FOCUS Winter 2018: A Global Community

Page 1

F O C US 2 01 8 WINTER

A GLOBAL COMMUNITY


2

GLOBAL | 2018

FOCUS Winter 2018

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Find Inside...

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell

Fielding has always thought of itself as a global institution because students anywhere in the world can be admitted to our programs. From our earliest beginnings, we defined our university not as a place to travel to for study, but as a way for our students to be connected to faculty regardless of where they lived.

Art Director Audrey Ma

FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

In my travels, alumni share with me stories about crossing the Canadian border to meet faculty in Detroit or driving several hours to join the face-to-face cluster meetings in Columbia, Maryland. A student in Tehran works on an independent study with a faculty member in California. An alumnus conducts a face-to-face and virtual webinar in Sweden.

FIELDING.EDU

Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2018 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President

4

9

16

4Fielding in

9Fielding on

13 19 Building Peace ‘Ready to Make in West Africa

Change’

5Digital

10 Where Our

14 Protecting

20 Traversing

6 Schools

12 ‘Developed

15 Using Media

21 Master’s &

7About

12 ‘Graduated

Talks to Educate Diplomats

Inclusion

& Programs

FPO

3

Fielding

8 Board of Trustees

the Road

Alumni Live

a Sense of Belonging’ at Fielding

with Students from Turkey & Somalia’

Children in Tanzania

to Fight Hunger

Boundaries

Certificate Graduates

16 22 20 Years of ELC Doctoral 18 Promoting

World Peace

Graduates

We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners to transform the world. —Fielding’s Vision Statement

In some cases, we may not even know where our faculty and students are as they travel around the world, doing their work and putting into practice what they have learned as scholar-practitioners. For us, borders matter less than the community we build together. From that perspective, there has never been a question about what it means to be global at Fielding. Yet, the forces of globalization and the dominance of technology have brought new questions: What does it mean to be global in this time and place in society? We aren’t truly global if all our thinking is dominated by Western scholarship; we aren’t truly global if we don’t take into consideration time zone differences for our learning environment; we aren’t truly global if we don’t actively learn from other cultures and develop competencies navigating across differences, and we aren’t truly global if we aren’t diverse and inclusive. The most important way for us live into our current vision is to persist in deepening our global mindset. A mindset is a journey, not an outcome—it is a process, not a product. Developing a global mindset means to constantly investigate one’s standpoint—how we situate ourselves—whether it is in our disciplines or in our personal lives and how we interpret those around us. We must reflect on our assumptions and develop the empathy that inspires us to appreciate, respect, and love the diversity of humanity, cultures, and ways that people move in the world. This work is, after all, part of what graduate education is all about: cultivating the habits of mind that encourage openness and embracing the other. In these pages, you will learn more about the work from our alumni, students, and faculty members as they work in places as diverse as Tanzania, India, the Middle East, Norway, and Palestine. You will also hear from our students who live in other countries, such as China, Ethiopia, and Mexico. By their examples, reflect on how you may develop a global mindset in your own work and life. For that is the essence of a Fielding educational experience—to take what we learn both personally and intellectually from our community so that we join with others in making our contribution to creating more justice in the world. •


2

GLOBAL | 2018

FOCUS Winter 2018

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Find Inside...

A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell

Fielding has always thought of itself as a global institution because students anywhere in the world can be admitted to our programs. From our earliest beginnings, we defined our university not as a place to travel to for study, but as a way for our students to be connected to faculty regardless of where they lived.

Art Director Audrey Ma

FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

In my travels, alumni share with me stories about crossing the Canadian border to meet faculty in Detroit or driving several hours to join the face-to-face cluster meetings in Columbia, Maryland. A student in Tehran works on an independent study with a faculty member in California. An alumnus conducts a face-to-face and virtual webinar in Sweden.

FIELDING.EDU

Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2018 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President

4

9

16

4Fielding in

9Fielding on

13 19 Building Peace ‘Ready to Make in West Africa

Change’

5Digital

10 Where Our

14 Protecting

20 Traversing

6 Schools

12 ‘Developed

15 Using Media

21 Master’s &

7About

12 ‘Graduated

Talks to Educate Diplomats

Inclusion

& Programs

FPO

3

Fielding

8 Board of Trustees

the Road

Alumni Live

a Sense of Belonging’ at Fielding

with Students from Turkey & Somalia’

Children in Tanzania

to Fight Hunger

Boundaries

Certificate Graduates

16 22 20 Years of ELC Doctoral 18 Promoting

World Peace

Graduates

We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners to transform the world. —Fielding’s Vision Statement

In some cases, we may not even know where our faculty and students are as they travel around the world, doing their work and putting into practice what they have learned as scholar-practitioners. For us, borders matter less than the community we build together. From that perspective, there has never been a question about what it means to be global at Fielding. Yet, the forces of globalization and the dominance of technology have brought new questions: What does it mean to be global in this time and place in society? We aren’t truly global if all our thinking is dominated by Western scholarship; we aren’t truly global if we don’t take into consideration time zone differences for our learning environment; we aren’t truly global if we don’t actively learn from other cultures and develop competencies navigating across differences, and we aren’t truly global if we aren’t diverse and inclusive. The most important way for us live into our current vision is to persist in deepening our global mindset. A mindset is a journey, not an outcome—it is a process, not a product. Developing a global mindset means to constantly investigate one’s standpoint—how we situate ourselves—whether it is in our disciplines or in our personal lives and how we interpret those around us. We must reflect on our assumptions and develop the empathy that inspires us to appreciate, respect, and love the diversity of humanity, cultures, and ways that people move in the world. This work is, after all, part of what graduate education is all about: cultivating the habits of mind that encourage openness and embracing the other. In these pages, you will learn more about the work from our alumni, students, and faculty members as they work in places as diverse as Tanzania, India, the Middle East, Norway, and Palestine. You will also hear from our students who live in other countries, such as China, Ethiopia, and Mexico. By their examples, reflect on how you may develop a global mindset in your own work and life. For that is the essence of a Fielding educational experience—to take what we learn both personally and intellectually from our community so that we join with others in making our contribution to creating more justice in the world. •


4

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

DIGITAL INCLUSION

FIELDING IN TALKS TO EDUCATE DIPLOMATS P

resident Katrina Rogers recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the nonprofit Global Diplomatic Center to facilitate discussions between the two institutions about education for diplomats worldwide.

While change is a constant in life, never before has humanity encountered the speed and frequency of change driven by technological innovation and advances in communication that have created a globalized world. Fielding’s graduate programs focus on the development of scholar-practitioners who become skilled in their specific fields and are equipped to manage complexity and ambiguity in rapidly changing societies. Successful leaders need to demonstrate excellent communication skills—both verbal and written. They are flexible learners and can also empower others through teamwork. They are open to change and encourage others to be the same. At Fielding, we also emphasize the ability to synthesize diverse and complex information as well as the skills to engage in original research. The goal and the result of a Fielding educational experience are for our graduates to be able to serve as agents of change.

5

Working with the United Nations to bring technology to all

Diplomats, as a group, face similar challenges. The world of diplomacy is in a constant state of flux with individuals often placed in unfamiliar settings managing a level of complexity for which their traditional education did not prepare them. The mission of the Global Diplomatic Center (GDC) is to offer education for diplomats at all levels of their careers. Being a diplomat requires a level of competence in cross-disciplinary knowledge as well as an awareness of the global context that may be driving policy at international, national, and local levels. GDC programs take the form of short, face-to-face courses on topics such as negotiation techniques, diplomatic leadership, and security management. They also offer specialized programs for youth and women in diplomatic leadership. Like Fielding, GDC is a proponent of open dialogue between and among experts, thinkers, and social activists from around the world, and it is in this spirit that this relationship was forged. As Fielding and GCD become more deeply acquainted, we will be looking at the possibility of Fielding offering graduate credit for some of these programs, and exploring the possibility of faculty involvement in course design and in teaching and learning. This furthers our work in reaching new audiences and also in sharing our distinctive learning modality with other organizations that also focus on quality education for the adult learner. •

Top Right Photo: Clockwise from front, center: Fielding’s President Katrina Rogers, former Trustee Leonard Haynes, VP of Strategic Initiatives & Research Orlando Taylor, and Director of Sponsored Programs and Special Projects Katherine McGraw met with Global Diplomatic Center’s Chief Operating Officer Morris Jackson and Founder & President Lina Omar in Fielding’s Washington, D.C., office to discuss diplomatic education.

H

ere at Fielding, it’s hard to imagine a day without using the Internet — but there are still millions of people in the world who lack access or the knowledge base to activate this remarkable tool that so many of us find right at our finger tips.

Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, director of Fielding’s Media Psychology program, has been able to join in conversations with the United Nations about creating universal availability to the Internet and technology as powerful tools for improving worldwide mental health, well-being, and resilience. The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 includes a vision of a world “where physical, mental, and social well-being are assured.” To that end, they’re bringing together scientists, practitioners, and other thought leaders to collaborate in fostering worldwide digital inclusion and global accessibility of technology. Fielding’s media psychology community is working through the EQUALS research group — a partnership between the International Telecommunication Union and United Nations — to research a means for promoting and empowering people through digital inclusion. The goal is to provide access to

information and communication technologies for people with specific needs, people living in non-urban areas, people with disabilities, and excluded populations. In May, Dr. Hogg attended the United Nations Science, Technology, & Innovation Forum, “Artificial Intelligence and Technology for Mental-Health, Well-Being, and Resilience,” which explored global access to mental health technology and how it’s currently being implemented in China, Lebanon, and the US. Discussion included how artificial intelligence can play a role in bridging the treatment gap — including use of Alexa, an Amazon product programmed to offer advice and information, and SimCoach, a virtual human therapy providing a safe therapy space for military personnel and their families.

Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg, director of Fielding’s Media Psychology program

In October, Dr. Hogg and EQUALS members also attended the Gender in Media Summit at Google New York City Headquarters sponsored by the Geena Davis Institute. The STEM event brought influencers together to talk about empowering women through media. A software tool called the Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient (GD-IQ 2.0) can analyze audio and video media content for screen and speaking time.

“Several of our dissertation students are working in the area of representation of females in prime-time television and poArtificial intelligence (AI) and virtual technol- litical roles,” says Dr. Hogg. “Collaborating ogy have become highly sophisticated, dewith the Geena Davis Institute could offer livering real-time information in an alwaysadditional insight to their research.” available manner. There is high potential for AI to be part of the solution, although Our Fielding media psychology students are research is still needed on understanding exploring and researching artificial intellihuman interaction with it and how to create gence, media, and technology for good, and the best, most ethical engagement with AI looking forward to sharing their knowledge applications. in discussions with the United Nations. •


4

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

DIGITAL INCLUSION

FIELDING IN TALKS TO EDUCATE DIPLOMATS P

resident Katrina Rogers recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the nonprofit Global Diplomatic Center to facilitate discussions between the two institutions about education for diplomats worldwide.

While change is a constant in life, never before has humanity encountered the speed and frequency of change driven by technological innovation and advances in communication that have created a globalized world. Fielding’s graduate programs focus on the development of scholar-practitioners who become skilled in their specific fields and are equipped to manage complexity and ambiguity in rapidly changing societies. Successful leaders need to demonstrate excellent communication skills—both verbal and written. They are flexible learners and can also empower others through teamwork. They are open to change and encourage others to be the same. At Fielding, we also emphasize the ability to synthesize diverse and complex information as well as the skills to engage in original research. The goal and the result of a Fielding educational experience are for our graduates to be able to serve as agents of change.

5

Working with the United Nations to bring technology to all

Diplomats, as a group, face similar challenges. The world of diplomacy is in a constant state of flux with individuals often placed in unfamiliar settings managing a level of complexity for which their traditional education did not prepare them. The mission of the Global Diplomatic Center (GDC) is to offer education for diplomats at all levels of their careers. Being a diplomat requires a level of competence in cross-disciplinary knowledge as well as an awareness of the global context that may be driving policy at international, national, and local levels. GDC programs take the form of short, face-to-face courses on topics such as negotiation techniques, diplomatic leadership, and security management. They also offer specialized programs for youth and women in diplomatic leadership. Like Fielding, GDC is a proponent of open dialogue between and among experts, thinkers, and social activists from around the world, and it is in this spirit that this relationship was forged. As Fielding and GCD become more deeply acquainted, we will be looking at the possibility of Fielding offering graduate credit for some of these programs, and exploring the possibility of faculty involvement in course design and in teaching and learning. This furthers our work in reaching new audiences and also in sharing our distinctive learning modality with other organizations that also focus on quality education for the adult learner. •

Top Right Photo: Clockwise from front, center: Fielding’s President Katrina Rogers, former Trustee Leonard Haynes, VP of Strategic Initiatives & Research Orlando Taylor, and Director of Sponsored Programs and Special Projects Katherine McGraw met with Global Diplomatic Center’s Chief Operating Officer Morris Jackson and Founder & President Lina Omar in Fielding’s Washington, D.C., office to discuss diplomatic education.

H

ere at Fielding, it’s hard to imagine a day without using the Internet — but there are still millions of people in the world who lack access or the knowledge base to activate this remarkable tool that so many of us find right at our finger tips.

Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, director of Fielding’s Media Psychology program, has been able to join in conversations with the United Nations about creating universal availability to the Internet and technology as powerful tools for improving worldwide mental health, well-being, and resilience. The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 includes a vision of a world “where physical, mental, and social well-being are assured.” To that end, they’re bringing together scientists, practitioners, and other thought leaders to collaborate in fostering worldwide digital inclusion and global accessibility of technology. Fielding’s media psychology community is working through the EQUALS research group — a partnership between the International Telecommunication Union and United Nations — to research a means for promoting and empowering people through digital inclusion. The goal is to provide access to

information and communication technologies for people with specific needs, people living in non-urban areas, people with disabilities, and excluded populations. In May, Dr. Hogg attended the United Nations Science, Technology, & Innovation Forum, “Artificial Intelligence and Technology for Mental-Health, Well-Being, and Resilience,” which explored global access to mental health technology and how it’s currently being implemented in China, Lebanon, and the US. Discussion included how artificial intelligence can play a role in bridging the treatment gap — including use of Alexa, an Amazon product programmed to offer advice and information, and SimCoach, a virtual human therapy providing a safe therapy space for military personnel and their families.

Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg, director of Fielding’s Media Psychology program

In October, Dr. Hogg and EQUALS members also attended the Gender in Media Summit at Google New York City Headquarters sponsored by the Geena Davis Institute. The STEM event brought influencers together to talk about empowering women through media. A software tool called the Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient (GD-IQ 2.0) can analyze audio and video media content for screen and speaking time.

“Several of our dissertation students are working in the area of representation of females in prime-time television and poArtificial intelligence (AI) and virtual technol- litical roles,” says Dr. Hogg. “Collaborating ogy have become highly sophisticated, dewith the Geena Davis Institute could offer livering real-time information in an alwaysadditional insight to their research.” available manner. There is high potential for AI to be part of the solution, although Our Fielding media psychology students are research is still needed on understanding exploring and researching artificial intellihuman interaction with it and how to create gence, media, and technology for good, and the best, most ethical engagement with AI looking forward to sharing their knowledge applications. in discussions with the United Nations. •


6

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ABOUT FIELDING Fast Facts

School of Leadership Studies DOCTORAL DEGREES EdD, Leadership for Change PhD, Human Development PhD, Infant & Early Childhood Development PhD, Organizational Development & Change MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Collaborative Educational Leadership MA, Digital Teaching and Learning MA, Infant & Early Childhood Development MA, Organizational Development & Leadership CERTIFICATES Academic Leadership Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development and Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Reflective Practice/Supervision

School of Psychology DOCTORAL DEGREES PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD, Media Psychology MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Media Psychology CERTIFICATES Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Doctoral Concentrations (excludes Clinical Psychology)

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity and Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, and Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership

Centers & Initiatives The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development. The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society. The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society. The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues in education, healthcare, the environment, violence prevention, and globalization.

RACE AND ETHNICITY

1% 4% 16% 10% 49%

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

Hispanic or Latino

Enrollment

1,045 Women

76% Men

24% Age Range

22–80

White

Two or More Races

6%

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

International Students

MISSION We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

VISION We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

VALUES Academic Excellence: We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

FACULTY

Total Faculty

4%

10%

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS

187

Total Staff

81

Students-to-Faculty

6:1

Community: We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect. Diversity: We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community. Learner-Centered Education: We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students. Social Justice: We commit to advancing equality and justice in our university, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. Transformational Learning: We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Aggregated data based on Fall 2016 census data as reported to Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

7


6

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ABOUT FIELDING Fast Facts

School of Leadership Studies DOCTORAL DEGREES EdD, Leadership for Change PhD, Human Development PhD, Infant & Early Childhood Development PhD, Organizational Development & Change MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Collaborative Educational Leadership MA, Digital Teaching and Learning MA, Infant & Early Childhood Development MA, Organizational Development & Leadership CERTIFICATES Academic Leadership Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development and Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Reflective Practice/Supervision

School of Psychology DOCTORAL DEGREES PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD, Media Psychology MASTER’S DEGREES MA, Media Psychology CERTIFICATES Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS Doctoral Concentrations (excludes Clinical Psychology)

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity and Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social and Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, and Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership

Centers & Initiatives The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development. The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society. The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society. The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues in education, healthcare, the environment, violence prevention, and globalization.

RACE AND ETHNICITY

1% 4% 16% 10% 49%

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Black or African American

Hispanic or Latino

Enrollment

1,045 Women

76% Men

24% Age Range

22–80

White

Two or More Races

6%

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

International Students

MISSION We are an innovative global community dedicated to educating scholars, leaders, and practitioners in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

VISION We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

VALUES Academic Excellence: We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

FACULTY

Total Faculty

4%

10%

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS

187

Total Staff

81

Students-to-Faculty

6:1

Community: We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect. Diversity: We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community. Learner-Centered Education: We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students. Social Justice: We commit to advancing equality and justice in our university, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. Transformational Learning: We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Aggregated data based on Fall 2016 census data as reported to Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).

7


8

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Judith Katz, EdD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group Washington, DC

Tomás Leal, MS

Senior Director, Research & Development Inclusion Strategy Lead, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

Patricia Marin, PhD

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Chair

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Educational Administration, College of Education, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC

Shalynda McIvory, MS

Karen Bogart, PhD Vice-Chair

Wayne Patterson, PhD

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Kevin Fickenscher, MD Treasurer

Student Member, Snellville, GA

Professor, Computer Science, Howard University Washington, DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

CEO/Founder, CREO Strategic Solutions, LLC Boston, MA

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Keith Earley, PhD, JD Secretary

Sushma Sharma

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Nancy Baker, PhD

Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Manley Begay, PhD

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

CEO, Resonate Consulting, New Delhi, India

Mary-Frances Winters, MBA

CEO and Founder, The Winters Group, Bowie, MD

Patricia Zell, JD

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

Caroline Elliott, MA

TRUSTEE EMERITI

Student Member, Mariana, AR

Michael Goldstein

Anthony Greene, PhD

Russ Goodman

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Garry Hare, PhD

Bo Gyllenpalm

Faculty Member, Kentfield, CA

E. Nancy Markle

Mānuka Hēnare, PhD

Fred Phillips

Associate Professor, University of Auckland Business School Auckland, New Zealand

Connie Shafran

Linda Honold, PhD

Nancy Shapiro

Principal, Strategic Vision In Action, Milwaukee, WI

9

FIELDING ON THE ROAD Annual trip to India is a student favorite

F

“I have a long research and personal relationship with Madurai, South India, and the Gandhian communities in that area, dating back to the early 1970s,” says Dr. Willis. “I am there almost every year for research and volunteer work, and speak Tamil, the local language.”

Dr. Thatchenkery, a professor of organization development and knowledge management at George Mason University, co-created the conference, which draws around 100 participants from business schools in Europe, Asia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States.

Along with our Asia, European and Canadian clusters, Dr. Willis says the ICMC is “an outstanding conference for beginning, mid-level, or senior researchers to share their work on a transnational stage,” and is helping Fielding spread its scholarship out to the larger transnational world. •

or a decade now, faculty member Tojo Thatchenkery, PhD, has co-chaired and co-organized the International Conference on Management Cases (ICMC) in New Delhi, India. Fielding faculty, doctoral students, and alumni love to attend and present papers there; in fact, the trip has become an annual pilgrimage and tradition.

“For students, it’s an opportunity to attend an international conference, present a paper, and get published in a peer-reviewed book,” says Dr. Thatchenkery. “It’s exposure to a thriving culture with a dynamic economy and an opportunity to meet colleagues from all around the world.” Participants are greeted with a bindi jewel and garland as a show of Indian hospitality. “There’s a Bollywood dance and it’s almost like a family,” Dr. Thatchenkery says. “The students feel like they belong to the conference.” Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, has presented there, as have faculty members Mike Manning, PhD, and Connie Corley, PhD. Fielding often offers scholarships to supplement travel costs for students. Last year Fielding student Millicent Mocodean of Calgary, Canada, received the conference’s Young Scholar Award of 10,000 Rupees. Alumna Pamela Kennebrew, EdD, has attended twice, not only for the chance to be published in an international journal but to see how her research on economic insecurity would land among different audiences. “It showed me that the feminization of poverty was a global issue,” says Dr. Kennebrew. “I learned that even though the challenges were framed differently, there were still some similarities. The whole thing was just a phenomenal experience. I met people that I’m still in contact with.” Her favorite part was the trip to Taj Mahal. Frequent attendee David Blake Willis, PhD, a Fielding faculty member in the School of Leadership Studies, has also taken students further south to an ashram in Madras.

Top: Fielding participants and friends at the 2014 ICMC Conference, New Delhi, India. Bottom: Faculty member David Willis and student Elena Duncan of Australia at the Taj Mahal, Agra, India.


8

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Judith Katz, EdD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group Washington, DC

Tomás Leal, MS

Senior Director, Research & Development Inclusion Strategy Lead, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

Patricia Marin, PhD

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Chair

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Educational Administration, College of Education, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC

Shalynda McIvory, MS

Karen Bogart, PhD Vice-Chair

Wayne Patterson, PhD

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Kevin Fickenscher, MD Treasurer

Student Member, Snellville, GA

Professor, Computer Science, Howard University Washington, DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

CEO/Founder, CREO Strategic Solutions, LLC Boston, MA

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Keith Earley, PhD, JD Secretary

Sushma Sharma

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Nancy Baker, PhD

Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Manley Begay, PhD

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

CEO, Resonate Consulting, New Delhi, India

Mary-Frances Winters, MBA

CEO and Founder, The Winters Group, Bowie, MD

Patricia Zell, JD

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

Caroline Elliott, MA

TRUSTEE EMERITI

Student Member, Mariana, AR

Michael Goldstein

Anthony Greene, PhD

Russ Goodman

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Garry Hare, PhD

Bo Gyllenpalm

Faculty Member, Kentfield, CA

E. Nancy Markle

Mānuka Hēnare, PhD

Fred Phillips

Associate Professor, University of Auckland Business School Auckland, New Zealand

Connie Shafran

Linda Honold, PhD

Nancy Shapiro

Principal, Strategic Vision In Action, Milwaukee, WI

9

FIELDING ON THE ROAD Annual trip to India is a student favorite

F

“I have a long research and personal relationship with Madurai, South India, and the Gandhian communities in that area, dating back to the early 1970s,” says Dr. Willis. “I am there almost every year for research and volunteer work, and speak Tamil, the local language.”

Dr. Thatchenkery, a professor of organization development and knowledge management at George Mason University, co-created the conference, which draws around 100 participants from business schools in Europe, Asia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States.

Along with our Asia, European and Canadian clusters, Dr. Willis says the ICMC is “an outstanding conference for beginning, mid-level, or senior researchers to share their work on a transnational stage,” and is helping Fielding spread its scholarship out to the larger transnational world. •

or a decade now, faculty member Tojo Thatchenkery, PhD, has co-chaired and co-organized the International Conference on Management Cases (ICMC) in New Delhi, India. Fielding faculty, doctoral students, and alumni love to attend and present papers there; in fact, the trip has become an annual pilgrimage and tradition.

“For students, it’s an opportunity to attend an international conference, present a paper, and get published in a peer-reviewed book,” says Dr. Thatchenkery. “It’s exposure to a thriving culture with a dynamic economy and an opportunity to meet colleagues from all around the world.” Participants are greeted with a bindi jewel and garland as a show of Indian hospitality. “There’s a Bollywood dance and it’s almost like a family,” Dr. Thatchenkery says. “The students feel like they belong to the conference.” Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, has presented there, as have faculty members Mike Manning, PhD, and Connie Corley, PhD. Fielding often offers scholarships to supplement travel costs for students. Last year Fielding student Millicent Mocodean of Calgary, Canada, received the conference’s Young Scholar Award of 10,000 Rupees. Alumna Pamela Kennebrew, EdD, has attended twice, not only for the chance to be published in an international journal but to see how her research on economic insecurity would land among different audiences. “It showed me that the feminization of poverty was a global issue,” says Dr. Kennebrew. “I learned that even though the challenges were framed differently, there were still some similarities. The whole thing was just a phenomenal experience. I met people that I’m still in contact with.” Her favorite part was the trip to Taj Mahal. Frequent attendee David Blake Willis, PhD, a Fielding faculty member in the School of Leadership Studies, has also taken students further south to an ashram in Madras.

Top: Fielding participants and friends at the 2014 ICMC Conference, New Delhi, India. Bottom: Faculty member David Willis and student Elena Duncan of Australia at the Taj Mahal, Agra, India.


10

GLOBAL | 2018

WHERE OUR ALUMNI LIVE AS OF MARCH 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

AFGHANISTAN 1 ARGENTINA 2 AUSTRALIA 6 BARBADOS 1 BELGIUM 1 BERMUDA 2 BRAZIL 5 CANADA 202 CAYMAN ISLANDS 1 CHINA 8 CZECH REPUBLIC 2 DENMARK 1 ETHIOPIA 1 FINLAND 5 FRANCE 3 GERMANY 8

GHANA 1 GRENADA 1 GUAM 1 GUATEMALA 1 HONG KONG 5 HUNGARY 1 INDIA 4 INDONESIA 2 IRELAND 1 ISRAEL 5 JAMAICA 9 JAPAN 11 NETHERLANDS 2 NIGERIA 1 PANAMA 1 PHILIPPINES 1

PUERTO RICO 2 QATAR 1 SAUDI ARABIA 1 SINGAPORE 3 SOUTH AFRICA 1 SOUTH KOREA 3 SWEDEN 3 SWITZERLAND 3 TANZANIA 1 TRINIDAD & TOBAGO 1 TURKEY 1 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 2 UNITED KINGDOM 8 USA 4873 US VIRGIN ISLANDS 1 VENEZUELA 1

11


10

GLOBAL | 2018

WHERE OUR ALUMNI LIVE AS OF MARCH 2017

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

AFGHANISTAN 1 ARGENTINA 2 AUSTRALIA 6 BARBADOS 1 BELGIUM 1 BERMUDA 2 BRAZIL 5 CANADA 202 CAYMAN ISLANDS 1 CHINA 8 CZECH REPUBLIC 2 DENMARK 1 ETHIOPIA 1 FINLAND 5 FRANCE 3 GERMANY 8

GHANA 1 GRENADA 1 GUAM 1 GUATEMALA 1 HONG KONG 5 HUNGARY 1 INDIA 4 INDONESIA 2 IRELAND 1 ISRAEL 5 JAMAICA 9 JAPAN 11 NETHERLANDS 2 NIGERIA 1 PANAMA 1 PHILIPPINES 1

PUERTO RICO 2 QATAR 1 SAUDI ARABIA 1 SINGAPORE 3 SOUTH AFRICA 1 SOUTH KOREA 3 SWEDEN 3 SWITZERLAND 3 TANZANIA 1 TRINIDAD & TOBAGO 1 TURKEY 1 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 2 UNITED KINGDOM 8 USA 4873 US VIRGIN ISLANDS 1 VENEZUELA 1

11


12

GLOBAL | 2018

‘DEVELOPED A SENSE OF BELONGING’ AT FIELDING

I

’m glad to be part of Fielding for its supportive and flexible learning environment. Responses from the staff there are often fast and encouraging. This is particularly important for a student like me living far away. With regular telecommunications, I gradually developed the sense of belonging and connectedness to Fielding.

I have been working in Hong Kong as a clinical psychologist for over 20 years. My studies at Fielding have a tremendous impact on my professional work. Mine is the only Ph.D program in the world in Infant and Early Childhood Development with an emphasis on mental health and developmental disabilities. What I have learned not only helps me develop my own clinical services for children, but also enhance the professional and public awareness in infant and early childhood mental health issues in Hong Kong. I collaborated with my colleagues to establish the Hong Kong Association for Infant Mental HONG KONG Health Limited in 2014, and the Association is now growing steadily in both the number of members and the quality of professional training offered. The faculty member I connect the most with is Dr. Ira Glovinsky. We share the same profession, and WING SI MOK, PhD student our common inInfant & Early Childhood Development terest in autism spectrum disorder. I met him personally during my last visit in Ann Arbor at Michigan a few years ago. Ira is not only the lecturer who taught me a number of courses, but he is also the chair of my dissertation committee and the mentor of my infant mental health practices. Fielding supports my international perspective by giving me connections with classmates and faculty members from different countries in the world. Besides, the training in Fielding often brings my awareness to honor the uniqueness of people from respective cultures. •

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

‘GRADUATED WITH STUDENTS FROM TURKEY & SOMALIA’

F

ielding was a great experience. I discovered a lot about the kind of learner I am. I remember National Session with great enthusiasm. I was able to attend lectures and workshops that were meaningful with deep learning about my discipline — but especially about me.

I feel privileged because even though I had to make sacrifices in my personal life to keep moving forward with the program, at the same time, I was able to keep working in what I love and be present for my family in important moments.

TOLUCA, MEXICO

At Fielding, I learned the notion of beLUIS GONZÁLEZ LÓPEZ, PhD alumnus ing a scholarHuman & Organizational Systems practitioner; to see my practice as a source of knowledge and development not only for me but for others; and a lot of specific lessons about social justice, equality, and transformative learning that have had an impact on my teaching and my way of understanding what I live. Dr. Miguel Guilarte was my mentor and dissertation chair, so we developed not only an academic relationship but a friendship that I cherish. Dr. Placida Gallegos, Dr. Steve Schapiro, and Dr. Margo Okazawa-Rey were also key in providing me with elements to analyze reality from a social justice perspective, and I constantly use insights that I got from their courses in my own teaching.

The international perspective was all around me at Fielding. I had the opportunity to share courses with people from other parts of the world, and to learn from the international experiences of many of the faculty members. And I had the opportunity to graduate with students from Turkey, Somalia, and Native Americans. •

BUILDING PEACE IN WEST AFRICA Alumnus Aminu Shittu brings Fielding skills to United Nations post

A

minu Shittu was coordinating the United Nations’ humanitarian interventions in Liberia when he began scouting for a PhD program.

“I was interested in deepening my intellectual expertise for both the office and field work,” says Dr. Shittu, who earned his PhD in Human Development at Fielding in 2016. He’s now a Political Affairs Officer for the UN’s Integrated Peace-Building Office in the West African nation of Bissau — where he daily confronts the very issues he studied at Fielding: leadership, gender, race, human rights, inclusive governance, institutional reforms, equitable distribution of resources, and marginalized groups. “Fielding offered me something unique that makes me an asset to the office,” he says.

It was the inclusive environment that drew him to Fielding, along with the flexibility it offered to students in remote locations. “Fielding’s emphasis on the correlation between theory and practice was exceptionally attractive,” he says. “I found the orientation linking academia to the practical world, and

making a change in society, extremely worthy. I felt that I had found the community I wish to belong to – connecting theory to practice as an international peacekeeper.” He connected especially with faculty member Dr. David Blake Willis, who became his mentor and chaired his dissertation, a case study of land expropriation for oil palm plantations in Liberia. “His intellectual depth and academic approach was appealing,” Dr. Shittu says of Dr. Willis. “I found it easy to connect with David as he expresses keen interest in students’ demands, and is always available for intellectual engagement.” Having had peace-keeping experiences in Kosovo, East Timor, Afghanistan and beyond, Dr. Shittu was impressed with Fielding’s capacity to keep pace with global developments, especially in the context of social justice. “I recall the passion with which matters of global warming, racial challenges, marginalized communities, and global economic crunch were discussed during different national sessions,” he says. “The depth of intellectual discussions, the impacts on our collective world, and the experiences of scholar-practitioners resonated with me.”

13

GUINEA-BISSAU, WEST AFRICA

AMINU SHITTU, PhD alumnus Human Development

He says his scholarly pursuits at Fielding — from research and critical thinking to intellectual analysis of social phenomenon — have an impact on his professional life every day. “I examine and analyze political developments in Guinea-Bissau on a daily basis as the United Nations leads the community of nations in search of a durable and peaceful resolution to the prolonged political impasse in Guinea-Bissau,” he says. “Critical analysis of events and the emerging trends coupled with regional dimensions are crucial and form parts of the reports I draft for the attention of policy makers.” Beyond the intellectual aspects of his studies, though, he says Fielding’s values parallel his daily work, too. “Fielding appreciates and accommodates diversities in scholarship – a core value in the UN system, where professionalism, integrity, and respect of diversity are demanded of staff.” Whether at Fielding or in the field, it’s heartening to know Dr. Shittu is practicing his scholarship wherever he goes. •


12

GLOBAL | 2018

‘DEVELOPED A SENSE OF BELONGING’ AT FIELDING

I

’m glad to be part of Fielding for its supportive and flexible learning environment. Responses from the staff there are often fast and encouraging. This is particularly important for a student like me living far away. With regular telecommunications, I gradually developed the sense of belonging and connectedness to Fielding.

I have been working in Hong Kong as a clinical psychologist for over 20 years. My studies at Fielding have a tremendous impact on my professional work. Mine is the only Ph.D program in the world in Infant and Early Childhood Development with an emphasis on mental health and developmental disabilities. What I have learned not only helps me develop my own clinical services for children, but also enhance the professional and public awareness in infant and early childhood mental health issues in Hong Kong. I collaborated with my colleagues to establish the Hong Kong Association for Infant Mental HONG KONG Health Limited in 2014, and the Association is now growing steadily in both the number of members and the quality of professional training offered. The faculty member I connect the most with is Dr. Ira Glovinsky. We share the same profession, and WING SI MOK, PhD student our common inInfant & Early Childhood Development terest in autism spectrum disorder. I met him personally during my last visit in Ann Arbor at Michigan a few years ago. Ira is not only the lecturer who taught me a number of courses, but he is also the chair of my dissertation committee and the mentor of my infant mental health practices. Fielding supports my international perspective by giving me connections with classmates and faculty members from different countries in the world. Besides, the training in Fielding often brings my awareness to honor the uniqueness of people from respective cultures. •

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

‘GRADUATED WITH STUDENTS FROM TURKEY & SOMALIA’

F

ielding was a great experience. I discovered a lot about the kind of learner I am. I remember National Session with great enthusiasm. I was able to attend lectures and workshops that were meaningful with deep learning about my discipline — but especially about me.

I feel privileged because even though I had to make sacrifices in my personal life to keep moving forward with the program, at the same time, I was able to keep working in what I love and be present for my family in important moments.

TOLUCA, MEXICO

At Fielding, I learned the notion of beLUIS GONZÁLEZ LÓPEZ, PhD alumnus ing a scholarHuman & Organizational Systems practitioner; to see my practice as a source of knowledge and development not only for me but for others; and a lot of specific lessons about social justice, equality, and transformative learning that have had an impact on my teaching and my way of understanding what I live. Dr. Miguel Guilarte was my mentor and dissertation chair, so we developed not only an academic relationship but a friendship that I cherish. Dr. Placida Gallegos, Dr. Steve Schapiro, and Dr. Margo Okazawa-Rey were also key in providing me with elements to analyze reality from a social justice perspective, and I constantly use insights that I got from their courses in my own teaching.

The international perspective was all around me at Fielding. I had the opportunity to share courses with people from other parts of the world, and to learn from the international experiences of many of the faculty members. And I had the opportunity to graduate with students from Turkey, Somalia, and Native Americans. •

BUILDING PEACE IN WEST AFRICA Alumnus Aminu Shittu brings Fielding skills to United Nations post

A

minu Shittu was coordinating the United Nations’ humanitarian interventions in Liberia when he began scouting for a PhD program.

“I was interested in deepening my intellectual expertise for both the office and field work,” says Dr. Shittu, who earned his PhD in Human Development at Fielding in 2016. He’s now a Political Affairs Officer for the UN’s Integrated Peace-Building Office in the West African nation of Bissau — where he daily confronts the very issues he studied at Fielding: leadership, gender, race, human rights, inclusive governance, institutional reforms, equitable distribution of resources, and marginalized groups. “Fielding offered me something unique that makes me an asset to the office,” he says.

It was the inclusive environment that drew him to Fielding, along with the flexibility it offered to students in remote locations. “Fielding’s emphasis on the correlation between theory and practice was exceptionally attractive,” he says. “I found the orientation linking academia to the practical world, and

making a change in society, extremely worthy. I felt that I had found the community I wish to belong to – connecting theory to practice as an international peacekeeper.” He connected especially with faculty member Dr. David Blake Willis, who became his mentor and chaired his dissertation, a case study of land expropriation for oil palm plantations in Liberia. “His intellectual depth and academic approach was appealing,” Dr. Shittu says of Dr. Willis. “I found it easy to connect with David as he expresses keen interest in students’ demands, and is always available for intellectual engagement.” Having had peace-keeping experiences in Kosovo, East Timor, Afghanistan and beyond, Dr. Shittu was impressed with Fielding’s capacity to keep pace with global developments, especially in the context of social justice. “I recall the passion with which matters of global warming, racial challenges, marginalized communities, and global economic crunch were discussed during different national sessions,” he says. “The depth of intellectual discussions, the impacts on our collective world, and the experiences of scholar-practitioners resonated with me.”

13

GUINEA-BISSAU, WEST AFRICA

AMINU SHITTU, PhD alumnus Human Development

He says his scholarly pursuits at Fielding — from research and critical thinking to intellectual analysis of social phenomenon — have an impact on his professional life every day. “I examine and analyze political developments in Guinea-Bissau on a daily basis as the United Nations leads the community of nations in search of a durable and peaceful resolution to the prolonged political impasse in Guinea-Bissau,” he says. “Critical analysis of events and the emerging trends coupled with regional dimensions are crucial and form parts of the reports I draft for the attention of policy makers.” Beyond the intellectual aspects of his studies, though, he says Fielding’s values parallel his daily work, too. “Fielding appreciates and accommodates diversities in scholarship – a core value in the UN system, where professionalism, integrity, and respect of diversity are demanded of staff.” Whether at Fielding or in the field, it’s heartening to know Dr. Shittu is practicing his scholarship wherever he goes. •


14

GLOBAL | 2018

PROTECTING CHILDREN IN TANZANIA

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

TANZANIA, EAST AFRICA

Being a ‘Fielding junkie’ pays off for Kate McAlpine

K

“Rather embarrassingly, I followed a boyfriend,” says Dr. McAlpine, who was 22 years old and studying with her beau at Oxford — she history, he ecology — when he left for East Africa to guide climbers up Kilimanjaro. She went along for the ride. “I had no idea what I was going to do.” But regular encounters with children on the streets of Tanzania sealed her fate. “The kids used to beg around the post office, and I wondered, What’s going on? Why isn’t anyone helping them?” she says. So she set up a soup kitchen out of a tree nursery, where the children could get a hot meal. Then the children began asking for schooling. Then housing. Then vocational training. “Every time we did something, they said they wanted more.” So she founded the Mkombozi Center for Street Children (Mkombozi means “Redeemer” in Swahili), to advocate for children’s rights. They taught the children to make furniture, helped families reunite, and offered conflict mediation between family members. “It was a time and a place and a naïveté,” she says. “As a result, I found myself running this increasingly bigger organization, so I started to be-

USING MEDIA TO FIGHT HUNGER Tatyana El-Kour’s work blends technology, psychology — and empathy

ate McAlpine isn’t terribly proud of what brought her to Tanzania from her native England in the first place. KATE MCALPINE, MA & PhD alumna Human & Organizational Development; certificate in Evidence Based Coaching

come interested in organizational health. That’s when I joined Fielding.” She earned a certificate in Evidence-Based Coaching from Fielding and a Master’s and PhD in Human and Organizational Development. “I absolutely loved it,” says Dr. McAlpine. “I have never learned as I learned at Fielding. It just absolutely nourished me. I particularly loved the teaching and the sense of passion and the values-based education. I come from Oxford, which rides on its own repute. To come to Fielding, which was so wonderfully earnest, was really lovely.” She was able to apply her studies directly to her organization—particularly lessons on integral theory. “That’s stuck with me through everything I do: looking at reality through different validity claims and perspectives,” she says. “It’s the one underpinning that I use in everything, as a way of understanding reality.”

A

s a globetrotting dietitian who works to combat everything from malnutrition to obesity, Tatyana El-Kour needed a PhD program that wouldn’t slow her down.

“I was very keen on choosing a doctoral program that provides support and at the same time would allow me to continue working while studying,” says El-Kour, who was also drawn to Fielding’s Media Psychology program. “I was working with the World Health Organization Regional Office in Cairo, and saw how media played a role in social movements and impacted the role of culture, religion, tradition, and gender. I was interested in how people shape their own behavior and, given how populations have rapidly adopted media and technology, I felt like this was kind of the missing link.”

So far, the program has exceeded her expectations. Not only has it allowed her to continue her work — whether consulting for Action

AMMAN, JORDAN

Dr. McAlpine’s organization won an award for being the most effective child protection agency in Africa. Now she helps others with organizational development. She’s currently working with Tanzania’s Community for Children’s Rights, which conducts research, designs interventions, builds a community of protectors, equips young people to break cycles of violence, and helps local authorities to govern in the interests of children.

Her children are studying in an international baccalaureate program — which Dr. McAlpine notes that her Fielding mentor David Blake Willis helped to develop. Ages 14 and 16, her kids are adaptable and independent, she says:

Dr. McAlpine during the Mkombozi days

El-Kour working with children in a Syrian refugee settlement in Lebanon

Against Hunger in Beirut or presenting on the future of eating at the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C. — but it has enhanced her work. “After I started my PhD at Fielding, I accepted a job supporting organizations implementing nutrition programs for the Syrian crisis,” she says, “and I felt empowered to do so because my studies have enabled me to use geographic information systems to illustrate the spatial clustering of hunger hotspots while also appreciating the interaction of geopolitics, social psychology, and the bigger realm of media, technology, and behavior. “ Born to Palestinian refugee parents in Amman, Jordan, El-Kour began working in nutrition by delivering gift baskets from food pantries to hospitals for victims of war, disasters, and conflict. “It grew on me and I decided I love it,” she says. “It’s my passion.” Since then, she has demonstrated how augmented reality can teach kids how sugar from soft drinks is metabolized in the body; conducted a cross-cultural analysis of global dietary best practices for autism; and studied how gaming apps are transforming the way children eat.

“I WAS VERY KEEN ON CHOOSING A DOCTORAL PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES SUPPORT AND AT THE SAME TIME WOULD ALLOW ME TO CONTINUE WORKING WHILE STUDYING,”

Last year, she was awarded a fellowship from Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment in order to help Syrian refugees. “So many of them are in hard-to-reach areas and you cannot really get there,” she says. For many of them, the only means of communications is through a texting app called WhatsApp. “I came up with the idea of trying to support women by helping them screen their own children and families for malnutrition using mobile technology. I’m working on it.”

And that boyfriend she followed? He’s now her husband, and they’re raising their family together in Tanzania. “It’s just the most fabulous place to have a childhood,” she says.

“They’re natural inquirers—in a way that I had to learn as an adult from Fielding. If you were to see me now compared to what I was like before Fielding, I’d be unrecognizable.” •

15

TATYANA EL-KOUR, PhD student Media Psychology

Most recently, she has been teaching pregnant and lactating women and their children to cook nutrient-dense, economic meals in a refugee settlement in Lebanon. “My Media Psychology studies inspired my creativity despite harsh living conditions,” she says, “and enabled me to understand the relationship between psychology and nutrition behavior in a crisis setting.” •


14

GLOBAL | 2018

PROTECTING CHILDREN IN TANZANIA

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

TANZANIA, EAST AFRICA

Being a ‘Fielding junkie’ pays off for Kate McAlpine

K

“Rather embarrassingly, I followed a boyfriend,” says Dr. McAlpine, who was 22 years old and studying with her beau at Oxford — she history, he ecology — when he left for East Africa to guide climbers up Kilimanjaro. She went along for the ride. “I had no idea what I was going to do.” But regular encounters with children on the streets of Tanzania sealed her fate. “The kids used to beg around the post office, and I wondered, What’s going on? Why isn’t anyone helping them?” she says. So she set up a soup kitchen out of a tree nursery, where the children could get a hot meal. Then the children began asking for schooling. Then housing. Then vocational training. “Every time we did something, they said they wanted more.” So she founded the Mkombozi Center for Street Children (Mkombozi means “Redeemer” in Swahili), to advocate for children’s rights. They taught the children to make furniture, helped families reunite, and offered conflict mediation between family members. “It was a time and a place and a naïveté,” she says. “As a result, I found myself running this increasingly bigger organization, so I started to be-

USING MEDIA TO FIGHT HUNGER Tatyana El-Kour’s work blends technology, psychology — and empathy

ate McAlpine isn’t terribly proud of what brought her to Tanzania from her native England in the first place. KATE MCALPINE, MA & PhD alumna Human & Organizational Development; certificate in Evidence Based Coaching

come interested in organizational health. That’s when I joined Fielding.” She earned a certificate in Evidence-Based Coaching from Fielding and a Master’s and PhD in Human and Organizational Development. “I absolutely loved it,” says Dr. McAlpine. “I have never learned as I learned at Fielding. It just absolutely nourished me. I particularly loved the teaching and the sense of passion and the values-based education. I come from Oxford, which rides on its own repute. To come to Fielding, which was so wonderfully earnest, was really lovely.” She was able to apply her studies directly to her organization—particularly lessons on integral theory. “That’s stuck with me through everything I do: looking at reality through different validity claims and perspectives,” she says. “It’s the one underpinning that I use in everything, as a way of understanding reality.”

A

s a globetrotting dietitian who works to combat everything from malnutrition to obesity, Tatyana El-Kour needed a PhD program that wouldn’t slow her down.

“I was very keen on choosing a doctoral program that provides support and at the same time would allow me to continue working while studying,” says El-Kour, who was also drawn to Fielding’s Media Psychology program. “I was working with the World Health Organization Regional Office in Cairo, and saw how media played a role in social movements and impacted the role of culture, religion, tradition, and gender. I was interested in how people shape their own behavior and, given how populations have rapidly adopted media and technology, I felt like this was kind of the missing link.”

So far, the program has exceeded her expectations. Not only has it allowed her to continue her work — whether consulting for Action

AMMAN, JORDAN

Dr. McAlpine’s organization won an award for being the most effective child protection agency in Africa. Now she helps others with organizational development. She’s currently working with Tanzania’s Community for Children’s Rights, which conducts research, designs interventions, builds a community of protectors, equips young people to break cycles of violence, and helps local authorities to govern in the interests of children.

Her children are studying in an international baccalaureate program — which Dr. McAlpine notes that her Fielding mentor David Blake Willis helped to develop. Ages 14 and 16, her kids are adaptable and independent, she says:

Dr. McAlpine during the Mkombozi days

El-Kour working with children in a Syrian refugee settlement in Lebanon

Against Hunger in Beirut or presenting on the future of eating at the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C. — but it has enhanced her work. “After I started my PhD at Fielding, I accepted a job supporting organizations implementing nutrition programs for the Syrian crisis,” she says, “and I felt empowered to do so because my studies have enabled me to use geographic information systems to illustrate the spatial clustering of hunger hotspots while also appreciating the interaction of geopolitics, social psychology, and the bigger realm of media, technology, and behavior. “ Born to Palestinian refugee parents in Amman, Jordan, El-Kour began working in nutrition by delivering gift baskets from food pantries to hospitals for victims of war, disasters, and conflict. “It grew on me and I decided I love it,” she says. “It’s my passion.” Since then, she has demonstrated how augmented reality can teach kids how sugar from soft drinks is metabolized in the body; conducted a cross-cultural analysis of global dietary best practices for autism; and studied how gaming apps are transforming the way children eat.

“I WAS VERY KEEN ON CHOOSING A DOCTORAL PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES SUPPORT AND AT THE SAME TIME WOULD ALLOW ME TO CONTINUE WORKING WHILE STUDYING,”

Last year, she was awarded a fellowship from Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment in order to help Syrian refugees. “So many of them are in hard-to-reach areas and you cannot really get there,” she says. For many of them, the only means of communications is through a texting app called WhatsApp. “I came up with the idea of trying to support women by helping them screen their own children and families for malnutrition using mobile technology. I’m working on it.”

And that boyfriend she followed? He’s now her husband, and they’re raising their family together in Tanzania. “It’s just the most fabulous place to have a childhood,” she says.

“They’re natural inquirers—in a way that I had to learn as an adult from Fielding. If you were to see me now compared to what I was like before Fielding, I’d be unrecognizable.” •

15

TATYANA EL-KOUR, PhD student Media Psychology

Most recently, she has been teaching pregnant and lactating women and their children to cook nutrient-dense, economic meals in a refugee settlement in Lebanon. “My Media Psychology studies inspired my creativity despite harsh living conditions,” she says, “and enabled me to understand the relationship between psychology and nutrition behavior in a crisis setting.” •


16

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

20 YEARS OF

ELC

A look back at the history of Educational Leadership for Change By Anna DiStefano & Kathy Tiner Sewell

F

ielding’s first degrees were PhDs in Education.

In 1974, the founders brought with them a small group of students who were disenchanted with another graduate school. Don Bushnell became the program director of the Education Program and awarded the first graduate, Larraine Matusak, a doctorate in higher education administration.

Once that small group of students graduated, Fielding turned its attention to the launch of PhD programs in Clinical and Organizational Psychology. In 1978, Don Bushnell created an additional doctoral program in Human and Organizational Development in response to the focus of adult learning in higher education. That program housed not only the PhD and EdD but also a Doctor of Human Services and a Doctor of Arts. With regional accreditation in the mid-’80s, Fielding focused its attention on the PhD and EdD programs, and institutional enrollments grew significantly for over a decade. New President Don MacIntyre set Fielding on the path of new program development in the early 1990s. He enlisted the support of Anna DiStefano as VP for academic planning and program development, and they collaborated on new initiatives with both external partners and internal faculty and alumni. Don and Anna and Willy DeMarcell Smith (then an associate dean in HOD) embarked on the development of a doctoral program in education that was aimed at transforming the institutions (K through 20+) rather than staffing them with traditional administrators. They used as the foundation for the curriculum the EdD program formerly housed in HOD. They sought to ensure the continuation of the Fielding culture by calling upon the talents of HOD alumni with experience in the field, e.g., Irene McHenry, Jenny Edwards, and Mark Scanlon-Greene. Peter Park, HOD faculty, added expertise to the curricular development, particularly his work with action research. Rodney Beaulieu worked closely with Willy to support the development of the EdD. Soon they were joined by Marie Fielder, Susan Taira, Kathy Tiner, and Judy Witt.

The first cohort in the EdD program for Educational Leadership and Change (ELC) began in 1996 with a memorandum of understanding with Cambridge College. With Willy as dean, the Fielding culture was integrated into the curriculum and climate. A lot of traveling, recruiting, and marketing across the nation resulted in a steady growth pattern for the ELC program. Cohorts supported by regional faculty began in Philadelphia, Savannah, Atlanta, Denver, New York, and Northern and Southern California. Eventually a Virtual Cohort was developed to support students in areas outside of cohort regions. An agreement with the Navajo Nation provided opportunity for Navajo educators to earn their educational doctorates with scholarships from the Nation and Fielding. This collaborative work continues today! With the departure of Willy in 1999 and a failed national search for a new dean, the EdD faculty requested that Susan Taira and Judy Witt become co-deans of the ELC program. A new form of collaborative leadership began at Fielding. When Susan became ill in 2001, Judy became dean. The ELC Scholarship and Praxis committee proposed a redefined curriculum that addressed the inequities in the educational system by graduating educational change agents. Shortly after this curriculum was implemented, the Student Equity Council was successful in advocating for the addition of Structural Inequality and Diversity to the core curriculum. Concentrations were offered in Higher Education Leadership and Community College Leadership. This curriculum was again redesigned in 2012 to focus even more on supporting change agentry with the addition of leadership praxis hours, a course in leadership for change, other course changes, and the design of a curriculum able to be completed within three years. Mario Borunda became the dean of ELC in 2012. The following year, Fielding restructured its program administrative leadership, changing from deans to program directors. Kathy Tiner-Sewell served as program director for 3 years. Barbara Mink is now in that role. Two decades later, hundreds of EdD graduates around the globe are making a difference as Educational Leaders for Change.•

Top: All gowned up: The faculty that have made the ELC program what it is today Bottom: Anna DiStefano (then and now) has helped ELC evolve from its earliest incarnation. She retires this year.

17


16

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

20 YEARS OF

ELC

A look back at the history of Educational Leadership for Change By Anna DiStefano & Kathy Tiner Sewell

F

ielding’s first degrees were PhDs in Education.

In 1974, the founders brought with them a small group of students who were disenchanted with another graduate school. Don Bushnell became the program director of the Education Program and awarded the first graduate, Larraine Matusak, a doctorate in higher education administration.

Once that small group of students graduated, Fielding turned its attention to the launch of PhD programs in Clinical and Organizational Psychology. In 1978, Don Bushnell created an additional doctoral program in Human and Organizational Development in response to the focus of adult learning in higher education. That program housed not only the PhD and EdD but also a Doctor of Human Services and a Doctor of Arts. With regional accreditation in the mid-’80s, Fielding focused its attention on the PhD and EdD programs, and institutional enrollments grew significantly for over a decade. New President Don MacIntyre set Fielding on the path of new program development in the early 1990s. He enlisted the support of Anna DiStefano as VP for academic planning and program development, and they collaborated on new initiatives with both external partners and internal faculty and alumni. Don and Anna and Willy DeMarcell Smith (then an associate dean in HOD) embarked on the development of a doctoral program in education that was aimed at transforming the institutions (K through 20+) rather than staffing them with traditional administrators. They used as the foundation for the curriculum the EdD program formerly housed in HOD. They sought to ensure the continuation of the Fielding culture by calling upon the talents of HOD alumni with experience in the field, e.g., Irene McHenry, Jenny Edwards, and Mark Scanlon-Greene. Peter Park, HOD faculty, added expertise to the curricular development, particularly his work with action research. Rodney Beaulieu worked closely with Willy to support the development of the EdD. Soon they were joined by Marie Fielder, Susan Taira, Kathy Tiner, and Judy Witt.

The first cohort in the EdD program for Educational Leadership and Change (ELC) began in 1996 with a memorandum of understanding with Cambridge College. With Willy as dean, the Fielding culture was integrated into the curriculum and climate. A lot of traveling, recruiting, and marketing across the nation resulted in a steady growth pattern for the ELC program. Cohorts supported by regional faculty began in Philadelphia, Savannah, Atlanta, Denver, New York, and Northern and Southern California. Eventually a Virtual Cohort was developed to support students in areas outside of cohort regions. An agreement with the Navajo Nation provided opportunity for Navajo educators to earn their educational doctorates with scholarships from the Nation and Fielding. This collaborative work continues today! With the departure of Willy in 1999 and a failed national search for a new dean, the EdD faculty requested that Susan Taira and Judy Witt become co-deans of the ELC program. A new form of collaborative leadership began at Fielding. When Susan became ill in 2001, Judy became dean. The ELC Scholarship and Praxis committee proposed a redefined curriculum that addressed the inequities in the educational system by graduating educational change agents. Shortly after this curriculum was implemented, the Student Equity Council was successful in advocating for the addition of Structural Inequality and Diversity to the core curriculum. Concentrations were offered in Higher Education Leadership and Community College Leadership. This curriculum was again redesigned in 2012 to focus even more on supporting change agentry with the addition of leadership praxis hours, a course in leadership for change, other course changes, and the design of a curriculum able to be completed within three years. Mario Borunda became the dean of ELC in 2012. The following year, Fielding restructured its program administrative leadership, changing from deans to program directors. Kathy Tiner-Sewell served as program director for 3 years. Barbara Mink is now in that role. Two decades later, hundreds of EdD graduates around the globe are making a difference as Educational Leaders for Change.•

Top: All gowned up: The faculty that have made the ELC program what it is today Bottom: Anna DiStefano (then and now) has helped ELC evolve from its earliest incarnation. She retires this year.

17


18

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

PROMOTING WORLD PEACE Faculty member Margo OkazawaRey seeks justice for all

W

hen Margo Okazawa-Rey was 11, her grandmother asked her what she wanted to be when she grew up.

“I remember saying I wanted to be a doctor or a social worker to help people,” she says. “I’ve always wanted to be of service.” Over a lifetime that has included community activism, feminist research, tenured and endowed-chair visiting faculty appointments, a dozen years as doctoral faculty at Fielding — and yes, even time as a social worker — Dr. Okazawa-Rey has spent the last two decades focused on promoting global peace and justice. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the International Women’s Network Against Militarism, a network she co-founded to examine and educate people about the ways that war, colonization, and the presence of military bases impact communities. This summer, members from the group’s eight regions — the US, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Guam, Korea, Okinawa, Japan, and Philippines — gathered in Naha, Okinawa, to report on the environmental destruction, sexual violence, and economic impacts of US military bases in those regions and the impacts on the most vulnerable people: poor women and children, indigenous people, and youth who are part of the “poverty draft.”

“Precious land and natural resources have been destroyed due to things like toxic materials used to clean military equipment and live-fire exercises and trainings,” says Dr. Okazawa-Rey. “We spent four days together sharing current conditions, analyzing the situations, and figuring out next steps.” Each local group organizes around its specific issues; for example, the Okinawan women are organizing against the construction of a new base in Henoko that will destroy ocean habitats, coral, and other sea life. The entire Network, particularly U.S. members, petitions the US

MARGO OKAZAWA-REY, EdD, Doctoral faculty Human & Organizational Development

government to close bases, clean up contaminated lands, stop recruiting from schools in Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US, and train military personnel to respect local women and culture. “All actions are both local and global,” Dr. Okazawa-Rey explains. “We experience phenomena ‘here’ but the even bigger impacts are ‘there.’ The saying goes, ‘When the US sneezes, the world catches cold.’ Our friends abroad get this connection, but many folks in the US have no real idea the terrifying impacts abroad.” Her own international perspective comes from experience, education — and exploration. “Coming to the States in 1960 as a mixed-race Black and Japanese child from Japan after WWII was a tricky proposition,” she says. The civil rights and women’s movements helped to broaden her perspective, but her experience as a Fulbright Senior Researcher in Korea in 1994 propelled her activism and research beyond US borders. That global outlook informs the way she interacts with doctoral candidates at Fielding. “When I work with international students, I insist they have an external reviewer from their own country,” she says, “and literature written by their scholars in their own languages.”

Dr. Okazawa-Rey will retire soon — but don’t expect her to stop dedicating her hands and heart to making the world a more just and peaceful place. She contributes her knowledge and skills to the Southeast Asia Team of Just Associates, a global, feminist human rights organization. And she plans to keep fulfilling the dream she had as a child: to be of service. “I’ll be encouraging people, especially women, to find their bigger purpose in life,” she says, “or to refine it and feel emboldened to live it daily.” •

A recent study shows that Fielding students and applicants...

• ARE POLITICALLY ACTIVE • ARE AVID READERS • ENJOY TRAVELING

19

‘READY TO MAKE CHANGE’ WHERE DO YOU LIVE AND WORK?

I temporarily live in Santa Barbara with my wife and daughter and I am working as a manager at a private school. My wife and I both are Chinese, so we will move back to our hometown, QingDao, China, when we both finish our studies.

WHAT ARE YOU STUDYING AT FIELDING UNIVERSITY?

I am in the leadership for change program. Moreover, I am training myself to be a good researcher and critical thinker.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO ATTEND FIELDING?

QINGDAO, CHINA

I can tell Fielding is a fast-growing institution, one of the most successful leaders in the online education area.

WHAT HAS YOUR EXPERIENCE BEEN LIKE SO FAR AT FIELDING?

I finally ZUOPIN QIN, EdD student Educational Leadership for Change understand one thing about myself: Learners do not need others to “guard” them to learn, they only need wise men to guide them. People have passion to find out what they really want to be. The most important thing that I’ve learned is how to be openminded and how to be ready to make change.

WHAT FACULTY MEMBER HAVE YOU MOST CONNECTED WITH?

Dr. Teresa Marquez-Lopez and I discussed a lot of dual-language topics. She is one of the most professional researchers in this area, and I got many new ideas from her. HOW DOES FIELDING SUPPORT AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE?

When we started our academic work, we began with “systems thinking”—not only focusing on the perspective of one country. The faculty knows details about other cultures — they know about my culture — and they share what they know. In fact, Fielding brings together a big international family. •


18

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

PROMOTING WORLD PEACE Faculty member Margo OkazawaRey seeks justice for all

W

hen Margo Okazawa-Rey was 11, her grandmother asked her what she wanted to be when she grew up.

“I remember saying I wanted to be a doctor or a social worker to help people,” she says. “I’ve always wanted to be of service.” Over a lifetime that has included community activism, feminist research, tenured and endowed-chair visiting faculty appointments, a dozen years as doctoral faculty at Fielding — and yes, even time as a social worker — Dr. Okazawa-Rey has spent the last two decades focused on promoting global peace and justice. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the International Women’s Network Against Militarism, a network she co-founded to examine and educate people about the ways that war, colonization, and the presence of military bases impact communities. This summer, members from the group’s eight regions — the US, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Guam, Korea, Okinawa, Japan, and Philippines — gathered in Naha, Okinawa, to report on the environmental destruction, sexual violence, and economic impacts of US military bases in those regions and the impacts on the most vulnerable people: poor women and children, indigenous people, and youth who are part of the “poverty draft.”

“Precious land and natural resources have been destroyed due to things like toxic materials used to clean military equipment and live-fire exercises and trainings,” says Dr. Okazawa-Rey. “We spent four days together sharing current conditions, analyzing the situations, and figuring out next steps.” Each local group organizes around its specific issues; for example, the Okinawan women are organizing against the construction of a new base in Henoko that will destroy ocean habitats, coral, and other sea life. The entire Network, particularly U.S. members, petitions the US

MARGO OKAZAWA-REY, EdD, Doctoral faculty Human & Organizational Development

government to close bases, clean up contaminated lands, stop recruiting from schools in Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US, and train military personnel to respect local women and culture. “All actions are both local and global,” Dr. Okazawa-Rey explains. “We experience phenomena ‘here’ but the even bigger impacts are ‘there.’ The saying goes, ‘When the US sneezes, the world catches cold.’ Our friends abroad get this connection, but many folks in the US have no real idea the terrifying impacts abroad.” Her own international perspective comes from experience, education — and exploration. “Coming to the States in 1960 as a mixed-race Black and Japanese child from Japan after WWII was a tricky proposition,” she says. The civil rights and women’s movements helped to broaden her perspective, but her experience as a Fulbright Senior Researcher in Korea in 1994 propelled her activism and research beyond US borders. That global outlook informs the way she interacts with doctoral candidates at Fielding. “When I work with international students, I insist they have an external reviewer from their own country,” she says, “and literature written by their scholars in their own languages.”

Dr. Okazawa-Rey will retire soon — but don’t expect her to stop dedicating her hands and heart to making the world a more just and peaceful place. She contributes her knowledge and skills to the Southeast Asia Team of Just Associates, a global, feminist human rights organization. And she plans to keep fulfilling the dream she had as a child: to be of service. “I’ll be encouraging people, especially women, to find their bigger purpose in life,” she says, “or to refine it and feel emboldened to live it daily.” •

A recent study shows that Fielding students and applicants...

• ARE POLITICALLY ACTIVE • ARE AVID READERS • ENJOY TRAVELING

19

‘READY TO MAKE CHANGE’ WHERE DO YOU LIVE AND WORK?

I temporarily live in Santa Barbara with my wife and daughter and I am working as a manager at a private school. My wife and I both are Chinese, so we will move back to our hometown, QingDao, China, when we both finish our studies.

WHAT ARE YOU STUDYING AT FIELDING UNIVERSITY?

I am in the leadership for change program. Moreover, I am training myself to be a good researcher and critical thinker.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO ATTEND FIELDING?

QINGDAO, CHINA

I can tell Fielding is a fast-growing institution, one of the most successful leaders in the online education area.

WHAT HAS YOUR EXPERIENCE BEEN LIKE SO FAR AT FIELDING?

I finally ZUOPIN QIN, EdD student Educational Leadership for Change understand one thing about myself: Learners do not need others to “guard” them to learn, they only need wise men to guide them. People have passion to find out what they really want to be. The most important thing that I’ve learned is how to be openminded and how to be ready to make change.

WHAT FACULTY MEMBER HAVE YOU MOST CONNECTED WITH?

Dr. Teresa Marquez-Lopez and I discussed a lot of dual-language topics. She is one of the most professional researchers in this area, and I got many new ideas from her. HOW DOES FIELDING SUPPORT AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE?

When we started our academic work, we began with “systems thinking”—not only focusing on the perspective of one country. The faculty knows details about other cultures — they know about my culture — and they share what they know. In fact, Fielding brings together a big international family. •


20

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

OSLO, NORWAY

21

Master’s & Certificate Graduates May 1, 2017–November 1, 2017

W

hether he’s donning his running shoes and hitting the trail, or winging back and forth between his home bases in Norway and Florida, or zipping from one academic discipline to another … and another—faculty member Fred Steier isn’t a guy who likes to stay in one place.

It’s his inquisitive nature, he says, that drives his urge to explore: “It’s having that curiosity about what something looks like from another perspective.” In the course of his academic career, he has worked with substance abusers and done participatory action research at NASA to look at their organizational culture after the Challenger accident. He has been a research director at a family therapy clinic, professor of communication, graduate program director of an engineering management program, chair of a department of theater arts, visiting scholar in an anthropology department, and Director of a Center for Cybernetic Studies in Complex Systems. “These seem to be all over the place in terms of a traditional notion of career,” notes Dr. Steier, who calls himself an ‘academic wanderer.’ “And yet, for me, there is a thread of continuity — and that thread is systemic and ecological understanding. I have always valued my systems background as a way of making clear the importance of the integration of multiple perspectives. “Issues that matter, and wicked problems, don’t have disciplinary boundaries.”

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

MASTER OF ARTS IN COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Jaslynn A. Cuff Rachaell Dockery Teresa Gouch Elizabeth B. Hallock Trenice P. Jefferson Maia M. King Patrick W. Montgomery Randi Mott Haruna Nail Brittney L. Roberson Trisha Whitmer Kelly N. Williams

Hortencia A. Corral Sonya L. Cross Rachel L. Fauver

TRAVERSING BOUNDARIES Fred Steier is a global and academic wanderer

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP Paul G. Ferratella Julie A. Fotheringham Amanda Negrete

FRED STEIER, PhD, Doctoral faculty Human & Organizational Development

Dr. Steier traveled to Norway as a graduate student. “I fell in love both with the land, and with what I felt was a strong ecological and environmental appreciation in the culture,” he says. “I also was a serious runner at the time, and felt that training in Norway was ideal.” Later, in his doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania, his studies of action research intersected with Norway’s industrial democracy movement. Then he met and married a Norwegian-American and they both received grants to do academic research in Oslo. Now he splits his time between there and Tampa, Florida — and gets to travel in between. “I’ve been fortunate to participate in several sessions sponsored by Fielding,” he says, “that brought together many facets of learning life in different countries.” These included a systems intensive at a lighthouse in northern Norway; a meeting for possible collaboration with the World Food Programme in Rome; an intensive in San Cugat, near Barcelona; a collaborative design session in Malmö, Sweden; and a meeting at a design studio in Amsterdam. Students attended from all over the world. “Having students all over the globe is a tremendous advantage for learning at Fielding – for the students, as a whole system, interacting with each other, and bringing insights from different cultural perspectives into all of the knowledge areas in which we work,” he says. “More than that, though, it is also a significant learning opportunity for us as faculty.”

CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Wendy J. Allen Jean Calasa Lori S. Cromley Kristen Del Simone Nicole Forward Woodson Xavier D. Johnson Paula E. Lee Roberta Mancuso Maria L. Marcon Janice A. Molloy Eliana Temkin Avonlie Wylson CERTIFICATE IN EVIDENCE BASED COACHING FOR ORGANIZATION LEADERSHIP Asma Batool Gary Dunahoo Jeanette Ebalo-Gangoy Monique Grissette-Banks Melissa Y. Kong CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL CONSULTING Wuraola O. Oladokun Terry B. Vida

Keely C. Contadeluci Andrea M. Gardner Ainslee Johnson Karin Mordt Heidi R. West Jessica J. Yemm CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH EMPHASIS IN BRAND PSYCHOLOGY & AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Tenika L. Moore CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Robert Dalton Haig J. Kojian Balaji Nettimi Paula A. Neuman Leslie A. Russell-Martin Amy Swope Eve G. Weber Joseph Wright Bonnie F. Yee-Hebert CERTIFICATE IN RESPECIALIZATION IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Courtney L. Crooks Stefanie A. Gray Angela C. Stewart


20

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

OSLO, NORWAY

21

Master’s & Certificate Graduates May 1, 2017–November 1, 2017

W

hether he’s donning his running shoes and hitting the trail, or winging back and forth between his home bases in Norway and Florida, or zipping from one academic discipline to another … and another—faculty member Fred Steier isn’t a guy who likes to stay in one place.

It’s his inquisitive nature, he says, that drives his urge to explore: “It’s having that curiosity about what something looks like from another perspective.” In the course of his academic career, he has worked with substance abusers and done participatory action research at NASA to look at their organizational culture after the Challenger accident. He has been a research director at a family therapy clinic, professor of communication, graduate program director of an engineering management program, chair of a department of theater arts, visiting scholar in an anthropology department, and Director of a Center for Cybernetic Studies in Complex Systems. “These seem to be all over the place in terms of a traditional notion of career,” notes Dr. Steier, who calls himself an ‘academic wanderer.’ “And yet, for me, there is a thread of continuity — and that thread is systemic and ecological understanding. I have always valued my systems background as a way of making clear the importance of the integration of multiple perspectives. “Issues that matter, and wicked problems, don’t have disciplinary boundaries.”

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

MASTER OF ARTS IN COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Jaslynn A. Cuff Rachaell Dockery Teresa Gouch Elizabeth B. Hallock Trenice P. Jefferson Maia M. King Patrick W. Montgomery Randi Mott Haruna Nail Brittney L. Roberson Trisha Whitmer Kelly N. Williams

Hortencia A. Corral Sonya L. Cross Rachel L. Fauver

TRAVERSING BOUNDARIES Fred Steier is a global and academic wanderer

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP Paul G. Ferratella Julie A. Fotheringham Amanda Negrete

FRED STEIER, PhD, Doctoral faculty Human & Organizational Development

Dr. Steier traveled to Norway as a graduate student. “I fell in love both with the land, and with what I felt was a strong ecological and environmental appreciation in the culture,” he says. “I also was a serious runner at the time, and felt that training in Norway was ideal.” Later, in his doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania, his studies of action research intersected with Norway’s industrial democracy movement. Then he met and married a Norwegian-American and they both received grants to do academic research in Oslo. Now he splits his time between there and Tampa, Florida — and gets to travel in between. “I’ve been fortunate to participate in several sessions sponsored by Fielding,” he says, “that brought together many facets of learning life in different countries.” These included a systems intensive at a lighthouse in northern Norway; a meeting for possible collaboration with the World Food Programme in Rome; an intensive in San Cugat, near Barcelona; a collaborative design session in Malmö, Sweden; and a meeting at a design studio in Amsterdam. Students attended from all over the world. “Having students all over the globe is a tremendous advantage for learning at Fielding – for the students, as a whole system, interacting with each other, and bringing insights from different cultural perspectives into all of the knowledge areas in which we work,” he says. “More than that, though, it is also a significant learning opportunity for us as faculty.”

CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Wendy J. Allen Jean Calasa Lori S. Cromley Kristen Del Simone Nicole Forward Woodson Xavier D. Johnson Paula E. Lee Roberta Mancuso Maria L. Marcon Janice A. Molloy Eliana Temkin Avonlie Wylson CERTIFICATE IN EVIDENCE BASED COACHING FOR ORGANIZATION LEADERSHIP Asma Batool Gary Dunahoo Jeanette Ebalo-Gangoy Monique Grissette-Banks Melissa Y. Kong CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL CONSULTING Wuraola O. Oladokun Terry B. Vida

Keely C. Contadeluci Andrea M. Gardner Ainslee Johnson Karin Mordt Heidi R. West Jessica J. Yemm CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH EMPHASIS IN BRAND PSYCHOLOGY & AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Tenika L. Moore CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Robert Dalton Haig J. Kojian Balaji Nettimi Paula A. Neuman Leslie A. Russell-Martin Amy Swope Eve G. Weber Joseph Wright Bonnie F. Yee-Hebert CERTIFICATE IN RESPECIALIZATION IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Courtney L. Crooks Stefanie A. Gray Angela C. Stewart


22

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Doctoral Graduates

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

May 1, 2017–November 1, 2017 SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

HUMAN AND ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Anthony E. Beebe, PhD State-Mandated

Rachelle Agatha, EdD The Community

College Funding Model: Changes for Success and Sustainability

Robin E. Hummel, EdD Exploring

Action Research as an Enduring Experience of Professional Development for Teachers

Juana Leia Jordan, EdD Voices of

Success Speaking of Lived Experiences of the Formerly Incarcerated

Tim Karas, EdD Through Increasing “Information Literacy” Capital and Habitus (Agency) the Complementary Impact on Composition Skills When Appropriately... Kristopher Ernest Rodriguez, EdD

How Do Consecrated Church Professionals Respond to the Catholic Faithful Who Express Affection in Ways That Are in Conflict with ...

Odemaris Valdivia, EdD

Designing Effective Vocational Education Curriculum to Meet Industry Needs

Dorothy Jones Valentine, EdD

Participatory Governance in California Community Colleges

Ellen Keithline Byrne, PhD

Mindful Creativity: An Exploration of a Mindfulness Intervention on Workgroup Creativity

Yagambaram Chetty, PhD

Social Justice Transition of Privileged Persons: A Phenomenological Study

Relationships, and Power: A Heideggerian Hermeneutic Study on the Experiences of Servant-Leaders

Muhsine I. Ozgen, PhD An Exploration

of the Determinants of Willingness to Mentor in Turkish Organizations

Robert B. Polk, Ma A Multimodal Study

Flavio M. Da Silva, PhD

Generation of Peace Dialogues: How the World Cafe Approach to Community Understanding Led to Cultures of Peace

W. Daniel Edgar, PhD Workplace

Social Networks and Autonomous Individual Innovation by Automotive Salespeople

Luis Gerardo Gonzalez Lopez, PhD

Developing Personal, Interpersonal, and Leadership Dimensions While Learning Civic Competencies in Service-Learning Experiences

Ruth L. Kennedy, PhD

Phenomenon of Overcoming Academic Challenges and Failure to Achieve Academic Goals

Ayumi Nishii, PhD Servanthood as Love,

Internal Organization Development (OD) Practitioners and Sustainability

Resolving the Wicked Nature of Compensation: A Meta-Ethical Approach

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Sam Jama, PhD Understanding the

American Voices in Concept Analysis of SelfIn-Relationship Through Narrative; Theme; Metaphor

on How Embodiment Relates to Perception of Complexity

Tad A. Hove, PhD Self-Determination

Construction in a Motorcycle Club

Suzan A. McVicker, PhD Cherokee

Claude Joseph Cloutier, PhD

Community Networks and Effective Change in Proprietary Colleges and Universities: A Systems Perspective

Anne S. Byrd, PhD Dominant Masculinity

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Theory and Higher Education Student Development

Shared Leadership in a Matrix Organization: An Exploratory Study

Mari C. Kong, PhD Being Brown on

the Thin Blue Line: A Narrative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Latinas within the Institution of Policing

Elizabeth A. Lennon, PhD

Witnessing: Médecins Sans Frontières and the Path from Encounter to Social Action

Mark Russell Luna, PhD

Perceptions of Promotion: An Examination of Hispanic Men’s Perceptions for Managerial Advancement in the Workplace

Juliann M. Smendzuik-O’Brien, PhD

Dawn E. Tymianski, PhD Medical

Error in the Canadian Healthcare System: Role Ambiguity, Accountability and Communication ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE

Marc Hanlan, PhD

Seven Impossible Things: The Experience and Dynamics of Developing a Transcendent Team INFANT & EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT WITH EMPHASIS IN MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Cristin Checchia, PhD Feeding

Difficulties and Social Connection within the Mother-Child: A Dynamic Systems Approach

Elaine T. Francisco, PhD Public School

Leadership: A Phenomenological Study of Professionals in Positions of Educational Leadership

Stephanie Nilsen, PhD Sensory

Strategies for Emotional Health, Behavioral Health, and Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom Setting

Dana A. Farr, PhD Leisure Time Physical Activity Moderates the Relationship Between Work Stress & Older Workers’ Mental Health

Ursula H. Alford, PhD Assessing Contributing Factors of Emotional & Social Function in Parkinson’s Candidates Prior to Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery

Dannie S. Harris, PhD The Effects of Adaptive Schemas on Coping Self-Efficacy & Posttraumatic Stress

Sandra D. Barnes, PhD The Impact of

Male Imprisonment Tattoos: The Experience of Tattooing While Serving Time & PostIncarceration

Spanking on African American Children

Brittany A. Blackmon, PhD

The Complexion Conflict: A Grounded Theory Investigation of Color Consciousness in LightSkinned Black Women

Yehoshua Bochner, PhD

The Influence of Adult Attachment Style on Marital Satisfaction in Hasidic/Arranged Marriages & Impact of Marital Expectations …

Deitra E. Bryant-Mallory, PhD

Sarah C. Holland, PhD

Athena Hubbard, PhD The Role of

Relationship Satisfaction in the Development of Posttraumatic Growth & Trauma Symptomatology in Service Members

Jamie M. Hutchcraft, PhD Mindfulness,

Dialectical Self-Esteem, & Health Behaviors in College Students

Cognitive Theory & the Effects of SPARCS on PTSD Symptom Reduction and School Functioning

Jeremy Dale Jinkerson, PhD Moral Injury in Combat Veterans: A Theoretical and Empirical Explanation of the Moderating Role of Worldview Relationships

Angela J. Buffington, PhD

Angela S. Klemm, PhD Direct

The Association of Religious Affiliation with the MMPI-A Alcohol/ Drug Problem Acknowledgment Scale in Post-Soviet Russian Adolescents

Malena Castillo, PhD How Latina

Supervisors with Organizational Power Experience Their Solo Status in a Mixed Ethnic and Mixed Gender Workplace Setting

Elizabeth Dampsey, PhD The Effects of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy on Emotion Regulation: Self-Efficacy and Self-Awareness as Potential Mediators Wade T. Deamond, PhD Do Proxies

for the Neurotransmitter Cortisol Predict Adaptation to Life with Chronic Pain?

Support Professionals’ Attachment Patterns, Mindfulness Qualities, and Work Experience

Dawn Yvonne Lanaville, PhD

Predicting Adult Sexual Aggression in Persons Exposed to Childhood Sexual Abuse

Monica A. Oganes, PhD

The Relationship Between CHC Factors as Measured by Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children & Reading Skills as Measured …

Kimberly D. Overlie, PhD

Adolescent Synthetic Drug Use: An Examination of Factors Predicting Synthetic Drug Use in Minnesota Junior High & HighSchool Students

Julio Rosado, PhD Interventions to Reduce Perceived Stigma for Mental Health Treatment in a Veteran Population Stephanie L. Schulz-Kraszewski, PhD Schemas, Well-Being, & Bullying in

Young Adults

Rebecca J. Smith, PhD The Relationship Between Adolescent Prosocial Moral Reasoning, Risk-Taking, & Perceived Environment to Prosocial Behaviors Jane M. Van Sickle, PhD The Effects of Cranio-Facial Reconstruction on Self-Identity MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Juan-Carlos Duran, PhD Digital Micronarratives as Tactics for Influencing Online Consumer Decision Making Michael W. French, PhD

Anna Catherine Lewis, PhD Utility

Barack Obama’s Campaign Strategy: How He Used Spoken Media to Counteract Cultural Stereotypes

Audrey G. Masilla, PhD Does Dodge’s

Inspiration & Aspiration: Women in STEM Careers Reflect on Role Models, Media Portrayals, & Influences on Occupational Goals

Cobi S. Michael, Phd Contributions of

of a Model of Family Functioning to Predict Early Adolescent Internalizing & Externalizing Behaviors

Social Information Processing Model Explain Perpetration of Sexual Aggression in Adults Within the General Population?

Kristin M. Hopper-Losenicky, PhD

Matthew L. Price, PhD

Elizabeth A. DeRouin, PhD

Hierarchical Attachments to Student Adaption to College

Calibrating Reality with a Mind’s Mirror Postulate: Towards a Comprehensive Schema for Measuring Personal Presence

Daniel Muñoz-Santamaria, PhD

Tunisha J. Singleton, PhD Digital

Tiffany Marie Duffing, PhD Killing in

The Role of Classroom Norms in Moderating the Relations of Children’s Behaviors to Peer Victimization

Billie C. Myers, PhD Shyness & Touch Avoidance: Does Interpersonal Dependency Moderate a Relationship?

Larry R. Taylor, PhD A Model for

An Examination of Relations Between the Emotional Reactivity Factor of Differentiation of Self, Family Structure, & Suicidal Ideation … Combat, Post-Combat Nightmare Distress, & TBI Among Active Duty Military Personnel with and without Suicidal Ideations

David M. Durst, PhD Fearful Avoidance & Mitigating Factors of Interdependence Among Adult Female Participants: A Qualitative Analysis

23

Khristina L. Nava, PhD Juror Decisions in a Capital Trial Involving Intellectual Disability

Fandemonium: Translating the Sport Experience & Fan Identification Through Emergent Technology the Classification of Digital Trust in Online Healthcare Social Networks


22

GLOBAL | 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Doctoral Graduates

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

May 1, 2017–November 1, 2017 SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

HUMAN AND ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Anthony E. Beebe, PhD State-Mandated

Rachelle Agatha, EdD The Community

College Funding Model: Changes for Success and Sustainability

Robin E. Hummel, EdD Exploring

Action Research as an Enduring Experience of Professional Development for Teachers

Juana Leia Jordan, EdD Voices of

Success Speaking of Lived Experiences of the Formerly Incarcerated

Tim Karas, EdD Through Increasing “Information Literacy” Capital and Habitus (Agency) the Complementary Impact on Composition Skills When Appropriately... Kristopher Ernest Rodriguez, EdD

How Do Consecrated Church Professionals Respond to the Catholic Faithful Who Express Affection in Ways That Are in Conflict with ...

Odemaris Valdivia, EdD

Designing Effective Vocational Education Curriculum to Meet Industry Needs

Dorothy Jones Valentine, EdD

Participatory Governance in California Community Colleges

Ellen Keithline Byrne, PhD

Mindful Creativity: An Exploration of a Mindfulness Intervention on Workgroup Creativity

Yagambaram Chetty, PhD

Social Justice Transition of Privileged Persons: A Phenomenological Study

Relationships, and Power: A Heideggerian Hermeneutic Study on the Experiences of Servant-Leaders

Muhsine I. Ozgen, PhD An Exploration

of the Determinants of Willingness to Mentor in Turkish Organizations

Robert B. Polk, Ma A Multimodal Study

Flavio M. Da Silva, PhD

Generation of Peace Dialogues: How the World Cafe Approach to Community Understanding Led to Cultures of Peace

W. Daniel Edgar, PhD Workplace

Social Networks and Autonomous Individual Innovation by Automotive Salespeople

Luis Gerardo Gonzalez Lopez, PhD

Developing Personal, Interpersonal, and Leadership Dimensions While Learning Civic Competencies in Service-Learning Experiences

Ruth L. Kennedy, PhD

Phenomenon of Overcoming Academic Challenges and Failure to Achieve Academic Goals

Ayumi Nishii, PhD Servanthood as Love,

Internal Organization Development (OD) Practitioners and Sustainability

Resolving the Wicked Nature of Compensation: A Meta-Ethical Approach

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Sam Jama, PhD Understanding the

American Voices in Concept Analysis of SelfIn-Relationship Through Narrative; Theme; Metaphor

on How Embodiment Relates to Perception of Complexity

Tad A. Hove, PhD Self-Determination

Construction in a Motorcycle Club

Suzan A. McVicker, PhD Cherokee

Claude Joseph Cloutier, PhD

Community Networks and Effective Change in Proprietary Colleges and Universities: A Systems Perspective

Anne S. Byrd, PhD Dominant Masculinity

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Theory and Higher Education Student Development

Shared Leadership in a Matrix Organization: An Exploratory Study

Mari C. Kong, PhD Being Brown on

the Thin Blue Line: A Narrative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Latinas within the Institution of Policing

Elizabeth A. Lennon, PhD

Witnessing: Médecins Sans Frontières and the Path from Encounter to Social Action

Mark Russell Luna, PhD

Perceptions of Promotion: An Examination of Hispanic Men’s Perceptions for Managerial Advancement in the Workplace

Juliann M. Smendzuik-O’Brien, PhD

Dawn E. Tymianski, PhD Medical

Error in the Canadian Healthcare System: Role Ambiguity, Accountability and Communication ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE

Marc Hanlan, PhD

Seven Impossible Things: The Experience and Dynamics of Developing a Transcendent Team INFANT & EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT WITH EMPHASIS IN MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Cristin Checchia, PhD Feeding

Difficulties and Social Connection within the Mother-Child: A Dynamic Systems Approach

Elaine T. Francisco, PhD Public School

Leadership: A Phenomenological Study of Professionals in Positions of Educational Leadership

Stephanie Nilsen, PhD Sensory

Strategies for Emotional Health, Behavioral Health, and Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom Setting

Dana A. Farr, PhD Leisure Time Physical Activity Moderates the Relationship Between Work Stress & Older Workers’ Mental Health

Ursula H. Alford, PhD Assessing Contributing Factors of Emotional & Social Function in Parkinson’s Candidates Prior to Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery

Dannie S. Harris, PhD The Effects of Adaptive Schemas on Coping Self-Efficacy & Posttraumatic Stress

Sandra D. Barnes, PhD The Impact of

Male Imprisonment Tattoos: The Experience of Tattooing While Serving Time & PostIncarceration

Spanking on African American Children

Brittany A. Blackmon, PhD

The Complexion Conflict: A Grounded Theory Investigation of Color Consciousness in LightSkinned Black Women

Yehoshua Bochner, PhD

The Influence of Adult Attachment Style on Marital Satisfaction in Hasidic/Arranged Marriages & Impact of Marital Expectations …

Deitra E. Bryant-Mallory, PhD

Sarah C. Holland, PhD

Athena Hubbard, PhD The Role of

Relationship Satisfaction in the Development of Posttraumatic Growth & Trauma Symptomatology in Service Members

Jamie M. Hutchcraft, PhD Mindfulness,

Dialectical Self-Esteem, & Health Behaviors in College Students

Cognitive Theory & the Effects of SPARCS on PTSD Symptom Reduction and School Functioning

Jeremy Dale Jinkerson, PhD Moral Injury in Combat Veterans: A Theoretical and Empirical Explanation of the Moderating Role of Worldview Relationships

Angela J. Buffington, PhD

Angela S. Klemm, PhD Direct

The Association of Religious Affiliation with the MMPI-A Alcohol/ Drug Problem Acknowledgment Scale in Post-Soviet Russian Adolescents

Malena Castillo, PhD How Latina

Supervisors with Organizational Power Experience Their Solo Status in a Mixed Ethnic and Mixed Gender Workplace Setting

Elizabeth Dampsey, PhD The Effects of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy on Emotion Regulation: Self-Efficacy and Self-Awareness as Potential Mediators Wade T. Deamond, PhD Do Proxies

for the Neurotransmitter Cortisol Predict Adaptation to Life with Chronic Pain?

Support Professionals’ Attachment Patterns, Mindfulness Qualities, and Work Experience

Dawn Yvonne Lanaville, PhD

Predicting Adult Sexual Aggression in Persons Exposed to Childhood Sexual Abuse

Monica A. Oganes, PhD

The Relationship Between CHC Factors as Measured by Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children & Reading Skills as Measured …

Kimberly D. Overlie, PhD

Adolescent Synthetic Drug Use: An Examination of Factors Predicting Synthetic Drug Use in Minnesota Junior High & HighSchool Students

Julio Rosado, PhD Interventions to Reduce Perceived Stigma for Mental Health Treatment in a Veteran Population Stephanie L. Schulz-Kraszewski, PhD Schemas, Well-Being, & Bullying in

Young Adults

Rebecca J. Smith, PhD The Relationship Between Adolescent Prosocial Moral Reasoning, Risk-Taking, & Perceived Environment to Prosocial Behaviors Jane M. Van Sickle, PhD The Effects of Cranio-Facial Reconstruction on Self-Identity MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Juan-Carlos Duran, PhD Digital Micronarratives as Tactics for Influencing Online Consumer Decision Making Michael W. French, PhD

Anna Catherine Lewis, PhD Utility

Barack Obama’s Campaign Strategy: How He Used Spoken Media to Counteract Cultural Stereotypes

Audrey G. Masilla, PhD Does Dodge’s

Inspiration & Aspiration: Women in STEM Careers Reflect on Role Models, Media Portrayals, & Influences on Occupational Goals

Cobi S. Michael, Phd Contributions of

of a Model of Family Functioning to Predict Early Adolescent Internalizing & Externalizing Behaviors

Social Information Processing Model Explain Perpetration of Sexual Aggression in Adults Within the General Population?

Kristin M. Hopper-Losenicky, PhD

Matthew L. Price, PhD

Elizabeth A. DeRouin, PhD

Hierarchical Attachments to Student Adaption to College

Calibrating Reality with a Mind’s Mirror Postulate: Towards a Comprehensive Schema for Measuring Personal Presence

Daniel Muñoz-Santamaria, PhD

Tunisha J. Singleton, PhD Digital

Tiffany Marie Duffing, PhD Killing in

The Role of Classroom Norms in Moderating the Relations of Children’s Behaviors to Peer Victimization

Billie C. Myers, PhD Shyness & Touch Avoidance: Does Interpersonal Dependency Moderate a Relationship?

Larry R. Taylor, PhD A Model for

An Examination of Relations Between the Emotional Reactivity Factor of Differentiation of Self, Family Structure, & Suicidal Ideation … Combat, Post-Combat Nightmare Distress, & TBI Among Active Duty Military Personnel with and without Suicidal Ideations

David M. Durst, PhD Fearful Avoidance & Mitigating Factors of Interdependence Among Adult Female Participants: A Qualitative Analysis

23

Khristina L. Nava, PhD Juror Decisions in a Capital Trial Involving Intellectual Disability

Fandemonium: Translating the Sport Experience & Fan Identification Through Emergent Technology the Classification of Digital Trust in Online Healthcare Social Networks


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 www.fielding.edu

FPO PAID

Permit No. xxxx

Santa Barbara, Ca

Get the latest news on our blog and social media channels!

FIELDING.EDU/NEWS-MEDIA


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.