Page 1

FOCUS MAGAZINE SUMMER 2019


2

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

3

FOCUS Summer 2019

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell

A Letter from the President

Art Director Audrey Ma FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2019 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

4

10

16

24

5

11

18

25

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

ABOUT FIELDING

6 7

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

45 GATHERINGS FOR 45 YEARS

FPO

8

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

9

UVI’S FIRST GRADUATE

MAKING FIELDING ACCESSIBLE

NEW SOCIAL JUSTICE & DIVERSITY CONCENTRATION

12

ADVOCATING FOR SPECIAL NEEDS KIDS

13

ADDRESSING WOMEN’S INEQUALITY

14

IN THE NEWS

STUDYING TRANSGENDER ISSUES

SEEKING VETERANS’ VOICES

19

PROMOTING EQUITY INSIDE & OUT

DEVELOPMENT

20

ACHIEVED WITH YOUR SUPPORT

22

FIELDING SUPPORTERS

THEIR MOTIVE: OUR MISSION

MASTER’S & CERTIFICATE GRADUATES

26

DOCTORAL GRADUATES

A

t some point in our lives, we have all experienced the pain of feeling excluded – whether it be from a play group, a conversation, a career opportunity, or even consideration in decisions being made on behalf of our communities and societies. Significant academic research demonstrates that people who routinely experience such marginalization evince higher stress levels and, often, poorer health. In America, this can be true for anyone who isn’t white and/ or economically secure.

“Inclusion is an essential component of academic excellence”

That’s why so many organizations are waking up and making efforts to weave inclusion into both their values and their dayto-day functions. Initially, these efforts often focus on diversifying the environment. The next evolution is to create a culture that welcomes diverse thinking, as well as diverse people. Fundamentally, this means a shift in behavior by everyone in the organization. It happens when there is a willingness to engage with people different from ourselves in meaningful ways. In one organization I worked with, inclusion efforts meant bringing in Native American people and perspectives. Eventually, this led to the organization being entirely transformed, newly capable of holding complex ways of thinking about the world, and approaching issues from indigenous, rather than western, worldviews.

Inclusion is an essential component of academic excellence, too. The habits of mind that graduate learning develops, particularly critical thinking and cognitive complexity, encourage us to be open to new ideas. Sometimes these new ideas require us to question our assumptions, and lead us to new ways of understanding. At Fielding, we are engaging community members in conversation about what it would look like to be a more diverse and inclusive university. These programs and events focus on bringing to life our strategic inclusion plan, which includes building a more inclusive culture, increasing the intercultural and global competence of all faculty, administration, and staff, and bringing more diversity to the faculty and student body. Throughout these pages of FOCUS, we share the various ways in which the Fielding community is living out its values of inclusion, from scholarship to practice, from education to nonprofit, and from military to corporate settings. I hope that these stories inspire us all to a greater understanding of how inclusion work leads to stronger scholarly research, practice, communities – and ultimately, societies.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President


2

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

3

FOCUS Summer 2019

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell

A Letter from the President

Art Director Audrey Ma FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2019 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

4

10

16

24

5

11

18

25

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

ABOUT FIELDING

6 7

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

45 GATHERINGS FOR 45 YEARS

FPO

8

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

9

UVI’S FIRST GRADUATE

MAKING FIELDING ACCESSIBLE

NEW SOCIAL JUSTICE & DIVERSITY CONCENTRATION

12

ADVOCATING FOR SPECIAL NEEDS KIDS

13

ADDRESSING WOMEN’S INEQUALITY

14

IN THE NEWS

STUDYING TRANSGENDER ISSUES

SEEKING VETERANS’ VOICES

19

PROMOTING EQUITY INSIDE & OUT

DEVELOPMENT

20

ACHIEVED WITH YOUR SUPPORT

22

FIELDING SUPPORTERS

THEIR MOTIVE: OUR MISSION

MASTER’S & CERTIFICATE GRADUATES

26

DOCTORAL GRADUATES

A

t some point in our lives, we have all experienced the pain of feeling excluded – whether it be from a play group, a conversation, a career opportunity, or even consideration in decisions being made on behalf of our communities and societies. Significant academic research demonstrates that people who routinely experience such marginalization evince higher stress levels and, often, poorer health. In America, this can be true for anyone who isn’t white and/ or economically secure.

“Inclusion is an essential component of academic excellence”

That’s why so many organizations are waking up and making efforts to weave inclusion into both their values and their dayto-day functions. Initially, these efforts often focus on diversifying the environment. The next evolution is to create a culture that welcomes diverse thinking, as well as diverse people. Fundamentally, this means a shift in behavior by everyone in the organization. It happens when there is a willingness to engage with people different from ourselves in meaningful ways. In one organization I worked with, inclusion efforts meant bringing in Native American people and perspectives. Eventually, this led to the organization being entirely transformed, newly capable of holding complex ways of thinking about the world, and approaching issues from indigenous, rather than western, worldviews.

Inclusion is an essential component of academic excellence, too. The habits of mind that graduate learning develops, particularly critical thinking and cognitive complexity, encourage us to be open to new ideas. Sometimes these new ideas require us to question our assumptions, and lead us to new ways of understanding. At Fielding, we are engaging community members in conversation about what it would look like to be a more diverse and inclusive university. These programs and events focus on bringing to life our strategic inclusion plan, which includes building a more inclusive culture, increasing the intercultural and global competence of all faculty, administration, and staff, and bringing more diversity to the faculty and student body. Throughout these pages of FOCUS, we share the various ways in which the Fielding community is living out its values of inclusion, from scholarship to practice, from education to nonprofit, and from military to corporate settings. I hope that these stories inspire us all to a greater understanding of how inclusion work leads to stronger scholarly research, practice, communities – and ultimately, societies.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President


4

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Board of

About

Fielding

VALUES

TRUSTEES

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice. COMMUNITY We support a collaborative

learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect.

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS

DIVERSITY We commit to having a faculty,

staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community.

LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION We create

an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students.

SOCIAL JUSTICE We commit to advancing equality and justice in our University, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING We inspire Karen S. Bogart, PhD Chair

Keith Earley, PhD, JD

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Vice-Chair

Zabrina Epps, PhD

Nancy Baker, PhD Treasurer

Senior Council, Cooley LLP, Washington, DC

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Patricia Zell, JD Secretary

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Michael Ali, PhD

Chief Digital and Information Officer, Omega Engineering, Norwalk, CT

Manley Begay, PhD

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

John Bennett, PhD

Professor, Queens University of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Student (HOD), Laurel, MD

Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Anthony Greene, PhD

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Judith Katz, EdD

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting, Group, Inc. Washington DC

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

Wayne Patterson, PhD

Professor, Computer Science, Harvard University, Washington DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Maria Sanchez, PhD

Student (Media), Westlake Village, CA

VISION Educating leaders, scholars, and practitioners for a more just and sustainable world.

5

MISSION We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs for a community of scholarpractitioners within a distributed learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge.

FACULTY Total Faculty: 137 Total Staff: 85 Students-to-Faculty:7:1

Indian 2% American or Alaska Native

4% Asian or 17% Black African American

11% Hispanic or Latino 51% White 5% Two or More Races 2% Race/Ethnicity Unknown 8% International Students

STUDENTS 988 Women: 76% Men: 24% Age Range 23–83 Enrollment:


4

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Board of

About

Fielding

VALUES

TRUSTEES

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice. COMMUNITY We support a collaborative

learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect.

STUDENT BODY DEMOGRAPHICS

DIVERSITY We commit to having a faculty,

staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community.

LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION We create

an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students.

SOCIAL JUSTICE We commit to advancing equality and justice in our University, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING We inspire Karen S. Bogart, PhD Chair

Keith Earley, PhD, JD

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Vice-Chair

Zabrina Epps, PhD

Nancy Baker, PhD Treasurer

Senior Council, Cooley LLP, Washington, DC

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Patricia Zell, JD Secretary

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Michael Ali, PhD

Chief Digital and Information Officer, Omega Engineering, Norwalk, CT

Manley Begay, PhD

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

John Bennett, PhD

Professor, Queens University of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.

Student (HOD), Laurel, MD

Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Anthony Greene, PhD

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Judith Katz, EdD

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting, Group, Inc. Washington DC

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

Wayne Patterson, PhD

Professor, Computer Science, Harvard University, Washington DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Maria Sanchez, PhD

Student (Media), Westlake Village, CA

VISION Educating leaders, scholars, and practitioners for a more just and sustainable world.

5

MISSION We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs for a community of scholarpractitioners within a distributed learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge.

FACULTY Total Faculty: 137 Total Staff: 85 Students-to-Faculty:7:1

Indian 2% American or Alaska Native

4% Asian or 17% Black African American

11% Hispanic or Latino 51% White 5% Two or More Races 2% Race/Ethnicity Unknown 8% International Students

STUDENTS 988 Women: 76% Men: 24% Age Range 23–83 Enrollment:


6

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY Doctoral Degrees

PhD, Clinical Psychology Concentrations Forensic Psychology Health Psychology Neuropsychology Social Justice & Diversity PhD, Media Psychology

Schools and

Concentrations

Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement Positive Psychology & Media Social Impact of Mobile Media & Immersive Technology

Master’s Degrees

MA, Media Psychology

Programs

Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

CENTERS & INITIATIVES

Doctoral Degrees

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses, and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable, and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

EdD, PhD, PhD, PhD,

Leadership for Change Human Development Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Change

Concentrations

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity & Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, & Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, & Communicative Leadership Sustainability Leadership

Master’s Degrees

MA, Infant & Early Childhood Development MA, Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society. The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

45 gatherings for 45 years The Fielding community is celebrating the university’s 45th anniversary this year by organizing 45+ gatherings of students, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, and friends across the globe! It’s not too late to join the fun: For a list of events that may be near you – or if you’re interested in hosting one – visit Events on alumni.fielding.edu. And let your Fielding flag fly! Clockwise from above: At the Library at Ephesus, Turkey; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Philadelphia, PA; Austin, TX; Santa Monica, CA; Santa Barbara, CA

7


6

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY Doctoral Degrees

PhD, Clinical Psychology Concentrations Forensic Psychology Health Psychology Neuropsychology Social Justice & Diversity PhD, Media Psychology

Schools and

Concentrations

Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement Positive Psychology & Media Social Impact of Mobile Media & Immersive Technology

Master’s Degrees

MA, Media Psychology

Programs

Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

CENTERS & INITIATIVES

Doctoral Degrees

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses, and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable, and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

EdD, PhD, PhD, PhD,

Leadership for Change Human Development Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Change

Concentrations

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity & Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, & Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, & Communicative Leadership Sustainability Leadership

Master’s Degrees

MA, Infant & Early Childhood Development MA, Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society. The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

45 gatherings for 45 years The Fielding community is celebrating the university’s 45th anniversary this year by organizing 45+ gatherings of students, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, and friends across the globe! It’s not too late to join the fun: For a list of events that may be near you – or if you’re interested in hosting one – visit Events on alumni.fielding.edu. And let your Fielding flag fly! Clockwise from above: At the Library at Ephesus, Turkey; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Philadelphia, PA; Austin, TX; Santa Monica, CA; Santa Barbara, CA

7


8

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

WORDS MATTER

A DREAM REALIZED

FIRST STUDENT GRADUATES UVI PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

T

CHANGING LANGUAGE BUILDS COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION

hree years after launching its first cohort, Fielding’s partnership with University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) graduated its first doctoral student in May. Student Joyce Ann Campbell graduated with a PhD in Creative Leadership for Innovation & Change from UVI and a certificate in Organizational Leadership & Development from Fielding.

BY TOMÁS LEAL CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER Tomás Leal

LATIN@. WOMXN. AFROFUTURISM. CHICANX. COLORISM. T

hese are among 300 new words added this year by Dictionary.com, many of which the organization says “spotlight more inclusive and empowered identity and cultural terms that have gained traction in recent years.” These changes in our language serve to embrace and acknowledge the inevitable and rapid changing demographics in the US and globally. As a Latino gay man and someone who has worked in the diversity and inclusion space for decades, these additions are personally affirming. They add light and credibility to my reality and personal experience. The world I grew up in demanded that I change and fit in if I wanted to be accepted. I still hear comments like, “They’re only words–what’s the big deal?” Well, these words are powerful and can send a strong message that can be either dismissive or engaging. Language that is inclusive and honors the realities and experiences of diverse communities connects us, and provides a vehicle by which we can gain cultural understanding and competence. In institutions of higher learning, language is of particular importance as colleges and universities

9

aspire to be places for robust discourse. Inclusive language means that we are intentional in the ways in which we talk to each other. Through such language, we can strengthen our teaching and learning practices. Changing our vocabulary is difficult. With the rise of non-binary pronouns, I personally struggled with getting that right; though I was committed to addressing people with pronouns that acknowledged gender identity, it felt awkward, counterintuitive, and so different than what I was taught and what I was used to. But my respect for individuals who do not identify with either gender, or who identify with both genders, overrides any hesitancy or feelings of discomfort I may have had with making this change. Leaning into any discomfort caused by these new words is a good start to understanding them as you hear them, even if you’re not ready to say them. Oftentimes it helps to ask someone, a neighbor or colleague, how they feel about the term that includes them. Sharing each other’s stories can help us see the power of words and their impact on us individually and on the communities where we live and work. •

“Our PhD recipients are an embodiment of a collaborative program which partners graduate level certificates with the core leadership and research courses at UVI,” said UVI Provost Camille McKayle, PhD. “Students are able to interact with faculty from both institutions, and choose dissertation topics and advisors that are able to draw from the students’ broad preparation and guide them to an appropriate dissertation topic. These partnerships strengthen UVI’s ability to offer a rigorous and practical program to students, and introduce students to our partner institutions in a meaningful way. I am truly pleased to see the fruits of our creative labor, and congratulate those completing their PhDs today.” This is UVI’s first doctoral program, a partnership which allows students to study jointly with either Fielding or Buffalo State University, and which has drawn students from the Caribbean, Ghana, the Marshall Islands, and the United States mainland. It was one of the first initiatives in Fielding’s HBCU partnership programs, led by VP of Strategic Initiatives & Research Orlando Taylor, PhD, and the late Provost Gerald Porter, PhD, with help from UVI’s Associate Provost James Maddirala, PhD. But it had a dramatic beginning: No sooner had the program launched on the UVI

campus in the summer of 2017 than Hurricanes Irma and Maria tore through the Virgin Islands, devastating campus buildings, decimating local infrastructure and wreaking havoc on the lives of many students. So it is that much more special to see the program’s first Fielding graduate finish this year, even as the UVI campus and the surrounding islands still work to repair and recover from those disasters. The second Fielding/UVI cohort has begun its second term and is scheduled to finish in December of 2019. A third cohort will begin in January of 2020. “With Cohort II well on their way to successfully completing their certificate this December 2019, we have ample evidence that this is a successful partnership that is mutually beneficial to Fielding and to UVI,” says Marcella Benson-Quaziena, PhD, director of the ODL program & Fielding’s liaison to UVI students. A third cohort will begin in January of 2020. Our first graduate, Dr. Joyce Ann Campbell, is the CFO of a start-up company in the Virgin Islands and chose the program for the skills and insights she could apply immediately to her professional work. Her dissertation examined the link between the bachelor’s

and master’s degrees awarded by colleges and universities in an economic region and the strength of the industries in those regions.   What does she intend to do with her degree? “In the short term, I plan to collaborate with cohorts researching topics in regional economic development in a way that informs the posthurricane economic recovery in the U.S. Virgin Islands,” says Dr. Campbell. “Eventually, I dream of taking a series of visiting professorships that will afford me the opportunity to teach and travel the world.” She says she feels honored and privileged to be the first graduate. “But this is not something that I did alone,” insists Dr. Campbell. “My track-mates know that we all contribute to each other’s success and we are not done until we are all done. I may be the first to finish but I have a responsibility to continue to contribute to the success of my track-mates however I can.” Dr. Campbell also has a message for anyone else considering a doctoral degree: “Do it! But get ready for the greatest challenge of your life.” •

TOP: Graduate Dr. Joyce Ann Campbell with Fielding VP Dr. Orlando Taylor LEFT: Fielding/UVI students at their 2018 August Residency with Dr. McKayle, far left, Dr. Madiralla beside her, UVI President David Hall in back, Joyce Campbell, center, Dr. Benson-Quaziena in hat, and Dr. Taylor, second from right.


8

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

WORDS MATTER

A DREAM REALIZED

FIRST STUDENT GRADUATES UVI PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

T

CHANGING LANGUAGE BUILDS COLLABORATIVE COMMUNICATION

hree years after launching its first cohort, Fielding’s partnership with University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) graduated its first doctoral student in May. Student Joyce Ann Campbell graduated with a PhD in Creative Leadership for Innovation & Change from UVI and a certificate in Organizational Leadership & Development from Fielding.

BY TOMÁS LEAL CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER Tomás Leal

LATIN@. WOMXN. AFROFUTURISM. CHICANX. COLORISM. T

hese are among 300 new words added this year by Dictionary.com, many of which the organization says “spotlight more inclusive and empowered identity and cultural terms that have gained traction in recent years.” These changes in our language serve to embrace and acknowledge the inevitable and rapid changing demographics in the US and globally. As a Latino gay man and someone who has worked in the diversity and inclusion space for decades, these additions are personally affirming. They add light and credibility to my reality and personal experience. The world I grew up in demanded that I change and fit in if I wanted to be accepted. I still hear comments like, “They’re only words–what’s the big deal?” Well, these words are powerful and can send a strong message that can be either dismissive or engaging. Language that is inclusive and honors the realities and experiences of diverse communities connects us, and provides a vehicle by which we can gain cultural understanding and competence. In institutions of higher learning, language is of particular importance as colleges and universities

9

aspire to be places for robust discourse. Inclusive language means that we are intentional in the ways in which we talk to each other. Through such language, we can strengthen our teaching and learning practices. Changing our vocabulary is difficult. With the rise of non-binary pronouns, I personally struggled with getting that right; though I was committed to addressing people with pronouns that acknowledged gender identity, it felt awkward, counterintuitive, and so different than what I was taught and what I was used to. But my respect for individuals who do not identify with either gender, or who identify with both genders, overrides any hesitancy or feelings of discomfort I may have had with making this change. Leaning into any discomfort caused by these new words is a good start to understanding them as you hear them, even if you’re not ready to say them. Oftentimes it helps to ask someone, a neighbor or colleague, how they feel about the term that includes them. Sharing each other’s stories can help us see the power of words and their impact on us individually and on the communities where we live and work. •

“Our PhD recipients are an embodiment of a collaborative program which partners graduate level certificates with the core leadership and research courses at UVI,” said UVI Provost Camille McKayle, PhD. “Students are able to interact with faculty from both institutions, and choose dissertation topics and advisors that are able to draw from the students’ broad preparation and guide them to an appropriate dissertation topic. These partnerships strengthen UVI’s ability to offer a rigorous and practical program to students, and introduce students to our partner institutions in a meaningful way. I am truly pleased to see the fruits of our creative labor, and congratulate those completing their PhDs today.” This is UVI’s first doctoral program, a partnership which allows students to study jointly with either Fielding or Buffalo State University, and which has drawn students from the Caribbean, Ghana, the Marshall Islands, and the United States mainland. It was one of the first initiatives in Fielding’s HBCU partnership programs, led by VP of Strategic Initiatives & Research Orlando Taylor, PhD, and the late Provost Gerald Porter, PhD, with help from UVI’s Associate Provost James Maddirala, PhD. But it had a dramatic beginning: No sooner had the program launched on the UVI

campus in the summer of 2017 than Hurricanes Irma and Maria tore through the Virgin Islands, devastating campus buildings, decimating local infrastructure and wreaking havoc on the lives of many students. So it is that much more special to see the program’s first Fielding graduate finish this year, even as the UVI campus and the surrounding islands still work to repair and recover from those disasters. The second Fielding/UVI cohort has begun its second term and is scheduled to finish in December of 2019. A third cohort will begin in January of 2020. “With Cohort II well on their way to successfully completing their certificate this December 2019, we have ample evidence that this is a successful partnership that is mutually beneficial to Fielding and to UVI,” says Marcella Benson-Quaziena, PhD, director of the ODL program & Fielding’s liaison to UVI students. A third cohort will begin in January of 2020. Our first graduate, Dr. Joyce Ann Campbell, is the CFO of a start-up company in the Virgin Islands and chose the program for the skills and insights she could apply immediately to her professional work. Her dissertation examined the link between the bachelor’s

and master’s degrees awarded by colleges and universities in an economic region and the strength of the industries in those regions.   What does she intend to do with her degree? “In the short term, I plan to collaborate with cohorts researching topics in regional economic development in a way that informs the posthurricane economic recovery in the U.S. Virgin Islands,” says Dr. Campbell. “Eventually, I dream of taking a series of visiting professorships that will afford me the opportunity to teach and travel the world.” She says she feels honored and privileged to be the first graduate. “But this is not something that I did alone,” insists Dr. Campbell. “My track-mates know that we all contribute to each other’s success and we are not done until we are all done. I may be the first to finish but I have a responsibility to continue to contribute to the success of my track-mates however I can.” Dr. Campbell also has a message for anyone else considering a doctoral degree: “Do it! But get ready for the greatest challenge of your life.” •

TOP: Graduate Dr. Joyce Ann Campbell with Fielding VP Dr. Orlando Taylor LEFT: Fielding/UVI students at their 2018 August Residency with Dr. McKayle, far left, Dr. Madiralla beside her, UVI President David Hall in back, Joyce Campbell, center, Dr. Benson-Quaziena in hat, and Dr. Taylor, second from right.


10

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ALL ABOUT ACCESS

11

FROM PRINCIPLE TO PRACTICE NEW SOCIAL JUSTICE & DIVERSITY CONCENTRATION

MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE

he social justice and diversity mission of Fielding Graduate University is of great need during these times of dramatic social change and upheaval. The American Psychological Association (APA) also mandates that training psychologists become competent in theory, research, and practice with diverse groups to overcome mental health disparities.

BY LINDSAY CAHN, DIRECTOR OF ADVISING

Lauren Mizock, PhD, faculty in Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program, developed the new Social Justice and Diversity Concentration to address these issues. The concentration makes a clear link between the clinical psychology curriculum and the university’s central values of social justice and diversity.

S

tudents with disabilities have enough barriers in their lives – and requesting accommodations shouldn’t present any more of them. That is my guiding principle as the Accommodation Coordinator for Fielding Graduate University.

In a lot of ways – ie. distance learning, social-justice focus, adult education – Fielding has always been ahead of the curve. I believe Fielding is also ahead of the curve in its inclusion of students with disabilities. Disabilities are not only physical or sensory impairments, but include learning disabilities and chronic illness, as well. One of my main priorities is reaching students who may not be aware they qualify for accommodations. Distance learning and online education both “level the playing field” for many students with disabilities. For example, students at brick-and-mortar universities may need accommodations to access classrooms, because the building isn’t wheelchair accessible (new public buildings weren’t required to be accessible until 1968, so many historic university buildings still aren’t). Students with “invisible disabilities” like PTSD, ADHD, or anxiety disorders may have difficulty concentrating in a traditional classroom because of the number of people in the room, the noise level, or even the physical layout of the room. Students with chronic illnesses cannot always predict when they will be well enough to attend classes. Fielding’s model lets students engage with the course material from a place where they feel comfortable, in the manner – and in many cases, at the time – that works best for them. Of course, distance education doesn’t entirely eliminate the need for accommodations. In some cases, technology itself is the barrier. For instance, students with hearing impairments may not be able to follow a Zoom discussion if they can’t read lips because participants don’t have their video turned on. The accommodation that student may need is a reminder to the faculty instructor to set ground rules for class discussions about using the camera when speaking, taking turns talking, and muting when not speaking.

T

Lindsay Cahn

expensive to purchase, voice-to-text is now included with all computers, Mac or PC, allowing students with visual or physical limitations to control their computers with their voice.

Dr. Mizock was inspired to create the concentration based on student request. One student submitted a letter to the faculty proposing a concentration of this kind to facilitate “more training on appropriately addressing and effectively meeting with clients who receive community based mental health services… curricula and research that addresses diverse and underserved communities in a more inclusive way.” Faculty officially approved the concentration in June of 2017.

New advances in character recognition and computer voices allow any text to be converted to audio in a manner of minutes. We used to have to wait weeks or months for a human to read a book onto an audio tape, or transcribe it into Braille; now I can contact a publisher to get the electronic book file in one or two days and it can be converted to audio in seconds. There is even a choice of multiple male and female speaking voices (and accents!). Audio books are useful not only to people with visual impairments, but also to those with many types of learning and cognitive disabilities.

Students in this concentration develop specialized training in psychotherapy, diagnosis, assessment, and research in cultural issues in clinical psychology. The concentration includes coursework, research, and clinical practice components. The requirements of the concentration are designed to be accessible and feasible to doctoral students engaged in the already rigorous course requirements of the program.

While accessing the publisher’s text file is limited to students with disabilities, all students have the option to purchase their books in electronic format, or even access them for free through the library. The Fielding library alone hosts 100,000 electronic books!

Advanced seminars are delivered at national sessions by a range of faculty in the clinical program across a breadth of topics. Courses include Cultural Competence in Research, Cultural Sensitivity in Assessment, Clinical Practice with Transgender Individuals, African American Psychology, LGBTQ Psychology, and Sexual and Gendered Violence. New faculty are developing other topics in immigration, intersectionality, and relational cultural therapy.

One of the things I’m most proud of is the ease of access to disability services at Fielding. At other, larger schools, students often must wait a long time before they can meet with a disability services advisor – who often will only accept a certain type of documentation. At Fielding, I’m available to meet with students when they need me, and often accommodations can be enacted immediately. Depending on the accommodation requested and the nature of the disability, I may not need documentation at all.

Students can fulfill the research component by addressing issues of culture and equity in their dissertation, research practicum, or other conference presentation or publication projects. For the clinical training portion, students can work with underserved populations at their clinical practicum, internship, or potentially volunteer experience.

At Fielding, accommodating disabilities isn’t just about following the law. Including students with disabilities in all aspects of the university community is an important part of our vision to pursue a more just and sustainable world. •

A number of students have already completed the concentration, and new students continue to enroll each term. “Multicultural psychology is no longer seen as a specialty but a necessity in clinical training,” says Dr. Mizock. “The concentration legitimates the commitment that many students wish to make to issues of community and equity.” •

As technology advances, many accommodations become easier to provide. One example is dictation or voice-to-text software. Once very Dr. Lauren Mizock


10

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ALL ABOUT ACCESS

11

FROM PRINCIPLE TO PRACTICE NEW SOCIAL JUSTICE & DIVERSITY CONCENTRATION

MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE

he social justice and diversity mission of Fielding Graduate University is of great need during these times of dramatic social change and upheaval. The American Psychological Association (APA) also mandates that training psychologists become competent in theory, research, and practice with diverse groups to overcome mental health disparities.

BY LINDSAY CAHN, DIRECTOR OF ADVISING

Lauren Mizock, PhD, faculty in Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program, developed the new Social Justice and Diversity Concentration to address these issues. The concentration makes a clear link between the clinical psychology curriculum and the university’s central values of social justice and diversity.

S

tudents with disabilities have enough barriers in their lives – and requesting accommodations shouldn’t present any more of them. That is my guiding principle as the Accommodation Coordinator for Fielding Graduate University.

In a lot of ways – ie. distance learning, social-justice focus, adult education – Fielding has always been ahead of the curve. I believe Fielding is also ahead of the curve in its inclusion of students with disabilities. Disabilities are not only physical or sensory impairments, but include learning disabilities and chronic illness, as well. One of my main priorities is reaching students who may not be aware they qualify for accommodations. Distance learning and online education both “level the playing field” for many students with disabilities. For example, students at brick-and-mortar universities may need accommodations to access classrooms, because the building isn’t wheelchair accessible (new public buildings weren’t required to be accessible until 1968, so many historic university buildings still aren’t). Students with “invisible disabilities” like PTSD, ADHD, or anxiety disorders may have difficulty concentrating in a traditional classroom because of the number of people in the room, the noise level, or even the physical layout of the room. Students with chronic illnesses cannot always predict when they will be well enough to attend classes. Fielding’s model lets students engage with the course material from a place where they feel comfortable, in the manner – and in many cases, at the time – that works best for them. Of course, distance education doesn’t entirely eliminate the need for accommodations. In some cases, technology itself is the barrier. For instance, students with hearing impairments may not be able to follow a Zoom discussion if they can’t read lips because participants don’t have their video turned on. The accommodation that student may need is a reminder to the faculty instructor to set ground rules for class discussions about using the camera when speaking, taking turns talking, and muting when not speaking.

T

Lindsay Cahn

expensive to purchase, voice-to-text is now included with all computers, Mac or PC, allowing students with visual or physical limitations to control their computers with their voice.

Dr. Mizock was inspired to create the concentration based on student request. One student submitted a letter to the faculty proposing a concentration of this kind to facilitate “more training on appropriately addressing and effectively meeting with clients who receive community based mental health services… curricula and research that addresses diverse and underserved communities in a more inclusive way.” Faculty officially approved the concentration in June of 2017.

New advances in character recognition and computer voices allow any text to be converted to audio in a manner of minutes. We used to have to wait weeks or months for a human to read a book onto an audio tape, or transcribe it into Braille; now I can contact a publisher to get the electronic book file in one or two days and it can be converted to audio in seconds. There is even a choice of multiple male and female speaking voices (and accents!). Audio books are useful not only to people with visual impairments, but also to those with many types of learning and cognitive disabilities.

Students in this concentration develop specialized training in psychotherapy, diagnosis, assessment, and research in cultural issues in clinical psychology. The concentration includes coursework, research, and clinical practice components. The requirements of the concentration are designed to be accessible and feasible to doctoral students engaged in the already rigorous course requirements of the program.

While accessing the publisher’s text file is limited to students with disabilities, all students have the option to purchase their books in electronic format, or even access them for free through the library. The Fielding library alone hosts 100,000 electronic books!

Advanced seminars are delivered at national sessions by a range of faculty in the clinical program across a breadth of topics. Courses include Cultural Competence in Research, Cultural Sensitivity in Assessment, Clinical Practice with Transgender Individuals, African American Psychology, LGBTQ Psychology, and Sexual and Gendered Violence. New faculty are developing other topics in immigration, intersectionality, and relational cultural therapy.

One of the things I’m most proud of is the ease of access to disability services at Fielding. At other, larger schools, students often must wait a long time before they can meet with a disability services advisor – who often will only accept a certain type of documentation. At Fielding, I’m available to meet with students when they need me, and often accommodations can be enacted immediately. Depending on the accommodation requested and the nature of the disability, I may not need documentation at all.

Students can fulfill the research component by addressing issues of culture and equity in their dissertation, research practicum, or other conference presentation or publication projects. For the clinical training portion, students can work with underserved populations at their clinical practicum, internship, or potentially volunteer experience.

At Fielding, accommodating disabilities isn’t just about following the law. Including students with disabilities in all aspects of the university community is an important part of our vision to pursue a more just and sustainable world. •

A number of students have already completed the concentration, and new students continue to enroll each term. “Multicultural psychology is no longer seen as a specialty but a necessity in clinical training,” says Dr. Mizock. “The concentration legitimates the commitment that many students wish to make to issues of community and equity.” •

As technology advances, many accommodations become easier to provide. One example is dictation or voice-to-text software. Once very Dr. Lauren Mizock


12

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Separated Is Not Equal CREATING INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

F

or a long time, schools managed children with special needs by removing them from the classroom: separating them out from their “typical” peers, isolating them from anyone whose learning could be disrupted by their frustrated outbursts. But those days are over. Newer studies – and old-fashioned compassion – have shown modern educators the benefits of integrating specialneeds students with general-education students. And two members of the Fielding community, from two different programs, are devoting their careers to making it happen. Corinne Catalano, PhD, is a faculty member in the Infant and Early Childhood Education program and also works at the Center for Autism and Early Childhood Mental Health at Montclair State University in New Jersey. The Garden State has the highest autism prevalence rate in the U.S. – and the lowest inclusion rates. “Most students are in segregated, self-contained classrooms,” says Dr. Catalano. “Research shows that children with disabilities, regardless of type and severity, do better developmentally, and as well or better academically, when they’re included with their non-disabled peers.” And when the integration is done well, it increases empathy and understanding of neurodiversity in the non-disabled students. Dr. Catalano is conducting research that informs her work in helping teachers feel prepared and supported to take on the challenge of including children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder into general education classrooms. “We know that major barriers to inclusion are attitudes and beliefs: ‘This can’t work.’ ‘I don’t know how to do this.’ ‘I’m scared because I’m not trained,’” she says. “Gaining a deeper under-

T

A student at Port View Preparatory School

standing of each individual child’s strengths and challenges helps teachers feel more confident in their ability to include all children.” Edward Miguel, EdD, is an alum of Fielding’s Leadership for Change program, and the founder and principal of Southern California’s Port View Preparatory school, which serves 140 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from kindergarten to age 22. Dr. Miguel’s dissertation was on the ramifications of restraining and secluding special-ed students who act out – a practice he believes is unnecessary, irresponsible, and even dangerous. Many people don’t know that special-needs students who behave disruptively or violently in schools and group homes are often placed in physical restraints by two or more people, or isolated in a small, confined space, to prevent them from injuring themselves or others. For example, says Dr. Miguel, “A student who doesn’t know how to say ‘I need help’ might flip over a chair.” While restraint or seclusion may stop the behavior temporarily, it doesn’t come close to addressing the student’s needs. “Why are we not teaching our kids to cope on their own?” says Dr. Miguel, whose school only uses therapeutic and academic interventions. “We get an opportunity to try out and find coping skills that work for each student, and they get to experience calming down on their own. That feeling fosters a sense of independence.” But he has another reason for promoting this method. “I’m tired of hearing about kids dying and getting hurt from restraint,” he says, citing US Government Accountability Office statistics that show at least 20 children died while being restrained or isolated over the course of two Dr. Edward Miguel receives an award from Disability Rights California in the capitol building, Sacramento, CA

hey all came to Fielding for different reasons. One was drawn by the orientation to adult learners. Another, a mother of four, wanted to earn a doctorate without having to commute four hours to the nearest university. The third was interested in faculty member Kristine Jacquin’s research in forensics and neuropsychology. Hailing from far-flung corners of a North American map – Southern California, the Pacific Northwest, and Easternmost Canada – the women met in Fielding’s Postbaccalaureate Clinical Psychology program and discovered a shared interest in overturning women’s inequality across the globe.

decades. “There are parents who are not getting their kids back the way they dropped them off at school – or not getting them back at all. That bothers me. We cannot call ourselves educators if that’s what we’re doing.”

Together, they have researched numerous studies on human trafficking, modern slavery, violence against women, and misconceptions about sex work. They’re presenting 12 posters at conferences this year.

Dr. Miguel has been called upon to testify before the California State Education Committee on behalf of a bill that prohibits restraint and seclusion in schools – a bill that passed, he’s delighted to report.

Their zeal for the subject stems from their personal observations. “I’ve lived and worked in lots of NGOs in Third-World countries in Africa, Central America, the Middle East – and I was really impacted by what I saw,” says Erinn Cameron, a PhD student whose goal is to work for the United Nations. “There’s so much need for psychological services. Women are disproportionately affected by inequality and lack of resources.”

Both Dr. Miguel and Dr. Catalano say the key to creating more inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities is investing the time to understand each individual’s needs. “It’s about getting to know somebody and meeting them on their level and individualizing that relationship,” says Dr. Miguel, “taking the time to get to know what their dreams are about, how they want to write their story.” “Inclusion can only happen,” Dr. Catalano adds, “if we as a society believe that all children have the right and the capacity to be part of the larger school community. It’s our job as the educators to make adaptations and modifications so that all children can learn together.”•

Fiona Cunningham, who begins the doctoral program this fall, has worked with victims of domestic violence for the past two decades. “Seeing firsthand the effects of the inequality that women experience, like poverty and poor health outcomes, trauma and addictions, has fueled my passion to look at the research,” says Cunningham, who has spoken before Ottawa’s Standing Committee on the Status of Women at the House of Commons on the systemic barriers

13

‘WE CAN FIX IT’

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS TEAM UP TO ADDRESS WOMEN’S INEQUALITY

and gaps in the needs of women’s transition shelters. “It’s amazing to have the opportunity to make a contribution to the field.”

inequality,” Cameron says. “Once there’s awareness, we can fix it. There are so many areas where reform can take place.” •

Sometimes their personal fervor for the issues creeps into their scholarly work. “We take these issues kind of personally,” says Samantha Hemingway, a PhD student who hopes to work in forensics and neuropsychology for the FBI one day. “Erinn is great about telling me when to calm down in my writing a little bit!” “She’s very passionate,” says Erinn, laughing. But the timing is right for this kind of research. With the #metoo movement, audiences may be more receptive to it than ever before. “In general right now, we’re paying more attention to these issues of inequality for women,” Hemingway adds, “and people are more receptive to learning about that. They may listen and take it to heart even more than they would have a few years ago.” They’re thrilled about all of the presentations they’ve been invited to make – for example, Erinn Cameron Cameron and Hemingway will be taking their research to Costa Rica in July and to Portugal in November – but most exciting of all is the opportunity to ultimately have an impact on people’s lives. “On a very basic level, we want to instigate change in policies – to make people aware of the

Above, Samantha Hemingway Below, Fiona Cunningham


12

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Separated Is Not Equal CREATING INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

F

or a long time, schools managed children with special needs by removing them from the classroom: separating them out from their “typical” peers, isolating them from anyone whose learning could be disrupted by their frustrated outbursts. But those days are over. Newer studies – and old-fashioned compassion – have shown modern educators the benefits of integrating specialneeds students with general-education students. And two members of the Fielding community, from two different programs, are devoting their careers to making it happen. Corinne Catalano, PhD, is a faculty member in the Infant and Early Childhood Education program and also works at the Center for Autism and Early Childhood Mental Health at Montclair State University in New Jersey. The Garden State has the highest autism prevalence rate in the U.S. – and the lowest inclusion rates. “Most students are in segregated, self-contained classrooms,” says Dr. Catalano. “Research shows that children with disabilities, regardless of type and severity, do better developmentally, and as well or better academically, when they’re included with their non-disabled peers.” And when the integration is done well, it increases empathy and understanding of neurodiversity in the non-disabled students. Dr. Catalano is conducting research that informs her work in helping teachers feel prepared and supported to take on the challenge of including children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder into general education classrooms. “We know that major barriers to inclusion are attitudes and beliefs: ‘This can’t work.’ ‘I don’t know how to do this.’ ‘I’m scared because I’m not trained,’” she says. “Gaining a deeper under-

T

A student at Port View Preparatory School

standing of each individual child’s strengths and challenges helps teachers feel more confident in their ability to include all children.” Edward Miguel, EdD, is an alum of Fielding’s Leadership for Change program, and the founder and principal of Southern California’s Port View Preparatory school, which serves 140 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from kindergarten to age 22. Dr. Miguel’s dissertation was on the ramifications of restraining and secluding special-ed students who act out – a practice he believes is unnecessary, irresponsible, and even dangerous. Many people don’t know that special-needs students who behave disruptively or violently in schools and group homes are often placed in physical restraints by two or more people, or isolated in a small, confined space, to prevent them from injuring themselves or others. For example, says Dr. Miguel, “A student who doesn’t know how to say ‘I need help’ might flip over a chair.” While restraint or seclusion may stop the behavior temporarily, it doesn’t come close to addressing the student’s needs. “Why are we not teaching our kids to cope on their own?” says Dr. Miguel, whose school only uses therapeutic and academic interventions. “We get an opportunity to try out and find coping skills that work for each student, and they get to experience calming down on their own. That feeling fosters a sense of independence.” But he has another reason for promoting this method. “I’m tired of hearing about kids dying and getting hurt from restraint,” he says, citing US Government Accountability Office statistics that show at least 20 children died while being restrained or isolated over the course of two Dr. Edward Miguel receives an award from Disability Rights California in the capitol building, Sacramento, CA

hey all came to Fielding for different reasons. One was drawn by the orientation to adult learners. Another, a mother of four, wanted to earn a doctorate without having to commute four hours to the nearest university. The third was interested in faculty member Kristine Jacquin’s research in forensics and neuropsychology. Hailing from far-flung corners of a North American map – Southern California, the Pacific Northwest, and Easternmost Canada – the women met in Fielding’s Postbaccalaureate Clinical Psychology program and discovered a shared interest in overturning women’s inequality across the globe.

decades. “There are parents who are not getting their kids back the way they dropped them off at school – or not getting them back at all. That bothers me. We cannot call ourselves educators if that’s what we’re doing.”

Together, they have researched numerous studies on human trafficking, modern slavery, violence against women, and misconceptions about sex work. They’re presenting 12 posters at conferences this year.

Dr. Miguel has been called upon to testify before the California State Education Committee on behalf of a bill that prohibits restraint and seclusion in schools – a bill that passed, he’s delighted to report.

Their zeal for the subject stems from their personal observations. “I’ve lived and worked in lots of NGOs in Third-World countries in Africa, Central America, the Middle East – and I was really impacted by what I saw,” says Erinn Cameron, a PhD student whose goal is to work for the United Nations. “There’s so much need for psychological services. Women are disproportionately affected by inequality and lack of resources.”

Both Dr. Miguel and Dr. Catalano say the key to creating more inclusive learning environments for students with disabilities is investing the time to understand each individual’s needs. “It’s about getting to know somebody and meeting them on their level and individualizing that relationship,” says Dr. Miguel, “taking the time to get to know what their dreams are about, how they want to write their story.” “Inclusion can only happen,” Dr. Catalano adds, “if we as a society believe that all children have the right and the capacity to be part of the larger school community. It’s our job as the educators to make adaptations and modifications so that all children can learn together.”•

Fiona Cunningham, who begins the doctoral program this fall, has worked with victims of domestic violence for the past two decades. “Seeing firsthand the effects of the inequality that women experience, like poverty and poor health outcomes, trauma and addictions, has fueled my passion to look at the research,” says Cunningham, who has spoken before Ottawa’s Standing Committee on the Status of Women at the House of Commons on the systemic barriers

13

‘WE CAN FIX IT’

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS TEAM UP TO ADDRESS WOMEN’S INEQUALITY

and gaps in the needs of women’s transition shelters. “It’s amazing to have the opportunity to make a contribution to the field.”

inequality,” Cameron says. “Once there’s awareness, we can fix it. There are so many areas where reform can take place.” •

Sometimes their personal fervor for the issues creeps into their scholarly work. “We take these issues kind of personally,” says Samantha Hemingway, a PhD student who hopes to work in forensics and neuropsychology for the FBI one day. “Erinn is great about telling me when to calm down in my writing a little bit!” “She’s very passionate,” says Erinn, laughing. But the timing is right for this kind of research. With the #metoo movement, audiences may be more receptive to it than ever before. “In general right now, we’re paying more attention to these issues of inequality for women,” Hemingway adds, “and people are more receptive to learning about that. They may listen and take it to heart even more than they would have a few years ago.” They’re thrilled about all of the presentations they’ve been invited to make – for example, Erinn Cameron Cameron and Hemingway will be taking their research to Costa Rica in July and to Portugal in November – but most exciting of all is the opportunity to ultimately have an impact on people’s lives. “On a very basic level, we want to instigate change in policies – to make people aware of the

Above, Samantha Hemingway Below, Fiona Cunningham


14

in the news FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

JUNE 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

FEBRUARY 2019

Alum Sam Jama, PhD, writes an article for his 60,000 colleagues in the Ontario, Canada government about the seven things he learned en route to his doctorate.

JULY 2018

HOD faculty Tojo Thatchenkery and student Ellen Keithline Byrne publishes in the Harvard Business Review on using mindfulness to increase team creativity.

HOD faculty Margo Okazawa-Rey speaks about Japanese War Brides, Occupation & Migration on C-SPAN 3’s American History TV series.

Alum Diyana Dobberteen writes about the link between job creation and climate change in the Santa Barbara Independent.

MA-ODL faculty Ruth Middleton House, EdD, is named among the Top 100 Influential Women in Georgia by Engineering Georgia magazine.

Alum Janja Lalich, PhD, shares her expertise with The New York Times Magazine on how to help someone who is in a cult.

APRIL 2019

Clinical Psychology faculty Tiffany Field, PhD, tells The Atlantic about the impact of physical touch on human health.

NYT best-selling author/talk-show host Thom Hartmann reads Point of Departure by HOD faculty FourArrows, PhD, EdD, for his International Book Club.

Alum Laura Berger writes about finding happiness at work – and the science of how to enjoy your job – for the Different Brains blog.

Media Psy faculty Pamela Rutledge, PhD, discusses the current climate of finger-pointing, frustration, and divisiveness with Forbes.

Admissions advisor Camie Barnwell writes about how Fielding’s Media Psychology program studies cultural touchstones like Black Panther for the Santa Barbara Independent.

JANUARY 2019 Faculty emerita Christine Ho, right, speaks to Democracy NOW’s Amy Goodman about the psychological effects of long-term detention on asylum seekers.

15

Alum Nathaniel Williams, EdD, shares his foster-child-turned-author-and-nonprofit founder life story with the Student Oriented Press.

Media Psychology faculty Karen Shackleford, PhD, talks “Game of Thrones” graphic content with The Hollywood Reporter.

MARCH 2019

HOD student William Hart writes about segregation in the workplace based on gender, for Conscious Company Media.

NOVEMBER 2018

Alum Monique Morris, EdD, gives a TED Talk on Why Black Girls Are Targeted for Punishment at School – and How to Change That.

Alum Patricia Dawson, MD, PhD, tells the Puget Sound Business Journal why she enrolled in Fielding midway through her career as a breast cancer surgeon.

Media Psychology student Lisa Swain speaks to Pantsuit Politics about the limits of bias in addressing societal polarization.

Clinical Psychology faculty Ruthellen Josselson, PhD, shows The Conversation how Michelle Obama’s memoir illustrates women’s ideal evolution.

Variety covers a report by Media Psychology student Alton Carswell showing that a majority of diverse TV writers experience discrimination on the job.

Alum Stephen Redmon, PhD, is profiled on the Kripalu blog for leading wellness retreats for students of all ages in Cuba, the Bahamas, and Puerto Rico.

Clinical Psychology alum Heather Sheafer, PhD, blogs about the best professional decision she ever made: relocating to another state for her internship.


14

in the news FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

JUNE 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018

OCTOBER 2018

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

FEBRUARY 2019

Alum Sam Jama, PhD, writes an article for his 60,000 colleagues in the Ontario, Canada government about the seven things he learned en route to his doctorate.

JULY 2018

HOD faculty Tojo Thatchenkery and student Ellen Keithline Byrne publishes in the Harvard Business Review on using mindfulness to increase team creativity.

HOD faculty Margo Okazawa-Rey speaks about Japanese War Brides, Occupation & Migration on C-SPAN 3’s American History TV series.

Alum Diyana Dobberteen writes about the link between job creation and climate change in the Santa Barbara Independent.

MA-ODL faculty Ruth Middleton House, EdD, is named among the Top 100 Influential Women in Georgia by Engineering Georgia magazine.

Alum Janja Lalich, PhD, shares her expertise with The New York Times Magazine on how to help someone who is in a cult.

APRIL 2019

Clinical Psychology faculty Tiffany Field, PhD, tells The Atlantic about the impact of physical touch on human health.

NYT best-selling author/talk-show host Thom Hartmann reads Point of Departure by HOD faculty FourArrows, PhD, EdD, for his International Book Club.

Alum Laura Berger writes about finding happiness at work – and the science of how to enjoy your job – for the Different Brains blog.

Media Psy faculty Pamela Rutledge, PhD, discusses the current climate of finger-pointing, frustration, and divisiveness with Forbes.

Admissions advisor Camie Barnwell writes about how Fielding’s Media Psychology program studies cultural touchstones like Black Panther for the Santa Barbara Independent.

JANUARY 2019 Faculty emerita Christine Ho, right, speaks to Democracy NOW’s Amy Goodman about the psychological effects of long-term detention on asylum seekers.

15

Alum Nathaniel Williams, EdD, shares his foster-child-turned-author-and-nonprofit founder life story with the Student Oriented Press.

Media Psychology faculty Karen Shackleford, PhD, talks “Game of Thrones” graphic content with The Hollywood Reporter.

MARCH 2019

HOD student William Hart writes about segregation in the workplace based on gender, for Conscious Company Media.

NOVEMBER 2018

Alum Monique Morris, EdD, gives a TED Talk on Why Black Girls Are Targeted for Punishment at School – and How to Change That.

Alum Patricia Dawson, MD, PhD, tells the Puget Sound Business Journal why she enrolled in Fielding midway through her career as a breast cancer surgeon.

Media Psychology student Lisa Swain speaks to Pantsuit Politics about the limits of bias in addressing societal polarization.

Clinical Psychology faculty Ruthellen Josselson, PhD, shows The Conversation how Michelle Obama’s memoir illustrates women’s ideal evolution.

Variety covers a report by Media Psychology student Alton Carswell showing that a majority of diverse TV writers experience discrimination on the job.

Alum Stephen Redmon, PhD, is profiled on the Kripalu blog for leading wellness retreats for students of all ages in Cuba, the Bahamas, and Puerto Rico.

Clinical Psychology alum Heather Sheafer, PhD, blogs about the best professional decision she ever made: relocating to another state for her internship.


16

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

OUR EXISTENCE IS RESISTANCE Coping, resiliency, and community for trans and gender diverse people

Doctoral candidates Aiden Hirshfield, in Media Psychology, and T. Dawson Woodrum, in Clinical Psychology, teamed up to share insights gleaned from studying transgender issues.

G

ender is a complex social construct that is flexible, ambiguous, and incredibly unique. However, the rigidity of gender definitions historically offered by society has forced individuals into strict binary gender roles and expectations that persist in research and in real life. For the many individuals who identify as gender diverse, this perpetuates a state of isolation, ignorance, and often intolerance. The delineations and expectations following gender are being challenged by the resiliency of individuals who express themselves and identify outside of the traditional binary expectations. However, the diverse representations of gender that exist are influenced by the normative conceptions that persist in each context. For instance, in the transphobic and male-dominated culture of Myanmar, gender diverse individuals (achout) can mitigate their stigmatized status by becoming respected spirit mediums (nat kadaw), which are historically female roles. Gender diverse individuals in India (Hijra) have low social status, are often disowned by family, denied education, and are restricted to certain occupations such as ceremonial performers and beggars. In both examples, gender diversity is culturally constrained to traditionally female roles and elucidates the stigmatization of gender incongruence. Aiden Hirshfield walked in January’s graduation.

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

17

The polarization of gender diverse groups, such as the transgender community, into masculine or feminine labels forces gender diverse individuals to adapt to binary expectations, rather than celebrating their unique forms of expression. Here, we look at the issue from the two psychological perspectives we studied at Fielding: Clinical Psychology: Many people who identify as transgender or gender diverse (TGD) experience increased levels of violence and discrimination across multiple situations throughout their lifespan. Historically, research concerning TGD people has tended to medicalize and pathologize their expression of gender diversity, instead of examining the impact marginalization has on otherwise healthy individuals. Both demoralization and community connectedness seem particularly well-suited for examining well-being in a less pathologizing and a more holistic and empowering way; both constructs capture important dimensions of the lived experience of TGD-identified people. A sense of belonging to a community of peers may be particularly important for TGD-identified people because of their shared experience of alienation from mainstream society and lack of opportunity to experience their identities in a supportive environment as the norm. Similarly, a sense of feeling connected to a supportive community of peers, in particular, may provide a preventative buffer against minority stress, as well as affording more opportunities to enhance well-being by use of effective coping mechanisms, like seeking help. Findings in this area highlight the need for programs that emphasize the development of empowering and effective TGD community-based connections which instill hope, reduce isolation, and thereby provide a buffer against the negative effects of demoralization. Media Psychology: Gender diverse individuals can benefit from the perceived anonymity of the Internet by using it to explore and express gender in ways that may be taboo or dangerous in their real lives. Social networking sites facilitate promising opportunities for minority communities to communicate and flourish, as well as opportunities for study. The little research that exists on gender diverse media practices focuses on the transgender community specifically, but findings from the most recent U.S Transgender Survey revealed that nearly one-third of transgender individuals have in the past or currently identify as non-binary. Apparent is the need to better understand the relationship between these identities, while still recognizing their unique and fluid language. Computer-mediated communication permits the development of unique language and performances that reject the dichotomy of binary gender presumptions. To compensate for the lack of representation in mass forms of media, the gender diverse community uses emerging platforms like social media to explore and validate their identities. It is vitally important that research concerning trans and gender diverse individuals creates more opportunities for participants to identify and express themselves authentically, thereby establishing a model of diversity and inclusion. •

AIDEN HIRSHFIELD Dissertation: Using Instagram and Selfies to Explore Body Image in Gender Diverse Individuals “As a transman conducting research on the gender diverse community, I expected to feel a deep sense of empowerment and connectedness as I discovered more about our shared experience. What I did not anticipate was the raw sense of disillusionment I felt as I uncovered the blatant exploitation and misrepresentation of my community in media and research. This process has certainly strengthened my resiliency, but more importantly, it has ignited a furious devotion to advocating for (and often demanding) inclusion.”

T. DAWSON WOODRUM Dissertation: The Relationship Between Demoralization, Community Connectedness, and Well-Being Among Transgender and Gender Diverse Individuals Dawson is one of the first inaugural recipients of The Dr. Sherry L. Hatcher Honorary Scholarship Fund “As a member of the gender diverse community, my research in Clinical Psychology has instilled a sense of hope beyond what I imagined was possible. We all have unique gender journey narratives.  When we have the mentorship and means to share them, we create a path for others to follow that has been suppressed throughout most of modern history. Self-knowledge and expression in the face of such daunting odds can, and will, help us reclaim the wisdom of the wounded healer.”


16

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

OUR EXISTENCE IS RESISTANCE Coping, resiliency, and community for trans and gender diverse people

Doctoral candidates Aiden Hirshfield, in Media Psychology, and T. Dawson Woodrum, in Clinical Psychology, teamed up to share insights gleaned from studying transgender issues.

G

ender is a complex social construct that is flexible, ambiguous, and incredibly unique. However, the rigidity of gender definitions historically offered by society has forced individuals into strict binary gender roles and expectations that persist in research and in real life. For the many individuals who identify as gender diverse, this perpetuates a state of isolation, ignorance, and often intolerance. The delineations and expectations following gender are being challenged by the resiliency of individuals who express themselves and identify outside of the traditional binary expectations. However, the diverse representations of gender that exist are influenced by the normative conceptions that persist in each context. For instance, in the transphobic and male-dominated culture of Myanmar, gender diverse individuals (achout) can mitigate their stigmatized status by becoming respected spirit mediums (nat kadaw), which are historically female roles. Gender diverse individuals in India (Hijra) have low social status, are often disowned by family, denied education, and are restricted to certain occupations such as ceremonial performers and beggars. In both examples, gender diversity is culturally constrained to traditionally female roles and elucidates the stigmatization of gender incongruence. Aiden Hirshfield walked in January’s graduation.

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

17

The polarization of gender diverse groups, such as the transgender community, into masculine or feminine labels forces gender diverse individuals to adapt to binary expectations, rather than celebrating their unique forms of expression. Here, we look at the issue from the two psychological perspectives we studied at Fielding: Clinical Psychology: Many people who identify as transgender or gender diverse (TGD) experience increased levels of violence and discrimination across multiple situations throughout their lifespan. Historically, research concerning TGD people has tended to medicalize and pathologize their expression of gender diversity, instead of examining the impact marginalization has on otherwise healthy individuals. Both demoralization and community connectedness seem particularly well-suited for examining well-being in a less pathologizing and a more holistic and empowering way; both constructs capture important dimensions of the lived experience of TGD-identified people. A sense of belonging to a community of peers may be particularly important for TGD-identified people because of their shared experience of alienation from mainstream society and lack of opportunity to experience their identities in a supportive environment as the norm. Similarly, a sense of feeling connected to a supportive community of peers, in particular, may provide a preventative buffer against minority stress, as well as affording more opportunities to enhance well-being by use of effective coping mechanisms, like seeking help. Findings in this area highlight the need for programs that emphasize the development of empowering and effective TGD community-based connections which instill hope, reduce isolation, and thereby provide a buffer against the negative effects of demoralization. Media Psychology: Gender diverse individuals can benefit from the perceived anonymity of the Internet by using it to explore and express gender in ways that may be taboo or dangerous in their real lives. Social networking sites facilitate promising opportunities for minority communities to communicate and flourish, as well as opportunities for study. The little research that exists on gender diverse media practices focuses on the transgender community specifically, but findings from the most recent U.S Transgender Survey revealed that nearly one-third of transgender individuals have in the past or currently identify as non-binary. Apparent is the need to better understand the relationship between these identities, while still recognizing their unique and fluid language. Computer-mediated communication permits the development of unique language and performances that reject the dichotomy of binary gender presumptions. To compensate for the lack of representation in mass forms of media, the gender diverse community uses emerging platforms like social media to explore and validate their identities. It is vitally important that research concerning trans and gender diverse individuals creates more opportunities for participants to identify and express themselves authentically, thereby establishing a model of diversity and inclusion. •

AIDEN HIRSHFIELD Dissertation: Using Instagram and Selfies to Explore Body Image in Gender Diverse Individuals “As a transman conducting research on the gender diverse community, I expected to feel a deep sense of empowerment and connectedness as I discovered more about our shared experience. What I did not anticipate was the raw sense of disillusionment I felt as I uncovered the blatant exploitation and misrepresentation of my community in media and research. This process has certainly strengthened my resiliency, but more importantly, it has ignited a furious devotion to advocating for (and often demanding) inclusion.”

T. DAWSON WOODRUM Dissertation: The Relationship Between Demoralization, Community Connectedness, and Well-Being Among Transgender and Gender Diverse Individuals Dawson is one of the first inaugural recipients of The Dr. Sherry L. Hatcher Honorary Scholarship Fund “As a member of the gender diverse community, my research in Clinical Psychology has instilled a sense of hope beyond what I imagined was possible. We all have unique gender journey narratives.  When we have the mentorship and means to share them, we create a path for others to follow that has been suppressed throughout most of modern history. Self-knowledge and expression in the face of such daunting odds can, and will, help us reclaim the wisdom of the wounded healer.”


18

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

PROMOTING

THE WHOLE STORY

Seeking the Voices of African American Women Veterans The USNS Prairie ship, where Page lived and worked

F

or five years, Cheryl Jefferson Page served as a hospital corpsman in the United States Navy. Two of those years were spent living and working aboard the USNS Prairie naval ship, where she was among the first-ever group of 120 women to join a crew of 1,200 men.

But when she transitioned out of the military, she felt like an “other” – neither military, nor civilian. “Unifying both of these experiences was a challenge,” she says. “I had been in a culture where there’s hierarchy, accountability, camaraderie, and an element of trust. The civilian world is messier. People who don’t understand your transformed identity and internal infrastructure as a veteran either fear it or dismiss it. You’re set apart as something different.” Now Jefferson Page is a doctoral student in Fielding’s Human & Organizational Development program, and researching African American women veterans returning back into society after they’ve served. “We treat women veterans like they’re different,” she says. “They’re special because they put their lives on the line for our freedom, but we are all part of the same human race. Diversity in having a range of human differences is an asset, not a liability that should make you excluded.” African American women combat veterans who served in Iraq/ Afghanistan are the fastest growing ethnic minority segment of veterans – but we don’t really know much about their experiences. “The whole of their stories have been omitted from the scholarly discourse,” says Jefferson Page. “And what is written tends to follow a common negative narrative about Black women: that they are unemployed, uneducated, in poor

19

health – not thriving.” Or that they suffer from PTSD. “While some of that may be true – because war changes people – it’s not the complete story,” Jefferson Page says. “Not all African American women veterans have a hard time resuming their roles in their families and neighborhoods. Some have recommissioned themselves by applying all of their experiences, both positive and negative, including higher education, special skills, maturity, determination, a heightened awareness, and a broader worldview and understanding of themselves. I want to offer an alternative perspective and study those who have done well, using the theory of post-traumatic growth.”

EQUITY INSIDE E & OUT

quity has always been important to Galen Maness. As the director of human resources for Starbucks’ Northern California region, he was proud to help the organization in its effort to recruit and hire 10,000 veterans, and he helped create employment partnerships with the Bay Area’s LGBTQ Community. While at Starbuck’s, Galen served on the Oakland Workforce Investment Board, which focuses on creating employment equity for youth ages 16-24. Now Maness is director of HR and Administration at The San Francisco Foundation, a nonprofit with a diverse staff that is focused on creating vibrant economically secure communities in the Bay Area. But he’s also a student in Fielding’s MA in Organizational Development & Leadership program – and he’s getting the opportunity to apply some of the lessons he’s learned at Fielding to bringing internal equity to his social justice-oriented organization. It is Galen’s observation that organizations can sometimes have a disconnect between their external-facing values and the internal experience of their employees. Maness is working closely with his CEO at the San Francisco Foundation to champion this cause there. “We are trying to create an environment that allows everyone to bring their full self to work,” he says, “that allows people with varying life experiences and differences to feel safe and trying to help people have a sense of belonging in the workplace.” He’s grateful for the skills he’s picked up at Fielding that help him in this work.

Jefferson Page says Fielding has taught Cheryl Jefferson Page her to look at society from a systems perspective to see how things are interconnected. But it was the university’s scholar-practitioner model that drew her here – and its implicit challenge to do work that improves the lives of people.

“I’ve learned to be a more effective listener, to value individuals’ journeys, and to work tirelessly to build an equitable workforce,” he says. Faculty member Ruth Middleton House, EdD, “helped me understand the importance of resiliency within communities, and of everyone having a seat at the table. In class with Jim Beaubien, PhD, I learned how different teams work together and the behaviors that functional and dysfunctional cohorts exhibit.

“All of us can make changes right where we are,” she says, “and be extraordinary in our communities.” •

“With each course,” Maness says, “I walk away with a new tool chest of resources I didn’t have before.” •


18

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

PROMOTING

THE WHOLE STORY

Seeking the Voices of African American Women Veterans The USNS Prairie ship, where Page lived and worked

F

or five years, Cheryl Jefferson Page served as a hospital corpsman in the United States Navy. Two of those years were spent living and working aboard the USNS Prairie naval ship, where she was among the first-ever group of 120 women to join a crew of 1,200 men.

But when she transitioned out of the military, she felt like an “other” – neither military, nor civilian. “Unifying both of these experiences was a challenge,” she says. “I had been in a culture where there’s hierarchy, accountability, camaraderie, and an element of trust. The civilian world is messier. People who don’t understand your transformed identity and internal infrastructure as a veteran either fear it or dismiss it. You’re set apart as something different.” Now Jefferson Page is a doctoral student in Fielding’s Human & Organizational Development program, and researching African American women veterans returning back into society after they’ve served. “We treat women veterans like they’re different,” she says. “They’re special because they put their lives on the line for our freedom, but we are all part of the same human race. Diversity in having a range of human differences is an asset, not a liability that should make you excluded.” African American women combat veterans who served in Iraq/ Afghanistan are the fastest growing ethnic minority segment of veterans – but we don’t really know much about their experiences. “The whole of their stories have been omitted from the scholarly discourse,” says Jefferson Page. “And what is written tends to follow a common negative narrative about Black women: that they are unemployed, uneducated, in poor

19

health – not thriving.” Or that they suffer from PTSD. “While some of that may be true – because war changes people – it’s not the complete story,” Jefferson Page says. “Not all African American women veterans have a hard time resuming their roles in their families and neighborhoods. Some have recommissioned themselves by applying all of their experiences, both positive and negative, including higher education, special skills, maturity, determination, a heightened awareness, and a broader worldview and understanding of themselves. I want to offer an alternative perspective and study those who have done well, using the theory of post-traumatic growth.”

EQUITY INSIDE E & OUT

quity has always been important to Galen Maness. As the director of human resources for Starbucks’ Northern California region, he was proud to help the organization in its effort to recruit and hire 10,000 veterans, and he helped create employment partnerships with the Bay Area’s LGBTQ Community. While at Starbuck’s, Galen served on the Oakland Workforce Investment Board, which focuses on creating employment equity for youth ages 16-24. Now Maness is director of HR and Administration at The San Francisco Foundation, a nonprofit with a diverse staff that is focused on creating vibrant economically secure communities in the Bay Area. But he’s also a student in Fielding’s MA in Organizational Development & Leadership program – and he’s getting the opportunity to apply some of the lessons he’s learned at Fielding to bringing internal equity to his social justice-oriented organization. It is Galen’s observation that organizations can sometimes have a disconnect between their external-facing values and the internal experience of their employees. Maness is working closely with his CEO at the San Francisco Foundation to champion this cause there. “We are trying to create an environment that allows everyone to bring their full self to work,” he says, “that allows people with varying life experiences and differences to feel safe and trying to help people have a sense of belonging in the workplace.” He’s grateful for the skills he’s picked up at Fielding that help him in this work.

Jefferson Page says Fielding has taught Cheryl Jefferson Page her to look at society from a systems perspective to see how things are interconnected. But it was the university’s scholar-practitioner model that drew her here – and its implicit challenge to do work that improves the lives of people.

“I’ve learned to be a more effective listener, to value individuals’ journeys, and to work tirelessly to build an equitable workforce,” he says. Faculty member Ruth Middleton House, EdD, “helped me understand the importance of resiliency within communities, and of everyone having a seat at the table. In class with Jim Beaubien, PhD, I learned how different teams work together and the behaviors that functional and dysfunctional cohorts exhibit.

“All of us can make changes right where we are,” she says, “and be extraordinary in our communities.” •

“With each course,” Maness says, “I walk away with a new tool chest of resources I didn’t have before.” •


DEVELOPMENT

Your

Philanthropic Impact

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ALL SCHOLARSHIPS CAN BE MADE AT FIELDING.EDU/GIVING.

205

82% OF THE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS RECEIVED OVER $1,000

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED IN FY19 (YEAR-TO -DATE) AND 196 SCHOLARSHIPS IN FY18

EMILY ECCLES Clinical Psychology doctoral student, Montecito Bank & Trust Scholarship: “Your scholarship helps alleviate the monetary stress that comes with graduate school and allows me to focus that energy on working towards my academic and professional goals.”

$457,663

was awarded in FY19 YTD and $359,046 in FY18

LARGEST SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED THIS YEAR:

$11,500

$5,426 WAS RAISED FOR THE MAGIC FEET SCHOLARSHIP via 48 gifts from students, faculty, staff, and alumni in January. North Carolina Professional Development Seminar raised the most funds and won this year’s trophy. Faculty member April Harris-Britt, PhD, left, and student Michele Tatum

43 SCHOLARSHIP AWARD PROGRAMS AVAILABLE TO FIELDING STUDENTS ANNUALLY

“I am honored to be the recipient of this award. You are part of my journey. Thanks for your support. Mil gracias!” ELISA AUCANCELA , IECD DOCTORAL STUDENT, SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

14% OF SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS RECEIVED $5,000 OR MORE

Fielding Finance Team (L-R) Sam Radhakrishna, Lillian Simmons, Amanda Greene, Neecole Moraga

5,000

$

was raised for the Advancement Scholarship via 42 gifts from students, faculty, staff, and alumni during Winter Session. 183 STUDENTS RECEIVED A SCHOLARSHIP IN FY19 YTD AND 155 STUDENTS RECEIVED SCHOLARSHIPS IN FY18

DONNA CLARK, PHD, ODC, Charlie & Edie Seashore Scholarship and The de Jonge LGBTQ/Allies Canadian Endowed Scholarship: “Fielding has offered me a unique educational experience that is enhancing my capacity to make change happen in Canadian workplaces. Your financial support for my research on women from diverse social locations in leadership is particularly appreciated as we hear so much in the media about the challenges women leaders still face.”


DEVELOPMENT

Your

Philanthropic Impact

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ALL SCHOLARSHIPS CAN BE MADE AT FIELDING.EDU/GIVING.

205

82% OF THE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS RECEIVED OVER $1,000

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED IN FY19 (YEAR-TO -DATE) AND 196 SCHOLARSHIPS IN FY18

EMILY ECCLES Clinical Psychology doctoral student, Montecito Bank & Trust Scholarship: “Your scholarship helps alleviate the monetary stress that comes with graduate school and allows me to focus that energy on working towards my academic and professional goals.”

$457,663

was awarded in FY19 YTD and $359,046 in FY18

LARGEST SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED THIS YEAR:

$11,500

$5,426 WAS RAISED FOR THE MAGIC FEET SCHOLARSHIP via 48 gifts from students, faculty, staff, and alumni in January. North Carolina Professional Development Seminar raised the most funds and won this year’s trophy. Faculty member April Harris-Britt, PhD, left, and student Michele Tatum

43 SCHOLARSHIP AWARD PROGRAMS AVAILABLE TO FIELDING STUDENTS ANNUALLY

“I am honored to be the recipient of this award. You are part of my journey. Thanks for your support. Mil gracias!” ELISA AUCANCELA , IECD DOCTORAL STUDENT, SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

14% OF SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS RECEIVED $5,000 OR MORE

Fielding Finance Team (L-R) Sam Radhakrishna, Lillian Simmons, Amanda Greene, Neecole Moraga

5,000

$

was raised for the Advancement Scholarship via 42 gifts from students, faculty, staff, and alumni during Winter Session. 183 STUDENTS RECEIVED A SCHOLARSHIP IN FY19 YTD AND 155 STUDENTS RECEIVED SCHOLARSHIPS IN FY18

DONNA CLARK, PHD, ODC, Charlie & Edie Seashore Scholarship and The de Jonge LGBTQ/Allies Canadian Endowed Scholarship: “Fielding has offered me a unique educational experience that is enhancing my capacity to make change happen in Canadian workplaces. Your financial support for my research on women from diverse social locations in leadership is particularly appreciated as we hear so much in the media about the challenges women leaders still face.”


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Thank You for your Support WE ARE G RATE FU L F O R YO U R S U P P O R T O F OUR ST UD E N TS , A LU MNI , A ND T H E U NI V E RSITY AS A W HO L E . The following list in alphabetical order reflects all contributions and pledges received from October 2, 2019, to April 30, 2019. Contact Elena Nicklasson at giving@fielding. edu with any questions.

Anonymous Niels & Dorothy Agger-Gupta Pauline Albert Mohamed & Paula Amer Suzanne Ames Beverly Anderson Julie Anding & Lisa Kornetsky Dorothy Andrews Richard Appelbaum & Karen Shapiro Diane Armstrong Czarina Azzam Nancy Baker & Cathy Hauer Holly Bardutz Gayle Barrett & Russ McSwain Ana Barrio Marilynn Bast John Bennett & Eric T. Johnson Marcella Benson-Quaziena Valerie Bentz Marion Bilich Scheherezade Black Dolores Blueford Marlene Blumenthal Karen & Zac Bogart Romagne Boucher Alma Boutin-Martinez Zarat Boyd Judy Boykin-McCarthy Tara Brach Tahlia Bragg John Brose

Deborah Bucci Barton Buechner Grace Bull Bruce & Norma Burlington Linda Burton Kelly Butler Christina Callos Dave Caplan Angela Chamberlain Wayne Chang Dang Chonwerawong Anita Clark Kelly Clark Donna Clark James Collison Kayla Conrad David Corey Connie Corley Margaret Cramer Craig Crawford Steven & Teresa Culbertson Sara Cureton Tom Darrah Loni & Jeffrey Davis Janet de Merode Lynne & John Demartini Anna DiStefano & Deborah Karoff Mary & Matthew Donovan Lawrence Drake Sanford Drob Bryan Duncan

Linda Durnell Wendi Dykes Terri Easter Ruth Edwards Nancy Ehlers Michelle Elias Nanine Ewing April Fallon Todd Favorite Joe Ferguson Susan Ferrant Dino Ferrare Tiffany Field Marles Finos Arline Fireman Jennifer Fleming Ron and Ellse Forbes Janet Fortier Marilyn Freimuth Ben Fuller Beverly Gabrielson Lee Geldett-Furr & Al Furr Debra Gerardi Tracy Gibbons Meredith Gilbert Blake Gilbert Elizabeth Glenn Susan G. Goldberg Michael & Jinny Goldstein Corinne Goodwin Joshua Green Charlyn Green Fareed Anthony Greene Pamela Grenz Jennifer Gruba Kathy Hairston Mary Hall Elaine Hanson Mary Hanzel Elizabeth Hardy & Rick Omlor Garry Hare Natan HarPaz April Harris-Britt Kimberly & Don Harrison Sherry & Robert Hatcher Raymond Hawkins Karl Hebenstreit Lloydene Hill Carol Hirashima Kim Hoffman Jerri Lynn & Adrian Hogg Linda & Reynolds Honold Denise Humphrey Lisa Hunter Clifford Hurst William & Linda Husson Kae & Phil Hutchison Jean-Pierre Isbouts & Cathie Labrador Szabi Ishtai-Zee Don Jacobs Anzi Jacobs Devon Jersild Alisha Jiwani Gerald Johnson Victoria Kaplan Joe Kapushion

Judith Katz & David Levine Christina Kaviani Stephen & Kay Gwen Kennedy Phillip Kent James & Yoshiko Kim Tracy Knight Zieva & Marc Konvisser Timothy & Evelyn Koppi Marti Kranzberg John Lamothe John & Francine Langley Lois LaShell & Alan Guskin James Lazarus Tomás Leal Barbara Leary Judy Lee Otto Lee Christina Leimer Curtis Levang Lisa Lewis Kathryn Littleton Katherine Lui Shirreka Mackay William MacNulty Heather Mahardy Laura Markos Paige & Don Marrs Caitlin Martin Roberta Martinez-Banks Barbara Mather Patricia Maxwell Susan & Mazer-Smith Charles McClintock & Carol Wilburn Monica McClintock Sonya McCrea James & Elna McFarland Katherine McGraw Sherri McKittrick Deanna McMain Veronica McMartin Cassell Mee & James Leonard Michele Mendelson Virginia Merwin Susan Mickel William Miller Weston Milliken Eileen Morgan Jo Ann Morris Donald Mroz & Susan Lapine Carol Muller Joan Newman Suzanne Nicholas Elena Nicklasson Ayumi Nishii Jennifer Nosker Carl & Dianne Oliver Jude & Bernie Olson Anna Orgon Judith Orloff Alayne Ormerod Beth Ornstein Jenne Palmer Roxane Pate Wayne Patterson David Peck

James & Barbara Peck Susan Pelzer Nicky Petersen Samantha Poling Marilyn Price-Mitchell Leslie Rainaldi Ronald Ray Joan Read Shawn Marie Rehfeld Charlotte Robson Katrina Rogers & William Cherry Juliet Rohde-Brown & James Paul Brown Frank Rojas Debra Row Kjell & Janice Rudestam Kimberly Rust Pamela Rutledge Maria Viola Sanchez Alexandria Santry-Raptis Dennis Sattler & Linda Sattler Caroline Schaerfl James Schiller & Terry Kirchner Lori Schneider Judith Schoenholtz-Read Lorraine Schooner Jane Schuster Karyl Sears Nancie Senet Daniel Sewell Karen Shackleford Constance & Jay Shafran Nancy Shapiro & Ira Shapiro Martha Sherman Tom & Ronna Sherman Markie Silverman Lillian Simmons Swarna Singhal Elissa Slanger Nicola Smith Lila Smith Monique Snowden Hinde Socol Marie Sonnet & Robert Berklich Charles Spearman Timothy & Sherry Stanton Kathleen Stuhr-Mack Sharka Stuyt Anna Szabados Tonya Tate Orlando Taylor Gine Thomes-Cotter Regina Tuma Lynne Valek Paul & Janice Van Almkerk Sergej Van Middendorp Colin Vogel Foyann Vogler Mary Ann Von Glinow Virginia VonReichbauer Gary Wagenheim Ericka Waidley Jan Wakeman Mary Warren Mary Wegmann Nancy Weisman

Hilda Wentland Colleen White Candace White Dennis White Shayla Williams David Willis & Mika Obayashi Claire Winson-Jones Mary-Frances Winters Arlene Falk Withers Timothy Yamasaki Pamela Young Patricia Zell & Michael Cox Tracy Zemansky

H ONORARY AND MEMOR I AL G IFTS AC KNOWL EDG E IMPOR TANT PEOPL E IN OUR L I V ES AND IN TH E FI EL DING COMMUNITY. IN H ONOR OF Patricia Adson Frank Barrett Mary Hall Barbara Mink Judith Orloff Kjell Rudestam

IN MEMORY OF

Lova Khoram Will Kouw Lee Mahon W. Barnett Pearce Gerald Porter Googun Von Glinow Felix and Poindexter Zemansky-Felton Evan Weisman

FOUNDERS CIRCLE B EQUESTS & OT H E R PLAN N E D GIF TS Fielding thanks those who have generously designated Fielding in their wills or made a planned gift to ensure Fielding’s future.

Anonymous Pauline Albert Natalie Ammarell Peggy Azad Nancy Lynn Baker John L. Bennett Valerie Bentz Marvin & Linda Branch Juanita Brown Lynn Bursten Don D. Bushnell Christine Clark Kelly Clark Anna DiStefano D’Ann Downey Nanine Ewing Jeff Frakes Leola Furman Kathy Geller Tracy Gibbons John Gladfelter* Michael Goldstein Sharon Hawley-Crum Linda Honold Roberta Jensen Anne Kratz Diana Kunkel & Trish Cleary

Sarah N. MacDougall Paige and Don Marrs Barbara A. Mather Charles McClintock & Carol Wilburn Sara Miller McCune Pamela S. Meyer Mary Lou Michael Eileen Morgan Christi Olson Wendy Overend Marilyn Price-Mitchell Kathleen Randolph Katrina Rogers Paul and Nancy Shaw Andrea L. Shields Judith Silverstein James E. Skibo Nicola Smith Carol Sommerfield Ted J. Takamura Roland* & Charlotte Troike Pam Van Dyke Patricia Zell *Deceased

FOUNDER S C IR CLE M E M BE R SH IP BE N E F ITS:

• • • •

Free Fielding publication annually Updates directly from the University Leadership Team Invitations to special events at the university Many recognition opportunities

TH E FL EX IB I L I T Y O F A PLAN N E D GIF T : • • •

You are free to alter your plans at any time. You can structure your gift in different ways: a specific amount of money, piece of property, or percentage of your estate. You retain control over your assets should you need them during your lifetime.

CO NTACT ELENA NICK LASS ON, DIRECTOR OF D EV ELO P M ENT, ABOU T HOW YOU CAN MAK E A N I M PACT AT FIELDING THROU G H A PLANNED GI FT : 8 05 . 898 . 2926 OR G IVING @ F IELDING .EDU

23


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Thank You for your Support WE ARE G RATE FU L F O R YO U R S U P P O R T O F OUR ST UD E N TS , A LU MNI , A ND T H E U NI V E RSITY AS A W HO L E . The following list in alphabetical order reflects all contributions and pledges received from October 2, 2019, to April 30, 2019. Contact Elena Nicklasson at giving@fielding. edu with any questions.

Anonymous Niels & Dorothy Agger-Gupta Pauline Albert Mohamed & Paula Amer Suzanne Ames Beverly Anderson Julie Anding & Lisa Kornetsky Dorothy Andrews Richard Appelbaum & Karen Shapiro Diane Armstrong Czarina Azzam Nancy Baker & Cathy Hauer Holly Bardutz Gayle Barrett & Russ McSwain Ana Barrio Marilynn Bast John Bennett & Eric T. Johnson Marcella Benson-Quaziena Valerie Bentz Marion Bilich Scheherezade Black Dolores Blueford Marlene Blumenthal Karen & Zac Bogart Romagne Boucher Alma Boutin-Martinez Zarat Boyd Judy Boykin-McCarthy Tara Brach Tahlia Bragg John Brose

Deborah Bucci Barton Buechner Grace Bull Bruce & Norma Burlington Linda Burton Kelly Butler Christina Callos Dave Caplan Angela Chamberlain Wayne Chang Dang Chonwerawong Anita Clark Kelly Clark Donna Clark James Collison Kayla Conrad David Corey Connie Corley Margaret Cramer Craig Crawford Steven & Teresa Culbertson Sara Cureton Tom Darrah Loni & Jeffrey Davis Janet de Merode Lynne & John Demartini Anna DiStefano & Deborah Karoff Mary & Matthew Donovan Lawrence Drake Sanford Drob Bryan Duncan

Linda Durnell Wendi Dykes Terri Easter Ruth Edwards Nancy Ehlers Michelle Elias Nanine Ewing April Fallon Todd Favorite Joe Ferguson Susan Ferrant Dino Ferrare Tiffany Field Marles Finos Arline Fireman Jennifer Fleming Ron and Ellse Forbes Janet Fortier Marilyn Freimuth Ben Fuller Beverly Gabrielson Lee Geldett-Furr & Al Furr Debra Gerardi Tracy Gibbons Meredith Gilbert Blake Gilbert Elizabeth Glenn Susan G. Goldberg Michael & Jinny Goldstein Corinne Goodwin Joshua Green Charlyn Green Fareed Anthony Greene Pamela Grenz Jennifer Gruba Kathy Hairston Mary Hall Elaine Hanson Mary Hanzel Elizabeth Hardy & Rick Omlor Garry Hare Natan HarPaz April Harris-Britt Kimberly & Don Harrison Sherry & Robert Hatcher Raymond Hawkins Karl Hebenstreit Lloydene Hill Carol Hirashima Kim Hoffman Jerri Lynn & Adrian Hogg Linda & Reynolds Honold Denise Humphrey Lisa Hunter Clifford Hurst William & Linda Husson Kae & Phil Hutchison Jean-Pierre Isbouts & Cathie Labrador Szabi Ishtai-Zee Don Jacobs Anzi Jacobs Devon Jersild Alisha Jiwani Gerald Johnson Victoria Kaplan Joe Kapushion

Judith Katz & David Levine Christina Kaviani Stephen & Kay Gwen Kennedy Phillip Kent James & Yoshiko Kim Tracy Knight Zieva & Marc Konvisser Timothy & Evelyn Koppi Marti Kranzberg John Lamothe John & Francine Langley Lois LaShell & Alan Guskin James Lazarus Tomás Leal Barbara Leary Judy Lee Otto Lee Christina Leimer Curtis Levang Lisa Lewis Kathryn Littleton Katherine Lui Shirreka Mackay William MacNulty Heather Mahardy Laura Markos Paige & Don Marrs Caitlin Martin Roberta Martinez-Banks Barbara Mather Patricia Maxwell Susan & Mazer-Smith Charles McClintock & Carol Wilburn Monica McClintock Sonya McCrea James & Elna McFarland Katherine McGraw Sherri McKittrick Deanna McMain Veronica McMartin Cassell Mee & James Leonard Michele Mendelson Virginia Merwin Susan Mickel William Miller Weston Milliken Eileen Morgan Jo Ann Morris Donald Mroz & Susan Lapine Carol Muller Joan Newman Suzanne Nicholas Elena Nicklasson Ayumi Nishii Jennifer Nosker Carl & Dianne Oliver Jude & Bernie Olson Anna Orgon Judith Orloff Alayne Ormerod Beth Ornstein Jenne Palmer Roxane Pate Wayne Patterson David Peck

James & Barbara Peck Susan Pelzer Nicky Petersen Samantha Poling Marilyn Price-Mitchell Leslie Rainaldi Ronald Ray Joan Read Shawn Marie Rehfeld Charlotte Robson Katrina Rogers & William Cherry Juliet Rohde-Brown & James Paul Brown Frank Rojas Debra Row Kjell & Janice Rudestam Kimberly Rust Pamela Rutledge Maria Viola Sanchez Alexandria Santry-Raptis Dennis Sattler & Linda Sattler Caroline Schaerfl James Schiller & Terry Kirchner Lori Schneider Judith Schoenholtz-Read Lorraine Schooner Jane Schuster Karyl Sears Nancie Senet Daniel Sewell Karen Shackleford Constance & Jay Shafran Nancy Shapiro & Ira Shapiro Martha Sherman Tom & Ronna Sherman Markie Silverman Lillian Simmons Swarna Singhal Elissa Slanger Nicola Smith Lila Smith Monique Snowden Hinde Socol Marie Sonnet & Robert Berklich Charles Spearman Timothy & Sherry Stanton Kathleen Stuhr-Mack Sharka Stuyt Anna Szabados Tonya Tate Orlando Taylor Gine Thomes-Cotter Regina Tuma Lynne Valek Paul & Janice Van Almkerk Sergej Van Middendorp Colin Vogel Foyann Vogler Mary Ann Von Glinow Virginia VonReichbauer Gary Wagenheim Ericka Waidley Jan Wakeman Mary Warren Mary Wegmann Nancy Weisman

Hilda Wentland Colleen White Candace White Dennis White Shayla Williams David Willis & Mika Obayashi Claire Winson-Jones Mary-Frances Winters Arlene Falk Withers Timothy Yamasaki Pamela Young Patricia Zell & Michael Cox Tracy Zemansky

H ONORARY AND MEMOR I AL G IFTS AC KNOWL EDG E IMPOR TANT PEOPL E IN OUR L I V ES AND IN TH E FI EL DING COMMUNITY. IN H ONOR OF Patricia Adson Frank Barrett Mary Hall Barbara Mink Judith Orloff Kjell Rudestam

IN MEMORY OF

Lova Khoram Will Kouw Lee Mahon W. Barnett Pearce Gerald Porter Googun Von Glinow Felix and Poindexter Zemansky-Felton Evan Weisman

FOUNDERS CIRCLE B EQUESTS & OT H E R PLAN N E D GIF TS Fielding thanks those who have generously designated Fielding in their wills or made a planned gift to ensure Fielding’s future.

Anonymous Pauline Albert Natalie Ammarell Peggy Azad Nancy Lynn Baker John L. Bennett Valerie Bentz Marvin & Linda Branch Juanita Brown Lynn Bursten Don D. Bushnell Christine Clark Kelly Clark Anna DiStefano D’Ann Downey Nanine Ewing Jeff Frakes Leola Furman Kathy Geller Tracy Gibbons John Gladfelter* Michael Goldstein Sharon Hawley-Crum Linda Honold Roberta Jensen Anne Kratz Diana Kunkel & Trish Cleary

Sarah N. MacDougall Paige and Don Marrs Barbara A. Mather Charles McClintock & Carol Wilburn Sara Miller McCune Pamela S. Meyer Mary Lou Michael Eileen Morgan Christi Olson Wendy Overend Marilyn Price-Mitchell Kathleen Randolph Katrina Rogers Paul and Nancy Shaw Andrea L. Shields Judith Silverstein James E. Skibo Nicola Smith Carol Sommerfield Ted J. Takamura Roland* & Charlotte Troike Pam Van Dyke Patricia Zell *Deceased

FOUNDER S C IR CLE M E M BE R SH IP BE N E F ITS:

• • • •

Free Fielding publication annually Updates directly from the University Leadership Team Invitations to special events at the university Many recognition opportunities

TH E FL EX IB I L I T Y O F A PLAN N E D GIF T : • • •

You are free to alter your plans at any time. You can structure your gift in different ways: a specific amount of money, piece of property, or percentage of your estate. You retain control over your assets should you need them during your lifetime.

CO NTACT ELENA NICK LASS ON, DIRECTOR OF D EV ELO P M ENT, ABOU T HOW YOU CAN MAK E A N I M PACT AT FIELDING THROU G H A PLANNED GI FT : 8 05 . 898 . 2926 OR G IVING @ F IELDING .EDU

23


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Their Motive: Our Mission LIFELONG LEARNERS MARIE SONNET AND ROBERT BERKLICH HELP FIELDING REMAIN ‘A FORCE FOR JUSTICE, INCLUSION, AND SUSTAINABILITY’

Receiving a doctoral degree at Fielding is a transformational experience. It also requires a lot of personal commitment and sacrifice at times. Often family members – spouses, for example – may take over the daily routines so the student can focus on school. Such is the case with Marie Sonnet, PhD ‘16, and her husband Robert Berklich, who, for that reason, considers himself a Fielding “alum by association.” They embraced their experience at Fielding as a commitment to life-long learning, and both continue to stay engaged by contributing their time, service, and funds. Inspired by Fielding as a “model of and a force for justice, inclusion, and sustainability in the 21st century,” Marie and Robert recently made a generous contribution to support the university’s mission – and told us why:

WHY CO N TRIBUTE TO F IE LD ING?

Most surely, we are motivated by Fielding’s mission and its learning model, which attracted Marie to the university almost a decade ago. The educational opportunity to seek highly self-directed personal and professional development in pursuit of a more just world sets Fielding apart. We wanted to support efforts to

recharge that mission in our 45th year so that the Fielding community can be a model of and a force for justice, inclusion, and sustainability in the 21st century. Of course, it’s important to us, too, that the value of a Fielding degree continues to rise.

Dr. Marie Sonnet and Robert Berklich

accessible way. This spring, the Press published Resilience: Navigating Challenges of Modern Life.

We’ve taken Fielding up on its promise of “lifelong learning.” We’ve had the amazing privilege of maintaining and developing relationships with gifted and generous members of the Fielding community. We are also taking advantage of the terrific resources and professional opportunities alumni enjoy. Thanks to other supporters, this now includes access to our wonderful library – a tremendous advantage. The Institute for Social Innovation also allows alumni to be scholar-practitioners with an academic institutional affiliation. These are remarkable benefits. HOW D I D YO U B ECO ME E N G AG E D WITH F I E L DI N G U N I VE RS I T Y PR E SS?

Fielding University Press, under the spirited leadership of Dr. Jean-Pierre Isbouts, provided a tremendous opportunity to co-edit the 12th volume in its Monograph Series, featuring Fielding research on the timely topic of resilience. Together with Dr. Connie Corley and eight other talented faculty, alumni, and student researchers, we gathered our studies in hopes of bringing more rigor to individual, community, and organizational practice in an

Masters & Certificates G RAD UAT ES

NOVEMBER 2, 2018 – MAY 1, 2019

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

WHY STAY I N VO LVE D W I T H F IE LD IN G?

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP Christine T. Au Katherine K. Bates Russell Taylor

W H AT I M PAC T DO E S YOUR S U P P O RT H AVE ?

We think our support maximizes the personal investment we’ve made in a Fielding degree while reminding the university of our hope that faculty and staff continue to make a Fielding education more well-known, ever more true to its values, and more impactful. We also wanted to join with the many alumni who give time, services, and funds to our alma mater to enable its important mission. Together, we’re helping to change the world. •

25

CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Edward A. Barrows, Jr. Desiree D. Briel Rodi Magda Capello Kaspary Robert Churilla Raquel Cosden Elisabeth L. Dick Laura M. Downing Jennifer L. Duran Patricia C. East Kenneth H. Feiler Ingen Fitzhugh June E. Malone John McGinty Kristina Noeva Dana L. Ross Kevin Sewell Nandi J. Shareef Peter A. Simmonds Carla Swearingen Brandon Zaslow

CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP David A. Cannonier Asiah I. Clendinen Sarah C. Crane Merl Eustache Shauna L. Matthew Joyce C. McKenzie Jennifer Palmer Crawford Ryan Paquet Monifa Potter Verna Rivers Kendra Roach Kenisha H. Thompson Joanne M. Walters Neville N. Williams

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Sally L. Glaspey Carla Keldawy Candice D. Marshall Marisa N. Oliveri Daniel M. Pesta Luke A. Schmidt Leah O. Selakovic Matthew L. Winter

CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Leila A. Bakry-Becker Daniel Hai CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA NEUROSCIENCE Laurie McCulloh Sharka Stuyt POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Cristina A. Aakre Jessica Berger LaSenie R. Coleman Natalya S. Collins-Howard Tiffany Davis Anna Grejtakova LaPorsha Hall Elisabeth L. Hand Benjamin I. Long Sierra N. Lynch Tiffanie N. Newlin Courtney L. Norris Sean O’Hearn Deana Radovancevic Rachel Schatzberg Michelle L. Zuzock


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Their Motive: Our Mission LIFELONG LEARNERS MARIE SONNET AND ROBERT BERKLICH HELP FIELDING REMAIN ‘A FORCE FOR JUSTICE, INCLUSION, AND SUSTAINABILITY’

Receiving a doctoral degree at Fielding is a transformational experience. It also requires a lot of personal commitment and sacrifice at times. Often family members – spouses, for example – may take over the daily routines so the student can focus on school. Such is the case with Marie Sonnet, PhD ‘16, and her husband Robert Berklich, who, for that reason, considers himself a Fielding “alum by association.” They embraced their experience at Fielding as a commitment to life-long learning, and both continue to stay engaged by contributing their time, service, and funds. Inspired by Fielding as a “model of and a force for justice, inclusion, and sustainability in the 21st century,” Marie and Robert recently made a generous contribution to support the university’s mission – and told us why:

WHY CO N TRIBUTE TO F IE LD ING?

Most surely, we are motivated by Fielding’s mission and its learning model, which attracted Marie to the university almost a decade ago. The educational opportunity to seek highly self-directed personal and professional development in pursuit of a more just world sets Fielding apart. We wanted to support efforts to

recharge that mission in our 45th year so that the Fielding community can be a model of and a force for justice, inclusion, and sustainability in the 21st century. Of course, it’s important to us, too, that the value of a Fielding degree continues to rise.

Dr. Marie Sonnet and Robert Berklich

accessible way. This spring, the Press published Resilience: Navigating Challenges of Modern Life.

We’ve taken Fielding up on its promise of “lifelong learning.” We’ve had the amazing privilege of maintaining and developing relationships with gifted and generous members of the Fielding community. We are also taking advantage of the terrific resources and professional opportunities alumni enjoy. Thanks to other supporters, this now includes access to our wonderful library – a tremendous advantage. The Institute for Social Innovation also allows alumni to be scholar-practitioners with an academic institutional affiliation. These are remarkable benefits. HOW D I D YO U B ECO ME E N G AG E D WITH F I E L DI N G U N I VE RS I T Y PR E SS?

Fielding University Press, under the spirited leadership of Dr. Jean-Pierre Isbouts, provided a tremendous opportunity to co-edit the 12th volume in its Monograph Series, featuring Fielding research on the timely topic of resilience. Together with Dr. Connie Corley and eight other talented faculty, alumni, and student researchers, we gathered our studies in hopes of bringing more rigor to individual, community, and organizational practice in an

Masters & Certificates G RAD UAT ES

NOVEMBER 2, 2018 – MAY 1, 2019

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

WHY STAY I N VO LVE D W I T H F IE LD IN G?

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP Christine T. Au Katherine K. Bates Russell Taylor

W H AT I M PAC T DO E S YOUR S U P P O RT H AVE ?

We think our support maximizes the personal investment we’ve made in a Fielding degree while reminding the university of our hope that faculty and staff continue to make a Fielding education more well-known, ever more true to its values, and more impactful. We also wanted to join with the many alumni who give time, services, and funds to our alma mater to enable its important mission. Together, we’re helping to change the world. •

25

CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Edward A. Barrows, Jr. Desiree D. Briel Rodi Magda Capello Kaspary Robert Churilla Raquel Cosden Elisabeth L. Dick Laura M. Downing Jennifer L. Duran Patricia C. East Kenneth H. Feiler Ingen Fitzhugh June E. Malone John McGinty Kristina Noeva Dana L. Ross Kevin Sewell Nandi J. Shareef Peter A. Simmonds Carla Swearingen Brandon Zaslow

CERTIFICATE IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP David A. Cannonier Asiah I. Clendinen Sarah C. Crane Merl Eustache Shauna L. Matthew Joyce C. McKenzie Jennifer Palmer Crawford Ryan Paquet Monifa Potter Verna Rivers Kendra Roach Kenisha H. Thompson Joanne M. Walters Neville N. Williams

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Sally L. Glaspey Carla Keldawy Candice D. Marshall Marisa N. Oliveri Daniel M. Pesta Luke A. Schmidt Leah O. Selakovic Matthew L. Winter

CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Leila A. Bakry-Becker Daniel Hai CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA NEUROSCIENCE Laurie McCulloh Sharka Stuyt POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Cristina A. Aakre Jessica Berger LaSenie R. Coleman Natalya S. Collins-Howard Tiffany Davis Anna Grejtakova LaPorsha Hall Elisabeth L. Hand Benjamin I. Long Sierra N. Lynch Tiffanie N. Newlin Courtney L. Norris Sean O’Hearn Deana Radovancevic Rachel Schatzberg Michelle L. Zuzock


26

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Plern Pratoommas, PhD

The Lived Experience of Parents Who Have a Child Diagnosed w/a Developmental Disability Who Received Early Intervention Services in Thailand

Doctoral Graduates

Lorri Sullivan, PhD

Reflecting on Supervision: The Views, Opinions, & Experiences of New Jersey Early Intervention Practitioners

Diana J. White, PhD

Should We Listen Better to Parents? The Predictive Value of Parent Concerns About Their Child’s Development

NOVEMBER 2, 2018 – MAY 1, 2019

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Suzette Andrews-Parker, EdD

Benefits of Critical Asset-Based Curriculum (CABC) in Higher Education: From the Voices of Students of Developmental Writing Courses

Matthew Colpitts, EdD

Emergency Management & Preparedness at Higher Education Institutions: Perceptions of Senior Student Affairs Officers & Emergency Managers

LaNitra M. Curtis, EdD

Using Restorative Practices to Address Academic Concerns for African American Adolescent Males

Francis Segbedzi Pongo, EdD

Providing Alternative Solutions to the Accessibility & Affordability Challenges facing Higher Education in Ghana

Sheri L. Sterner, EdD

An Analysis of Community College Achievement Outcomes Using Critical Race Theory & Intersectionality HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Jamesena Talbott, PhD

Cultivating an Interprofessional Collaborative Ecology of Care for Older Women Living w/ Eating Disorders HUMAN & ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

Jamie L. Jensen, PhD

Digital Decolonization: Centering the Voices of Indigenous Students in a Distributed Learning Program

Linda H. McMullen, PhD

Howard Thurman’s Journey to Community: A Study of the Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples 1943-1953

O. Daniel Nelson, PhD

Can Religious Tolerance Be Enhanced on A Social Network Site? The Effects of Social Media Use on Attitudes of Religious Tolerance & Intolerance

Bernadette Norz, PhD

Employed Physicians & Work Engagement in Health Care Organizations (HCOs)

Melanie R. Rodriguez, PhD

Growing Capabilities Across Cultures: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Cultural Intelligence & Developmental Feedback

Gregory T. Williams, PhD

Janis V. Farmer, PhD

Navigating an Invisible Labyrinth: Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education

How Can Truth-Claims of Voter Fraud Influence Public Policy? A Political Discourse Analysis

Christina F. Kaviani, PhD

Cindy Wong, PhD

The Impact of Smartphones on the Sexual Behaviors of Generation Z College Males

Key Factors in Retaining Chinese Graduate Trainees: A Case Study in a Multinational in China

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

Sabreena Andriesz, PhD

Career Advancement in Western Multinational Corporations: The Experiences of Asian Born & Educated Educated Leaders in Global Organizations

Kin Yuk Chung, PhD

Play to Learn: A Phenomenographic Study of Adult Learning Engagement in LEGO Serious Play

Donna F. Clark, PhD

Women, Relational Leadership, & Power: A Qualitative Study of How Senior Women Leaders Experience, Conceptualize & Practice Leadership & Power

Wendi Dykes, PhD

Play Well: Constructing Creative Confidence with LEGO Serious Play

Dara S. Hysmith, PhD

Constructing Employee Potential: An Examination of Managers’ Implicit Person & Espoused Theories

Karen C. Mercurius, PhD

Diversity & Exclusion in Higher Education Administration: Black Women Navigating their Careers in Advancement at Elite, Predominately White Institutions INFANT & EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT W/EMPHASIS IN MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Kianna Marie McCoy, PhD

Absenting: The Father’s Process of Raising a Child with Autism

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY W/EMPHASIS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Kristian A. Aloma, PhD

The Impact of Time and Frequency of Use on Self-Brand Overlap

William A. Baldowski, PhD

Using YouTube to Connect Emotionally & Construct Meaning After a Tragic Event

Elisabeth M. Limbaugh, PhD

Does Every Life Have a Soundtrack?: A Study on How Music Lyrics Shape Self-Narrative

PSYCHOLOGY W/EMPHASIS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Arthur L. Bennett, Jr., PhD

The Relationship Between Self-Regulation & the Impact of Timing Control on Academic Fluency in College Students with & w/out ADHD

Elisa M. Brown Fuller, PhD

The Cumulative Effect of Interparental Conflict on Internalizing & Externalizing Symptoms in Preschoolers

Shannon Connell, PhD

Akua L. Jackson, PhD

Racial Socialization & Socio-Emotional Adjustment in African-American Children in the Rural South

Leah G. Kenyon-George, PhD

Breastfeeding Duration and its Association w/ Parental Physical & Mental Health & Parenting Stress

Sarah C. Otis, PhD

Executive Functioning as a Protective Factor in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Stephanie H. Procell, PhD

The Effect of Focused Attention & Open Monitoring Meditation on Resilience & Psychological Well-Being in Caregivers of Persons w/Dementia

Recidvism: Perspectives from Formerly Incarcerated Individuals on Factors that Contributed to their Choice Not to Reoffend

Bryan C. Duncan, PhD

Behavioral Phenotypes Associated w/ Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children w/ Autism Spectrum Disorders

Impact of Childhood Abuse on Adult Health Decision Making: Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior w/Self-Efficacy as Mediator

Jacqueline N. Fulcher, PhD

Self-Efficacy & Personality Factors in Predicting Successful Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes for Persons w/ Disabilities Post-Vocational Rehabilitation Enrollment

Ava Grace, PhD

Parents of Children w/Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Are More Demonstrative than Imitative & Playful w/Their Children

27

Harry M. Voulgarakis, PhD

Loise King Waller, PhD

Mindfulness & the Perception of Agency

Tammy Lai Ha Wong, PhD

Language Brokering Experiences among Young Chinese Immigrants in Canada: A Narrative Study

Liudmila Zayed, PhD

The Influence of Acculturative Stress on Body Image Dissatisfaction in a Sample of Female & Male Hispanic Individuals Post Bariatric Surgery


26

FIELDING INCLUSION | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Plern Pratoommas, PhD

The Lived Experience of Parents Who Have a Child Diagnosed w/a Developmental Disability Who Received Early Intervention Services in Thailand

Doctoral Graduates

Lorri Sullivan, PhD

Reflecting on Supervision: The Views, Opinions, & Experiences of New Jersey Early Intervention Practitioners

Diana J. White, PhD

Should We Listen Better to Parents? The Predictive Value of Parent Concerns About Their Child’s Development

NOVEMBER 2, 2018 – MAY 1, 2019

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Suzette Andrews-Parker, EdD

Benefits of Critical Asset-Based Curriculum (CABC) in Higher Education: From the Voices of Students of Developmental Writing Courses

Matthew Colpitts, EdD

Emergency Management & Preparedness at Higher Education Institutions: Perceptions of Senior Student Affairs Officers & Emergency Managers

LaNitra M. Curtis, EdD

Using Restorative Practices to Address Academic Concerns for African American Adolescent Males

Francis Segbedzi Pongo, EdD

Providing Alternative Solutions to the Accessibility & Affordability Challenges facing Higher Education in Ghana

Sheri L. Sterner, EdD

An Analysis of Community College Achievement Outcomes Using Critical Race Theory & Intersectionality HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Jamesena Talbott, PhD

Cultivating an Interprofessional Collaborative Ecology of Care for Older Women Living w/ Eating Disorders HUMAN & ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

Jamie L. Jensen, PhD

Digital Decolonization: Centering the Voices of Indigenous Students in a Distributed Learning Program

Linda H. McMullen, PhD

Howard Thurman’s Journey to Community: A Study of the Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples 1943-1953

O. Daniel Nelson, PhD

Can Religious Tolerance Be Enhanced on A Social Network Site? The Effects of Social Media Use on Attitudes of Religious Tolerance & Intolerance

Bernadette Norz, PhD

Employed Physicians & Work Engagement in Health Care Organizations (HCOs)

Melanie R. Rodriguez, PhD

Growing Capabilities Across Cultures: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Cultural Intelligence & Developmental Feedback

Gregory T. Williams, PhD

Janis V. Farmer, PhD

Navigating an Invisible Labyrinth: Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education

How Can Truth-Claims of Voter Fraud Influence Public Policy? A Political Discourse Analysis

Christina F. Kaviani, PhD

Cindy Wong, PhD

The Impact of Smartphones on the Sexual Behaviors of Generation Z College Males

Key Factors in Retaining Chinese Graduate Trainees: A Case Study in a Multinational in China

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

Sabreena Andriesz, PhD

Career Advancement in Western Multinational Corporations: The Experiences of Asian Born & Educated Educated Leaders in Global Organizations

Kin Yuk Chung, PhD

Play to Learn: A Phenomenographic Study of Adult Learning Engagement in LEGO Serious Play

Donna F. Clark, PhD

Women, Relational Leadership, & Power: A Qualitative Study of How Senior Women Leaders Experience, Conceptualize & Practice Leadership & Power

Wendi Dykes, PhD

Play Well: Constructing Creative Confidence with LEGO Serious Play

Dara S. Hysmith, PhD

Constructing Employee Potential: An Examination of Managers’ Implicit Person & Espoused Theories

Karen C. Mercurius, PhD

Diversity & Exclusion in Higher Education Administration: Black Women Navigating their Careers in Advancement at Elite, Predominately White Institutions INFANT & EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT W/EMPHASIS IN MENTAL HEALTH & DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

Kianna Marie McCoy, PhD

Absenting: The Father’s Process of Raising a Child with Autism

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY W/EMPHASIS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Kristian A. Aloma, PhD

The Impact of Time and Frequency of Use on Self-Brand Overlap

William A. Baldowski, PhD

Using YouTube to Connect Emotionally & Construct Meaning After a Tragic Event

Elisabeth M. Limbaugh, PhD

Does Every Life Have a Soundtrack?: A Study on How Music Lyrics Shape Self-Narrative

PSYCHOLOGY W/EMPHASIS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Arthur L. Bennett, Jr., PhD

The Relationship Between Self-Regulation & the Impact of Timing Control on Academic Fluency in College Students with & w/out ADHD

Elisa M. Brown Fuller, PhD

The Cumulative Effect of Interparental Conflict on Internalizing & Externalizing Symptoms in Preschoolers

Shannon Connell, PhD

Akua L. Jackson, PhD

Racial Socialization & Socio-Emotional Adjustment in African-American Children in the Rural South

Leah G. Kenyon-George, PhD

Breastfeeding Duration and its Association w/ Parental Physical & Mental Health & Parenting Stress

Sarah C. Otis, PhD

Executive Functioning as a Protective Factor in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Stephanie H. Procell, PhD

The Effect of Focused Attention & Open Monitoring Meditation on Resilience & Psychological Well-Being in Caregivers of Persons w/Dementia

Recidvism: Perspectives from Formerly Incarcerated Individuals on Factors that Contributed to their Choice Not to Reoffend

Bryan C. Duncan, PhD

Behavioral Phenotypes Associated w/ Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children w/ Autism Spectrum Disorders

Impact of Childhood Abuse on Adult Health Decision Making: Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior w/Self-Efficacy as Mediator

Jacqueline N. Fulcher, PhD

Self-Efficacy & Personality Factors in Predicting Successful Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes for Persons w/ Disabilities Post-Vocational Rehabilitation Enrollment

Ava Grace, PhD

Parents of Children w/Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Are More Demonstrative than Imitative & Playful w/Their Children

27

Harry M. Voulgarakis, PhD

Loise King Waller, PhD

Mindfulness & the Perception of Agency

Tammy Lai Ha Wong, PhD

Language Brokering Experiences among Young Chinese Immigrants in Canada: A Narrative Study

Liudmila Zayed, PhD

The Influence of Acculturative Stress on Body Image Dissatisfaction in a Sample of Female & Male Hispanic Individuals Post Bariatric Surgery


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 www.fielding.edu

Fielding Alumni Association: Access to valuable networks and resources, both professional and personal – because Fielding is dedicated to serving its community of life-long learners. Open to alumni, students, and faculty.

JOIN TODAY AT

ALUMNI.FIELDING.EDU

PAID

FPO

Permit No. xxxx

Santa Barbara, Ca

NETWORKER. PARTNER. ADVOCATE. PRACTITIONER.

Profile for Fielding Graduate University

Focus Summer 2019: Inclusion