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ge o r get own v i ew G E O R G E TO W N ’S P R E M I E R M AG A Z I N E

DECEMBER 2019

Hometown Holiday Celebrating Georgetown’s Historic Architecture with Mayor Dale & Mickie Ross D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO WN VI EW

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contents

FEATURES CELEBRATION CHURCH’S CHRISTMAS AT THE MOVIES 20 A Timeless Message with a Creative Approach HISTORIC GEORGETOWN HOMES 32 Modern Living that Embraces the Past A SIX-PACK OF LIVE HOLIDAY ATTRACTIONS Local and “Worth the Drive” SPECIALS & COLUMNS HEALTHY HABITS Managing Holiday Emotions

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EXPERIENCE GEORGETOWN 10 Georgetown Christmas Stroll

ON THE COVER Mayor Dale and Mickie Ross have lived in Georgetown’s historic district since 2004. Earlier this year, they completed a year-long renovation on their 106 year old home, and invited the Georgetown View to visit as part of our look at historic preservation.

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CELEBRATING AT CELEBRATION

Cover and above photo by David Valdez

Visit our Facebook page for follow-ups to these stories and hints to those upcoming... GeorgetownView Magazine

FIVE QUESTIONS Santa Claus

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HOME & GARDEN New Year’s Eve Hacks

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SANTA CLAUS’ RIDE A Law Enforcement Look

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WHY IS THIS A THING? Salvation Army Bells

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SAVE THE PLANET I’ll Have a “Green” Christmas

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ASK THE EXPERT Securing Your Home from Me

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POPPY TALKS O’ Christmas Tree...

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MOVERS & SHAKERS People Making A Difference in Our Community: Carolyn Holloway

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KIDS’ VIEW Faces of Georgetown 2040 Contest

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FACTS TO BLOW YOUR MIND 66 The Nature of Nature

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Celebration Church’s Christmas at the Movies entertains while it enlightens. Photo courtesy of Celebration Church.

FOOD Crowd Pleasers...Just in Time For Your Holiday Gathering

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PARTING SHOT National Christmas Tree Visits the Georgetown Square

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first look PUBLISHER

Cathy Payne

cathy@georgetownview. com

ANN MARIE KENNON EDITOR’S NOTE

Like many of the best in her craft, Cathy has a specialized degree—in her case, hard science—and a gift for writing. She found her voice and fulfilment reporting and writing news and magazine features for a regional Central Texas audience. Along with serving as the publisher of the Georgetown View, Cathy provides daily support for multiple news magazines, marketing campaigns, and books.

While I would love to say this letter will be as extraordinary as the 1897 letter to Virginia about Santa Claus, my real life this month is about 3rd and 4th cousins going through the pantry like locusts; wondering who in history thought a milky cup of raw egg was something we should drink (even with alcohol) rather than throw in a hot, buttered frying pan. I’m also becoming BFFs with my Amazon truck driver.

EDITOR Ann Marie Ludlow Kennon AnnMarie@georgetownview.com

Still, I love Christmas, and I have had an excellent and mirthful time pulling together this December issue. One can not have enough Santa Claus, of course, but we explored as many meanings of the giving season as possible.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tracie Jack • Greta Bauer Megan Freedman CREATIVE Buz21 Media CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Valdez • Reagan Zaragosa PRODUCTION MANAGER Donna Sypion PRE-PRESS Renee Blue CONSULTANT Ben Daniel ADVERTISING Mark Elliott • ads@georgetownview.com 512-240-2267 • 512-598-3500 Dave Schumacher DISTRIBUTION Tom Higgs IT/WEBMASTER Jesse Payne

I’m so pleased to feature several visits with Santa Claus, for historical and humorous perspective, and was fortunate enough to be invited to visit and learn about Celebration Church’s creative and unique celebration of the birth of Christ. Our city’s biggest worship community never disappoints. We also take a look at some of the traditions we share as a city; how the Stroll got started, the beauty of our historical homes, and the rich variety of retail therapy in and around the Square. I am also excited to announce our “Faces of Georgetown 2040” contest. I truly believe we have a treasure trove of excellence in the young people who live here. It will be an honor to showcase their extreme talents, creativity, and plans to help humanity at every age. In between, we have lifehacks and tips to help you manage the holiday at your house as well. I hope you have a thoughtful moment, a few laughs, and—of course—I hope you have “Joy” in your holidays too.

Georgetown View is an Optimus Media Group, LLC publication. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved. Georgetown View is published monthly and individually mailed USPS, free of charge, to homes and businesses in the Georgetown zip codes. Mail may be sent to View Magazine, P.O. Box 203, Jarrell, TX 76537. For advertising rates or editorial correspondence visit www.georgetownview.com. Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction, and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives. William A. Foster, USMC • Medal of Honor Recipient, WWII Veteran

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healthy habits

Greta Bauer • Greta@georgetownview.com

MANAGING EMOTIONS DURING THE HOLIDAYS

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t is a time for delighting in lights and decorations, family and friends, giving and serving, feasting, and a little break from our regular life. On the other hand, holidays can mean stress or sadness. Maybe you’re happy to see your family, but you can’t seem to help arguing with your parents about your life, and feeling like you’re 16 again. Or perhaps someone special is missing for the first time this year.

HOW DO WE MOVE THROUGH WITH MIXED EMOTIONS? Experts tell us to embrace parts of the holidays we love and do away with those we don’t. Give yourself permission to not shop, send cards, or live in the kitchen. This will help you avoid feeling defeated because you ran out of time or money to do it all, and you will have more time and space to do the things you feel strongly about this year. Lauren McAndrews was a case manager for Child Protective Services for ten years, and has experience with families in crisis. She says, “Try not to expect the perfect holiday, perfect dinner, or perfect family; enjoy the moment. It’s easy to remember the best versions of past celebrations and expect they should always be duplicated. Life is not a Hallmark movie, and living in the present will help you avoid reverting to old patterns. Maybe include someone in your gatherings who knows you only in the ‘now’, so you can stay grounded in your best ‘today’ self.” Eve Eschner Hogan is a relationship specialist, and author of several books. She writes, “Be merry for someone else. If you aren’t able to be with people you’re missing, reach out to help others.” Get creative about it, and plan early. Many places require background checks, and shelters are often rich with volunteers on holidays. Why not make cards for people in senior living, deployed, or even in prison? If you do want to spend time with people, it’s helpful to create an escape plan. Drive yourself to holiday parties or ride with a trusted friend who will take you home whenever you want. Knowing you can easily leave any time can help you enjoy the activity much more than you would if you felt stuck.

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DON’T FORGET THE CHILDREN Holidays are filled with childish excitement, but some children may have difficulty with deviations from their normal routines. Heather Moeller, LPC, LSSP is the Social, Emotional, Learning and Mental Health Specialist for GISD and she says the important thing is planning. “Parents should be mindful of what they know of their kids; what makes them comfortable and which things pose challenges. If you know you’re going into something that may be stressful, have those conversations in advance to prepare for some self-care; i.e., support for one’s self, options.”

Heather recommends having a signal or encouraging children to speak up when they need a nap, or a quiet place to withdraw and color, or decompress in some way. “It’s also vital that we validate the feelings our kiddos have. They are always told be behave and be polite, but they need to know it’s okay if they don’t enjoy particular activities as expected; being out of sorts around large crowds, or being hugged by a lot of people they don’t see very often.” Experts agree a lot of it boils down to recognizing holiday triggers, such as money worries or personal demands, so they can be dealt with before they lead to a meltdown. With a little planning and some positive thinking, everyone can find peace and joy during the holidays.


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experience georgetown

Ann Marie Kennon • AnnMarie@georgetownview.com

39th Annual Georgetown Christmas Stroll

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ain or shine!... the 39th Annual Christmas Stroll kicks off Friday, December 6, at 5:00pm with dessert with the Grinch, early shopping at more than 150 vendors, and a trip back to Bethlehem and a live nativity scene. On Saturday, the hometown holiday parade begins at 10am and activities continue until 8pm in and around the downtown Square.

HOW IT ALL STARTED Decades ago, the Georgetown community literally strolled to celebrate the beginning of the Christmas season. Nell Benold is the matriarch of one of Georgetown’s legacy families, and she shared her memories of the simplicity and sweetness of how it all began. “In the evening, on an early Friday in December, the choirs of all the main churches would gather at the corner of Austin Avenue and Route 29. The streets were not lit at the time, and as the singers strolled toward the Square, singing carols together, the lights would come on—one by one—to signify the light of Jesus coming into the world. It was a symbolic and beautiful community celebration.” She says shop owners roasted chestnuts and had other treats on the sidewalks, and served hot cranberry juice and cider.

“People milled around and enjoyed the candle-lit Christmas tree that was personally tended to on the south side. Georgetown was very small at that time, so everyone knew everyone else. It wasn’t at all glitzy like it is today, but the store owners did stay open to sell some things. Everyone chipped in and did a little bit. It was heartwarming.”

A GROWING CITY Leo “Mr. Georgetown” Wood was the city manager from 1969 to 1985. He remembers how the stroll eventually grew into a parade with floats and Santa Claus, but still took place on Friday nights. In 1980, after population growth and renewal programs had sparked a rise in new businesses on the Square, the Downtown Merchants Association was founded, and the first official celebration took place. The first year featured residents in costume strolling around the Square, much like the church choirs had done in the past. As it grew, floats were added and Leo himself rode on one as City Manager, and later as Mayor. He says, “There was always apple cider available on the Square

Austin Avenue, 1984. Photo: City of Georgetown 10

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 5:00pm - 9:00pm Starting at 5:00pm Bethlehem Village Early Shopping with 150+ Vendors Downtown Restaurants & Bistro Food Court Dessert with the Grinch

6:00pm Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas • Free popcorn for the children (bring chairs and blankets) Live Entertainment on two stages

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 10:00AM – 8:00PM Parade begins at 10:00am Santa’s Village & Photo Opportunity begins at 11:30am Shopping from 150+ Vendors Downtown Restaurants & Bistro Food Court Bethlehem Village Winter Wonderland, Ice skating, Swing carousel, Candyland obstacle and a hayride for kids and families. The Stroll grew as Georgetown grew, and now it is one of our greatest annual attractions and brings people from all over Central Texas.”

course, Home Depot Workshop Live Entertainment on two stages Whoo Hair Village

The parade was moved to Saturday mornings in the mid-2000s for safety reasons, and to make sure families could enjoy it without worrying about staying up late. Despite the change in the size and scale of our 2019 Stroll, much of that original charm is still present. The “Lighting of the Square” is a community celebration to mark the light coming into the world, and a live nativity details the story of Jesus’ birth. There will be plenty of treats and refreshments available for visitors and shoppers, and the community, however large, still comes together to see the parade of floats and a visit from Santa Claus.

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SANTA CLAUS FATHER CHRISTMAS

Despite his busy schedule, Santa “Phil” has been bringing Christmas in Georgetown for 11 years. He was able to take a break from his toy shop gig to answer some questions we had for him about his job and what he loves most about Christmas.

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Santa, what are kids asking for this year? “Frozen” is still very big and LOL Surprise toys are popular this year. Although sometimes I tease the kids who want “everything Frozen” and tell them I’ll be happy to bring them some ice cubes. It always gets a giggle or a sideways look. What are some unique requests you have gotten? I love how generous children are towards others, and I get to see it. Believers believe Santa has access to all kinds of things, but if I can’t do what they ask, I can always bring comfort. I often get asked if I can bring a child’s loved one home from overseas. I let them know that our President doesn’t like war either and he is trying very hard to bring all of our service members home. So many children ask for things for someone else; helping a family member who is ill, or something for a sibling who is having a hard time. I tell them, “Your family has best doctors helping right now. I’m certain they will do their best for your wish.” Tell us about the Naughty and Nice List. Some children ask why I don’t know their name. I start by asking “Why do you ask? Did you forget it?” I tell them the Nice List is miles and miles long. I can’t remember all those names. The Naughty List is really short and I remember those names, so if I know their name there’s a pretty good chance they’re on the Naughty List.

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Just how do you deliver presents to boys and girls across the world in only one night? Santa has special magic dust that helps reindeer fly and also help him slow down time. Santa-Time is different than human time, so my reindeer and I can get around the whole world before morning.

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Does it make you sad when kids don’t believe in you any more? Sometimes children ask me if I am the real Santa. I tell them I don’t really know, because only children can see and feel the real Santa. So I ask them, “You tell me; am I the real Santa or not?”

When they tell me they are no longer believers, I explain that Santa Claus is a Christmas thing, but Christmas is not just about the man in the red suit. It is about the love and happiness you share with your family. If Santa is one of the things that helps you remember, then you should believe in him. If you no longer feel like Santa is your Christmas thing, then believe things that bring you love and happiness.

Photo courtesy of Phil Gingrich 14

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Blue Christmas Service

Christmas Eve Services Tuesday, December 24 1:00 PM Traditional Candlelight Service in the Sanctuary 3:00 PM Family Service in the Sanctuary 5:00 PM Contemporary Service in the McKinney Christian Ministry Center 7:00 PM Traditional Candlelight Service in the Sanctuary

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home & garden

New Year’s Eve Hacks My favorite New Year’s Eve hack? Noise canceling headphones, because I go to bed at 10pm. But, if you’re more fun than I am, you’re likely either planning a rockin’ party and looking for tips, or you can’t wait to have a few friends over for wine and football, or you’ve not planned anything yet, and we are going to talk you into it. If you want to have a fabulous party but don’t want to stay up late, make it a “London 2020” event and ring in the New Year at 6pm. You can stream or download archived celebrations from around the world at EarthCam.com and time them for any hour. Ask your party guests to bring 2020 calendars and have a swap meet. For extra kicks, make sure they fill in important birthdays or notes so everyone will remember your party all year. Year-round hack for the ladies: If you know you are a diva in those 4-inch heels but don’t look forward to the pain of dancing on them for hours, tape your third and fourth toes together. These two toes share a nerve that can become strained when the toes are separated, which can happen when you’re pushing on them for a while. If your shoes are open-toe, I’d recommend clear medical tape, or zazz it up with coordinating colors of duct tape. You can extend the fun, or be less sore in the morning. It’s Texas, so New Year’s Eve is just as likely to be not-cold as it is to be dark. Use frozen grapes to keep white wine chilled. To freeze grapes, rinse and dry them. Spread them out on something flat so they aren’t touching. Put them in your freezer for four to five hours — they start to lose flavor after that.

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by Greta Bauer • Greta@georgetownview.com

P.S. - If you can’t find the corkscrew for your wine, twist a household screw into the center, slide between the tines of a dinner fork—face up—and press down against the bottle’s lip for leverage. Don’t forget to create a few signature “mocktails” for the designated drivers. If it does get cold, and you want to stay outside, you can turn clay pots into cheap tabletop space heaters. To save space, I’ll just tell you to search “Clay Pot Heater” on YouTube. Red Solo Cups... they’re not just *in* a song, they also make great amplifiers to hear music. Drop your phone in one (make sure it’s empty!) for a great sound boost. If you don’t have fancy chafing dishes and Sterno, wrap a brick in a few layers of aluminum foil, put in a 200° oven for 20 minutes, and put your dishes on top to keep them warm on the buffet. Look cool... make sure you call the little wire cage around the top of the champagne bottle a “muselet”. That’s it’s real name. Near midnight, work up your best Barbara Walters impersonation and tell everyone... “This... is 20-20.” When it’s time for cleanup, vacuum up 2-3 teaspoons of cinnamon first. The heat from the motor will leave a nice aroma behind when you’re done. While we’re on pretty smells, dump whole coffee beans in a large bowl and partially bury tea light candles in the top. Light and enjoy for a lot less cost than jar candles.


A Timeless Message with a Creative Approach

by Ann Marie Kennon & Cathy Payne AnnMarie@georgetownview.com Photos courtesy of Celebration Church

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his month, across the nation, churches will be filled to capacity with those who—whether weekly attenders, twice-a-year, or for the first time—will be celebrating the birth of Christ. In Georgetown, Celebration Church will be presenting their annual Christmas at the Movies series with the hope of drawing families and non-church goers to hear the Christmas and gospel message in a unique, entertaining, and relatable way.

IT IS CREATIVE Celebration Church is known, among other things, for regularly shattering the traditional paradigm of “church”, and Christmas at the Movies is a stellar example of what church leaders and “dream team” of volunteers, dancers, singers and musicians do best. Over the first three weekends in December, attendees will enjoy spectacular live and multi-media presentations crafted around popular films, designed to illuminate spiritual truths that are often lost in modern culture. Lori Champion, who co-founded Celebration Church with her husband, Joe, explains, “Our approach to

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church has always been to be relevant in style, yet timeless when it comes to the truth of God’s Word. There are wonderful precedents for that throughout the history of the church. We also see that modeled by the biblical disciples; reaching out to the culture in a language people can understand, without compromising the message of Christ. For example, Paul, in Acts 17, quoted modern poets and philosophers of the day in his sermon on Mars Hill. Jesus used popular phrases of the day and relatable analogies to communicate to a particular culture; whether it was to farmers or fishermen, he spoke in parables to open their eyes to His truth. Jesus was a creative communicator, yet his creativity wasn’t for the purpose of entertainment, but for eternal impact. “During the holidays, we know families are looking for things to do together, and Christmas at the Movies is a perfect opportunity. From our Celebration Kids wing, where there are photo ops with movie characters, and age-appropriate movie presentations, to the ‘big screen’ adult experience, there is definitely something for all ages. It is also a time for those in our church who are gifted in music, dance, or production to let their talents shine. I’m always amazed at the gifted people we have in our very own congregation and community.” Lori was ecstatic that last year’s program brought in more than 9,000 people per week over the threeweek run, but looking beyond attendance, she is more grateful for the significant spiritual impact that resulted,


W H E N J E S U S S P O K E I N PA R A B L E S , H E WA S S P E A K I N G TO T H E ‘ M O V I E S’ O F T H E D AY. T H E Y W E R E H I S WAY O F E X P L A I N I N G T H I S I S W H AT I S G O I N G O N , W H AT I S F I L L I N G YO U R M I N D S , W H AT YO U ’ R E TA L K I N G A B O U T. T H E N H E P U T S P I R I T UA L T R U T H S A R O U N D I T.

Christmas at the Movies 2019 Dec. 7 & 8 How the Grinch Stole Christmas

“IT IS AUSTIN”

Dec. 14 &15 The Lion King Dec. 21, 22 & 24 A Christmas Carol

Christmas Services Westinghouse Campus: Saturday, Dec. 21- 5pm Sunday, Dec. 22 - 9:30am & 11:30am Tuesday, Dec. 24 - 1pm, 3pm & 5pm Central Austin Campus: Sunday, Dec. 22, 11am

as several hundred people stepped into a personal journey of faith. “I love having the chance to share the Gospel through movies people are familiar with. I am excited about what this year holds and all God will do.” Services at the Westinghouse Campus (601 Westinghouse Road, Georgetown) are Saturdays at 5pm and Sundays at 9:30 and 11:30am. The Central Austin Campus (1006 W. Koenig Lane, Austin) services are Sundays at 11am. ►

While these three words might seem ambiguous, to Celebration Church Pastors Joe and Lori Champion they were a beacon to a path of faith and obedience. After 10 years of church ministry and many years of prayer that God would lead them to the city where they would plant and spend the rest of their lives building a church, Joe and Lori got the answer they were seeking. The Champions sold their home, packed up their three young sons, moved to Williamson County, and left the rest of the details up to God. What started nearly two decades ago with an eager, yet fledgling congregation of 54 (including more than a few of the Champions’ visiting family members) has grown to thousands and is spreading, not just across central Texas, but around the world. About their growth, both in number and location, Lori says, “We were told then, and we believe now, that we are stepping into other people’s prayers. We are not just supposed to make an impact in Georgetown, but around Austin and the whole area. It has never been about the numbers; we have always focused on the health of our church, seeing one person at a time discover their God-given purpose and the growth takes care of itself.”

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celebration church IT IS COMMUNITY Celebration Church has been taking care of community needs for nearly 20 years, but Christmas is an opportunity to serve people in a bigger way. Lori explains, “Celebration is our name, so holidays are right up our alley. As well, Jesus is the reason for the season, and we exist as a church to bring hope, light, and celebration to people’s lives.” She says the church’s mission during the season is to help those coming face to face with the stress that may accompany this time of year. “Our church has always been as much about what happens outside of our walls. The season seems to start earlier and earlier every year, and does not always live up to the dreams people have, whether due to a difficult family dynamic or a recent loss.” Not only does Celebration’s pastoral care team respond to a greater number of counseling calls and needs within their church family, this season they helped provide nearly 4,000 Thanksgiving meals to people across central Texas. They are also working with the National Guard to provide gifts and wrapping for local families, and will provide gift bags for 700 inmates in regional correctional facilities. For those who are concerned about feeling lost in a large church, Celebration Church intentionally works to create the closeness of a small town. “We’ve always said, ‘As our church grows larger, we must grow smaller’, and we primarily do this through our small groups ministry. Hundreds

of groups for all ages and stages of life meet in homes, businesses, and at our church throughout the week,” Lori says, “to minister to the ‘felt’ needs of our church members, and it is always extended to the community.”

IT IS THE FUTURE Since 2000, Celebration Church has had numerous “homes”, including a library, a hotel, and a strip center. Finally, in 2005, through what can only be described as divine provision, the church was able to buy acreage along IH-35 in Georgetown, and in 2016 opened their current 80,000 square foot campus “on the hill” on Westinghouse Road. More importantly however, over the last nineteen years, that faithful group of 54 has grown to over 14,000 members and regular attendees in their Austin/Georgetown locations. Today, the Celebration Church vision is materializing through two satellite campuses in the Austin metroplex (with more on the horizon); twelve campuses and a world-class school in Mozambique, Africa; a campus just outside of Naples, Italy that serves American armed forces with an English-speaking service, and locals with a service in Italian; an accredited university in Georgetown; and weekly virtual services and special events inside eight regional correctional facilities. Begun in 2018, the Celebration Central Austin campus nurtures university students, young

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professionals, and those new to Austin and looking for family. “We saw people who were like us; we moved here and didn’t know whom to have Thanksgiving with, or to do life with. When we strive to answer their needs on Sundays, they’ll know they are part of a family, a community, and they belong here,” says Lori. “Sometimes people stumble over form, but God’s message is the same for every generation. We are here to give them something alive, and relevant to them.” Not surprisingly, the success of Celebration Central Austin has brought about the launch of a Southwest Austin campus scheduled to start services on January 19, 2020. The church is welcoming to, and hoping many will see it as a great opportunity to grow with a church from the ground up. Pastors Joe and Lori simply want people to fall in love with their Bible because, as Lori says, “We can’t depend on one service a week to make it work. This message is for every day and what happens in Georgetown is the same message we give and the feeling we share in Italy, Africa, and Austin.”


Art Kids ses s Cla

KIDS ART CLASSES

Teacher Kati

AFTER SCHOOL THURSDAYS supplies provided

AGE 5-8 4:30-5:30pm AGE 9-12 5:45-6:45pm Cost$15.50/lesson ($62/month) $35 Registration

AFTER SCHOOL Thursdays Supplies Provided Age 5-8 4:30 - 5:30 pm Age 9-12 5:45 - 6:45 pm

Cost $15.50/lesson ($62/month)

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Kid ses For more information email ArtseaStudioGtown@gmail.com or s Cla

website KimHoerster.com Kids Art

FOR MORE INFORMATION AFTER SCHOOL Thursdays Supplies Provided Age 5-8 4:30 - 5:30 pm

ArtseaStudioGtown@gmail.com Age 9-12 5:45 - 6:45 pm

KimHoerster.com

Cost $15.50/lesson ($62/month)

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Located: Near you 3100 S I-35, Georgetown

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3100 S I-35, GEORGETOWN Located in Acrotex Building

For more information email ArtseaStudioGtown@gmail.com or website KimHoerster.com Kids Art

Located: Near you 3100 S I-35, Georgetown

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First Presbyterian Church Cantata Chorus & Orchestra Philip Smith, conductor

Let There Be Peace WORSHIP SERVICES FEATURING MUSIC BY DAN FORREST | CRAIG COURTNEY | HOWARD HELVEY

Sunday, December 15, 2019 8:30 and 11:00 am

703 S. Church Street, Georgetown, TX 78626 Church Office: 512-863-3381 philip.smith@fpcgeorgetown.org

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six-p ack of “live” christmas activities

Tracie Jack • Tracie@georgetownview.com

The display includes millions of holiday lights along the park trail and there are also live performances from local entertainers. “Zip” passes available online to allow families to enter the park at 6:15pm. AustinTrailOfLights.org

LIVE TREES W H E T H E R YO U P R E F E R TO M O D E L YO U R H O L I D AY S A F T E R NORMAN ROCKWELL O R C L A R K G R I S W O L D, THERE ARE PLENTY OF G R E AT WAY S TO E N J OY CHRISTMAS IN AND AROUND G E O R G E TO W N . W H E N YO U D E C I D E TO TA K E A B R E A K F R O M BINGEING ON HALLMARK MOVIES A N D H OT C H O CO L AT E , HERE ARE SOME FA M I LY - F R I E N D LY P L A C E S TO E N J OY T H E SEASON... LIVE AND IN PERSON

Put the family in the car and drive to the Elgin Christmas Tree Farm to choose and cut your own tree. They also have a worship service December 8 and 15 at 11am. Monday – Thursday 10:00am-2:00pm Friday and Saturday 10:00am-5:30pm Sunday 12:00-5:30 120 Natures Way, Elgin (512) 281-5016 ElginChristmasTreeFarm.com

Make it a weekend at Kelumac Christmas Tree Farm in Bryan. You can cut your own tree, stay overnight in their B&B, and shop for old world ornaments at the Christmas gift shop. 10379 Taylor Road, Bryan TX 77808 (979) 279-3931 • Kelumac.com

300 E Washington St., Burnet fbcburnet.org

The Salado Christmas Stroll takes place over two weekends. Nightly activities include live nativity, strolling carolers, live music throughout the village, late night shopping, Santa, “A Christmas Carol”, and more. Dec 6th -8th and 13th -15th. VisitSaladoTexas.com/event/salado-christmas-stroll/

LIGHT DISPLAYS Austin Trail of Lights in Zilker Park is well-known around Central Texas. They are open 7-10pm nightly December 10th-23rd.

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LIVE NATIVITIES Main Street Bethlehem is located two blocks east of the town square in Burnet. Displays will be “live” from 6pm to 9pm each evening, December 6-8 and 13-15.

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six-pack of “live” christmas activities Cedar Park’s Tree Lighting and Santa’s Workshop will feature a snow hill and play areas, live music performances, games & prizes, yule fire, inflatables, photos with Santa (bring your own camera) and arts & crafts projects. Food concessions will also be available. The Cedar Park Police Department will be accepting new and unwrapped gifts for Blue Santa. Visit December 6 from 6:30 - 9pm Heritage Oak Park - 875 Quest Parkway CedarParkTexas.gov

REINDEER Sweet Eats Fruit Farm is having Christmas with Santa and live reindeer. Families can enjoy their usual activities; pony rides, petting zoo and more. Admission is $16 for the holiday event, but includes photos with Santa. Plus Christmas trees for sale, and a gingerbread house for all the photo ops you can manage. 14400 E State Hwy 29, Georgetown SweetEats.com/events/

WORTH THE DRIVE SANTA CLAUS Sights and Sounds of Christmas in San Marcos has it all, including ice skating! Visit with Santa; enjoy shopping, food, live music, Bethlehem and a carnival. Visit December 4-7th and 11-14th. Sights-n-sounds.org

Close to home, the Wolf Ranch Christmas Holiday Celebration will feature free pictures with Santa, ice skating, an inflatable tubing ride, horse drawn carriage rides and much more. December 14 from 5pm to 7pm Wolf Ranch Shopping Center 1015 W University Ave, Georgetown

PERFORMANCES The ZACH Theatre in Austin is performing A Christmas Carol through December 29. ZACH’s adaptation of the Dickens’ classic is a “musical sleigh ride through rhythm and time, infusing the traditional Victorian story with a score that spans all genres and eras.” Family-friendly and very engaging, this is recommended for ages 6 and up. 202 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704 (512) 476-0541 • tickets.zachtheatre.org

Sam Bass Theatre presents the Best Christmas Pageant Ever through December 22. Enjoy the hilarious mayhem of the inventively awful Herdman kids in this modern Christmas classic. Saturdays and Sundays at 2pm 600 N Lee St, Round Rock • (512) 763-7228 SamBassTheatre.buyplaytix.com

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advertorial

ONE OF A KIND LIKE HER MERCHANDISE, PINK POPPY OWNER KAY BRIGGS, IS UNLIKE ANY OTHER FASHION MAVEN IN GEORGETOWN...

AND

SHE IS EXCITED TO ANNOUNCE THE MOVE TO HER NEW HOME IN RIVERY PLACE IN FEBRUARY 2020. Pink Poppy has been an anchor of fashion on the downtown Square for ten years. Owner Kay Briggs is delighted about growth to come for the boutique known as much for its vibrant personality as its signature color. She says she is eager to explore her new space and discover more ways to serve Pink Poppy friends. “I have so many wonderful friendships with women who come here, and I appreciate the trust they give me. I am really looking forward to leveling-up our customer service at Rivery. Simply changing where I am will not change my desire to provide a high level of comfort, and one-to-one customer service, while I continue to promote our community and its businesses.”

A new location for Pink Poppy is really exciting! I can not wait to be able to assist my local Pink Poppy friends ...even better... in a location that has easier access and the same great service. ~Kay Briggs

Kay loves being there for her customers, and truly desires to dress them in a manner that is fashionable, and at a level of personal comfort.

WATCH FOR SPECIALS AND EMAILS • WE WILL BE VERY ACTIVE ON FACEBOOK @PinkPoppyARTisanBoutique On the web at info-www.pinkpoppygtx.com 28

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“I’m quirky and I like things creative, but I can dress people as classic or as artistic as they like. You can’t get that kind of connection, or satisfaction from online shopping.” Those personal connections will extend to phone calls when special items arrive at the store. As well, she is enhancing Customer Appreciation with $50 gift card provided to local customers on their birthdays. Kay also promotes the local business community through another Business she owns, Pink Poppy Events. She is a big part of the cadre of shop owners who team up for special events. Local shopping and supporting Georgetown’s businesses is a mission she has a heartfelt commitment to promote; “A lot of our city’s charm is in our local businesses. Shopping local all year will keep our Georgetown thriving.” Pink Poppy will continue to carry the same artistic clothing, jeans lines, and classic-to-supertrendy styles people have grown to love. She will also add more artisan items— jewelry, clothing, and artwork—to give the boutique even greater appeal to regular customers, and impress visitors stopping by from the Sheraton. As well, a new location will not sway her commitment to quality clothing that is Earth-friendly. “We are very conscious of how our choices, and what people put on their bodies, affect our community.” Pink Poppy will be open through January 2020 in its current location and will open in February at 1500 Rivery Blvd Suite 2165, next to Woops. See her ad on the facing page.


Christmas Greetings from... First Presbyterian Church Georgetown! Come join us this Christmas season and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. On Sunday, we have an 8:30a.m. worship service in our historic Sanctuary on Church St., and an 11a.m. service in our Worship Center, inside the 7th St. entrance. We invite you to the events on the schedule below. DEC. 7 CHRISTMAS STROLL

Visit our historic Sanctuary, built in 1873, the oldest church building in Georgetown. Spend a quiet moment away from the hustle and bustle of the Christmas Stroll, enjoy music, bell ringing, bottled water and crafts for the children. DEC. 15 CHRISTMAS CANTATA

8:30 & 11a.m.

First Presbyterian's Cantata Chorus & Orchestra presents Let There Be Peace in the Worship Center—Fellowship Hall

CHRISTMAS EVE / CANDLELIGHT SERVICES

5:30p.m.

Children's Service in the Worship Center—Fellowship Hall, followed by a birthday party for Jesus at 6:15p.m.

7:00p.m.

Worship Service in the Worship Center—Fellowship Hall

Shop Local, Shop Small, Shop Pink Poppy

celebrating the holidays with a

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50% OFF entire store sale December 1-24th 2019 (limited exclusions)

10:30p.m. Worship Service with Communion in the Sanctuary www.fpcgeorgetown.org | www.facebook.com/fpcgeorgetown

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

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PINK POPPY IS MOVING... TO THE RIVERY! Starting February 2020 you’ll find us at: 1500 Rivery Blvd, Suite 2165

512-943-8252

www.PinkPoppyGTX.com 114 W 8th St, on the Georgetown Square @PinkPoppyArtisansBoutique D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO WN VI EW

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the holly and the felony We asked our Georgetown law enforcement experts... How many laws does Santa Claus break in the normal execution of his duties? Santa Claus is involved in many regulatory and federal infractions even before he starts his ride Christmas Eve. Long before Dec. 25, he is actively engaged in fulltime surveillance of 1.9 billion children. In the course of compiling his colossal “naughty-or-nice” list, he reads emails and letters, which is a violation of the 4th Amendment. While it’s difficult to test or prove, we can also be fairly certain that among the millions of homes, just in the United States, he probably has one or two adult beverages to keep him warm, so it’s likely that he would not pass a DUI test if we were to stop him. Which leads me to the fact that scientists estimate his speed, to reach every home in 24 hours, exceeds 1,800 miles per second. Definitely time for a reckless driving ticket. We also need to consider his health code violations. Rudolph’s red nose is obviously a symptom of infectious cervine rhinotracheitis. Here in Georgetown, he will be guilty of disturbing the peace, unless he has figured out how to land nearly 2,000 pounds of reindeer and a sleigh full of retail items on a roof without making noise. We will also be looking into any property damage; e.g., unless those broken shingles magically fix themselves when his 1,000-pound sleigh takes off. Following that will be criminal trespass, which is a misdemeanor, but the volume of occurrences may warrant greater punishment by the judiciary. Santa will certainly be breaking and entering many private citizen residences, and may be charged with misconduct should he be found kissing anyone’s mommy.

MAY IT PLEASE THE COURT... While we at the Georgetown View do love and admire the greatest police department on planet Earth, we also love and admire Mr. Claus. We are fully prepared to argue, if not for his innocence, at least his freedom. Readers, I submit to you Mr. Claus has been unfairly accused and I will prove that, legally, there is no cause for my client to be in this courtroom today.

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First of all, none of the 1.9 billion children who got exactly what they wanted complained about privacy rights. Second, you may not charge my client with DUI or speeding due to the fact that there is no blood evidence (because he’s never been caught), nor has humankind developed a radar detector that registers speed in six digits. As well, Santa has been working with these livestock for more than 1,700 years, and there has been no documented disease to date. Regarding disturbing the peace and destruction of property, the state has provided no eyewitness accounts or forensic evidence to prove guilt on either charge. No security video, reindeer hairs, or fibers from a sack that carries 2.3 million tons of gifts. It also follows that Santa can not be proven guilty of criminal trespass because there is no evidence he was here. Breaking and entering is erroneous because the prosecutor can not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that, without consent of the owner, the defendant entered the home with the intent to commit a felony, theft, or assault. While the property indeed was locked at the time, my client received inquiries from their children and the owners left cookies and milk and a note with specific instructions, to wit, an invitation to come into the home. Also, there was no intent. To the contrary, Mr. Claus brought items with him, which he left at the scene. The only items he removed were cookies that were left for him and carrots to fuel his primary mode of transport. Despite any validity attached to previous charges, I futher submit that, from the start, Mr. Claus has been a victim of selective prosecution. Each charge here applies in multiple situations, but do you see the Easter Bunny and Tooth Fairy at the defense table? Nay, you do not. You must let the Fat Man go!


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Modern Lifestyles in Historic Homes H istor ic homes and buildings provide cultural exper iences, and create benefits for leisure and tour ism. The benefits are not always about the proper t y value, but in their impac t on the communit y.

M AYO R D A L E A N D M I C K I E R O S S T R E AT R E A D E R S TO A P H OTO TO U R O F T H E I R O L D - TO W N H O M E . B U I LT I N 1913, I T I S N OT O N LY A B E AU T I F U L R E S TO R AT I O N , B U T A L S O A G R E AT E X A M P L E O F W E AV I N G T H E PA S T A N D T H E P R E S E N T I N TO A CO M F O R TA B L E S PA C E F O R LO N G I N TO T H E F U T U R E . Public buildings in the Downtown Historic District include the Victorian-era Old Williamson County Jail and the 1911 Courthouse. Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com • Photos by David Valdez unless otherwise credited.

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HISTORY The Ross’ home on Church Street was built in 1913 for the Carlson family, who were ready to retire and move into town. The heirs sold the home in the 1940s and the new owners added a second floor, including a living room, bath and kitchen. Typical of the time, the ceilings were just 7’ high, and plenty of space was allotted for an upstairs porch. When Dale and Mickie bought the home in 2004, they realized Mickie’s dream of living in an old house. Dale recalls, “We had to lock her in the attic when dealing with the realtor because she would have paid anything to live here. But I agreed to it because it has a perfect yard.” Mickie says, “We looked at new homes that cost the same, but you can’t buy history, and, for me, it’s all about being authentic. In our first year, a car pulled up with an elderly lady and her granddaughter. Turned out, she was a Carlson, and our house once belonged to her grandmother. She wanted her granddaughter to see it. They visited often and I was thrilled to learn more about their family, which paralleled some of the history of Georgetown.” In 2019, after a year-long renovation, the home is now a showplace that blends historic charm with spaces that reflect a modern lifestyle without compromising ambiance. And it is still just a ten-minute walk to downtown and everything inviting at our beautiful town square.

CARLSON (ROSS) HOME CIRCA 1940

Courtesy of Mickie Ross

ROSS HOME 2019

their home to be. “I sleep on it and usually dream about what the home will look like. When I wake up, I sketch those ideas and present them to the clients.“

CHANGES FOR THE BETTER Changes to the home were, literally, dreamed into reality by Green Earth Builders’ John Lawton. He says his process includes visiting with homeowners to get a feel for their personality and what they want D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO WN VI EW

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The Ross’ home was built in 1913

The first landowner, a Kentucky immigrant named Stubblefield, owned it for a single day. He volunteered in the Texas Revolution and the state awarded him land for payment.

John added an interior staircase (previous page) and converted the upstairs apartment into the master bedroom, having rebuilt the low ceilings into vaulted architecture to brighten the rooms (cover photo). “Most older homes had smaller rooms that felt bigger thanks to high ceilings. My vision is to open them up and adapt the space to modern lifestyles without sacrificing traditional craftsmanship and character.“ He explains, in early-to-mid 20th century homes, small rooms were adequate because families spent time outside or on porches. Today, kids don’t spend long hours roaming independently, so they need larger, open spaces in the home for play; and social visits are kitchen-heavy.

Dale adds, “Our younger generation are big fans of authenticity, and many are going back to their roots in Georgetown. All of this historic preservation and renovation is about going to back to a time when things were simpler.” Mickie agrees; “We want to continue to honor what the Carlsons would do. Back in their day, families would go to church, then walk downtown and have a picnic lunch. Many people still do that today.”

John says, “People have adapted to a certain style of living and there are many ways to make old houses fit that. Many times we pull something up and owners are thrilled to see longleaf pine or beadboard and we make every effort to keep those intact, even as we’re knocking out a wall or adding a secret door to a new closet. We try to stay with as much of the original home as possible.”

Believe it or not, there are still places in the downtown area to build a new home. But, it takes a person with vision, “horsepower”, and a love of Georgetown to re-dedicate land in our historic district in ways that respect the past while embracing the future.

In the Ross home, John removed walls to create space for entertaining—visitors can see the back door from the front door—but kept the interior columns and covered them with raised panel to complete the look. Upstairs, he created motorized insets for modern things like televisions, so the home has a comfortable blend of old and new. “I am pleased that people want to renovate in a way that keeps tradition present. When the client wants a large sub-zero refrigerator in an old kitchen, we adapt the look with cabinetry and ensure the new things don’t dominate the room.”

BUILDING “NEW” IN OLD TOWN

Chance Leigh is one such builder. He has been developing land and building quality homes since he was 18 years old, and while he does build homes elsewhere, he says historic district homes—called infills—are his vanity projects. “There are 60 builders in Georgetown, and they are all great with one-acre lots and creative builds. But zoom in, to the downtown area, and you realize it takes effort to balance finance and time with compliance and design rules.”

T H E Y A R E N OT M A K I N G A N Y M O R E ‘ D O W N TO W N ’. E V E R Y H O M E I S U N I Q U E I N S I Z E A N D L AYO U T, S O I N O R D E R TO D O I T R I G H T, I CO M PA R E I T TO R U N N I N G A M A R AT H O N .

After a team of elves helped prepare nine Christmas trees, dozens of vintage Santa Clauses, and holiday decor, Dale and Mickie hosted a cocktail party to usher in the season. Pictured are Carolyn Holloway, Bill Schoen, Lori Champion, Sherri and Kyle Champion, Mickie and Dale Ross, Erin Kiltz, Dr. Edward Burger, Jack Garey, Paulette Taylor, John Kiltz, and Joe Champion.

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Chance navigates the process himself; finds out who owns the land, sends a handwritten letter, and closes the deal himself. He talks to neighbors and usually doesn’t break ground for a year or more. But when it is complete and someone buys it, he says, “I get goosebumps and it has all been worth it.” More than anything, Chance is committed to period correctness and builds homes to fit appropriately where they stand. “No one wants to stand out like a Starbucks on the Square. I build with balance; meshing the new and the old to make a new home fit in. Downtown, you are always dealing with small footprints, so it takes a little more vision and commitment to the details and appearance. If I feel like I’m not on the same page as the buyer, I will give back the check.” When he acquires a new property, he personally visits with others on the block to let them know what he is building next to them. “I always want their feedback because I don’t want them to be upset once construction starts and we can’t turn back. Sometimes people just want an empty lot to stay an empty lot. I love Georgetown, I really care what the people who live there think, and I try to make them happy. ” Chance was born and raised in Georgetown, “I don’t see anything for what it is, but more for what it can be and I’m not in this business to appease one buyer. I want to build another home, and another, and feel welcome to do it. I never want anything to look like an afterthought. I want downtown to be organic; not like something we picked out of a catalog and threw together.”

An example of Chance Leigh’s work in Old Town... built more than 100 years after the Ross’ home. Photo by Ann Marie Kennon

THE HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE Amanda Parr is a member of Georgetown’s Historic Architecture Review Committee (HARC) and lives in our historic district. She explains that “historic” homes are those more than 50 years old, and they do not necessarily conform to a specific look or design. “Historic homes tell the story of Georgetown; we see how lifestyles change over time by the types of homes we have. Much like the Victorian homes near Austin Avenue evoke a feeling of steadfastness and prosperity, mid-century homes near Hutto Road remind us of the time when most Southwestern professors lived here. Alumni still come to town and drive through the neighborhoods to reminisce.” HARC is not about making things look old, but rather to ensure buildings follow guidelines to maintain the fabric of our neighborhoods. “We don’t want every home to be a replicate of something from 1910. We want to show progress and how Georgetown has changed through the years. Everyone wants a nice kitchen and wi-fi; our goal is to make sure that restorations simply reflect the time period for the home.” ►

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Left: Sherri Champion helped the “elves” prepare for the holiday season. Above: The Ross home library; restored longleaf pine floor, inset bookcases, and the “secret” door to Dale’s office.

Amanda says, “Historic preservation matters to all of us, not just those who live downtown. People are drawn to visit or move to Georgetown because of our historic overlay and our Square. They understand it is part of what makes our town unique and vibrant. In simple terms, it’s what brings people here. Who doesn’t want to live in an interesting place that remembers and values its own history?” Amanda believes we should all appreciate appropriate development and management of our historic areas. Williamson County is a very desirable place to live, and everyone from HARC to builders to contractors know that it is up to all of us to be able to tell our story and what makes us special. “We want to appreciate the gems we have here and enhance them rather than take them away.”

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why is this a thing?

Greta Bauer • Greta@georgetownview.com

Salvation Army Bell-Ringers I

n December 1891, Salvation Army Captain Joseph McFee resolved to provide Christmas dinner to San Francisco’s poor, but the question of how to pay for the food stayed in his mind. He recalled his days as a sailor in Liverpool, England; there was a large pot on the landing where the boats came in, into which passersby threw in charitable donations. Joseph got permission to place a similar pot at the Oakland Ferry Landing, at the foot of Market Street. It was placed in a conspicuous position and launched a tradition that has spread globally.

Police Chief Wayne Nero, Superintendent Dr. Fred Brent, School Board Trustee Andy

Webb bringing in the money on the Square during the Christmas Stroll. By Christmas 1895, kettles had spread across much of the West Coast. Two Salvation Army officers who had Salvation Army kettles can be found throughout been part of the original kettle launch, William A. McInthe holiday season; most regularly at the entrance of tyre and N.J. Lewis, were transferred east and took the Walmart on IH-35. There will also be site and event kettle idea with them. In 1897, McIntyre and his family kettles at the fireplace at Wolf Ranch, and on the Square set up three kettles in the heart of Boston. That year the during the Christmas parade and Stroll. kettles in Boston and locations nationwide provided 150,000 Christmas dinners for the needy. Many of our city’s notables sign up for volunteer

GEORGETOWN KETTLES

In 1898, the New York World called The Salvation Army kettles “the newest and most novel device for collecting money. There is a man in charge to see that contributions are not stolen.” In 1901, kettle contributions in New York City provided funds for the first great sit-down dinner in Madison Square Garden, a custom that continued for many years.

2019 Today, donations to The Salvation Army Christmas kettles help 4.5 million people during Thanksgiving and Christmas, and nearly 30 million people are served nationwide through shelters, after-school programs, addiction-recovery programs, summer camps, disaster assistance, and many other social services.

hours and compete to see who among them can bring in the most donations. Business and civic leaders, elected officials, and community activists all volunteer their time and employ word of mouth and social media outreach to claim bragging rights for the season. Laura Spradlin, Director of the Georgetown Service Center says, while it is an informal contest, the Salvation Army appreciates that everyone wins when the bell-ringers compete. If you’d like to take a turn ringing the bell, visit RegisterToRing.com or email Laura.Spradlin@uss. salvationarmy.org to sign up as a volunteer and support the year-round work of The Salvation Army. Groups may also sign up for a roaming kettle to feature at a business or event until the end of December.

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Greta Bauer • Greta@georgetownview.com

save the planet

I’LL HAVE A GREEN CHRISTMAS

O F T E N W E F I N D O U R S E LV E S T H I N K I N G A B O U T T H E C H O I C E B E T W E E N A R E A L C H R I S T M A S T R E E O R A N A R T I F I C I A L O N E T H AT W I L L L A S T F O R A F E W Y E A R S . T H E R E A R E M A N Y T H I N G S TO CO N S I D E R , B U T I N T E R M S O F S AV I N G T H E P L A N E T, MOST AGREE LIVE TREES ARE THE BEST CHOICE FOR MANY REASONS.

“REAL” IS HEALTHY

“REAL” IS RECYLEABLE

While they’re growing, trees support all life by absorbing carbon dioxide and other gases, and emitting fresh oxygen. The National Christmas Tree Association estimates farms are growing about 450,000,000 trees at any given time; together, they harvest about 30 million each year. That is a lot of plant growth, which stabilizes soils, protects water supplies, and provides refuge for wildlife. As an added benefit, Christmas trees are often grown on soil that won’t support other crops, so our land utilization is more uniform.

Real Christmas trees are biodegradable, which means they can be easily reused. Be sure to remove everything, including tinsel, before delivering it to a recycle station. Steve adds, “When you’re done with the tree in your home, it can be turned into mulch to support other growth, so the tree has a life that goes on and extends its usefulness.”

Plus, don’t overlook the enjoyment of taking the family out for a day on the farm, or sharing the task of picking the “perfect” tree. See page 26 for info on two local farms.

“REAL” IS RENEWABLE Trees are grown on farms just like any other crop and farmers are smart; they plant multiple seedlings for every tree harvested to ensure a constant and healthy supply. Artificial trees, used for six to nine years on average, are typically heavy on plastics and metals, which end up in landfills for a few centuries. Not to mention, much of that plastic started its life in China. “When a tree is cut down, another can be grown in its place,” says Steve Long of the Nature Conservancy. “

You can also put a cut tree into a pond or lake (with permission) to create a natural habitat for fish.

“REAL” IS RE-PLANTABLE Balled and burlapped or “living” trees are gaining popularity. Farmers grow the Christmas tree’s roots into a ball and wrap it, dirt and all, in a burlap sack. They are also sold in large pots. These trees can be displayed in your home for two weeks, then replanted outside. Be sure to prepare a hole ahead of time and prepare the soil. Also ask your grower about tree species, and their growth requirements (soil, water, and space needed), and mention any allergies you may have ahead of time. Locally, contact Landmark Nurseries, Inc. in Round Rock. 512-251-9238 or Austin Tree Farm 512-338-4050. Growers caution those using re-plantable trees to use LED lights that are not high-temperature. Keep the root ball moist, but not soggy; e.g., ice cubes slowly melt and water the tree over time. When ready to re-plant, place the tree in a garage or outer room to acclimate it back to the outdoor temperatures.

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by Ann Marie Kennon • AnnMarie@georgetownview.com

The FBI estimates 1 out of every 36 homes will be burglarized. While we have all heard the standard precautions from our home insurers, the Georgetown View reached out to some people who have actually been convicted of robbery or burglary, to get a better idea of how they manage to work around those “standard” precautions. This is especially important over the holidays when homeowner schedules are less routine and we are more likely to have a lot of extra merchandise and valuables around the home. We will call our “experts” Adam, Baker, Charlie, and Clark.

WHAT WE LOOK FOR

HOW TO KEEP YOUR HOME SAFE FROM...

THESE GUYS

Our experts say they most often come in through unlocked doors or windows, which is more common than people want to admit. If force is necessary, the loud *bang* of kicking in a door can be mistaken for many things and dismissed. The sound of breaking glass is always out of place and draws attention; plus, no one wants to be cut.

If you’re going to reinforce your home, start with steel exterior doors and add a deadbolt for good measure. Adam says, “We usually start in the master bedroom, where you keep most of your valuables or guns, away from your kids. Then we move through the home looking in everything from the toilet tank to your cereal boxes. What we really want is guns, jewelry, electronics, collectibles, cash and credit cards. It’s especially nice if you have them in a portable safe we can take with us and open at our leisure later.”

Invest in a bank’s lock-box or at least a wall safe; we never want to take the time to crack those. Generally, Experts say they look for homes they are certain are empty, or appear to be so. They and their friends almost always knock first, and if you answer the door, they will pretend to be lost or looking for a Craig’s List seller. Some bring a clipboard and dress nicely so you think they are doing a survey. Which is semi-true... they are surveilling your home; looking for your alarm pad, or mirrors that let them see around your house from the door or window.

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Having security cameras is nice, but for Charlie, that was just a guarantee that there were some great things to look for inside. “Video doorbells will make you feel better about porch pirates, but I steal those too and you’ll have a nice video of me taking it.”

If you’re going to use cameras, make them visible to deter us, but put them out of our reach. Include a motion-activated light for good measure.

WHAT WE LIKE “I love it when you leave a ladder around,” Baker says. “Most people don’t lock their upstairs windows, and they usually aren’t wired either.” Adam likes small dogs. “They are adorable, especially because they know I’m not afraid of them and I always bring a hot dog or a treat with me.” Baker adds, “I love going through your trash, especially when you haven’t cut up or broken down your boxes from Apple, Sony, or Smith & Wesson.” Charlie says he likes large homes with nice cars in the driveway, tall fences and lots of shrubbery that enable him to work in solitude. Those nice cars are especially handy when unlocked and he already knows you’re not home—the garage door opener lets him in much more easily.


PUT BARS ON YOUR WINDOWS AND DOORS • GET AN ALARM KEEP AN EXTRA CAR IN THE DRIVEWAY • KEEP LIGHTS, TVS AND RADIOS ON GET TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORS QUICKLY, ESPECIALLY IN NEW DEVELOPMENTS

WHAT WE DON’T LIKE All experts agree, “Unless we’ve already learned your schedule, we generally don’t like cars in the driveway. That is almost always an indication that someone is home.” Charlie says, “Leave lights, radios or televisions on, even when you’re not home. Although if you are the type to leave your blinds and shades down all the time, the lights won’t matter, especially if you live in an upper-class neighborhood. I can work behind closed drapes pretty easily.” Our Experts agree they never want to be in the house when someone is home, and they will leave immediately if an alarm system is triggered, although there are ways of circumventing those. “Your best bet is to get to know your neighbors; they will know if something at your house is ‘not right.’” Baker says he does a lot of casing when people invite him to their home to see the items they are selling on Craig’s List or other websites. “If it’s something small, I’ll just grab it and run, or I can come back later and take other items I noticed while I was there. Also, people get chatty and tell me they are moving or downsizing, and all the other great things they are looking to sell that I can grab when I come back later. So, when you tell me to meet you in a ‘safe place’ at a police station, I will definitely not show up.”

CHEAP TRICKS

Hiding cameras is a good way to catch a thief, but mounting them in obvious places may keep them from thieving in the first place. Using more than one will help create cross coverage; multiple angles will limit the unobserved lanes of approach. It may also deter someone who doesn’t want to draw attention by spending time to detach all of them. If you can’t afford high-tech, the Ring doorbell is good, but upgrade to add the Peephole Cam. You’ll at least get a good look at the person running away with your doorbell. Install fake cameras. They are cheaper than the real thing and thieves generally can’t tell the difference. If you’re home, have an extra car key fob somewhere handy, or on your nightstand when sleeping. If you hear something suspicious, hit the Panic button to scare away potential intruders. Ask a neighbor to use your driveway or park in front of your house when you’re out of town. Let your kids leave a few toys in the front yard. The more people burglars think live in the home, the more likely someone is always in the house. When it comes to your family, sign up at MyLocalCrime.com. If the majority of crimes in your area are burglary, get some cameras and a big dog. If the majority are assaults or other violent crimes, maybe rethink the camera and invest in the kind of personal protection Texas is famous for.

“Clark” is a different kind of expert. He’s the Varsity of foiling bad guys, and he has pro tips from the good guys. When it comes to your property, it’s more about deterrence than recovery. It may not seem neighborly, but one of your goals should be simply to make your house look less appealing to a criminal than anyone else’s.

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poppy talks

O’ Christmas Tree, You’re Fractal-y The holidays always put me in a mindful mood. When I’m not stressed out about them. There are lots of Christmas mindsets, I think. I fall squarely in the “Santa and church are great, but what I really want is to bask in the love of family near and far” camp. I am also mindful that I work too much and have to be intentional about the love and family part. I generally have to resort to tricks to keep myself from letting tension and worry override the happy relationship-y glow I’m trying to achieve. To do this, naturally, I turn to weird science. Meditation sounds great, but I haven’t done that yet that I didn’t fall asleep. And concentrating on my breathing just makes me breathe faster because I’m paying attention. But, there are other random things that work just as well. Just for today, use your non-dominant hand for non-critical tasks. Smart people who studied this say brushing teeth, stirring coffee, using a fork, or even opening a door with your other hand can boost your creativity because you’re using both sides of your brain; forcing them to integrate in new ways. It’s also possible it will make you more open minded. Perhaps I could use my non-dominant hand to punch out the person in the express lane with 168 grocery items... but that’s not very Christmas-y of me. Apparently, chewing gum is also helpful for stress and concentration. Take that!... every teacher I ever had. Seems the act of continuously chewing stimulates a brain enough to avoid distraction by immediate surroundings. Then again, I’m old, and chewing makes my stomach think there’s food on the way and then I

need to distract my brain from reflux. Oh well... next! Looking at fractals is supposed to calm us. Anything with a pattern; waves, snowflakes, trees, spirals, etc. I agree with that. I think it’s also why adult coloring books are making a comeback. I like watching videos of massive flocks of birds flying in patterns. The how in the world are they doing that pondering is offset by the soothing fluidity of the movement and wishing I could fly too. Maybe next time I try to meditate, I’ll transcend myself into a grackle and hang out on a power line by the HEB, with a few thousand friends, to ponder that. One thing I did come up with helps me to be more mindful of what I’m saying. When saying things we say all the time, the meaning kind of gets lost in the recitation. So, I ditch the rhythm and say the words like I would in conversation. Say the pledge of allegiance in your head...I’ll wait. Did it have a da-DA-da-DA-da-DA-da-DA pattern? Instead of I PLEDGE aLLEGiance, TO the flag, of the uNITed STATEs of aMERica... what I really want to feel is “I pledge ALLEGIANCE... to the FLAGoftheUnitedStatesofAmerica.” Allegiance and the symbol of my great country are top of mind now and I feel good about it. Works with those prayers we learned in Sunday school too; “Thy WILL beDoneOnEarth. AS (much as) ItIsInHeaven”; i.e., you’re still the boss! Okay, that does make me feel Christmas-y. I’m going to go find some gum and stare at a snowflake.

Have a wonderful, peaceful, thoughtful holiday... 54

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movers & shakers

Carolyn Holloway

O

h, I can’t pick just one,” she says when asked about her favorite non-profit. “But it is hard to put into words what the Palace Theatre does for children in this community.”

Carolyn Holloway I T H A R D LY S E E M S N E C E S S A R Y TO INTRODUCE C A R O LY N H O L LO WAY, B E C AU S E S H E I S B U S Y W I T H O R I N V O LV E D I N M O S T O F W H AT GOES ON IN G E O R G E TO W N . FROM MAJOR FUNDRAISING E F F O R T S TO T H E S U N C I T Y S Q UA R E DANCERS, SHE IS F R E Q U E N T LY R E CO G N I Z E D F O R H E R CO N S TA N T A N D TIRELESS EFFORTS ON BEHALF OF THE CITY O F G E O R G E TO W N I N GENERAL, AND S P E C I F I C A L LY, F O R HER, THE NEEDS OF AND BENEFITS FOR CHILDREN.

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Carolyn has been a member and supporter of the theatre since she moved to Georgetown in 2001. She helped create and has nurtured the children’s education programs, which are growing in number, quality, and reputation every year. “I’ve been involved in theater since the 1960s and I saw the benefit of giving children self-confidence through this outlet for creativity. The Palace is very inclusive and they work so well as a team.” Prior to moving to Sun City, she was involved in the Dallas Children’s Theater, founded by her long-time friend, Robyn Flatt. “When I moved here and saw that we had a repertoire theatre, I just knew I had to introduce the Palace folks to friends in Dallas and we started the children’s program here. The Dallas theatre has a national reputation, and I wanted to see Georgetown enjoying that same kind of opportunity. Seeing the transformation of children, typical and challenged, on a stage makes my heart full.” She has worked tirelessly to support, fund, and market the Palace Children Education Center, which she hopes will be ready to open its doors by Summer 2020. Carolyn also co-founded and manages the Graham Holloway Family Foundation, named for her late husband, in the late 90s. The foundation vets and supports non-profits that are small and sometimes overlooked. “We focus on issues for health and children; little specific requests that no one else may be able to take care of. The

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Photo courtesy of Carolyn Holloway

foundation donates annually to AIDS research, autism, cancer care, Alzheimer’s, community ministries, and, of course, junior players.” Outside of her own foundation she is a member of Georgetown’s Seeds of Strength giving circle, which provides funding to small non-profits based on need. “I love it because the money stays right here in Georgetown and our memberships are exponentially spread around to so many people and really make a difference.” She is also a tenacious supporter and member of Rotary of Sun City. Named “Rotarian of the Year” in 2014, she continues to work for Rotary concerns; polio, homelessness, and hunger. “One of my favorites is our breakfast with Santa. Each year the firemen fix more than 1,000 meals; that’s not just hungry people but also gifts and sundries for needy families in Georgetown. This year we were fortunate to work with Kohl’s and we got to see the faces of the parents who were able to give their children a real Christmas. That’s what it is all about.”


movers & shakers Carolyn with Paulette Taylor. Photo by David Valdez

She is also a major player in the Rotary Early Act First Knight program in Jarrell and Georgetown ISDs. “I love being a part of enabling young people to gain the feeling of self-worth for having moral character and positive attributes over grades and academic accomplishment. It is critical that we reward children who not only get good grades, but show compassion and empathy.” Carolyn is also active in the Field of Honor program, another Rotary effort. “Having recently restored my father-in-law’s photo album, which included unique memories from World War I, I was reminded of that magnificent generation. Those men never talked about their experiences in war; it was just something you got up and did. They didn’t feel like heroes; it was just the right thing to do.” She is also on the Board of Visitors for Southwestern University. She promotes the university within and outside of Georgetown because, she says, “Connecting businesses helps involve the students in the community and vice versa.” University President Dr. Edward Burger eloquently reflected on her service; “Carolyn is a very special, beloved, valued, and inspiring leader in our community. Thus, I am delighted she is being recognized in such a fitting manner. Congratulations, Carolyn, from Southwestern University.”

“It’s easy to get involved in this city,” she says. “There are a lot of people with generous hearts who are looking for outlets and they can find it easily in Georgetown.” Carolyn was also named Citizen of the Year by the Georgetown Advocate in 2016. She said it was a surprise to her and was characteristically humble. “Me? Everyone [in Georgetown] is like me; giving back in different ways. I feel privileged to live here; a secure place to live, friends and opportunities like these. I can sit on my porch and watch the deer run across my backyard. I love living this close to nature and still have all the things I need. Especially the people here who make Georgetown a city of compassion. Whenever someone sees a need, they just do something to fix it.” Still, Carolyn is not taking a break any time soon. “I’m going to continue being a part of all my groups. I just want to keep up and keep doing the good work.”

There’s never enough room to talk about a philanthropist’s work, but she is also a supporter of The Georgetown Project, A Gift of Time, the Georgetown Library, Georgetown Arts Center, Central Texas Philharmonic, Williamson Museum, and a few more.

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kids’ view WE ARE SEARCHING FOR...

“Faces of Georgetown 2040” A

pril is the “Month of the Young Child”, and to celebrate the amazing young spirits we know to be living in Georgetown, we are looking for those kids most likely to make the cover of our magazine in 2040. Normally, we feature grownups who have contributed to our community­—in superlative ways—as philanthropists, leaders, entrepreneurs, or via other means of achievement and support. But, we recognize while our children don’t yet have big resumes, they certainly have big ideas, grand plans, and great passion. Our kids are already contributing to our community in ways that will bear future fruit, and we want to share their energy and excitement.

IT’S UP TO YOU, GEORGETOWN... Tell us about a child you think represents and embodies the things we love and appreciate about Georgetown and its residents, passion, character, and confidence. Our panel of judges will review the submissions and we will choose one finalist from each of three age groups. Those finalists will receive a professional photo session and be featured in our April 2020 issue.

OUR TOP STUDENT WILL BE ON THE COVER OF OUR MAGAZINE 20 YEARS EARLY

Enthusiasm for living in and the values of Georgetown and Texas Students need not have a long list of awards or accomplishments, but should demonstrate a commitment to responsibility, future goals, interests, hobbies, service or vocations Personal charisma and positive attributes.

Kindergarten through 8th grade students, at any school or home school, are eligible. Students may self-nominate; parents, guardians or mentors may nominate, or all may work together to submit — one entry per child. Groups will be Early elementary (K-2), Upper elementary (3-5) and Middle school (6-8).

Nominations will be accepted as of the print date of this December issue. Deadline for submission is January 15 at 11:59pm.

Nominations must include...

Finalists will be notified and scheduled for their photo shoot by February 7. Digital files of published photos will be provided to each finalist’s family; prints may be purchased directly from the photographer.

biographical information about the nominee parent name(s) and contact information (must live within Georgetown city limits or ETJ) a narrative, up to 300 words, that demonstrates the child’s — unique ideas about Georgetown, and/or — exceptional plans for community service, and/or — programs or interests he or she is involved in, and/or — planning to participate in the future. We want to know about each child’s goals, influences, challenges, triumphs, or sense of humanity and kindness. Photographs may be included, preferably showing the student’s personality and/or engaged in a preferred activity.

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Judges will consider the following criteria:

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Semi-finalists will be contacted and may be asked to meet our judges, in person, before January 31.

Photo shoots will be completed by March 1 to maintain an on-time production schedule.


meet our judges

Mickie Ross is the Executive Director of the Williamson Museum. Few people know the history and values of Georgetown like Mickie does, and as a former educator, she brings an expert eye to understanding the achievements and goals of our young people.

Eric P. Lashley is the Library Services Director for the award winning Georgetown Public Library. The Library has a dedicated staff working to engage, empower, and enlighten the youth in our community.

FOR EXAMPLE... Buzzy is home-schooled and is in the 4th grade. He is crazy about Scouting and has 12 patches on his way to someday being an Eagle Scout. He works hard in math and is studying at a 6th grade level in science because he loves forensics. He has also attended kids’ selfdefense classes at the Sheriff’s department and hopes to one day be a first responder in a K-9 unit.

The Honorable Donna King is Judge of the 26th District Court and mother of four. She was a club volleyball coach, a court advocate for foster care children, mentor for Georgetown Partners in Education, a friend of Special Olympics-CenTex Rockets, and a team administrator for select baseball programs.

Virginia is an 8th grader at Texas Middle School. For the past three years, she has had her birthday party at the Springfield Eldercare to share her big day with her grandmother and her friends. This year she took homeec classes and baked and decorated all the cupcakes for the party herself. She is an assistant youth leader in her Sunday school program and is on the UIL Modern Oratory team. She wants to go to law school someday and be an advocate for senior citizens’ rights.

Submit your entry: www.GeorgetownView.com/gtown2040.html or by email at editor@georgetownview.com THE FINE PRINT Georgetown View reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject and/or disqualify entries that are inconsistent with our editorial standards, audience expectations, or that Georgetown View believes may violate any applicable law or regulation. Any entries submitted by an adult who is not the parent or legal guardian of the child must include parent contact information for consent. The decisions of our judges are final. The Faces of Georgetown 2040 Winner will appear on the April 2020 cover; runners-up will appear in the Kids’ View section of the April issue. Winners will be notified 1–4 weeks before the photo shoot to be scheduled. There will be no financial compensation in lieu of photo sessions. Finalists must be available to get to a photo shoot in Georgetown area at their own expense. Only first names, grade level, and schools attended will be published. Addresses and ages will not be published. Parent names will be included, with permission. If you do not wish your child’s information or likeness to be made public, please do not submit a nomination.

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facts to blow your mind

THE NATURE OF NATURE Isaac Newton’s apple tree is still alive and growing today...technically. The tree was blown down in 1820, but remained rooted and re-grew. The now 400-year-old site is a tourist attraction at Woolsthorpe Manor.

People have been growing their own “Newton” trees all over the globe with shoots taken from the original. P.S. - the apple landed on the ground, not on Sir Isaac’s head.

Oak trees do not produce acorns until they are 50 years old. No one knows why, but catnip is ten times more effective as a mosquito repellent than DEET. Caffeine—found in tea leaves, guarana berries, kola nuts, and, coffee beans—acts as a natural pesticide. It overloads the nervous systems of insects before they can do too much damage to the plant.

The stuff under your toenails is actually bacteria (not fungus) ... science hasn’t even begun to count those!

There are 8.7 million life forms on Earth. About 7.8 million are animals, and roughly 70 percent of the rest are either mushrooms, mold, or fungi. There are about 400,000 different species of plants on Earth. Scientists believe edible ones number as many as 300,000........we humans eat 200 of them. If the oceans dried out, the salt left over would cover the continents to a depth of 5 feet.

s...

lug

s re mo No here yw an

Climatologists estimate the snow that compressed and eventually became the glacier... that caved into the iceberg... that hit the Titanic, fell on Greenland when King Tut was ruling Egypt. (~1300 B.C.) In terms of rainfall and concentration, a hurricane releases the force of 10,000 atomic bombs. There were sharks before there were trees. Sharks have survived all five global mass extinctions, which together wiped out 80 percent of the life forms Earth has ever had.

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This 240-million-year-old fish is Helicoprion.

Unless you’re me... then it’s about 12.


December opening Dates subject to change

6 Brahms: The Boy 2 6 Playmobile City Lights has some changes, check out our new grille menu where you can order food at the concession and have it delivered to your movie. Our new lower matinee price every day before 6 pm is $6.00 a ticket. Tuesdays enjoy our Family Fun night for only $5.25 a ticket after 6 pm.

13 Black Christmas 13 Jumanji Next Level 13 Richard Jewell C H EC K U S O UT AT:

20 Cats 20 Star Wars Rise of Skywalker 20 Bombshell 25 Little Women 25 Spies in Disguise

www.citylightstheatres.com for complete schedule show times and purchase tickets on-line or call 512 868 9922 Now equipped with all new state-of-the-art digital projection equipment & Master Image 3D.

FeedThemAndFreeThem

The Campbell Family Christmas Five ye a rs a g o, the G e o rge town Vi e w int ro d u ced you to th e Ca mpbell fa mily (pic t u red a b ove wit h Pa sto r G eo rg e Cr i s p) an d the ir Chr ist mas Eve t ra d it io n . D way n e, h is wife C l a u d i a , a n d th e i r c h i l d re n , h ave co nti n u e d to s e r ve th e h o m eless communi t y in Aust in, a nd we c a u ght u p wit h t h em a ga in fo r ye a r 1 3 o f th e i r mi n i s tr y. I t a l l be g a n w i th a s i n g l e c a r a n d a pl an to “j ust g o fi nd th e m.” Ple a se visit o u r web site w w w.Ge org etown Vi ew. co m to s e e h ow th e y— a n d th e i r mi n i s tr y— h ave e vo l ve d a nd conti nue to se r ve. Tracie Jack • Tracie@georgetownview.com D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO WN VI EW

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food

Holiday crowd pleasers... just in time! THE NIGHT BEFORE? The holidays mean parties, get-togethers, and gatherings of all kinds. This month, we’re sharing some ideas that will get you five-star reviews whether you have plenty of time to prepare, or just whipping something up quickly for surprise visitors.

CRANBERRY JALAPEÑO CHUTNEY WITH CREAM CHEESE SPREAD This easy dip/spread is festive with the reds and greens; and the sweet mingled with the surprise zip from the jalapeño leave taste buds begging for more. Even though the prep time is only about 15 minutes, make this recipe the night before because the longer the chutney sits in the refrigerator, the better it tastes! Leftovers make a savory spread for turkey sandwiches the next day.

INGREDIENTS 12 oz. fresh uncooked cranberries 1/4 c. green onion 1-2 fresh jalapeños 2 tbsp. fresh cilantro 3/4 c. sugar 1 1/2 tbsp. lemon juice (divided) 1/2 tsp. salt (divided) 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1/4 c. parsley (chopped) 16 oz. cream cheese Using a food processor, pulse the cranberries, green onion, cilantro and jalapeño until coarsely chopped (do not over process or it will get too watery). Place in a bowl and add sugar, 1 tbsp lemon juice, and 1/8 tsp salt. Cover and refrigerate overnight. In a separate bowl, whip cream cheese with 1/2 tbsp lemon juice, pepper, remaining salt, and parsley and spread into a glass pie plate or 9x9 dish. When ready to serve, pour off any liquid off the cranberry mixture and spread over the cream cheese. Serve with crackers, pita chips, or crudités.

FAMILY PULLING IN THE DRIVEWAY?

AUNT DEBRA’S PIMENTO CHEESE A super-quick, super-easy family favorite for 25 years!

INGREDIENTS 3 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 c. sharp cheddar cheese (shredded) 1 c. monterrey jack cheese (shredded) 1/2 c. mayo

2-3 tbsp. pimentos

Add remaining ingredients & continue mixing until well blended.

2-3 tbsp. fresh minced garlic

Makes 3 cups.

1 tsp. minced onion

black pepper to taste

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With a hand-mixer, whip cream cheese and mayo until smooth & fluffy.


Party Tips QUICK & EASY (AND, OH, SO FABULOUS) DESSERTS Write Out the Full Menu

CRESCENT APPLE DUMPLINGS

Include everything: from the appetizers, including things like olives or chips, to the garnishes. List out everything in the order you will be serving the meal. This way you won’t forget anything — and you won’t look in the fridge the following day to discover you never served the sliced chorizo.

Prep time: 15 minutes / Cook time: 30 minutes. Serves 16

INGREDIENTS

1/2 c. sugar

2 tart apples (granny smith or similar)

1 tsp. vanilla

2 cans crescent rolls

pinch salt

3/4 c. butter or margarine

8 oz. lemon-lime soda

1 c. brown sugar 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon Preheat over to 350°. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish. Peel and core apples, then cut into eight wedges each. Mix white sugar and 1/2 tsp. cinnamon. Roll each apple wedge in cinnamon/sugar mixture until coated. Separate crescent dough into triangles and wrap around apple wedges. Place in baking dish. In a small saucepan, melt butter and mix in brown sugar, 1 tsp. cinnamon, vanilla and salt until dissolved. Pour mixture over apples. Pour lemon-lime soda around the edge of the baking dish, trying to avoid pouring on top of dumplings. Bake until golden brown - about 30 minutes. Serve hot, topped with ice-cream or half & half.

HOLIDAY SPICED NO-BAKE CHEESECAKE

Write Out Your Task List for the Day Of... No job is too small to be included: bringing the chicken to room temperature, mincing parsley, putting ice in the ice bucket, peeling the potatoes. Organize the tasks into time frames: morning, afternoon, two hours before the party and right up to the arrival of guests.

Prep time: 10 minutes (plus time to chill in the refrigerator). Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

1 tsp. vanilla

graham cracker pie crust

1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

8 oz. cream cheese (softened)

8 oz. container of whipped topping

1/2 c. sugar

1 c. pecans - chopped (optional)

With a hand-mixer, whip cream cheese, sugar and vanilla until fluffy. Mix in pumpkin pie spice. Fold in cool whip & pecans. Pour into pie crust. Garnish with additional pumpkin spice and chopped pecans. Refrigerate until set - about 1 hour. Serve with additional whipped topping.

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Our Stores Help Support Our Local Mission!

Hunger Free Holidays

October 1st-December 31st

Help The Caring Place fill the Food Pantry for the holidays by hosting a Food Drive! Bring non-perishables to the 2000 Railroad Avenue drive through, Mon-Sat, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Caring Place Food Pantry can buy 3.5 pounds of food for every $1 you donate!

Shopping for Good! Be part of every day caring, simply by shopping with us!

The Shops at The Caring Place

2000 Railroad Avenue Georgetown, Texas 512-943-0700 Mon-Sat 9 am - 4 pm, Thurs 'til 7 pm

www.caringplacetx.org/donate 70

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Second Helping

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GOLD & COIN MART ESTATE LIQUIDATION 2502 WILLIAMS DR. • 512.363.9270 PROTECTING ALL THAT YOU LOVE Responsibly

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Efficiently

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oducer

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Protecting All That You Love ...

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Georgetown, TX 78626

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489-7685

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LET US QUOTE YOUR COMMERCIAL INSURANCE Office: 512-489-0012 {while supplies last} Receive a Free Bag of Beef Jerky

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parting shot

National Christmas Tree Visit Thanks to GISD Trustee Elizabeth McFarland, who called Councilman Kevin Pitts, who called Tourism Manager Cari Miller, who called the National Park Service... the 2019 Capitol Christmas Tree dazzled 6,000 visitors on the Square at a quick whistle stop November 17. Driver Ricardo Martinez said Georgetown was his biggest celebration so far. The tree was on its way from Carson National Forest in New Mexico to Washington D.C. U.S. Capitol Tree Day—by proclamation of the Mayor—included music, kids crafts, and all manner of food and drink. Visitors were also able to meet Santa and two of his reindeer. The 60-foot tree made several stops on its journey, and arrived in the Nation’s Capital November 25th. The Capitol Tree is the centerpiece of the Pageant of Peace on the Capitol Mall, which features 70 companion trees; one for each state and more. This year, the Texas tree will feature a “Red Poppy Festival” ornament. The tradition of the Capitol Christmas Tree, or “The People’s Tree,” began in 1964 when Speaker of the House John W. McCormack placed a live Christmas tree on the Capitol lawn. In 1970, the Capitol Architect asked the U.S. Forest Service to provide a Christmas tree. Since then, different national forests in 22 states have been chosen to provide the annual evergreen. Insets L-R: County Judge Bill Gravell shares his Facetime live with Yukon • Top of the 60-ft blue spruce, decorated by the people of Questa, New Mexico • Visitors were invited to sign the banner on the side of the truck • Nick Ledbetter and Rose the Reindeer prepare for another photo op. Nick, Rose and Yukon came to Georgetown from the North Pole by way of Oklahoma.

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Georgetown View • December 2019  

Georgetown View magazine features people, stories, helpful information, and humor for and about the people in Georgetown, Texas.

Georgetown View • December 2019  

Georgetown View magazine features people, stories, helpful information, and humor for and about the people in Georgetown, Texas.