moratorium and Relational Paths for Midlife Doctoral Students MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Kelley M. Micuda, PhD Combat Branding and the Islamic State: A Missing Link to Generating a Terrorist Recruit Profile Nicole D. Phinney, PhD The Influence of Music in Transportation and Character Identification in Fictional Film Narratives John Robinson, PhD Audience Attitude Development and Maintenance in Political Talk Radio Mischa A. Routon, PhD A Phenomenological Inquiry of Counseling Trainees’ Experiences of Reviewing Video-Recorded Psychotherapy Sessions… Larry R. Taylor, PhD A Model for the Classification of Digital Trust in Online Healthcare Social Networks Cynthia J. Vinney, PhD Personal Pop Culture: An Investigation of Fans’ Eudaimonic Responses to Favorite Television Caryn Wiley-Rapoport, PhD The Quantified Self and the Psychological Self: Using Narrative Identity to Bring Meaning to Fitness Band Data

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FOCUS Summer 2017: Social Justice  

FOCUS Summer 2017: Social Justice