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F O C U S 2 01 7 WINTER

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD


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RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

In this Issue FOCUS Winter 2017 President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell Art Director Audrey Ma Photographer Jacqueline Pilar Copyeditor Frances Goodrow

FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2017 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

4

5

Our academic vision

Alumnus in Congress

6

7

Schools and programs

About Fielding

8

9

New NSF grants

Teaching research

10

12

LGBTQ sexual health needs

Anger kinetics

13

14

Mood disorders in children

Big data

15

16

Workers’ rights

Neuropsychology

17

18

Women’s leadership

How stories shape our reality

20 Protecting marine life

FPO

21 Our graduates

Fielding: Research for a Changing World Often a thing is defined by what it is not: We say that ice is colorless or a circle is opposite a square. At Fielding, however, we are defined by the things we are: scholarly, practice-oriented, and enduring. As social waves and trends come and go, we continue to stand for the values required to build a lifelong community of scholars, practitioners, and leaders who seek to build a more sustainable, just, and humane world. These are not just words—they are the very things that we use to breathe life into new concepts and ways of being. They are how we make meaning of the complex and interrelated societies in which we live, work, and play. Our values of academic excellence, learner-centered education, social justice, diversity, transformational learning, and community are fully on display in these pages. A distinctive feature of any graduate school is the role it plays in creating new knowledge. At Fielding, this role is linked to creating knowledge that not only adds to the scholarly literature, but is applied in the world to make a positive social difference. Furthermore, we are committed to research that substantially shifts our thinking, grounds theory in empiricism, and offers our intellectual descendants better tools for making positive change. Our faculty’s passion for its subjects—and devotion to its research— move the world. They change Fielding, as well, as we’re ever evolving to meet the needs of a changing societal landscape. As our founders once commented, Fielding is less of an institution (the thing we are not) and more of a collection of ideas (the thing that we are.). I hope you enjoy this window into just some of the significant kinds of research conducted at Fielding by our scholars, practitioners, and leaders.

“At Fielding, research is applied in the world to make a positive social difference.” KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President

3


2

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

In this Issue FOCUS Winter 2017 President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell Art Director Audrey Ma Photographer Jacqueline Pilar Copyeditor Frances Goodrow

FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2017 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

4

5

Our academic vision

Alumnus in Congress

6

7

Schools and programs

About Fielding

8

9

New NSF grants

Teaching research

10

12

LGBTQ sexual health needs

Anger kinetics

13

14

Mood disorders in children

Big data

15

16

Workers’ rights

Neuropsychology

17

18

Women’s leadership

How stories shape our reality

20 Protecting marine life

FPO

21 Our graduates

Fielding: Research for a Changing World Often a thing is defined by what it is not: We say that ice is colorless or a circle is opposite a square. At Fielding, however, we are defined by the things we are: scholarly, practice-oriented, and enduring. As social waves and trends come and go, we continue to stand for the values required to build a lifelong community of scholars, practitioners, and leaders who seek to build a more sustainable, just, and humane world. These are not just words—they are the very things that we use to breathe life into new concepts and ways of being. They are how we make meaning of the complex and interrelated societies in which we live, work, and play. Our values of academic excellence, learner-centered education, social justice, diversity, transformational learning, and community are fully on display in these pages. A distinctive feature of any graduate school is the role it plays in creating new knowledge. At Fielding, this role is linked to creating knowledge that not only adds to the scholarly literature, but is applied in the world to make a positive social difference. Furthermore, we are committed to research that substantially shifts our thinking, grounds theory in empiricism, and offers our intellectual descendants better tools for making positive change. Our faculty’s passion for its subjects—and devotion to its research— move the world. They change Fielding, as well, as we’re ever evolving to meet the needs of a changing societal landscape. As our founders once commented, Fielding is less of an institution (the thing we are not) and more of a collection of ideas (the thing that we are.). I hope you enjoy this window into just some of the significant kinds of research conducted at Fielding by our scholars, practitioners, and leaders.

“At Fielding, research is applied in the world to make a positive social difference.” KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President

3


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RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

Salud Carbajal: Alumnus in Congress

Now and for the Future: Fielding’s Academic Vision

W

hen freshman Congressman Salud Carbajal takes office in the nation’s capital this month, he’ll be bringing many of the skills and perspectives he learned in Organizational Management at Fielding.

BY PRESIDENT KATRINA ROGERS & PROVOST AND SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT GERALD PORTER

F

ielding Graduate University is an institution responsive to the demands of our time, and focused on graduate education in the social sciences. Fielding has accomplished its mission through a highly personalized experiential learning model that connects theoretical mastery with practical application.

The academic vision at Fielding is driven by our continued dedication to offering highquality graduate education that invites learners to craft their own research and scholarship agendas. The Fielding faculty practice andragogy, a learning approach that focuses on how adults learn and how they need to be supported in reaching their goals. This approach to graduate education emphasizes the unique cognitive needs of adults and supports the life circumstances that are likely to confront them. Fielding weds this andragogical sensitivity to academic rigor and the cultivation of new knowledge. Our senior leadership team and faculty leaders have implemented a comprehensive academic plan to strengthen current programs, build new programs addressing 21st century needs, and re-envision what a university can be for a new generation of learners in a global community. A new School of Leadership Studies (SLS) was launched in July, 2016, that brings under one umbrella the programs formerly housed in the School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) and the School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC). This merger strengthens the rigor of academic programs by exposing students to a broader range of Fielding faculty’s extensive expertise, and enabling students to pursue research questions that are not only relevant but systemic and multidisciplinary in scope.

Now more than ever, leaders in organizations, communities, and systems face complex problems—complexities that can be untangled with skills and capabilities taught in a Fielding SLS program. These programs offer a common doctoral framework so students can tailor their education across disciplines. The framework also focuses attention on the essential tools that graduate students build at Fielding: excellent writing, strong critical thinking, solid research skills, discernment of interrelationships between and among theories, and the ability to navigate diverse environments and work across difference. The faculties of the various programs within the school collaborate on course offerings and across disciplinary lines, serving students from other programs, enabling students to partake in a wider variety of learning opportunities and faculty expertise. One result has been to add new concentrations in diverse and distinctive content areas such as media, technology, and innovation; leadership for social and ecological sustainability; and reflective practice/supervision. Another expression of Fielding’s academic vision is our innovative programming in psychology. Our first academic program was the highly regarded PhD in Clinical Psychology, the only such program with a distributive model accredited by the American Psychological Association. The faculty are skilled scholar-practitioners, well versed in the distinctive needs of our students for a learning environment that builds community and is offered in a flexible way. Additional programs over the years, such as a post-doctorate in neuropsychology, graduate programs in media psychology, and a post-baccalaureate in clinical psychology have built on our reputation in behavioral science. Lastly, we seek to imagine the future of

5

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

graduate education and Fielding’s role in this future. The students of the future need to be prepared for societies that are increasingly diverse, economically insecure, and global in orientation. Working professionals will need to be culturally competent, globally savvy, fluent in IT and computer applications, and prepared for rapidly changing technology and workforce requirements. Institutions themselves will need to be agile, flexible, and adaptive.

The students of the future, those born since 1995 (Generation Z), now make up 26 percent of the population. Eighty-one percent believe that a college education is necessary and more than a third near college age are worried about the affordability of college, while nearly half are worried about student debt. They also tend to be risk averse. In terms of learning styles, they prefer intrapersonal and independent learning over group work, as well as practical, hands-on instruction from engaged instructors. Fielding leaders are discussing how our institution can address these changing mores of the next generation. This exciting work of imagining the Fielding future necessitates a habit of mind that is creative while also grounded in the available data. The enduring and abiding elements of Fielding remain: a flexible, relational learning environment and a strong dispersed and diverse community with exemplary quality in all academic offerings. These elements will always be evident at Fielding. Thus, the work of building a better future continues.

ˑ

“It served me well throughout my many years in county government,” says Carbajal, who served on the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors for 12 years before being elected to Congress in November. “Fielding was a great foundation to lean on and draw from—a reservoir of knowledge.” Born in Mexico, Carbajal immigrated to the U.S. with his family as a child. His father worked as a miner in Arizona, and then a farm worker in Oxnard, Calif. Carbajal attended the University of California, Santa Barbara, as an undergrad, and served in the Marine Corps Reserve for eight years, including active duty service during the Gulf War.

customer-service framework based on a lot of the things I learned.” He graduated in 2003—and was elected as County Supervisor the following year. During his years in office, he became known for championing environmental causes, health programs that benefit children and seniors, and school programs that help at-risk kids. He has received a Community Environmental Council Environmental Hero award; a Planned Parenthood Action Fund of Santa Barbara, Ventura, and San Luis Obispo Counties “Sticking His Neck Out” Award; a Jewish Federation Ambassador of Freedom Award; and was named a Community Role Model by Women’s Economic Ventures. Now Congressman Carbajal, a Democrat, will represent California’s 24th district— Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties and parts of Ventura County—in DC.

“I’m very well aware that I am a freshman and my party is in the minority,” he says, “but I am not deterred from trying to work with anyone and everyone, my party and the party across the aisle, to try to move legislation forward. I will continue to be a loud voice and an advocate for the residents of the Central “It had a very progressive mission and teaching Coast that elected me.” style. That was important to me,” he says. “It Indeed, he has a long list of issues he hopes also took into consideration the schedules of to address: economic opportunity for working working professionals.” families, access and affordability for higher education, comprehensive immigration reOnce he started, though, what he loved most form, sustainable social security and Medicare was the ability to apply what he learned to programs, civil rights, climate change … real-life situations. It was Santa Barbara County Supervisor Naomi Schwartz who encouraged him to pursue higher education. He was working as her chief of staff at the time, and Fielding appealed to him for a couple of reasons.

“We engaged in dialogue and invited people from the community to interact with us and provide insight,” he says. “It was relevant to our daily working environment—very practical, very germane. It allowed us firsthand to understand the theoretical concepts of what we were learning and apply those to different aspects of our job.” Carbajal was interested in thinking about the county’s role in terms of customer service. “What was it that drove customer service vs. the principles that undermined customer service—in government and from a public policy standpoint?” he says, and his Fielding studies helped him develop that idea. “It was very helpful. I was able to work on implementing a

It won’t be easy. But he’s ready. “Fielding always challenged us to think of diverse points of view, to try to really understand the humanity of our interactions with one another,” the Congressman says. “While we might have diverging views, there’s a guiding principle of working together despite our differences to find common ground for the greater good. It’s something I’ve always had as a value, and Fielding reinforced that.”

ˑ


4

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

Salud Carbajal: Alumnus in Congress

Now and for the Future: Fielding’s Academic Vision

W

hen freshman Congressman Salud Carbajal takes office in the nation’s capital this month, he’ll be bringing many of the skills and perspectives he learned in Organizational Management at Fielding.

BY PRESIDENT KATRINA ROGERS & PROVOST AND SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT GERALD PORTER

F

ielding Graduate University is an institution responsive to the demands of our time, and focused on graduate education in the social sciences. Fielding has accomplished its mission through a highly personalized experiential learning model that connects theoretical mastery with practical application.

The academic vision at Fielding is driven by our continued dedication to offering highquality graduate education that invites learners to craft their own research and scholarship agendas. The Fielding faculty practice andragogy, a learning approach that focuses on how adults learn and how they need to be supported in reaching their goals. This approach to graduate education emphasizes the unique cognitive needs of adults and supports the life circumstances that are likely to confront them. Fielding weds this andragogical sensitivity to academic rigor and the cultivation of new knowledge. Our senior leadership team and faculty leaders have implemented a comprehensive academic plan to strengthen current programs, build new programs addressing 21st century needs, and re-envision what a university can be for a new generation of learners in a global community. A new School of Leadership Studies (SLS) was launched in July, 2016, that brings under one umbrella the programs formerly housed in the School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) and the School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC). This merger strengthens the rigor of academic programs by exposing students to a broader range of Fielding faculty’s extensive expertise, and enabling students to pursue research questions that are not only relevant but systemic and multidisciplinary in scope.

Now more than ever, leaders in organizations, communities, and systems face complex problems—complexities that can be untangled with skills and capabilities taught in a Fielding SLS program. These programs offer a common doctoral framework so students can tailor their education across disciplines. The framework also focuses attention on the essential tools that graduate students build at Fielding: excellent writing, strong critical thinking, solid research skills, discernment of interrelationships between and among theories, and the ability to navigate diverse environments and work across difference. The faculties of the various programs within the school collaborate on course offerings and across disciplinary lines, serving students from other programs, enabling students to partake in a wider variety of learning opportunities and faculty expertise. One result has been to add new concentrations in diverse and distinctive content areas such as media, technology, and innovation; leadership for social and ecological sustainability; and reflective practice/supervision. Another expression of Fielding’s academic vision is our innovative programming in psychology. Our first academic program was the highly regarded PhD in Clinical Psychology, the only such program with a distributive model accredited by the American Psychological Association. The faculty are skilled scholar-practitioners, well versed in the distinctive needs of our students for a learning environment that builds community and is offered in a flexible way. Additional programs over the years, such as a post-doctorate in neuropsychology, graduate programs in media psychology, and a post-baccalaureate in clinical psychology have built on our reputation in behavioral science. Lastly, we seek to imagine the future of

5

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

graduate education and Fielding’s role in this future. The students of the future need to be prepared for societies that are increasingly diverse, economically insecure, and global in orientation. Working professionals will need to be culturally competent, globally savvy, fluent in IT and computer applications, and prepared for rapidly changing technology and workforce requirements. Institutions themselves will need to be agile, flexible, and adaptive.

The students of the future, those born since 1995 (Generation Z), now make up 26 percent of the population. Eighty-one percent believe that a college education is necessary and more than a third near college age are worried about the affordability of college, while nearly half are worried about student debt. They also tend to be risk averse. In terms of learning styles, they prefer intrapersonal and independent learning over group work, as well as practical, hands-on instruction from engaged instructors. Fielding leaders are discussing how our institution can address these changing mores of the next generation. This exciting work of imagining the Fielding future necessitates a habit of mind that is creative while also grounded in the available data. The enduring and abiding elements of Fielding remain: a flexible, relational learning environment and a strong dispersed and diverse community with exemplary quality in all academic offerings. These elements will always be evident at Fielding. Thus, the work of building a better future continues.

ˑ

“It served me well throughout my many years in county government,” says Carbajal, who served on the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors for 12 years before being elected to Congress in November. “Fielding was a great foundation to lean on and draw from—a reservoir of knowledge.” Born in Mexico, Carbajal immigrated to the U.S. with his family as a child. His father worked as a miner in Arizona, and then a farm worker in Oxnard, Calif. Carbajal attended the University of California, Santa Barbara, as an undergrad, and served in the Marine Corps Reserve for eight years, including active duty service during the Gulf War.

customer-service framework based on a lot of the things I learned.” He graduated in 2003—and was elected as County Supervisor the following year. During his years in office, he became known for championing environmental causes, health programs that benefit children and seniors, and school programs that help at-risk kids. He has received a Community Environmental Council Environmental Hero award; a Planned Parenthood Action Fund of Santa Barbara, Ventura, and San Luis Obispo Counties “Sticking His Neck Out” Award; a Jewish Federation Ambassador of Freedom Award; and was named a Community Role Model by Women’s Economic Ventures. Now Congressman Carbajal, a Democrat, will represent California’s 24th district— Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties and parts of Ventura County—in DC.

“I’m very well aware that I am a freshman and my party is in the minority,” he says, “but I am not deterred from trying to work with anyone and everyone, my party and the party across the aisle, to try to move legislation forward. I will continue to be a loud voice and an advocate for the residents of the Central “It had a very progressive mission and teaching Coast that elected me.” style. That was important to me,” he says. “It Indeed, he has a long list of issues he hopes also took into consideration the schedules of to address: economic opportunity for working working professionals.” families, access and affordability for higher education, comprehensive immigration reOnce he started, though, what he loved most form, sustainable social security and Medicare was the ability to apply what he learned to programs, civil rights, climate change … real-life situations. It was Santa Barbara County Supervisor Naomi Schwartz who encouraged him to pursue higher education. He was working as her chief of staff at the time, and Fielding appealed to him for a couple of reasons.

“We engaged in dialogue and invited people from the community to interact with us and provide insight,” he says. “It was relevant to our daily working environment—very practical, very germane. It allowed us firsthand to understand the theoretical concepts of what we were learning and apply those to different aspects of our job.” Carbajal was interested in thinking about the county’s role in terms of customer service. “What was it that drove customer service vs. the principles that undermined customer service—in government and from a public policy standpoint?” he says, and his Fielding studies helped him develop that idea. “It was very helpful. I was able to work on implementing a

It won’t be easy. But he’s ready. “Fielding always challenged us to think of diverse points of view, to try to really understand the humanity of our interactions with one another,” the Congressman says. “While we might have diverging views, there’s a guiding principle of working together despite our differences to find common ground for the greater good. It’s something I’ve always had as a value, and Fielding reinforced that.”

ˑ


6

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

About Fielding

Schools & Programs School of Leadership Studies DOCTORAL DEGREES EdD, Leadership for Change PhD, Human Development PhD, Infant & Early Childhood Development PhD, Organizational Development & Change MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Collaborative Educational Leadership MA, Digital Teaching and Learning MA, Organizational Development and Leadership CERTIFICATES

Doctoral Concentrations (excludes Clinical Psychology)

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity and Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, and Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership

Centers & Initiatives

Mission We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Vision We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Academic Leadership Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development and Leadership

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses, and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable, and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

School of Psychology

The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect.

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment is committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues in education, healthcare, the environment, violence prevention, and globalization.

We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community.

DOCTORAL DEGREES PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD, Media Psychology MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Media Psychology CERTIFICATES Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement) Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society.

Values ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE:

We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

COMMUNITY:

DIVERSITY:

LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION:

We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students.

SOCIAL JUSTICE:

We commit to advancing equality and justice in our university, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING:

We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Fast Facts Student Body Demographics

Enrollment 1,168 Women 74% Men 26% Age Range 22–79

Faculty

Total Faculty 178 Total Staff 83 Students-to-Faculty 7:1

Race and Ethnicity

American Indian or Alaska Native 2% Asian 4% Black or African American 14% Hispanic or Latino 9% White 50% Two or More Races 4% Race/Ethnicity Unknown 8% International Students 9%

Aggregated data based on Fall 2015 census data as reported to Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

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6

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

About Fielding

Schools & Programs School of Leadership Studies DOCTORAL DEGREES EdD, Leadership for Change PhD, Human Development PhD, Infant & Early Childhood Development PhD, Organizational Development & Change MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Collaborative Educational Leadership MA, Digital Teaching and Learning MA, Organizational Development and Leadership CERTIFICATES

Doctoral Concentrations (excludes Clinical Psychology)

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity and Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, and Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership

Centers & Initiatives

Mission We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Vision We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Academic Leadership Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development and Leadership

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses, and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable, and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

School of Psychology

The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect.

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment is committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues in education, healthcare, the environment, violence prevention, and globalization.

We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community.

DOCTORAL DEGREES PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD, Media Psychology MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Media Psychology CERTIFICATES Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement) Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society.

Values ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE:

We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

COMMUNITY:

DIVERSITY:

LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION:

We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students.

SOCIAL JUSTICE:

We commit to advancing equality and justice in our university, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING:

We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Fast Facts Student Body Demographics

Enrollment 1,168 Women 74% Men 26% Age Range 22–79

Faculty

Total Faculty 178 Total Staff 83 Students-to-Faculty 7:1

Race and Ethnicity

American Indian or Alaska Native 2% Asian 4% Black or African American 14% Hispanic or Latino 9% White 50% Two or More Races 4% Race/Ethnicity Unknown 8% International Students 9%

Aggregated data based on Fall 2015 census data as reported to Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

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RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

9

practicums—which, for Clinical Psychology students, entails 200 hours of research.

New Research Grants from National Science Foundation

R

esearch is an integral part of any doctoral granting university—but engaging in research at a high level comes with a cost.

Enter Orlando Taylor, Fielding’s vice president of strategic initiatives and research. For decades, Taylor, PhD, has been a national leader in higher education on issues pertaining to diversity and inclusion, and a vigorous advocate and spokesperson on topics of access, equity, and preparing the next generation of researchers and faculty. He also served on the board of the Council of Graduate Schools and led the graduate school for many years at Howard University.

“We were so fortunate to have Orlando join us at Fielding,” says President Katrina Rogers. “His experience and commitment to the work of advancing leadership within underserved populations is critical for Fielding to be preparing leaders in the 21st century.” Dr. Taylor is a prolific and highly successful grant writer, having acquired more than $40 million in grant funding during his career. In his first two years at Fielding, the university has received several grants, including

three from the National Science Foundation (NSF) totaling more than $1.3 million.

“The NSF is the gold standard for research and program development grants in the area of science, technology, engineering, and math—or STEM,” says Dr. Taylor. “They’re highly competitive and prestigious awards.” Not only has Dr. Taylor’s office brought in invaluable funding, it has helped Fielding forge strategic relationships with other prominent higher-ed organizations. These relationships enhance Fielding’s visibility and reputation, and position the university to be more attractive to future students and faculty—and more competitive in future grant competitions. For the aforementioned NSF grants, Fielding: • Partnered with the American Indian Higher Education Consortium to offer the Post-Graduate Certificate in Academic Leadership program for Tribal College and University women faculty in STEM fields. • Partnered with the Society of STEM Women of Color to offer professional development opportunities in academic

“They work 10 hours a week on their own and then we meet with them twice a month,” Dr. Bendell says. “We help them formulate research questions. Research is a process. You don’t just get up one morning and suddenly you have terrific insight. It usually comes from a familiarity with a population that then leads to questions and answers.” Dr. Bendell and Dr. Field have tapped into a terrific tool that provides that population familiarity. It’s Princeton’s New Immigrant Survey, a database of surveys of 6,000 legal US immigrants dating back to 2003. Fielding students can access the database and find vast amounts of data to use in their research—rather than having to conduct interviews or surveys themselves, from scratch.

DR. ORLANDO TAYLOR

“Immigrants are important as we look at the political situation and the changing demographics of the United States,” says Dr. Bendell. “There are a dozen studies that have been done on this multicultural database with very interesting results. For example, 13 Fielding students all over the country are working together to research immigration issues, including the effects of stress on parenting.”

leadership at the Annual Conclave of the Society of STEM Women of Color.

• Partnered with the American Association of Colleges and Universities, the University of the Virgin Islands, and North Carolina A&T University to launch the Center for Advancing STEM Leadership. The center will study the strategies used by leaders at Historically Black Colleges and Universities to produce disproportionately high levels of under-represented minority STEM graduates over the years. Numerous members of the Fielding community have been instrumental in the research, presentation, and administration of these grants, including faculty members Patrice Rosenthal, Karen Dill-Shackleford, Lenneal Henderson, Charles McClintock, Leila Gonzalez-Sullivan, and Lauren Mizock, and student Susan Eddington. “We’ve only just begun,” says Dr. Taylor. “Going forward, we’re going to continue to seek institution-wide grants and work closely with the faculty, students, and alumni to get more proposals out the door to support their work and their interests.”

ˑ

DR. DEBRA BENDELL

Teaching the Research Process

D

ebra Bendell and Tiffany Field have known each other for three decades, and though they live on opposite coasts, they’ve been conducting research together for nearly as long.

The Clinical Psychology faculty colleagues have teamed up to study pregnant women, immigrant families, preterm infants, and more.

Both instructors are delighted with how students have made use of the information at their fingertips. “They come up with interesting topics,” says Dr. Field. “They say research is ‘me-search’ so a lot of students glom onto questions that are personally relevant to them.” Their teaching assistants have both had significant work come out of the database: Student Harry Voulgarakis had a poster and a publication around access to prostate cancer screening among legal immigrants. Student Riwa Kassar looked at English proficiency within the immigrant sample and found that those who didn’t learn English were more depressed than those who did.

Some students will go on to publish their research. The hope is always that any new findings will be used by clinical psychologists in their therapeutic work with patients. “Research,” says Dr. Field, “is the bottom line for solving problems and providing solutions for people, and for the world.”

ˑ

“One study that we both worked on was massaging premature babies to help them grow,” says Field, PhD.” Debra used to be in charge of the neonatal intensive care unit where they evaluated and assessed these babies. We massaged them and they gained 47% more weight and were discharged six days earlier on average than infants who weren’t massaged.” Dr. Field now runs the Touch Research Institute in Miami, studying the effect of massage on chronic pain, autoimmune disorders, PTSD, and other conditions. Bendell, PhD, lives in California, where she is well known for her work in attachment theory, and also supervises research projects at UCLA. Together, these research veterans help Fielding students navigate the research process. They teach a course at Fielding’s national sessions called Dissertation Bootcamp. “Students tell us where they’re stuck and we consult with them about how to move the process forward,” says Dr. Bendell. They also guide their cluster students through year-long research

DR. TIFFANY FIELD


8

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

9

practicums—which, for Clinical Psychology students, entails 200 hours of research.

New Research Grants from National Science Foundation

R

esearch is an integral part of any doctoral granting university—but engaging in research at a high level comes with a cost.

Enter Orlando Taylor, Fielding’s vice president of strategic initiatives and research. For decades, Taylor, PhD, has been a national leader in higher education on issues pertaining to diversity and inclusion, and a vigorous advocate and spokesperson on topics of access, equity, and preparing the next generation of researchers and faculty. He also served on the board of the Council of Graduate Schools and led the graduate school for many years at Howard University.

“We were so fortunate to have Orlando join us at Fielding,” says President Katrina Rogers. “His experience and commitment to the work of advancing leadership within underserved populations is critical for Fielding to be preparing leaders in the 21st century.” Dr. Taylor is a prolific and highly successful grant writer, having acquired more than $40 million in grant funding during his career. In his first two years at Fielding, the university has received several grants, including

three from the National Science Foundation (NSF) totaling more than $1.3 million.

“The NSF is the gold standard for research and program development grants in the area of science, technology, engineering, and math—or STEM,” says Dr. Taylor. “They’re highly competitive and prestigious awards.” Not only has Dr. Taylor’s office brought in invaluable funding, it has helped Fielding forge strategic relationships with other prominent higher-ed organizations. These relationships enhance Fielding’s visibility and reputation, and position the university to be more attractive to future students and faculty—and more competitive in future grant competitions. For the aforementioned NSF grants, Fielding: • Partnered with the American Indian Higher Education Consortium to offer the Post-Graduate Certificate in Academic Leadership program for Tribal College and University women faculty in STEM fields. • Partnered with the Society of STEM Women of Color to offer professional development opportunities in academic

“They work 10 hours a week on their own and then we meet with them twice a month,” Dr. Bendell says. “We help them formulate research questions. Research is a process. You don’t just get up one morning and suddenly you have terrific insight. It usually comes from a familiarity with a population that then leads to questions and answers.” Dr. Bendell and Dr. Field have tapped into a terrific tool that provides that population familiarity. It’s Princeton’s New Immigrant Survey, a database of surveys of 6,000 legal US immigrants dating back to 2003. Fielding students can access the database and find vast amounts of data to use in their research—rather than having to conduct interviews or surveys themselves, from scratch.

DR. ORLANDO TAYLOR

“Immigrants are important as we look at the political situation and the changing demographics of the United States,” says Dr. Bendell. “There are a dozen studies that have been done on this multicultural database with very interesting results. For example, 13 Fielding students all over the country are working together to research immigration issues, including the effects of stress on parenting.”

leadership at the Annual Conclave of the Society of STEM Women of Color.

• Partnered with the American Association of Colleges and Universities, the University of the Virgin Islands, and North Carolina A&T University to launch the Center for Advancing STEM Leadership. The center will study the strategies used by leaders at Historically Black Colleges and Universities to produce disproportionately high levels of under-represented minority STEM graduates over the years. Numerous members of the Fielding community have been instrumental in the research, presentation, and administration of these grants, including faculty members Patrice Rosenthal, Karen Dill-Shackleford, Lenneal Henderson, Charles McClintock, Leila Gonzalez-Sullivan, and Lauren Mizock, and student Susan Eddington. “We’ve only just begun,” says Dr. Taylor. “Going forward, we’re going to continue to seek institution-wide grants and work closely with the faculty, students, and alumni to get more proposals out the door to support their work and their interests.”

ˑ

DR. DEBRA BENDELL

Teaching the Research Process

D

ebra Bendell and Tiffany Field have known each other for three decades, and though they live on opposite coasts, they’ve been conducting research together for nearly as long.

The Clinical Psychology faculty colleagues have teamed up to study pregnant women, immigrant families, preterm infants, and more.

Both instructors are delighted with how students have made use of the information at their fingertips. “They come up with interesting topics,” says Dr. Field. “They say research is ‘me-search’ so a lot of students glom onto questions that are personally relevant to them.” Their teaching assistants have both had significant work come out of the database: Student Harry Voulgarakis had a poster and a publication around access to prostate cancer screening among legal immigrants. Student Riwa Kassar looked at English proficiency within the immigrant sample and found that those who didn’t learn English were more depressed than those who did.

Some students will go on to publish their research. The hope is always that any new findings will be used by clinical psychologists in their therapeutic work with patients. “Research,” says Dr. Field, “is the bottom line for solving problems and providing solutions for people, and for the world.”

ˑ

“One study that we both worked on was massaging premature babies to help them grow,” says Field, PhD.” Debra used to be in charge of the neonatal intensive care unit where they evaluated and assessed these babies. We massaged them and they gained 47% more weight and were discharged six days earlier on average than infants who weren’t massaged.” Dr. Field now runs the Touch Research Institute in Miami, studying the effect of massage on chronic pain, autoimmune disorders, PTSD, and other conditions. Bendell, PhD, lives in California, where she is well known for her work in attachment theory, and also supervises research projects at UCLA. Together, these research veterans help Fielding students navigate the research process. They teach a course at Fielding’s national sessions called Dissertation Bootcamp. “Students tell us where they’re stuck and we consult with them about how to move the process forward,” says Dr. Bendell. They also guide their cluster students through year-long research

DR. TIFFANY FIELD


10

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

tion devoted to women’s health—wanted to collaborate, it stepped up. “Kirsten McGregor, then associate director of WNGE, and I basically asked, ‘How can we be of service to you?’” Dr. DiStefano says. Planned Parenthood wanted to expand services for the LGBTQ communities in culturally competent ways, from understanding exactly what services the community needs to communicating appropriately with all clients. “We decided to design a research study to find out what the needs of these communities are—expressed in their language,” Dr. DiStefano says. “You have to assume that the bisexual community doesn’t have the same needs as the transgender community, which doesn’t have the same needs as the gay community, and so forth. So you have to ask the right questions in the right way using the right words.”

LGBTQ Sexual Health Needs Helping Planned Parenthood expand services

T

he questions that kicked off Anna DiStefano’s latest research project weren’t so unusual: “What should we be asking and how should we be asking it?”

After all, such notions are the sparks that have ignited scholarly inquiry for centuries.

addressed by the health and education systems in these counties,” says DiStefano, EdD. “We have a partner in Planned Parenthood that wants to do something about that, and we want to support their doing it. We think these communities are important.” Both working for social change and supporting underserved populations are longstanding Fielding traditions—and Dr. DiStefano ought to know. She’s been here since 1983, serving in roles from dean of the School of Human & Organization Development to provost. She’s currently doctoral faculty in the School of Leadership Studies and chairs the EdD faculty.

But this project isn’t your average academic pursuit, undertaken with the hope of contributing nobly to the hallowed font of knowledge—or even being published in a journal. It’s almost two years of participatory action research whose sole goal is to help Planned Parenthood offer more sexual and reproductive health services to the LGBTQ community in Santa Barbara and Ventura “Fielding is distinctive in how it serves Counties. It aims to be immediately usewomen,” says Dr. DiStefano, “and employs ful in effecting positive change in our own the talents of women as faculty and adminneighborhoods. istrators in ways that were atypical of higher education for a long time—and some would “The LGBTQ communities have a variety of say still are. It’s also a place where women health needs that are not being adequately will pursue action to change things.”

11

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

That’s why Dr. DiStefano and a group of Fielding colleagues, including Gloria Willingham, PhD, and Dan Sewell, PhD, created the university’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) in 2003 with funding from an anonymous donor. A grant from a family foundation in Georgia allowed network associates from the US and Germany to teach dental health in Kenya, and demonstrate the use of solar cookers there so that girls there could attend school rather than spend their days gathering firewood. Approved as an NGO (non-governmental organization) by the United Nations, WNGE has also led a women’s empowerment panel in Saudi Arabia, produced a webinar series on global health issues and leadership, and established a Fielding fellowship every semester for doctoral students who are researching women’s empowerment. So it’s not surprising that when WNGE learned that the California Central Coast office of Planned Parenthood—an organiza-

The first step of their project was to enlist the input of other grassroots partners like a trans advocacy network and a long-standing community nonprofit that serves and advocates for the LGBTQ communities. They attended local Pride events throughout the summer, where they asked volunteers to answer questions about their needs and preferences. “When I meet people—especially kids—at places like Pride, they’re so pleased and excited to have somebody talk openly about these issues,” Dr. DiStefano says.

flexibility and persistence,” Dr. DiStefano says. “Every community needs to learn from each other but every community is different, too. You don’t take what another community learns and assume it’s going to be relevant for your area. You need to build this stuff from the ground up.” She says Fielding students are learning how to do exactly this sort of effective, boots-on-theground research in their studies here.

Next come in-depth interviews, a broadly distributed online survey, and targeted followup focus groups. When finished, Planned Parenthood California Central Coast will use the information to train its staff and expand its services.

“The thing I’m most proud of is that we take the lead from our community-based partners and seek funds for and develop a timeline based on their circumstances,” she says. “We’re working on their agendas, on their timelines, with their donors. It’s what makes us relevant to them and shows that we’re not just using them for our purposes.

“What I’ve learned about doing this kind of research is that you have to have patience and

“We’ve made a vow that this isn’t about Fielding’s agenda. It’s about their agenda.”

ˑ

“The LGBTQ communities have a variety of health needs that are not being adequately addressed.”

DR. ANNA DISTEFANO


10

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

tion devoted to women’s health—wanted to collaborate, it stepped up. “Kirsten McGregor, then associate director of WNGE, and I basically asked, ‘How can we be of service to you?’” Dr. DiStefano says. Planned Parenthood wanted to expand services for the LGBTQ communities in culturally competent ways, from understanding exactly what services the community needs to communicating appropriately with all clients. “We decided to design a research study to find out what the needs of these communities are—expressed in their language,” Dr. DiStefano says. “You have to assume that the bisexual community doesn’t have the same needs as the transgender community, which doesn’t have the same needs as the gay community, and so forth. So you have to ask the right questions in the right way using the right words.”

LGBTQ Sexual Health Needs Helping Planned Parenthood expand services

T

he questions that kicked off Anna DiStefano’s latest research project weren’t so unusual: “What should we be asking and how should we be asking it?”

After all, such notions are the sparks that have ignited scholarly inquiry for centuries.

addressed by the health and education systems in these counties,” says DiStefano, EdD. “We have a partner in Planned Parenthood that wants to do something about that, and we want to support their doing it. We think these communities are important.” Both working for social change and supporting underserved populations are longstanding Fielding traditions—and Dr. DiStefano ought to know. She’s been here since 1983, serving in roles from dean of the School of Human & Organization Development to provost. She’s currently doctoral faculty in the School of Leadership Studies and chairs the EdD faculty.

But this project isn’t your average academic pursuit, undertaken with the hope of contributing nobly to the hallowed font of knowledge—or even being published in a journal. It’s almost two years of participatory action research whose sole goal is to help Planned Parenthood offer more sexual and reproductive health services to the LGBTQ community in Santa Barbara and Ventura “Fielding is distinctive in how it serves Counties. It aims to be immediately usewomen,” says Dr. DiStefano, “and employs ful in effecting positive change in our own the talents of women as faculty and adminneighborhoods. istrators in ways that were atypical of higher education for a long time—and some would “The LGBTQ communities have a variety of say still are. It’s also a place where women health needs that are not being adequately will pursue action to change things.”

11

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

That’s why Dr. DiStefano and a group of Fielding colleagues, including Gloria Willingham, PhD, and Dan Sewell, PhD, created the university’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) in 2003 with funding from an anonymous donor. A grant from a family foundation in Georgia allowed network associates from the US and Germany to teach dental health in Kenya, and demonstrate the use of solar cookers there so that girls there could attend school rather than spend their days gathering firewood. Approved as an NGO (non-governmental organization) by the United Nations, WNGE has also led a women’s empowerment panel in Saudi Arabia, produced a webinar series on global health issues and leadership, and established a Fielding fellowship every semester for doctoral students who are researching women’s empowerment. So it’s not surprising that when WNGE learned that the California Central Coast office of Planned Parenthood—an organiza-

The first step of their project was to enlist the input of other grassroots partners like a trans advocacy network and a long-standing community nonprofit that serves and advocates for the LGBTQ communities. They attended local Pride events throughout the summer, where they asked volunteers to answer questions about their needs and preferences. “When I meet people—especially kids—at places like Pride, they’re so pleased and excited to have somebody talk openly about these issues,” Dr. DiStefano says.

flexibility and persistence,” Dr. DiStefano says. “Every community needs to learn from each other but every community is different, too. You don’t take what another community learns and assume it’s going to be relevant for your area. You need to build this stuff from the ground up.” She says Fielding students are learning how to do exactly this sort of effective, boots-on-theground research in their studies here.

Next come in-depth interviews, a broadly distributed online survey, and targeted followup focus groups. When finished, Planned Parenthood California Central Coast will use the information to train its staff and expand its services.

“The thing I’m most proud of is that we take the lead from our community-based partners and seek funds for and develop a timeline based on their circumstances,” she says. “We’re working on their agendas, on their timelines, with their donors. It’s what makes us relevant to them and shows that we’re not just using them for our purposes.

“What I’ve learned about doing this kind of research is that you have to have patience and

“We’ve made a vow that this isn’t about Fielding’s agenda. It’s about their agenda.”

ˑ

“The LGBTQ communities have a variety of health needs that are not being adequately addressed.”

DR. ANNA DISTEFANO


12

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

13

But it does require an interviewer with a cool head. “I’ve definitely learned a lot about the range of triggers that people have,” he says, “and to manage that instinctual fear of anger—to learn how to sit with someone who’s on the edge of losing it.”

His interest in anger developed from his passion for wellness. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as an undergrad with the goal of becoming a veterinarian. But some junior-year career counseling changed his course. “I discovered that I wanted to make pets well so that I could make people happy,” he said. “So what I really wanted was to make people happy.” He began working with special-needs kids and teens with substanceabuse issues, and went on to earn his Doctor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida.

DR. ANTHONY GREENE

Anger Kinetics

Exploring adolescents’ emotions

T

hink academic research sounds like dull work? Then you’ve never conducted a Structured Anger Assessment Interview with Dr. Anthony Greene.

“I’ve had occasions when 20 minutes into the interview, someone says, ‘If you ask me that question again, I’m going to smack you in the face,’” he says. “I’ve had to stop the interview.”

Dr. Greene oversees Fielding’s in-house research project Young Voices, an ongoing investigation into anger experience and expression in adolescents. As part of the project, Dr. Greene trains his students to administer the anger-assessment interview, which was developed by one of his grad school colleagues.

“It’s a provocative interview,” he explains. “There’s a lot of asking people to justify why they do what they do, like saying, ‘Why does that make you angry?’ If they’re defensive or don’t feel comfortable with it, that tends to provoke aggressive behavior — ‘verbal stylistics,’ we call them — and that’s part of the assessment: rating what provokes their anger, and how they respond and cope.” Some of the verbal stylistics they look for are intensity, expressiveness, laughter, self-involvement, hostility, and even loudness. “It’s a more nuanced way of measuring anger as opposed to a paper and pencil, where they’re just circling numbers,” he says. “It’s a little richer and it’s harder for them to fake.”

“It’s a good fit for me,” he says. “It’s feel-good work. I’m fascinated by how plastic the mind is and yet how it can hold things and shape our behavior in ways we’re not aware of.” After researching the interaction between anger and heart disease, and working with domestic violence offenders on court-ordered anger management, he joined the Fielding faculty 23 years ago. As founder and coordinator of the university’s Violence Prevention and Control Concentration, he launched the Young Voices project in 2013 to collect data on what teens are angry about and how they express it. Students all over the country recruit interview subjects from their local communities, interview them, record and code their responses, and enter them into the growing database. Why does this kind of research matter? “Let’s say I’m doing an evaluation of an angry, minority kid from an impoverished neighborhood,” says Dr. Greene, “and I evaluate him as being antisocial—something negative. In his environment, he has a logical, sound reason for being angry; it’s not really a mental illness, it’s that his environment is sick. That level of anger varies according to different social identities, i.e. what race you are, gender, sexual identity. “By sampling across kids and getting some norms across different identities, there will be data people can use to say, ‘This level of anger is pretty normal for a kid of this background.’”

Mood Disorders in Children Bringing wellness to families DR. IRA GLOVINSKY

T

he data is in—and it’s disturbing: Rates of depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder are on the rise among young people.

“If you look at the census, every 10 years we’re seeing an increase in serious mood disorders, in more children, and at younger ages,” says Ira Glovinsky, who co-leads Fielding’s Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program. “We’re seeing more disturbances at home and particularly in school settings and we really don’t know how to treat it. The main model continues to be psychopharmacological; we give medication.”

Dr. Glovinsky has spent years researching mood disorders in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

The research could prove useful to therapists in other ways, as well, offering anger-management tools and interventions for parents, teachers, and therapists. For example, the study’s data shows that kids with more best friends have more healthy expressions of anger, kids who play organized sports are less angry than those who don’t—and that yelling into a pillow isn’t as helpful in quelling rage as common lore would have us believe.

“If we don’t develop new treatments that work with these kids, we’ll continue to see this explosion of mood instability that can destroy marriages, families, and classrooms,” he says. “These kids become adults and if they don’t have the foundation for mood regulation, we’re in trouble.”

“It may in fact intensify the feeling,” says Dr. Greene. “You may need to do some problem solving.”

All his research is undertaken with the goal of decreasing the frequency, duration, and intensity of these mood symptoms. “We ask, what are the factors in the family unit that create psychopathology and wellness? Which interventions work with very young children and parents, and which just don’t work?” he says. “If you intervene early enough, the well

More than 20 Fielding students have contributed research practicum hours to the study, which currently includes data on nearly 200 subjects. Dr. Greene hopes there will be thousands one day and—if cool heads prevail—it’s likely there will be.

ˑ

periods may get longer and longer.” He knows from personal experience. Dr. Glovinsky started out as a substitute teacher in the New York City school system. When he was assigned to an especially chaotic classroom known for “out-of-control” kids, he discovered his calling. “I loved it,” he says. “There were no books, no chalk, no pictures on the wall. I had to figure out how to get to these kids, so I followed their lead, got into their world rather than expecting them to get into mine. We developed this wonderful relationship. We had a ball.” The following year, he went to the University of Michigan to get his PhD in special education and got an internship in a children’s psychiatric hospital teaching younger inpatients. He enjoyed that, too. “I love puzzles and I love challenges,” he says—but his greatest challenge was yet to come. Dr. Glovinsky earned his degree in special education, became licensed as a psychologist, ran the hospital’s early intervention program, and even worked as a psychologist on a neonatal intensive care team in another hospital. Then, not long after his own daughter was born in 1976, he began to notice peculiar behavior in her. She was eventually diagnosed with bipolar disorder. At the time, he says, “There were very few

people in the country who believed that young kids could be bipolar. I plopped myself in the medical library and read everything I could on bipolar and kids, and eventually published articles on the history of pediatric bipolar disorder.” His daughter is doing well now, and Glovinsky went on to write two books on bipolar patterns and mood swings in children with eminent child psychiatrist Stanley Greenspan. In addition to his private practice, he’s currently researching bipolar mothers and their infants, as well as gathering data on the difference between seeing preschool patients at home vs. in a clinical office setting. At Fielding, Dr. Glovinsky has worked with a student for a study on autistic kids, which was published by the Infant Mental Health Journal, and is collaborating with fellow IECD faculty Nina Newman on a book training teachers to work with kids with severe emotional disabilities. “What Fielding is helping us do is to spread these answers across the world,” he says. “I’ve done a training via Skype with a group of psychiatrists in Taiwan who had very little knowledge or experience about the disorder. I did another presentation in Chile.

“Fielding provides an environment with the virtual learning potential to touch people all over the world. That’s not grandiose; that’s happening.”

ˑ


12

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

13

But it does require an interviewer with a cool head. “I’ve definitely learned a lot about the range of triggers that people have,” he says, “and to manage that instinctual fear of anger—to learn how to sit with someone who’s on the edge of losing it.”

His interest in anger developed from his passion for wellness. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as an undergrad with the goal of becoming a veterinarian. But some junior-year career counseling changed his course. “I discovered that I wanted to make pets well so that I could make people happy,” he said. “So what I really wanted was to make people happy.” He began working with special-needs kids and teens with substanceabuse issues, and went on to earn his Doctor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida.

DR. ANTHONY GREENE

Anger Kinetics

Exploring adolescents’ emotions

T

hink academic research sounds like dull work? Then you’ve never conducted a Structured Anger Assessment Interview with Dr. Anthony Greene.

“I’ve had occasions when 20 minutes into the interview, someone says, ‘If you ask me that question again, I’m going to smack you in the face,’” he says. “I’ve had to stop the interview.”

Dr. Greene oversees Fielding’s in-house research project Young Voices, an ongoing investigation into anger experience and expression in adolescents. As part of the project, Dr. Greene trains his students to administer the anger-assessment interview, which was developed by one of his grad school colleagues.

“It’s a provocative interview,” he explains. “There’s a lot of asking people to justify why they do what they do, like saying, ‘Why does that make you angry?’ If they’re defensive or don’t feel comfortable with it, that tends to provoke aggressive behavior — ‘verbal stylistics,’ we call them — and that’s part of the assessment: rating what provokes their anger, and how they respond and cope.” Some of the verbal stylistics they look for are intensity, expressiveness, laughter, self-involvement, hostility, and even loudness. “It’s a more nuanced way of measuring anger as opposed to a paper and pencil, where they’re just circling numbers,” he says. “It’s a little richer and it’s harder for them to fake.”

“It’s a good fit for me,” he says. “It’s feel-good work. I’m fascinated by how plastic the mind is and yet how it can hold things and shape our behavior in ways we’re not aware of.” After researching the interaction between anger and heart disease, and working with domestic violence offenders on court-ordered anger management, he joined the Fielding faculty 23 years ago. As founder and coordinator of the university’s Violence Prevention and Control Concentration, he launched the Young Voices project in 2013 to collect data on what teens are angry about and how they express it. Students all over the country recruit interview subjects from their local communities, interview them, record and code their responses, and enter them into the growing database. Why does this kind of research matter? “Let’s say I’m doing an evaluation of an angry, minority kid from an impoverished neighborhood,” says Dr. Greene, “and I evaluate him as being antisocial—something negative. In his environment, he has a logical, sound reason for being angry; it’s not really a mental illness, it’s that his environment is sick. That level of anger varies according to different social identities, i.e. what race you are, gender, sexual identity. “By sampling across kids and getting some norms across different identities, there will be data people can use to say, ‘This level of anger is pretty normal for a kid of this background.’”

Mood Disorders in Children Bringing wellness to families DR. IRA GLOVINSKY

T

he data is in—and it’s disturbing: Rates of depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder are on the rise among young people.

“If you look at the census, every 10 years we’re seeing an increase in serious mood disorders, in more children, and at younger ages,” says Ira Glovinsky, who co-leads Fielding’s Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program. “We’re seeing more disturbances at home and particularly in school settings and we really don’t know how to treat it. The main model continues to be psychopharmacological; we give medication.”

Dr. Glovinsky has spent years researching mood disorders in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

The research could prove useful to therapists in other ways, as well, offering anger-management tools and interventions for parents, teachers, and therapists. For example, the study’s data shows that kids with more best friends have more healthy expressions of anger, kids who play organized sports are less angry than those who don’t—and that yelling into a pillow isn’t as helpful in quelling rage as common lore would have us believe.

“If we don’t develop new treatments that work with these kids, we’ll continue to see this explosion of mood instability that can destroy marriages, families, and classrooms,” he says. “These kids become adults and if they don’t have the foundation for mood regulation, we’re in trouble.”

“It may in fact intensify the feeling,” says Dr. Greene. “You may need to do some problem solving.”

All his research is undertaken with the goal of decreasing the frequency, duration, and intensity of these mood symptoms. “We ask, what are the factors in the family unit that create psychopathology and wellness? Which interventions work with very young children and parents, and which just don’t work?” he says. “If you intervene early enough, the well

More than 20 Fielding students have contributed research practicum hours to the study, which currently includes data on nearly 200 subjects. Dr. Greene hopes there will be thousands one day and—if cool heads prevail—it’s likely there will be.

ˑ

periods may get longer and longer.” He knows from personal experience. Dr. Glovinsky started out as a substitute teacher in the New York City school system. When he was assigned to an especially chaotic classroom known for “out-of-control” kids, he discovered his calling. “I loved it,” he says. “There were no books, no chalk, no pictures on the wall. I had to figure out how to get to these kids, so I followed their lead, got into their world rather than expecting them to get into mine. We developed this wonderful relationship. We had a ball.” The following year, he went to the University of Michigan to get his PhD in special education and got an internship in a children’s psychiatric hospital teaching younger inpatients. He enjoyed that, too. “I love puzzles and I love challenges,” he says—but his greatest challenge was yet to come. Dr. Glovinsky earned his degree in special education, became licensed as a psychologist, ran the hospital’s early intervention program, and even worked as a psychologist on a neonatal intensive care team in another hospital. Then, not long after his own daughter was born in 1976, he began to notice peculiar behavior in her. She was eventually diagnosed with bipolar disorder. At the time, he says, “There were very few

people in the country who believed that young kids could be bipolar. I plopped myself in the medical library and read everything I could on bipolar and kids, and eventually published articles on the history of pediatric bipolar disorder.” His daughter is doing well now, and Glovinsky went on to write two books on bipolar patterns and mood swings in children with eminent child psychiatrist Stanley Greenspan. In addition to his private practice, he’s currently researching bipolar mothers and their infants, as well as gathering data on the difference between seeing preschool patients at home vs. in a clinical office setting. At Fielding, Dr. Glovinsky has worked with a student for a study on autistic kids, which was published by the Infant Mental Health Journal, and is collaborating with fellow IECD faculty Nina Newman on a book training teachers to work with kids with severe emotional disabilities. “What Fielding is helping us do is to spread these answers across the world,” he says. “I’ve done a training via Skype with a group of psychiatrists in Taiwan who had very little knowledge or experience about the disorder. I did another presentation in Chile.

“Fielding provides an environment with the virtual learning potential to touch people all over the world. That’s not grandiose; that’s happening.”

ˑ


14

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

Workers’ Rights

Questioning the ‘data-driven decision’

T

here was a time when we had to guess at a lot of things: Who’s buying what? Who’s traveling where? Which streets are busiest and at what times? They were educated guesses, but they were conjecture just the same.

Enter big data. The funneling of our lives into the digital realm has allowed us to collect vast swaths of data points that can be analyzed by computers to reveal patterns and trends—and even predict future behavior.

“Predictive analytics is another name for it,” says Regina Tuma, a doctoral faculty member in Fielding’s Media Psychology program. “For everything we do online, there’s a data point attached to it. They’re keeping track of everything. That’s the price we pay for going on the Internet.” The information is used for lots of different purposes. “In marketing, it’s being used to determine user tastes in order to niche market to the right consumer,” Dr. Tuma says. “We’re seeing it in the schools to gather data points on kids, from test scores to even what they eat and how that impacts learning. It’s used in law enforcement to look at neighborhoods and try to predict crime based on data points. It has emerged really as a way of making decisions.” It makes sense: Better to make decisions based on fact than on hunches … right? But as a social scientist, something about it troubled Dr. Tuma. “I was reading about how big data algorithms would determine your insurance rates and ability to qualify for mortgages, and I started thinking: How objective is this—and what are the tradeoffs? With politicians making decisions based on this, what does that do to democracy? And where is the discussion in all of this?” she says. “When we do research in psychology, we sample, we are objective, we describe how we select our sample, we detail our methods. None of this is revealed with big data because it’s all proprietary.”

15

Dr. Tuma has a PhD in psychology but has always been passionate about media and culture. She spent years “teaching in a media program and soft-pedalling the psychology, or teaching in a psych program and soft-pedalling the media,” she jokes. “I knew that Fielding, with its Media Psychology program, would make me whole.” She was teaching the Psychology of Social Media when the big data course was born. “We’re trying to layer the psychology into the big data movement,” she says. “We critique big data from a methodological perspective. For example, who has access to technology in society? Is the sample representative? Are we leaving out people of lower economic standing who are not using computers? Are we interpreting correlation as causation?

“What happens in a society that is under constant surveillance and how does that change our psychology? Do people react and try to subvert and outsmart the algorithm? That then begs a question about the truth value of big-data patterns.” Students who understand the psychology of interpretation involved in reading big data outputs, and who’ve researched the socio-cultural aspects of an algorithm—namely, who goes in and who gets left out—are likely to be in high demand in the tech workforce, from government to private companies, she says. “Our students really have an opportunity to go out there and make a difference,” Dr. Tuma says. “The goal is not to be anti-big data but to be able to interrogate it—and perhaps that’s where the knowledge really begins.”

ˑ

Shining the light on exploitation Collapsed Bangladesh garment factory complex known as Rana Plaza.

I

n 2013, visible cracks appeared in the walls of the Bangladesh garment factory complex known as Rana Plaza. But workers were ordered to return to their jobs anyway—and the next day, the eightstory building collapsed, killing 1,138 people inside.

“People were buried alive. Amputations were performed on the spot,” says Richard Appelbaum, who leads Fielding’s doctoral concentration in Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability. “Bangladesh is the most dangerous place to be a worker. In the decade before the Rana Plaza collapse, an estimated 1,000 people died in factory fires. And yet every major clothing company in the world was producing in Bangladesh despite these dangers.” For years, Dr. Appelbaum has been shedding light on the plight of overburdened workers. He chairs the advisory council of the Workers’ Rights Consortium and is editor of the new book Achieving Workers’ Rights in the Global Economy. His field research includes visiting factories in thirdworld countries. “The system is set up to make workers’ rights difficult, if not impossible, to attain,” he says.

What’s more, the data is collected on such a huge scale and taken from so many samples that it’s often assumed to be infallible. “My greatest concern about big data is it’s becoming a conversation stopper,” says Dr. Tuma, who jokes that nothing shuts up a room like the phrase “data-driven decision.” “But big data points are gathered to algorithms created by human beings, so our own biases come into the creation of these algorithms—and into how the data are interpreted, as well.”

Dr. Appelbaum has been with Fielding since shortly after the university was founded more than 40 years ago. Though he taught simultaneously at the University of California, Santa Barbara, cofounding its Global and International Studies Program, he says Fielding has always been a labor of love.

To research the issue further, Dr. Tuma recently created a new course at Fielding: The Psychology of Big Data. “It’s a broader critical reflection,” she says, “asking, What sort of knowledge do we really get from big data? And can we trust the pictures it creates about ourselves and our world?”

“I joke that it’s the best job because I get paid to learn from my students,” he says. “I’ve made lifelong friends of these students. They’re always interesting people who bring a huge amount of relevant experience.”

DR. REGINA TUMA

That application of education to the real world is what makes this university special in his eyes. Raised in Rochester, NY, Dr. Appelbaum attended Columbia University and earned a master’s in public affairs from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School, during which he spent the summer of 1965 in Guatemala. He studied the seasonal migration of Indians in San Ildefonso Ixtahuacán to the coast—under horrific conditions—where they worked on plantations owned by U.S. companies. Next, he spent a year and a half in Peru on a Ford Foundation program, advising the National Office of Planning and Urbanism on the problems facing the people in the highlands.

in China with 130,000 workers. He’s talked at great length with workers, factory owners, and brand representatives alike. “The world has moved from a situation in which much production was done within a country where national laws governed production systems and workers could go on strike to get a fair deal, to a global economy, wherein the brands don’t make anything; they outsource to independent factories and have no legal responsibility,” he says. “I got to see ‘corporate social responsibility’ in action.” This was part of the impetus for Fielding’s concentration in Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability.

“It was eye-opening,” he says. “I saw vastly “We have a lot of students interested in busiunequal social systems and began to reness—and who want businesses to be honest,” he says. When those students become PhDs alize the effect of economics and politics and go to work on the sustainability side of on everything. I also realized the folly of business, amazing things just might hapsending a 24-year old, fresh out of graduate pen. “Maybe they can begin to change the school, to a developing country to serve as some kind of expert.” He returned to the states, culture.” earning a PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago.

ˑ

But he came across horrific working conditions again 25 years later, when he and Edna Bonacich of UC Riverside spent 10 years studying the garment industry in Los Angeles, which was employing undocumented immigrants in sweatshop conditions. He organized the Los Angeles Jewish Commission on Sweatshops and volunteered in the Garment Worker Center teaching workers about their rights, before he and Dr. Bonacich wrote the book Behind the Label about the inequality they witnessed. “It woke me up to the exploitation,” he says. “I started studying global supply chains.” Dr. Appelbaum has visited factories run by Gap, Quicksilver, Nike and other industry leaders—as well as complexes

DR. RICHARD APPELBAUM


14

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

Workers’ Rights

Questioning the ‘data-driven decision’

T

here was a time when we had to guess at a lot of things: Who’s buying what? Who’s traveling where? Which streets are busiest and at what times? They were educated guesses, but they were conjecture just the same.

Enter big data. The funneling of our lives into the digital realm has allowed us to collect vast swaths of data points that can be analyzed by computers to reveal patterns and trends—and even predict future behavior.

“Predictive analytics is another name for it,” says Regina Tuma, a doctoral faculty member in Fielding’s Media Psychology program. “For everything we do online, there’s a data point attached to it. They’re keeping track of everything. That’s the price we pay for going on the Internet.” The information is used for lots of different purposes. “In marketing, it’s being used to determine user tastes in order to niche market to the right consumer,” Dr. Tuma says. “We’re seeing it in the schools to gather data points on kids, from test scores to even what they eat and how that impacts learning. It’s used in law enforcement to look at neighborhoods and try to predict crime based on data points. It has emerged really as a way of making decisions.” It makes sense: Better to make decisions based on fact than on hunches … right? But as a social scientist, something about it troubled Dr. Tuma. “I was reading about how big data algorithms would determine your insurance rates and ability to qualify for mortgages, and I started thinking: How objective is this—and what are the tradeoffs? With politicians making decisions based on this, what does that do to democracy? And where is the discussion in all of this?” she says. “When we do research in psychology, we sample, we are objective, we describe how we select our sample, we detail our methods. None of this is revealed with big data because it’s all proprietary.”

15

Dr. Tuma has a PhD in psychology but has always been passionate about media and culture. She spent years “teaching in a media program and soft-pedalling the psychology, or teaching in a psych program and soft-pedalling the media,” she jokes. “I knew that Fielding, with its Media Psychology program, would make me whole.” She was teaching the Psychology of Social Media when the big data course was born. “We’re trying to layer the psychology into the big data movement,” she says. “We critique big data from a methodological perspective. For example, who has access to technology in society? Is the sample representative? Are we leaving out people of lower economic standing who are not using computers? Are we interpreting correlation as causation?

“What happens in a society that is under constant surveillance and how does that change our psychology? Do people react and try to subvert and outsmart the algorithm? That then begs a question about the truth value of big-data patterns.” Students who understand the psychology of interpretation involved in reading big data outputs, and who’ve researched the socio-cultural aspects of an algorithm—namely, who goes in and who gets left out—are likely to be in high demand in the tech workforce, from government to private companies, she says. “Our students really have an opportunity to go out there and make a difference,” Dr. Tuma says. “The goal is not to be anti-big data but to be able to interrogate it—and perhaps that’s where the knowledge really begins.”

ˑ

Shining the light on exploitation Collapsed Bangladesh garment factory complex known as Rana Plaza.

I

n 2013, visible cracks appeared in the walls of the Bangladesh garment factory complex known as Rana Plaza. But workers were ordered to return to their jobs anyway—and the next day, the eightstory building collapsed, killing 1,138 people inside.

“People were buried alive. Amputations were performed on the spot,” says Richard Appelbaum, who leads Fielding’s doctoral concentration in Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability. “Bangladesh is the most dangerous place to be a worker. In the decade before the Rana Plaza collapse, an estimated 1,000 people died in factory fires. And yet every major clothing company in the world was producing in Bangladesh despite these dangers.” For years, Dr. Appelbaum has been shedding light on the plight of overburdened workers. He chairs the advisory council of the Workers’ Rights Consortium and is editor of the new book Achieving Workers’ Rights in the Global Economy. His field research includes visiting factories in thirdworld countries. “The system is set up to make workers’ rights difficult, if not impossible, to attain,” he says.

What’s more, the data is collected on such a huge scale and taken from so many samples that it’s often assumed to be infallible. “My greatest concern about big data is it’s becoming a conversation stopper,” says Dr. Tuma, who jokes that nothing shuts up a room like the phrase “data-driven decision.” “But big data points are gathered to algorithms created by human beings, so our own biases come into the creation of these algorithms—and into how the data are interpreted, as well.”

Dr. Appelbaum has been with Fielding since shortly after the university was founded more than 40 years ago. Though he taught simultaneously at the University of California, Santa Barbara, cofounding its Global and International Studies Program, he says Fielding has always been a labor of love.

To research the issue further, Dr. Tuma recently created a new course at Fielding: The Psychology of Big Data. “It’s a broader critical reflection,” she says, “asking, What sort of knowledge do we really get from big data? And can we trust the pictures it creates about ourselves and our world?”

“I joke that it’s the best job because I get paid to learn from my students,” he says. “I’ve made lifelong friends of these students. They’re always interesting people who bring a huge amount of relevant experience.”

DR. REGINA TUMA

That application of education to the real world is what makes this university special in his eyes. Raised in Rochester, NY, Dr. Appelbaum attended Columbia University and earned a master’s in public affairs from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School, during which he spent the summer of 1965 in Guatemala. He studied the seasonal migration of Indians in San Ildefonso Ixtahuacán to the coast—under horrific conditions—where they worked on plantations owned by U.S. companies. Next, he spent a year and a half in Peru on a Ford Foundation program, advising the National Office of Planning and Urbanism on the problems facing the people in the highlands.

in China with 130,000 workers. He’s talked at great length with workers, factory owners, and brand representatives alike. “The world has moved from a situation in which much production was done within a country where national laws governed production systems and workers could go on strike to get a fair deal, to a global economy, wherein the brands don’t make anything; they outsource to independent factories and have no legal responsibility,” he says. “I got to see ‘corporate social responsibility’ in action.” This was part of the impetus for Fielding’s concentration in Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability.

“It was eye-opening,” he says. “I saw vastly “We have a lot of students interested in busiunequal social systems and began to reness—and who want businesses to be honest,” he says. When those students become PhDs alize the effect of economics and politics and go to work on the sustainability side of on everything. I also realized the folly of business, amazing things just might hapsending a 24-year old, fresh out of graduate pen. “Maybe they can begin to change the school, to a developing country to serve as some kind of expert.” He returned to the states, culture.” earning a PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago.

ˑ

But he came across horrific working conditions again 25 years later, when he and Edna Bonacich of UC Riverside spent 10 years studying the garment industry in Los Angeles, which was employing undocumented immigrants in sweatshop conditions. He organized the Los Angeles Jewish Commission on Sweatshops and volunteered in the Garment Worker Center teaching workers about their rights, before he and Dr. Bonacich wrote the book Behind the Label about the inequality they witnessed. “It woke me up to the exploitation,” he says. “I started studying global supply chains.” Dr. Appelbaum has visited factories run by Gap, Quicksilver, Nike and other industry leaders—as well as complexes

DR. RICHARD APPELBAUM


16

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

17

Women’s Leadership

Developing skills in diverse communities

I

t was March and two dozen women were gathered in the East Mountains of Albuquerque . They were in their 20s and 70s and all ages between. They were Native American, White, Latina. They talked about how sexism and racism had influenced who they are, and how they’d overcome both.

Neuropsychology Understanding how we think

I

t all started with monkeys.

Henry Soper was a Yale graduate just back from the Army—including a tour of duty in Vietnam—when he walked into the University of Connecticut’s primate lab as a research assistant. It was 1969 (two of the monkeys were named Simon and Garfunkel) and the rugby-playing Soper turned out to be an excellent monkey wrangler.

“I’ve always had a way with animals. I think they know I like them better than humans,” he jokes. While earning his masters in experimental psychology, Dr. Soper studied brain-behavior interaction and speech pathways in the monkeys. It’s the untapped potential of psychology and neurobiology that drew him to the field. He later earned his doctorate in physiological/comparative psychology from UConn.

keeping their minds occupied all day long (they can!). Another of his students is now doing research on veterans with traumatic brain injury at UCLA, and Dr. Soper is editing a book by another student on how racial prejudice develops. Dr. Soper is a licensed psychotherapist who sees patients in the clinical realm, as well. But whether he’s helping a family understand their child’s attention-deficit disorder or contributing research to the greater fount of scientific knowledge, his goal is the same. “Hopefully, the knowledge we gain will be put to use for understanding,” he says. “In the end, what I want to be known for is having provided a chunk of information that will help people with their problems.”

ˑ

It was the first-ever action project designed and delivered by Fielding’s Women’s Research Team, organized by Gallegos, PhD. The idea behind the event was for women on Fielding’s faculty, as well as women students and alumni, to work with other women to develop intercultural and intergenerational leadership. “As a country, we think we’ve already solved the gender problem,” says Dr. Gallegos. “But women’s ways of leading have been under leveraged, under-utilized. Yes, we’ve learned how to play the game—but we’ve played it so well, we don’t even remember how to lead otherwise. “I think the world desperately needs what women could offer if we could lead by our own ways of leading.”

“There was still so little known about it,” he says, “simple questions that needed to be addressed: How do people think? What does thinking mean? How is it that we do things so much differently than even our close relatives, the bonobo chimpanzees — and that our frontal lobes can do so much more than any other animals? It was so much fun to ask a question and get the answer.”

A faculty member in the School of Leadership Studies, Dr. Gallegos has devoted her career to facilitating workplace diversity, transformative learning, and social justice.

This year marks Dr. Soper’s 30th year on faculty at Fielding, where he developed the Clinical Psychology program’s Neuropsychology concentration and helps students with their brain-related research projects.

“I’ve done a lot of work in social identity about how people think about their group membership from race to gender to class,” she says. “My research over the last 30 years has been around people of color in the workplace, including Latina leaders developing their journey.”

“I’m still doing the same thing—but humans cost less than monkeys, and you don’t have to feed them,” he says with a wink. “I am a scientist, and I like doing research. Every time I answer a question, there are two or three more that come up. It’s getting to the nuts and bolts of what makes us who we are, and why do we have the troubles that we have?”

She’s been at Fielding for 12 years, and during that time, she met a lot of faculty members who were working within their communities to spur positive change. But she wondered how much more they could accomplish if they joined forces to make an impact collectively.

His recent studies have looked in depth at autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dementia, and traumatic brain injury.

“What I’m hoping to do is paint a better picture of the brain,” says Dr. Soper from an office packed with towers of books and decorated with scale models of dinosaur skeletons—and a Neanderthal skull. Under his mentorship, one student studied a group of prisoners over the age of 60 to see if they could stave off intellectual decline by

“People were crying,” says Placida Gallegos. “Some said it changed their lives, telling their stories to each other about the things they’d been through.”

DR. HENRY SOPER

resources?” she says. “Given the diverse backgrounds and talents of Fielding graduates and students, it seemed important to find ways to join women in various communities and provide access to what Fielding women have to offer.” So she developed the Social Transformation Project and secured funding for three projects: One was Crossing Bridges, a mentoring and storytelling project spanning generations in East Long Angeles, led by doctoral faculty member Connie Corley, PhD. Another was Redefining Masculinity, an exploration of gender-based practices that produce imbalances of power and privilege throughout society, led by doctoral student Akasha.

“Women’s ways of leading have been under-leveraged, under-utilized.”

Dr. Gallegos, who hosted the first one in her hometown of New Mexico. Twenty women community leaders got online coaching before the full day of face-toface sessions. More virtual coaching followed. “We start with the needs of the women, by asking what THEY need, so they contribute to designing the sessions,” Dr. Gallegos says—but the invited leaders weren’t the only ones who benefitted. “It affected the Fielding women almost as much or more as the participants.” Since then, three women who live in various regions across the country have expressed interest in hosting another session. They hope to eventually offer it to incarcerated women, veterans, and all kinds of groups of all ages. “Placida Gallegos is the embodiment of brilliance, fearlessness, and heart,” says student Akasha. “As in similar chaotic times throughout human history, I think that people like Placida are key to helping return some order by making things happen in the world.”

ˑ

“The Social Transformation Project was born out of Fielding’s commitment to engage with local communities,” Akasha says. “The purpose is to create knowledge and best practices that enable all of us—staff, faculty, students, alums, and other stakeholders—to serve our global community in ways that lead to the greatest good for the most people.” To that end, Dr. Gallegos and 40 women at Fielding joined forces to answer the question, “What is women’s leadership and how do we better support that?” They organized into a coaching team, design team, research team, and finance team to produce “Leading as Women Because Our Lives & Communities Depend on Us,” a leadership development program for underserved communities.

“The idea was that we could humbly contribute to diverse communities of women, “I thought, what if Fielding showed up in com- partner with them and collaborate to identify munities as an institution and provided our and further develop their leadership,” says

DR. PLACIDA GALLEGOS


16

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

17

Women’s Leadership

Developing skills in diverse communities

I

t was March and two dozen women were gathered in the East Mountains of Albuquerque . They were in their 20s and 70s and all ages between. They were Native American, White, Latina. They talked about how sexism and racism had influenced who they are, and how they’d overcome both.

Neuropsychology Understanding how we think

I

t all started with monkeys.

Henry Soper was a Yale graduate just back from the Army—including a tour of duty in Vietnam—when he walked into the University of Connecticut’s primate lab as a research assistant. It was 1969 (two of the monkeys were named Simon and Garfunkel) and the rugby-playing Soper turned out to be an excellent monkey wrangler.

“I’ve always had a way with animals. I think they know I like them better than humans,” he jokes. While earning his masters in experimental psychology, Dr. Soper studied brain-behavior interaction and speech pathways in the monkeys. It’s the untapped potential of psychology and neurobiology that drew him to the field. He later earned his doctorate in physiological/comparative psychology from UConn.

keeping their minds occupied all day long (they can!). Another of his students is now doing research on veterans with traumatic brain injury at UCLA, and Dr. Soper is editing a book by another student on how racial prejudice develops. Dr. Soper is a licensed psychotherapist who sees patients in the clinical realm, as well. But whether he’s helping a family understand their child’s attention-deficit disorder or contributing research to the greater fount of scientific knowledge, his goal is the same. “Hopefully, the knowledge we gain will be put to use for understanding,” he says. “In the end, what I want to be known for is having provided a chunk of information that will help people with their problems.”

ˑ

It was the first-ever action project designed and delivered by Fielding’s Women’s Research Team, organized by Gallegos, PhD. The idea behind the event was for women on Fielding’s faculty, as well as women students and alumni, to work with other women to develop intercultural and intergenerational leadership. “As a country, we think we’ve already solved the gender problem,” says Dr. Gallegos. “But women’s ways of leading have been under leveraged, under-utilized. Yes, we’ve learned how to play the game—but we’ve played it so well, we don’t even remember how to lead otherwise. “I think the world desperately needs what women could offer if we could lead by our own ways of leading.”

“There was still so little known about it,” he says, “simple questions that needed to be addressed: How do people think? What does thinking mean? How is it that we do things so much differently than even our close relatives, the bonobo chimpanzees — and that our frontal lobes can do so much more than any other animals? It was so much fun to ask a question and get the answer.”

A faculty member in the School of Leadership Studies, Dr. Gallegos has devoted her career to facilitating workplace diversity, transformative learning, and social justice.

This year marks Dr. Soper’s 30th year on faculty at Fielding, where he developed the Clinical Psychology program’s Neuropsychology concentration and helps students with their brain-related research projects.

“I’ve done a lot of work in social identity about how people think about their group membership from race to gender to class,” she says. “My research over the last 30 years has been around people of color in the workplace, including Latina leaders developing their journey.”

“I’m still doing the same thing—but humans cost less than monkeys, and you don’t have to feed them,” he says with a wink. “I am a scientist, and I like doing research. Every time I answer a question, there are two or three more that come up. It’s getting to the nuts and bolts of what makes us who we are, and why do we have the troubles that we have?”

She’s been at Fielding for 12 years, and during that time, she met a lot of faculty members who were working within their communities to spur positive change. But she wondered how much more they could accomplish if they joined forces to make an impact collectively.

His recent studies have looked in depth at autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dementia, and traumatic brain injury.

“What I’m hoping to do is paint a better picture of the brain,” says Dr. Soper from an office packed with towers of books and decorated with scale models of dinosaur skeletons—and a Neanderthal skull. Under his mentorship, one student studied a group of prisoners over the age of 60 to see if they could stave off intellectual decline by

“People were crying,” says Placida Gallegos. “Some said it changed their lives, telling their stories to each other about the things they’d been through.”

DR. HENRY SOPER

resources?” she says. “Given the diverse backgrounds and talents of Fielding graduates and students, it seemed important to find ways to join women in various communities and provide access to what Fielding women have to offer.” So she developed the Social Transformation Project and secured funding for three projects: One was Crossing Bridges, a mentoring and storytelling project spanning generations in East Long Angeles, led by doctoral faculty member Connie Corley, PhD. Another was Redefining Masculinity, an exploration of gender-based practices that produce imbalances of power and privilege throughout society, led by doctoral student Akasha.

“Women’s ways of leading have been under-leveraged, under-utilized.”

Dr. Gallegos, who hosted the first one in her hometown of New Mexico. Twenty women community leaders got online coaching before the full day of face-toface sessions. More virtual coaching followed. “We start with the needs of the women, by asking what THEY need, so they contribute to designing the sessions,” Dr. Gallegos says—but the invited leaders weren’t the only ones who benefitted. “It affected the Fielding women almost as much or more as the participants.” Since then, three women who live in various regions across the country have expressed interest in hosting another session. They hope to eventually offer it to incarcerated women, veterans, and all kinds of groups of all ages. “Placida Gallegos is the embodiment of brilliance, fearlessness, and heart,” says student Akasha. “As in similar chaotic times throughout human history, I think that people like Placida are key to helping return some order by making things happen in the world.”

ˑ

“The Social Transformation Project was born out of Fielding’s commitment to engage with local communities,” Akasha says. “The purpose is to create knowledge and best practices that enable all of us—staff, faculty, students, alums, and other stakeholders—to serve our global community in ways that lead to the greatest good for the most people.” To that end, Dr. Gallegos and 40 women at Fielding joined forces to answer the question, “What is women’s leadership and how do we better support that?” They organized into a coaching team, design team, research team, and finance team to produce “Leading as Women Because Our Lives & Communities Depend on Us,” a leadership development program for underserved communities.

“The idea was that we could humbly contribute to diverse communities of women, “I thought, what if Fielding showed up in com- partner with them and collaborate to identify munities as an institution and provided our and further develop their leadership,” says

DR. PLACIDA GALLEGOS


18

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

theoretical explanation of what happens psychologically when we connect to story. The next stage in this work is an in-progress book called Finding Truth in Fiction, under contract with Oxford University Press and co-authored by Fielding Media Psychology alum Cynthia Vinney, PhD.

One of the projects she’s most excited about is a journal article she researched and wrote with then-student Vinney. Available online (and soon in print) in the journal Psychology of Popular Media Culture, it’s about “Mad Men” fan fiction—original stories written by fans of the show and based on its characters.

“People will talk about television shows as if they don’t matter, but we act as if they’re our favorite thing in the world,” says Dr. Dill-Shackleford. “So I’m trying to reconcile that and explain the value in it so that people can think of fandom and viewership less as shaming identities.”

Dr. Dill-Shackleford and Dr. Vinney took 340 “Mad Men” stories from two online fan-fiction archives, whittled those down to a manageable sample of 52, and then analyzed the content of each, looking for themes.

In fact, watching stories sparks important, significant psychological work, she says: “People learn and make meaning from dramas. There is a process we call ‘dual empathy’ in which people simultaneously take a journey with a character to a certain time and place, while also using those simulated experiences to interrogate their autobiographical memories and clarify personal values and meanings.”

How Stories Shape Our Reality

AMC Photo

Trying on characters to clarify values

S

ome kids play with dolls. Some kids play sports. Karen Dill-Shackleford, however, had a rather unusual hobby.

“As a child, I watched television shows and tried to understand what message I was supposed to be learning from them,” she says. She was particularly curious about gender roles and what kinds of relationships were considered “good.”

Not surprisingly, Dill-Shackleford grew up to be faculty in Fielding’s Media Psychology program and has done several recent research projects around the wildly popular “Mad Men” television series. “What I really want to know is how we make sense of our reality through story,” she says,

“how we understand our own lives through television shows and film.” She earned her PhD in social psychology from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and wrote her dissertation on the psychological effects of video game violence. After she testified on the subject before Congress for the American Psychological Association, the makers of the popular, violent video game series Grand Theft Auto named one of the game’s cars after her: The Karin Dilletante. She testified before Congress again in 2007 about misogyny in rap music lyrics. Dr. Dill-Shackleford‘s research and writing focus on explaining what we gain from our connections to story worlds. She says these connections simultaneously take us to new places

and help us revisit elements of our own lives that are important to us. Lately, for example, some of her work has focused on how fans find meaning in “Mad Men,” the Emmy-winning AMC television series set in a 1960s Madison Avenue ad agency. This line of research all began with a project with a number of Fielding collaborators. The research team began by asking what we learn about parenting from TV parents like Don and Betty Draper from “Mad Men.” This research ultimately evolved into a book, Mad Men Unzipped: Fans on Sex, Love & the Sixties on TV, which she co-authored with others in Fielding’s Media Psychology program. Later came the article “Connecting the Dots Between Fantasy and Reality,” an in-depth

19

broad range of emotions. “They were more thought-provoking than fun, and mostly from the perspective of a female character,” Dr. Dill-Shackleford says. “Sometimes they took something that happened in the show and resolved it in a different way from what happened in the show. We called those wish fulfillments.”

And playing out our fantasies through fictional characters isn’t a frivolous pastime, she says: “We think we’re all just killing time on the sofa, but for each person who connects to “We got to see what facets of relationships peoa story, it’s about trying on other realities ple wanted those characters to explore: identity, and thinking about how other people perceive sexuality, social meaning,” Dr. Dill-Shackleford relationships. It’s also about asking yourself says. “Are they reflecting on a certain character what matters and why. You feel through other or pair of characters? Is it moving, pleasurable, characters and sort out your own feelings from humorous? What emotions are the characa safe distance. ters experiencing? Dr. Vinney and I worked together to make sure we were coding in the “Viewers understand that it’s fiction—but same way.” they also understand that we use stories to say, ‘What if …?’ It’s imagination, and we learn What they found was that fans were writing through imagining.” stories full of complex content that evoked a

ˑ

“What I really want to know is how we make sense of our reality through story, how we understand our own lives through television shows and film.”

DR. KAREN DILL-SHACKLEFORD


18

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

theoretical explanation of what happens psychologically when we connect to story. The next stage in this work is an in-progress book called Finding Truth in Fiction, under contract with Oxford University Press and co-authored by Fielding Media Psychology alum Cynthia Vinney, PhD.

One of the projects she’s most excited about is a journal article she researched and wrote with then-student Vinney. Available online (and soon in print) in the journal Psychology of Popular Media Culture, it’s about “Mad Men” fan fiction—original stories written by fans of the show and based on its characters.

“People will talk about television shows as if they don’t matter, but we act as if they’re our favorite thing in the world,” says Dr. Dill-Shackleford. “So I’m trying to reconcile that and explain the value in it so that people can think of fandom and viewership less as shaming identities.”

Dr. Dill-Shackleford and Dr. Vinney took 340 “Mad Men” stories from two online fan-fiction archives, whittled those down to a manageable sample of 52, and then analyzed the content of each, looking for themes.

In fact, watching stories sparks important, significant psychological work, she says: “People learn and make meaning from dramas. There is a process we call ‘dual empathy’ in which people simultaneously take a journey with a character to a certain time and place, while also using those simulated experiences to interrogate their autobiographical memories and clarify personal values and meanings.”

How Stories Shape Our Reality

AMC Photo

Trying on characters to clarify values

S

ome kids play with dolls. Some kids play sports. Karen Dill-Shackleford, however, had a rather unusual hobby.

“As a child, I watched television shows and tried to understand what message I was supposed to be learning from them,” she says. She was particularly curious about gender roles and what kinds of relationships were considered “good.”

Not surprisingly, Dill-Shackleford grew up to be faculty in Fielding’s Media Psychology program and has done several recent research projects around the wildly popular “Mad Men” television series. “What I really want to know is how we make sense of our reality through story,” she says,

“how we understand our own lives through television shows and film.” She earned her PhD in social psychology from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and wrote her dissertation on the psychological effects of video game violence. After she testified on the subject before Congress for the American Psychological Association, the makers of the popular, violent video game series Grand Theft Auto named one of the game’s cars after her: The Karin Dilletante. She testified before Congress again in 2007 about misogyny in rap music lyrics. Dr. Dill-Shackleford‘s research and writing focus on explaining what we gain from our connections to story worlds. She says these connections simultaneously take us to new places

and help us revisit elements of our own lives that are important to us. Lately, for example, some of her work has focused on how fans find meaning in “Mad Men,” the Emmy-winning AMC television series set in a 1960s Madison Avenue ad agency. This line of research all began with a project with a number of Fielding collaborators. The research team began by asking what we learn about parenting from TV parents like Don and Betty Draper from “Mad Men.” This research ultimately evolved into a book, Mad Men Unzipped: Fans on Sex, Love & the Sixties on TV, which she co-authored with others in Fielding’s Media Psychology program. Later came the article “Connecting the Dots Between Fantasy and Reality,” an in-depth

19

broad range of emotions. “They were more thought-provoking than fun, and mostly from the perspective of a female character,” Dr. Dill-Shackleford says. “Sometimes they took something that happened in the show and resolved it in a different way from what happened in the show. We called those wish fulfillments.”

And playing out our fantasies through fictional characters isn’t a frivolous pastime, she says: “We think we’re all just killing time on the sofa, but for each person who connects to “We got to see what facets of relationships peoa story, it’s about trying on other realities ple wanted those characters to explore: identity, and thinking about how other people perceive sexuality, social meaning,” Dr. Dill-Shackleford relationships. It’s also about asking yourself says. “Are they reflecting on a certain character what matters and why. You feel through other or pair of characters? Is it moving, pleasurable, characters and sort out your own feelings from humorous? What emotions are the characa safe distance. ters experiencing? Dr. Vinney and I worked together to make sure we were coding in the “Viewers understand that it’s fiction—but same way.” they also understand that we use stories to say, ‘What if …?’ It’s imagination, and we learn What they found was that fans were writing through imagining.” stories full of complex content that evoked a

ˑ

“What I really want to know is how we make sense of our reality through story, how we understand our own lives through television shows and film.”

DR. KAREN DILL-SHACKLEFORD


20

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

Protecting Marine Life Creating a No Take Zone in the Pacific

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

percent of our oceans have no-take zones. It’s hard to convince fishermen not to fish! “They all say, ‘We know it’s a problem, but even if we agreed, our competitors would sneak in and they would be reaping the benefits while we’d be hurt,’” Four Arrows says. It took several years of working with community groups, marine biologists, and the government, but he finally got the 300 citizens of Arroyo Seco to agree to the terms. He launched a successful Kickstarter campaign and raised the nearly $29,000 required for the area study and official report. Red tape has stalled the project at various points, but Four Arrows thinks it may become the first no-take zone that is actually sponsored and maintained by the 14 fishing cooperatives along the coast, rather than by the government.

O

ne of the things that sets Fielding apart from other graduate schools is its roots in the real world. Our faculty isn’t made up of ivory-tower academics, but rather boots-onthe-ground scholar-practitioners who apply their knowledge to improving their communities—and helping their students do the same.

Malia J. Monaco

Eric J. Lane

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

Jeanne Marie Mudd

Vanetta R. Larosa

Janet L. Ottersberg

Victoria L. Londin

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP

Vincent J. Schera

Betsy E. Nacim

Jessica Sion

Karla M. Narvaez

What makes him so passionate about this issue? It’s his indigenous heritage, he says, and its emphasis on the Seventh Generation and respect for all of life, human and non-human.    

Scott E. Brolin

Shirley Suhenda

Mohammad R. Nikkhou

Sheron Y. Chirwa

Bradley K. Ward

Karen Pujals

A former Marine Corps officer and co-founder of Veterans for Peace in Northern Arizona, Four Arrows inspires his Fielding students to put their leadership skills to work in ways that matter.

Philippe R. Desrochers

CERTIFICATE IN EVIDENCE BASED COACHING FOR ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Linda D. Kelican

Anthony J. Bishop

Kathleen M. Kueht

Natalie J. Bloodworth

Elizabeth K. Olson

Holly N. Collins

Gretchen L. Neve

Christa L. Drakulic

“In the Marine Corps, when you send your troops in to do something, you don’t just stand back and send them,” he says. “You lead them. If I’m going to push students into areas where they’re passionate and not do it myself, then I’m not following that example. “At Fielding, we really are creating change agents who will get out there and change the world—and this requires that we walk the talk ourselves.”

ˑ

A case in point is Four Arrows, aka Don Jacobs, PhD, EdD. Doctoral faculty in the School of Leadership Studies, Four Arrows practices action research with social and ecological justice in mind.

Louise Jasmin Amanda J. Mathieson Monica R. McClintock Ritesh Nambiar Donna M. Winfrey CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING

“Action research is identifying a problem, coming up with a solution, implementing the solution, and evaluating the solution,” he says. “It’s usually about helping improve something within a community, and often involves community participants.”

Jennifer L. Adams Olutosin Burrell

Such a process describes Four Arrows’ recent work at Standing Rock, where he spent weeks taking part in the protest against the laying of an oil pipeline through sacred Indian territory and under the Missouri River. It also describes a project he’s been leading for several years in Central Mexico: to help a small fishing village create the first No Take Zone on the Pacific Ocean.

FOUR ARROWS

James R. Gilooly SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

Joshua Green Andrea R. Holzner

Margaret M. Crawford

MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Cindy Crosby

Emily A. Curtin

Christina K. Fox

Jessica L. Glace

Christy A. Gilmore

Jacqueline E. Green

Christina C. Hartigan

“The problem is that our oceans are dying,” he says, citing studies that show sustainable fisheries will be depleted by 2048. “I see people going out on their boats further and further to get smaller and smaller fish. And most people in the world don’t know about this situation.” For three years he has been working with the fishing cooperatives up and down the Costalegre along the Pacific Ocean, to convince them to establish and abide a no-take zone—an area where no one’s allowed to fish. Other marine parks have shown that within three to nine years of no fishing, marine life returns in abundance. A classic example is on the Sea of Cortez at Cabo Pulmo—but currently, less than half of one

Master’s & Certificates Graduates May 1–Nov. 16, 2016 SCHOOL OF

“The goal isn’t just to solve the problem,” he says, “but to provide a template for others to use, and do the same.”

21

Christopher Hicks

CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Lindsey A. Howey

Garry J. Allen

Jill E. James

Marieanne Cott Pollock

Louise A. Korver

Stephanie L. Glanville

Shannon Mead

Jane C. Klein

Melissa D. Johnson James D. McMichael Eyenita G. Moore Joy Quiles Hazel C. Richards Kesha M. Sancho


20

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

Protecting Marine Life Creating a No Take Zone in the Pacific

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

percent of our oceans have no-take zones. It’s hard to convince fishermen not to fish! “They all say, ‘We know it’s a problem, but even if we agreed, our competitors would sneak in and they would be reaping the benefits while we’d be hurt,’” Four Arrows says. It took several years of working with community groups, marine biologists, and the government, but he finally got the 300 citizens of Arroyo Seco to agree to the terms. He launched a successful Kickstarter campaign and raised the nearly $29,000 required for the area study and official report. Red tape has stalled the project at various points, but Four Arrows thinks it may become the first no-take zone that is actually sponsored and maintained by the 14 fishing cooperatives along the coast, rather than by the government.

O

ne of the things that sets Fielding apart from other graduate schools is its roots in the real world. Our faculty isn’t made up of ivory-tower academics, but rather boots-onthe-ground scholar-practitioners who apply their knowledge to improving their communities—and helping their students do the same.

Malia J. Monaco

Eric J. Lane

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

Jeanne Marie Mudd

Vanetta R. Larosa

Janet L. Ottersberg

Victoria L. Londin

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP

Vincent J. Schera

Betsy E. Nacim

Jessica Sion

Karla M. Narvaez

What makes him so passionate about this issue? It’s his indigenous heritage, he says, and its emphasis on the Seventh Generation and respect for all of life, human and non-human.    

Scott E. Brolin

Shirley Suhenda

Mohammad R. Nikkhou

Sheron Y. Chirwa

Bradley K. Ward

Karen Pujals

A former Marine Corps officer and co-founder of Veterans for Peace in Northern Arizona, Four Arrows inspires his Fielding students to put their leadership skills to work in ways that matter.

Philippe R. Desrochers

CERTIFICATE IN EVIDENCE BASED COACHING FOR ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Linda D. Kelican

Anthony J. Bishop

Kathleen M. Kueht

Natalie J. Bloodworth

Elizabeth K. Olson

Holly N. Collins

Gretchen L. Neve

Christa L. Drakulic

“In the Marine Corps, when you send your troops in to do something, you don’t just stand back and send them,” he says. “You lead them. If I’m going to push students into areas where they’re passionate and not do it myself, then I’m not following that example. “At Fielding, we really are creating change agents who will get out there and change the world—and this requires that we walk the talk ourselves.”

ˑ

A case in point is Four Arrows, aka Don Jacobs, PhD, EdD. Doctoral faculty in the School of Leadership Studies, Four Arrows practices action research with social and ecological justice in mind.

Louise Jasmin Amanda J. Mathieson Monica R. McClintock Ritesh Nambiar Donna M. Winfrey CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING

“Action research is identifying a problem, coming up with a solution, implementing the solution, and evaluating the solution,” he says. “It’s usually about helping improve something within a community, and often involves community participants.”

Jennifer L. Adams Olutosin Burrell

Such a process describes Four Arrows’ recent work at Standing Rock, where he spent weeks taking part in the protest against the laying of an oil pipeline through sacred Indian territory and under the Missouri River. It also describes a project he’s been leading for several years in Central Mexico: to help a small fishing village create the first No Take Zone on the Pacific Ocean.

FOUR ARROWS

James R. Gilooly SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

Joshua Green Andrea R. Holzner

Margaret M. Crawford

MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Cindy Crosby

Emily A. Curtin

Christina K. Fox

Jessica L. Glace

Christy A. Gilmore

Jacqueline E. Green

Christina C. Hartigan

“The problem is that our oceans are dying,” he says, citing studies that show sustainable fisheries will be depleted by 2048. “I see people going out on their boats further and further to get smaller and smaller fish. And most people in the world don’t know about this situation.” For three years he has been working with the fishing cooperatives up and down the Costalegre along the Pacific Ocean, to convince them to establish and abide a no-take zone—an area where no one’s allowed to fish. Other marine parks have shown that within three to nine years of no fishing, marine life returns in abundance. A classic example is on the Sea of Cortez at Cabo Pulmo—but currently, less than half of one

Master’s & Certificates Graduates May 1–Nov. 16, 2016 SCHOOL OF

“The goal isn’t just to solve the problem,” he says, “but to provide a template for others to use, and do the same.”

21

Christopher Hicks

CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Lindsey A. Howey

Garry J. Allen

Jill E. James

Marieanne Cott Pollock

Louise A. Korver

Stephanie L. Glanville

Shannon Mead

Jane C. Klein

Melissa D. Johnson James D. McMichael Eyenita G. Moore Joy Quiles Hazel C. Richards Kesha M. Sancho


22

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

Doctoral Graduates SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Karen S. Barker, EdD The Evaluation

of the Gateway Paramedic Technician Program: An Action Research Project

Berlinda R. Begay, EdD Infusing

Navajo Creation Stories and Navajo Philsophy to Awaken and Nourish the Spirit of our Language Within Language Instruction and Curriculum Development

Carol A. Brown, EdD Implementation of the California Foster Youth Success Initiative at One California Campus: Perceptions of Students and Staff

Tasha N. Ellis, EdD The Impact of

the Georgia Antibullying Law on Urban Elementary School Settings

Mikaele Etuale, EdD General Attitudes

and Perceptions of Faculty Who Use Service Learning at the American Samoa Community College

Pandora Christina Mike, EdD Navajo Teachers Weaving Navajo Culture into Their Teaching: An Appreciative Inquiry Case Study

Laura M. Galloway, PhD Expanding Spaces For Transformation: Supporting Social Justice in a Distributed Learning Enviornment

B. Estella Patel, EdD Indelible Identity:

Craig P. Horangic,PhD

Examining Experiences and Perspectives of Secondary “Long-Term English Learner” Students Achieving Reclassification Status in High School

Jessica L. Robles, EdD Forming

Effective Partnerships as Part of Collective Impact: A Case Study

Louis E. Rumpf, EdD The Synthesis of Social Reality and the Evolution of Barrio Logan: A Critical View of the Framing and Representations of Urban Redevelopment Vincent H. Whipple, Jr., EdD Native

American College Student Perceptions of Cultural Affiliation and Tribal Traditions: A Mixed Methods Study

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE

Samah A. Alzubi, PhD Social

Making Meaning of Sensemaking: A Phenomenographic Study of Collective Sensemaking

Rene M. Lebsock, EdD The Art of

Teaching Reading: A Study of Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Teacher Education Reading Course

Edward S. Miguel, EdD The Dynamics

and Ramifications of Severe Challenging Behaviors: Daring to Reduce Challenging Behavior in Schools Without Physical Restraint and Seclusion

Inbal Demri, PhD Gender, Identity, and Entrepreneurship: A Qualitative Study of Entrepreneurial Women in Silicon Valley Robin A. Frkal, PhD Creating Dialogic

Conditions for Transformative Learning in an Adult Women’s Leadership Program: A Communication Perspective

Cynthia P. Puccio, PhD “YOU’RE

Deborah Maria Ward, PhD Happiness

School Parents’ Views on Using Video Games in Education

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

E. Christopher Mare, PhD

Designing for Consciousness: Towards a Theory of Environmental Design Using Neurophenomenology as Methodology

Yo Moreno, PhD Trainers in the

Multigenerational Workplace Classroom: Assessing the Field and Advancing the Work

Theresa C. Tavarez, PhD Interrupted

for Elementary Teachers on the Dine Nation to Grow Professionally

Christine M. Russell, PhD Middle

Michael S. Lewis, PhD Responding to Radical Industry Change: A Study of the Demise of Digital Equipment Corporation

Susan J. Auger, PhD Making the Best of

Leaders Construct Power: Exploring a New Leadership Discourse

Dana Johnson, PhD Understanding Parent Experiences When Working With and Within an Autism Treatment Team: An Interpretive Phenomenological Inquiry

Interoceptive Awareness Is Positively Related to Emotion Regulation

Geraldine Gaffney, EdD The Paperless

Valerie J. Davis, PhD How Collaborative

of Music in Transportation and Character Identification in Fictional Film Narratives

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Joseph W. Kurtis, PhD Conditions That Lead to Transformative Learning and Development in Adults

Keren Stashower, PhD Convening Holding Environments That Enable Collective Learning in Organizations

Dave M. Goldtooth, EdD Opportunities

Nicole D. Phinney, PhD The Influence

Deborah Sussman, PhD The Lived Experience of the Parent During the Morning Routine

Adaptation: A Study of OD Practitioners Implementing Appreciative Inquiry in ForProfit Organizations

Constructions of Childhood Deviance by United States Educators and Jordanian Educators It: A Grounded Theory

INFANT AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

and Life Satisfaction Predicted by Social Media Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Perphelia Fowler, EdD Navajo Female Leaders: Weaving Together Their Experiences, Culture, and Community Prison: Innovative and Pragmatic Responses of Reentrant Women Citizens

May 1–Nov. 16, 2016

MAKING ME LAUGH”: The Emergence of Humor in Playful Interactions with Young Children on the Autism Spectrum

Sandhya Johnson, PhD Innovation

Work Lives: Imposed Retirement Transitions on Men and Women Professionals in the Corporate Sector

Jennifer Rene Abbott, PhD

Lindsay E. Mullan, PhD The Role of Parental Diabetes-Specific Self-Efficacy on Mealtime Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Sean M. Pritchard, PhD Mindfulness

and Beyond: A Qualitative Study of Advanced Mahasi Meditators’ Experience

Whillma Quenicka, PhD Substance of

Choice and PTSD Symptom Cluster among Women with Different Types of Childhood Abuse

Blerim Rexhaj, PhD A Narrative Study of Relational Dimensions of Men With Alcohol-Related Problems and Their Relationship With Alcohol

Dustin B. Bridges, PhD Relationship

MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Between Spiritual Transformation and Altruism: A Relational Spirituality Model

Sarah A. Sharp, PhD Perceived Personal Control in Youth Soccer Coaches and Referees

Michael T. Felix, PhD Understanding

Chad R. Brownfield, PhD

Jennifer Steel, PhD Attitudes and Characteristics of Military Serial Rapists: A Comparison with Their Civilian Counterparts

Employee Engagement Through the Performance Metrics of Individuals Who Use an Enterprise Video-Sharing Application

Reintegration Back Into the Community: The Relationship Between Motivation, Employment Stability, and Prosocial Behavior

Lisa M. Gaumond, PhD Television

Charles E. Cancilla, PhD Mindfulness

Viewing and Self-Discrepancy

Ericka M. Goerling, PhD Gratitude

in the 21st Century: An Experimental Examination of Gratitude Expressions on Facebook and Resultant Subjective WellBeing

Enforcement Trauma and Resilience

Rafael E. Linera Rivera, PhD Social Representation of Threat in Extended Media Ecology: Sochi 2014 Olympics, Jihadist Deeds, and Online Propaganda

Marya Leslie Wilson, PhD The Last Straw: Betrayal and Career Exit of Professional Women

Neva T. McDonald, PhD The Vampire Phenomenon in Fantasy Media and Teenager Perceptions of the Afterlife

Baiba L. Zarins, PhD Experiential Research: Assessing Narrative Inquiry Based Nursing Education Curriculum Through the Reflective Journey of Program Students

Rochelle L. Paul, PhD The Role of Personality on Selective Exposure in Politics: Distinctions in Pro- and Counter-Attitudinal Media Choice Through Selective Approach and Selective Avoidance

Michael G. Tavolacci, PhD Law

23

Martial Arts Training Versus Traditional Martial Arts Training as Support for Improved Academic Performance in Children Diagnosed with AD/HD

Andres Tapia, PhD How

Unaccompanied Minors from Central America Make Meaning of MigrationRelated Traumatic Experiences

Tamara L. Taylor, PhD Sense of

Self-Management, and SeparationIndividuation: Their Relationships

Coherence in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Autistic Symptoms, Behavior Problems, and Risk of Maternal Depression

Suzi Wallace Highfill, PhD Smoking

Ann D. Trotter, PhD Self-Determination

G. Channing Harris, PhD Epilepsy,

and Life Satisfaction Among Native American Indians

Robin E. Kissinger, PhD Fractionating

the Frontal Lobes: A Theory of Executive Processing

Kimberly Klem, PhD Paranoia in Russian and Latin American Adolescents

Theory Applied to Predictors of Diabetes Adaptation and Self-Management in a Sample of Veterans

Erika S. Vadopalas, PhD Birth Order

and Personality: An MMPI-A Study of Adolescents From Post-Soviet Russia

Shenae L. Whitehead, PhD Resilience Factors as Predictors of Perceived Marital Success Among Female Military Spouses


22

RESEARCH FOR A CHANGING WORLD | 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | WWW.FIELDING.EDU

Doctoral Graduates SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Karen S. Barker, EdD The Evaluation

of the Gateway Paramedic Technician Program: An Action Research Project

Berlinda R. Begay, EdD Infusing

Navajo Creation Stories and Navajo Philsophy to Awaken and Nourish the Spirit of our Language Within Language Instruction and Curriculum Development

Carol A. Brown, EdD Implementation of the California Foster Youth Success Initiative at One California Campus: Perceptions of Students and Staff

Tasha N. Ellis, EdD The Impact of

the Georgia Antibullying Law on Urban Elementary School Settings

Mikaele Etuale, EdD General Attitudes

and Perceptions of Faculty Who Use Service Learning at the American Samoa Community College

Pandora Christina Mike, EdD Navajo Teachers Weaving Navajo Culture into Their Teaching: An Appreciative Inquiry Case Study

Laura M. Galloway, PhD Expanding Spaces For Transformation: Supporting Social Justice in a Distributed Learning Enviornment

B. Estella Patel, EdD Indelible Identity:

Craig P. Horangic,PhD

Examining Experiences and Perspectives of Secondary “Long-Term English Learner” Students Achieving Reclassification Status in High School

Jessica L. Robles, EdD Forming

Effective Partnerships as Part of Collective Impact: A Case Study

Louis E. Rumpf, EdD The Synthesis of Social Reality and the Evolution of Barrio Logan: A Critical View of the Framing and Representations of Urban Redevelopment Vincent H. Whipple, Jr., EdD Native

American College Student Perceptions of Cultural Affiliation and Tribal Traditions: A Mixed Methods Study

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE

Samah A. Alzubi, PhD Social

Making Meaning of Sensemaking: A Phenomenographic Study of Collective Sensemaking

Rene M. Lebsock, EdD The Art of

Teaching Reading: A Study of Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Teacher Education Reading Course

Edward S. Miguel, EdD The Dynamics

and Ramifications of Severe Challenging Behaviors: Daring to Reduce Challenging Behavior in Schools Without Physical Restraint and Seclusion

Inbal Demri, PhD Gender, Identity, and Entrepreneurship: A Qualitative Study of Entrepreneurial Women in Silicon Valley Robin A. Frkal, PhD Creating Dialogic

Conditions for Transformative Learning in an Adult Women’s Leadership Program: A Communication Perspective

Cynthia P. Puccio, PhD “YOU’RE

Deborah Maria Ward, PhD Happiness

School Parents’ Views on Using Video Games in Education

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

E. Christopher Mare, PhD

Designing for Consciousness: Towards a Theory of Environmental Design Using Neurophenomenology as Methodology

Yo Moreno, PhD Trainers in the

Multigenerational Workplace Classroom: Assessing the Field and Advancing the Work

Theresa C. Tavarez, PhD Interrupted

for Elementary Teachers on the Dine Nation to Grow Professionally

Christine M. Russell, PhD Middle

Michael S. Lewis, PhD Responding to Radical Industry Change: A Study of the Demise of Digital Equipment Corporation

Susan J. Auger, PhD Making the Best of

Leaders Construct Power: Exploring a New Leadership Discourse

Dana Johnson, PhD Understanding Parent Experiences When Working With and Within an Autism Treatment Team: An Interpretive Phenomenological Inquiry

Interoceptive Awareness Is Positively Related to Emotion Regulation

Geraldine Gaffney, EdD The Paperless

Valerie J. Davis, PhD How Collaborative

of Music in Transportation and Character Identification in Fictional Film Narratives

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Joseph W. Kurtis, PhD Conditions That Lead to Transformative Learning and Development in Adults

Keren Stashower, PhD Convening Holding Environments That Enable Collective Learning in Organizations

Dave M. Goldtooth, EdD Opportunities

Nicole D. Phinney, PhD The Influence

Deborah Sussman, PhD The Lived Experience of the Parent During the Morning Routine

Adaptation: A Study of OD Practitioners Implementing Appreciative Inquiry in ForProfit Organizations

Constructions of Childhood Deviance by United States Educators and Jordanian Educators It: A Grounded Theory

INFANT AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

and Life Satisfaction Predicted by Social Media Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Perphelia Fowler, EdD Navajo Female Leaders: Weaving Together Their Experiences, Culture, and Community Prison: Innovative and Pragmatic Responses of Reentrant Women Citizens

May 1–Nov. 16, 2016

MAKING ME LAUGH”: The Emergence of Humor in Playful Interactions with Young Children on the Autism Spectrum

Sandhya Johnson, PhD Innovation

Work Lives: Imposed Retirement Transitions on Men and Women Professionals in the Corporate Sector

Jennifer Rene Abbott, PhD

Lindsay E. Mullan, PhD The Role of Parental Diabetes-Specific Self-Efficacy on Mealtime Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Sean M. Pritchard, PhD Mindfulness

and Beyond: A Qualitative Study of Advanced Mahasi Meditators’ Experience

Whillma Quenicka, PhD Substance of

Choice and PTSD Symptom Cluster among Women with Different Types of Childhood Abuse

Blerim Rexhaj, PhD A Narrative Study of Relational Dimensions of Men With Alcohol-Related Problems and Their Relationship With Alcohol

Dustin B. Bridges, PhD Relationship

MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Between Spiritual Transformation and Altruism: A Relational Spirituality Model

Sarah A. Sharp, PhD Perceived Personal Control in Youth Soccer Coaches and Referees

Michael T. Felix, PhD Understanding

Chad R. Brownfield, PhD

Jennifer Steel, PhD Attitudes and Characteristics of Military Serial Rapists: A Comparison with Their Civilian Counterparts

Employee Engagement Through the Performance Metrics of Individuals Who Use an Enterprise Video-Sharing Application

Reintegration Back Into the Community: The Relationship Between Motivation, Employment Stability, and Prosocial Behavior

Lisa M. Gaumond, PhD Television

Charles E. Cancilla, PhD Mindfulness

Viewing and Self-Discrepancy

Ericka M. Goerling, PhD Gratitude

in the 21st Century: An Experimental Examination of Gratitude Expressions on Facebook and Resultant Subjective WellBeing

Enforcement Trauma and Resilience

Rafael E. Linera Rivera, PhD Social Representation of Threat in Extended Media Ecology: Sochi 2014 Olympics, Jihadist Deeds, and Online Propaganda

Marya Leslie Wilson, PhD The Last Straw: Betrayal and Career Exit of Professional Women

Neva T. McDonald, PhD The Vampire Phenomenon in Fantasy Media and Teenager Perceptions of the Afterlife

Baiba L. Zarins, PhD Experiential Research: Assessing Narrative Inquiry Based Nursing Education Curriculum Through the Reflective Journey of Program Students

Rochelle L. Paul, PhD The Role of Personality on Selective Exposure in Politics: Distinctions in Pro- and Counter-Attitudinal Media Choice Through Selective Approach and Selective Avoidance

Michael G. Tavolacci, PhD Law

23

Martial Arts Training Versus Traditional Martial Arts Training as Support for Improved Academic Performance in Children Diagnosed with AD/HD

Andres Tapia, PhD How

Unaccompanied Minors from Central America Make Meaning of MigrationRelated Traumatic Experiences

Tamara L. Taylor, PhD Sense of

Self-Management, and SeparationIndividuation: Their Relationships

Coherence in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Autistic Symptoms, Behavior Problems, and Risk of Maternal Depression

Suzi Wallace Highfill, PhD Smoking

Ann D. Trotter, PhD Self-Determination

G. Channing Harris, PhD Epilepsy,

and Life Satisfaction Among Native American Indians

Robin E. Kissinger, PhD Fractionating

the Frontal Lobes: A Theory of Executive Processing

Kimberly Klem, PhD Paranoia in Russian and Latin American Adolescents

Theory Applied to Predictors of Diabetes Adaptation and Self-Management in a Sample of Veterans

Erika S. Vadopalas, PhD Birth Order

and Personality: An MMPI-A Study of Adolescents From Post-Soviet Russia

Shenae L. Whitehead, PhD Resilience Factors as Predictors of Perceived Marital Success Among Female Military Spouses


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FOCUS Winter 2017: Research  

FOCUS Winter 2017: Research