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SEPTEMBER 2019

BiG CAUSE & EFFECT THE LEGAC Y OF GR ACIE KILTZ LIVES ON AT BROOKWOOD IN GEORGETOWN REMEMBERING 9.11.01 LOCAL TEXANS SHARE THEIR STORIES

THE OTHER SIDE OF NYLE MAXWELL CARS AND PHILANTHROPY

ASTRONAUT TRAINING IN GEORGETOWN SAVING NASA MILLIONS


FEATURES

contents

TEXANS AND 9/11 | 20 Untold Stories NYLE MAXWELL | 28 Life is Quite a Ride BIG CAUSE AND EFFECT | 34 The Legacy of Gracie Kiltz Lives On At Brookwood in Georgetown ASTRONAUT TRAINING IN GEORGETOWN | 44 Opifex Hopes To Save NASA Millions

PANORAMAS HOME & GARDEN | 6 Rebuild or Remodel? EXPERIENCE GEORGETOWN | 8 Architects of Change BiG Golf Benefit WELL-BEING | 12 Local Picks for Safety in the Sun EDUCATION | 16 Georgetown’s Civil Air Patrol Squadron

FIVE QUESTIONS THE DAYTRIPPER | 24 Chet Garner

ON THE COVER

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SAVING NASA MILLIONS

ASK THE EXPERT GETTING THROUGH ABIA | 39 Tips From The Pilot

WHY IS THIS A THING?

Since the start, Erin and Gracie Kiltz were the heart of Brookwood in Georgetown; a community that supports and treasures special needs adults. Gracie’s loss was deeply felt, not just at BiG, but by all those who knew her in Georgetown. Erin Kiltz shared these family photos with Georgetown View for our feature story about Gracie’s legacy and the growth and future of BiG.

CBD OIL | 47

Photo by Anna Kraft Photography.

FOOD

SAVE THE PLANET

MONARCH HABITAT HEROES | 49

WORTH THE DRIVE

CENTRAL TX OLIVE RANCH | 51 Food, Fun, and Fresh Tasting

POPPY TALKS

POPPY PEARLS | 56 Advice, Maybe, You Can Use

44

CELEBRATING ORGANIC HARVEST MONTH | 60

PARTING SHOT

Barton Bollfrass and Opifex Global are applying a new paradigm in business that is changing the way we think about space exploration; from Georgetown all the way to the White House.

9/11 STAIR CLIMB | 64 Honor and Reverence for Heroes and Victims

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first look ANN MARIE KENNON EDITOR’S NOTE Having reached my half-century mark just this year, I don’t have a “remember where I was” moment for Pearl Harbor or JFK. I do remember it was snowing when President Reagan was shot. I was driving when the

PUBLISHER Cathy Payne cathy@gtownview.com EDITOR Ann Marie Ludlow Kennon annmarie@gtownview.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tracie Jack • Greta Bauer Megan Freedman CREATIVE Buz21 Media

Challenger exploded. A soldier friend called me from the Middle East to tell me they pulled Saddam out of a hole. I remember where I was standing when my dad got his new heart. Many events stand out in my mind, but none with the clarity and emotional attachments of nearly every moment of my day on September 11, 2001. Speaking to contributors this month about their experiences brought back the sense of incredulity of the day, which is why I also sought out a person who was not even born at the time. I hoped, and was pleasantly surprised, that what our young people know about one of our saddest days is not just the shock, but the hope that followed. It gives me hope to believe we are still teaching those values because we remember how united we all were in those early days; we smiled at strangers and couldn’t

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Rudy Ximenez • David Valdez Reagan Zaragosa • Emma Jack

bake enough cookies for first responders... how much love and gratitude

PRODUCTION MANAGER Donna Sypion

town; their growth, and all they provide for our neighbors with special

PRE-PRESS Renee Blue

we felt just by virtue of living in the United States. Speaking of hope, we have two stories about Brookwood in Georgeneeds. Teaching their Citizens about their own inherent value and all the things they have to contribute to this world is nothing short of amazing. I am thrilled to showcase our local astronaut training company (yes, we have

CONSULTANT Ben Daniel

one!), Opifex. I did get to try on a bomb suit a long time ago, but still wish I was

ADVERTISING Mark Elliott ads@gtownview.com 512-240-2267 • 512-598-3500

30 years younger so I could get into a

Dave Schumacher

and those like him.

DISTRIBUTION Tom Higgs IT/WEBMASTER Jesse Payne Georgetown View is an Optimus Media Group, LLC publication. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved. Georgetown View is published monthly and individually mailed USPS, free of charge, to more than 41,000 homes and businesses in the Georgetown zip codes. Mail may be sent to View Magazine, PO Box 2281, Georgetown, TX 78627. For advertising rates or editorial correspondence visit www.georgetownview.com.

pressure suit and be a part of the space program we will likely have in the next few decades thanks to Barton Bollfrass We’ve also added some new columns this month that I hope readers will find as helpful as they are interesting. I’m told my prime directive is also to make it fun, so I will continue to do my best with humor, and plenty of things you might not know or won’t believe.

Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction, and skilful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives. William A. Foster, USMC  Medal of Honor Recipient, WWII Veteran

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Panor a ma HOME & GARDEN

Rebuild or Remodel?

T hi s i s yo ur l i f e , not j us t a f i na nc i a l a s s e t . T

rying to decide whether to remodel or rebuild is one of the biggest decisions a homeowner can make.

We asked Kiersty Lombar, a Realtor with Best of Wilco Keller-Williams, how she handles this question as an expert in homes and property value. “The first thing I always ask is, ‘Why are you asking the question?’ It is important for homeowners to understand what they really want. My goal, then, is to find out what it is about your home or your living situation that is not comfortable for you and it helps to know why.” She suggests being wary of trying to re-create something shown in a reality television show because while it looks fun and easy, it rarely is. “Keep in mind, if there is more than one camera on the show, it is more scripted than reality. They also use costs that are not likely to be accurate. Costs and rates vary greatly from place to place and may even be different in the next neighborhood over.” Think about whether you are just unhappy with your current surroundings, then consider your divestiture plan for the house; i.e., a plan for getting out. If you want a fresh look with a trendy element, consider how long you will be in that home and recognize that over ten years, trends change. A lime-green countertop will be bright and fresh, but if you’re planning to sell soon, plan to replace it soon too. “Think about what makes sense in your time line,” she says. “If you make a choice that is taste-specific, you will likely want to unwind that to appeal to buyers’ diverse tastes.” She also recommends doing the math with your comfort in mind; which decisions make sense for a living space that you want to enjoy. “A change does not necessarily have to pay you back when it comes to your own comfort. Make the change, and make your home the place you like to be, not just trying to make it nice for the next buyer, unless you are actually preparing to put your home on the market.” 6

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The bottom line, Kiersty says, is to ask someone you trust and who is respectful of your feelings. A good realtor should be able to look at a room, and assess your financial and timing circumstances. That person should ask how long you will be there, your budget, and your goal. You may want to ask your expert which experts he or she would trust for their own house. People in the business get a sense for who is ethical and does good work. She also recommends asking more than one person; “Talk to your realtor, financial planner, and even a contractor. There is no one-size-fits-all. The same home in the same condition is a vastly different path for a newlywed couple than it is for a couple nearing retirement.” Ann Marie Kennon • AnnMarie@gtownview.com

I l o ok at t he t i m e f ram e b e f o re d i ve st i t u re and ap p l y a t rad i t i onal ap p re ci at i on rate to l e t t he cl i e nt k now w hat t he f u t u re l o oks l i ke. W hi l e re al e st ate i s c ycl i ca l and u np re d i c t ab l e, I can l o o k at a hom e ow ne r ’s b u d ge t , t h e n hi stor i cal d at a, and l e t t he m k now t he b e st and hi ghe st u se of t he i r m one y b ase d on t he i r b u d ge t .


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D O N ’ T M I S S O U R “ B I G ” CO V E R S TO R Y O N PA G E 34

EXPERIENCE GEORGETOWN

Architects of Change: BiG’s Golf Benefit Tracie Jack • Tracie@gtownview.com

B

rookwood in Georgetown (BiG) is an innovative vocational and residential community for adults with special needs. It’s possible that our society has misunderstood the value of offering meaningful work and purpose to those with disabilities. By celebrating the innate worth of its Citizens and validating their dignity, BiG is changing history. “Architects of Change” is this year’s annual fundraiser. The focus for the annual BiG Golf Benefit is to raise support and sponsorship for the cause itself. BiG “Architects of Change” and Golf Team hopefuls, Beth, Auggie, Joel, Toi. Because funding for the community’s yearly operating expenses is largely In the seven years since BiG launched its first Golf Benefit, based on the success of the benefit, every Citizen particiwith the exception of the year they launched their capital pates in the campaign. campaign, the Citizens of BiG have met their goal. For 2019, Instead of a typical pay-to-play golf tournament, each Citthe goal is $550,000, and 100 percent of the proceeds go to izen serves as a team captain, with the goal to raise $10,000. the program. BiG attempts to partner each Citizen with a local business or an individual who will help rally alongside them; send out awareness letters, ask others to consider supporting their team captain, and share the BiG story. Once committed, the sponsor has a team of four. Together each helps a Citizen share his or her personal story and campaign for the funds. Some businesses, such as Dell, are a matching grantor, matching every dollar an employee from Dell contributes. “It’s just a goal,” says Erin Kiltz, founder and director of BiG. “No one is expected to write a check for $10,000. We would rather you share the story ten times than write a $10,000 check, because the rest just happens. You come to lunch in the Café, you come on a tour on a Wednesday and see BiG, and people just naturally want to offer support.” The morning of the Benefit, Citizens arrive for a celebration breakfast, a delicious start to a fun day, which usually includes their own putt-putt contest. Later, the Citizens and their families will see their sponsors off to play. “It’s really a golf day for the sponsors,” Kiltz said. “It’s a day to focus on those dedicated, fundraising sponsors and honor them.” 8

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CD and Darla at “the office”.


OTHER BIG EVENTS THIS FALL Friday, Sept. 12 5pm-8pm

Honey Re-launch and Late Night Shopping

BiG Shop 905 N. Church St, Georgetown

Monday, October 14

Golf Benefit Celebration

Golf Sponsor Invitation

Friday, November 1

8th Birthday Celebration and Late-night Shopping

BiG Shop 905 N. Church St, Georgetown

Wed.-Sun., Nov. 20-24

A Christmas Affair Holiday Market

Community Impact Center 5330 Bluffstone Lane, Austin

Friday, November 29

Christmas Tree Farm Opens

Big Greenhouse 905 N. Church St, Georgetown

Donations to the golf benefit will be accepted through December 31st. Donations can be mailed to 905 S. Church St Georgetown, 78626 or select a team and sponsor direct at BrookwoodInGeorgetown.org


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y m m i J s ' a g e V SMOKEHOUSE

advertorial

One Gourmet BBQ Joint T

o say that James Ramsey is self-taught would be a bit of a stretch; but he is, in fact, self-taught at the craft for which he is quickly establishing a reputation in Georgetown—BBQ. James already has a thriving food truck and catering business, and now he’s expanded to brick and mortar. And while Jimmy Vega’s Smokehouse is located inconspicuously in an industrial park off N. Austin Avenue, diners discover a comfortable, quaint, familiar BBQ joint with exceptionally good food. With family lineage and legacy in Georgetown (his father is Dr. David Ramsey, founder of Chisholm Trail Pediatrics), James, a Georgetown High School graduate, initially headed to Texas Tech to pursue a degree in engineering; quickly however, he traded his slide rule for a sauté pan and decided to pursue his true passion— cooking great quality food. He trained and refined his skills at Le Cordon Bleu, a renowned cooking school founded in Paris in 1895 with culinary schools around the world. In restaurant terms, Ramsey is an enigma when it comes to his style and ability at his craft. As a classically trained chef, he has a superior skill set, along with a fervent passion to

create complex, high-end menus; in other words, this chef is as comfortable creating a six-course gourmet meal as traditional BBQ fare. As far as his BBQ is concerned, James says, “Cooking is my passion, and this is a family affair.” His wife, Angela works alongside him and gets the credit for keeping the business side of things running. The food, though, is his domain. The fresh, made-from-scratch sausage is a Ramsey family recipe; his turkey is whole muscle breast, lightly smoked; and the brisket is one-hundred percent Texas traditional. Jimmy Vega’s Smokehouse sides are the place creativity abounds—gourmet touches make the homemade German potato salad, slaw, Jimmy beans, decadent desserts, and a host of other madefrom-scratch options unique and binge-worthy. Jimmy Vega’s Smokehouse is open Monday through Friday for lunch 11 am-3 pm; Thursday and Friday for dinner 4 pm-9 pm; and Saturdays 3 pm - 9 pm. It may be off the beaten path, but this BBQ joint is on a trail well worth finding! Follow them on Facebook, or visit JimmyVegas.biz for menu, directions, specials—and more mouthwatering pictures.

Jimmy Vega’s Smokehouse • 40120 Industrial Cir. • Georgetown • 512-577-2813 • JimmyVegas.biz SE P T E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO W N VI EW

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HEALTH & WELLNESS • SAVING YOURSELF FROM THE SUN

Greta Bauer • Greta@gtownview.com

W

e can’t do anything about the thinning ozone layer, which used to protect us better from ultraviolet rays, but humans are nothing if not resourceful. There are many new products available to us, and new ways of thinking to avoid sun damage and the problems it can cause. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer; there are more new cases every year than all other types combined. Most people know by now that even one bad skin burn can cause problems much later in life. It’s also worth knowing that melanomas can pop up in places that never even see the sun; i.e., your nose may look like a grilled hot dog but the dangerous mole may appear between your toes or even inside your body. Here are some new ideas and things you can adopt to keep yourself safer from the burn.

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOTTLE We use SPF for “skin protection factor” but there is also a UPF “ultraviolet protection factor.” Your average t-shirt has a UPF rating of about 5, but you can now buy clothing with a UPF 15-50 rating from sporting good stores like Bass Pro and Academy. Fisherman, golfers and other sports enthusiasts have many to choose from but both stores carry clothing for women and toddlers as well. For instance, the Dorfman Pacific Nylon Boonie Hat for Toddlers or Kids has a UPF50 rating, which is great for the sensitive skin on our youngsters with fair hair. Sun Sleeves are a great way to protect your arms without adding layers in the heat. Made of UPF nylon, they come in variety of colors and styles, including some that look like full-coverage tattoos. You can get those at uvskinz.com or locally at sports stores and even Walmart. 12

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A STEP A-HEAD A typical baseball cap only protects half your face, and leaves your ears and neck exposed. Luckily, the Panama Hat is making a comeback. The wide brim can reduce the risk of lobster ears and necks while also keeping direct sun rays away from your eyes in three directions. Oversized or wrap-around sunglasses, while they may not look as cool, are best to cut down on the rays that come at you from the top and sides. Sunglasses typically have labels that say what percentage of UVA and UVB rays they block. Locally, DICK’s sporting goods has a large selection for most budgets.

PLAN YOUR DAY & WEEK Visit TheWeatherNetwork.com/us/forecasts/uv/texas/georgetown to see the UV index for the next week so you will know when sunshine will be most intense. UV forecast calculations use the predicted ozone layer thickness over Georgetown on an hourly basis. Data takes into account the angle of the sun, cloud cover and precipitation.


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EDUCATION • GEORGETOWN’S CIVIL AIR PATROL, APOLLO WING Ann Marie Kennon • AnnMarie@gtownview.com

O

ne of Georgetown’s best kept secrets is indicative of what’s best about its people. As a non-profit entity, ready to serve at home or wherever called, the Apollo Wing of the Civil Air Patrol is an all-volunteer unit of 70 cadets and 41 senior members whose duty is to provide civilian, auxiliary support for the U.S. Air Force. Their mission is three-fold; provide emergency services, including search and rescue and disaster relief operations; aerospace education; and cadet programs for teenagers. The cadet program is the key to this story because the CAP is open to any person, age 12 to 18, and is not specific to any school. For students who are in private or home schools, Civil Air Patrol is an opportunity to gain aviation experience, adapt to military discipline, and build the kind of character that serves young people well in college and beyond.

Cadet 2nd Lieutenant Denison and her twin sister joined because they hope to attend the Air Force Academy. “We always liked and wanted to be in the military and I want to be a pilot. This is great exposure and a huge leg up on others who will enlist out of high school. Having been in for a while, even if I change my mind about the Academy, I will still be a part of Apollo Wing. People have poured so much knowledge into me and I’ve learned a great deal.” Cadet Captain Irey joined when he was 12 years old; “This seemed like the best way to get experience that will help me; I plan to be in Air Force ROTC in college. Already it’s more about the community and growth experiences that will serve me and have been a great benefit in my high school career.”

HOW IT ALL STARTED In 1938, Milton Knight, an Ohio pilot and businessman, organized, and incorporated the Civilian Air Reserve (CAR) to support the war effort using America’s civilian aviation resources. The organization assumed many missions including anti-submarine patrol and warfare, border patrols, and courier services. During World War II, coastal patrol reportedly flew 24 million miles and sighted 173 enemy U-boats, dropping a total of 82 bombs and depth charges throughout the conflict. Unconfirmed reports say they were responsible for sinking two enemy U-boats. Other military-styled civilian aviation units emerged nationwide after the war, training for homeland defense. The Apollo Composite Wing was stood up in Georgetown in 1978. 16

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IT IS AS MUCH A LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE FOR THE CADETS AS IT IS FOR THE SENIOR MEMBERS. I WILL HAVE THESE MANAGEMENT SKILLS FOR MY ENTIRE LIFE. ~Senior Lt. Tawni Mehan

BE A PART OF IT

N AT I O N A L LY, C I V I L A I R PAT R O L PERFORMS 98% OF ALL INLAND SEARCH & RESCUE FOR THE AIR FORCE 2018: 36 saves and 147 finds Cadets are also exposed to a variety of leadership styles and have the opportunity to be leaders themselves. At an age when peer acceptance is at a premium, it is outside their comfort zones to be “in charge” and often a commander is younger than the cadets he or she is leading. Lt. Denison says, “This is the time to learn how to set goals and work with others to be productive. I’m usually shy and if you told me I would have to speak up or be a commander of any kind, I wouldn’t have believed it. But while acquiring leadership skills, we are learning that safety, rocketry, STEM, aerospace and communications are as challenging as they are rewarding.” Aside from character and leadership, the education program provides cadets the opportunity to fly with adult members and work toward getting their own pilot license—something that would cost thousands at a commercial school.

The Civil Air Patrol is a non-combat unit, but is counted in our national assessment of force. Apollo Wing meets every Tuesday at 6:30pm at the Georgetown Municipal Airport. Their meetings are open for the public to observe and ask questions about the education programs and community service they provide on a regular basis. Anyone over 21 may apply for the Senior Service and be a part of the organization that provides disaster relief; helps maintain critical communications during hurricanes; locate downed planes or wildfires; construct in-field radio towers, and more. Incidentally, PT night is once per month and promotions are achievement-based. Apollo has doubled its platoon size in the past year simply by word of mouth, but one only needs to speak to any of their enthusiastic cadets to understand what Senior Lt. Tawni Mehan says about her engagement; “I was just going to put my foot in to see what it was all about, but I was completely sucked in by the values I see and learn from the people here, and I’m happy to be part of the family. Everyone works hard for personal growth; it’s a choice to be here, so achievement is common. I wish more young people could experience this and also exhibit the kind of character I see in these cadets.”

Anthony Redhead pilots the squadron’s Cessna 172 — the most popular training aircraft in the world. Civil Air Patrol cadets fly with him to learn how to take aerial photographs, and also to fly the plane themselves. Cadets as young as 16 years old, after 10-12 hours of training (and if the instructor is confident) are ready to fly solo around the air field. Senior members bend over backwards to help the cadets train and prepare, and Anthony says, “This is the most awesome job. It is very rewarding to see the reaction of the kids in flight and the reaction of the parents when the kids come back. They see how much fun the kids had and have a new sense of confidence.”

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September 11 appears on every calendar, but no one says it like that any more. It is a day that will live in infamy and, although not official, it will always be called 9/11. While the attacks took place far from Texas, every American alive that day will always remember exactly what they were doing when they heard, and it was no less staggering from across the miles.

Stories of 9/11 From Texans, Some Who Were there Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@gtownview.com

O

n September 11, 2001, I was at work 23 miles from the Pentagon. I was also a volunteer at Franconia Fire Department in Fairfax County. Just after 8:46am, I got a page: commuter plane has crashed into the top of the world trade center. When the second plane crashed, my pager blew up with a repeating level-4 “EVERYONE REPORT NOW” message. The Pentagon was hit while I was on my way home to grab my uniform. My story is not dramatic except to say that as a backfill ambulance driver, I spent 36 hours seeing to the needs of a lot of people who, like so many, were also far away, but dealing with shock and panic. As the city shut down and everyone within 100 miles of the Capitol tried to get home at once, I rolled up on a dozen accidents despite the bumper-to-bumper traffic on every piece of road. I went to a half-dozen homes for trouble breathing and chest pains. Sadly, because the paramedics from my station were at the Pentagon dealing with the inconceivable, the best we could do was check vitals, provide oxygen, insist they turn off their televisions, and see their doctors as soon as they could. This month, I set out to share stories of others who were in New York or Washington D.C. who also found their way to Texas. We will never forget no matter much how much time has passed or the distance between.

In 2001, JENNIFER STRATTON was a staff assistant for Illinois Senator Peter Fitzgerald and she was at work in the Capitol Building that day. The televisions were on and all of the staffers and employees were anxious about what was happening, but the work had to be done. That was until she heard her chief of staff running through the halls, banging on every door. He was shouting for everyone to get out of the building immediately because the fourth plane (Flight 93) had just turned around in Ohio and was heading back to D.C. She made a call to her mother, hoping to make it through before cell towers were overloaded with calls. “I called my mother to tell her I was okay and that I loved her. I didn’t know how things were going to end up that day but she had to hear it from me.” Jen says despite the chaos, she and everyone in the congressional buildings came back to work September 12, “to show the world America was still open for business.” She still loves politics. 20

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BRITTANY CHEATHEAM was a junior in high school and at that time, there was no Internet-instant-notification of events. She was in class that morning and received a note from the front office with the words “Dad is okay”. She found out later her mother had somehow gotten through to someone on the switchboard at his office. At the time, she knew nothing about the attacks, but learned shortly after as teachers began to turn on coverage of the attacks unfolding on the TVs in the classrooms. Her father worked for Boar’s Head and was in New York City for business and had been at a shop at WTC as recently as the Sunday before. On September 11th, he was on a rooftop four miles away and, like many, he and his colleagues thought a Cessna had accidentally struck the first tower. After seeing the fireball from the second plane, he realized it was an attack. He witnessed both towers falling then waited for the Brooklyn Bridge to re-open. Using the rental car he’d gotten for the business trip, drove 27 hours straight home to Houston only stopping once to sleep after driving for 21 hours. While waiting for the Brooklyn Bridge to re-open, he handed out Boar’s Head sandwiches to the rescue workers.

DAVID VALDEZ was the official photographer for George H. W. Bush’s presidential term. In 2001, he was a George W. Bush political appointee working in the Public Affairs Office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in Washington,D.C. He was headed to work on a Habitat for Humanity house build just a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol building. “Driving up Independence Ave., just past the Capitol, we were just talking about the day’s work. When we arrived at the Habitat site there were about 20 people who had already arrived, but upset, crying and looking confused.” He turned on the radio loudly, heard a plane was headed to Washington D.C. and the Federal Government was closed. Then came the explosion at 9:37 am; the plane crashing into the Pentagon. As people began to panic, some drove away quickly and he learned later, some as far as West Virginia. He took his passengers toward HUD. He said the Capitol Police were

in the street yelling at all in bound traffic, telling everyone to turn around because Flight 93 was headed toward the Capitol. With thousands of Federal Government employees headed home at the same time, there was a massive amount of traffic. David turned around, but saw cars driving on the sidewalks in front of the local restaurants trying to get through anyway. He drove one passenger home to Maryland and, because the District was closed, he made his way back to Virginia around the Capital Beltway before driving back to his own home in Annapolis. “From the time I arrived at the Habitat for Humanity build around 9:15am, until I got home that day was about 12 hours. That commute usually took me 50 minutes. I had just recently moved back to Washington D.C. and my wife Sarah Jane was still living in Florida. Because the cell phone lines in Washington D.C. were overloaded, I could not call out but she could call in, which she did often.” David also went back to work the next day because one of his responsibilities was managing the HUD.gov web site, which was critical to nationwide communications with HUD staff. He did make it back to that Habitat Build a few months later, and to this day he continues to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity in Williamson County. EMMA McANDREWS is 15 years old, so not having been born yet, she has no memory of the events that took place. “I was not even a thought since my parents were just dating at the time. But the events of 9/11 have absolutely impacted me.” Emma’s mother is from a town in New Jersey and her friends and relatives suffered many personal losses. Emma’s aunt was a first responder and she lost many friends and co-workers that day. Even as a teenager, she is acutely aware that the country she loves was changed forever. “I was not a part of the 9/11 events in 2001, but I am part of the story. I see the picture that hangs in my grandfather’s home taken from a bridge with the trade center towers in sight; I travel through the airports and security that I am told is very different from before the attacks; I have visited the 9/11 memorial and museum on two occasions, seeing not only loss and sadness, but strength and hope.”

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Emma believes she is part of this story because she is an American and she is part of the future of this country. “Many died in the 9/11 attacks and I pray they are never forgotten. I, along with many, will continue to have strength, courage and hope to continue the story.” LOLA POZO MCDONALD has a story not told, but she is responsible for an image you may have seen. She was a flight attendant for United Airlines—she lost 16 friends that day. Early that morning, she flew on a commuter flight from Dulles to Logan International. By 9 am she was already preparing to come back and was boarding passengers to return to Washington D.C. when the news broke. When it became known that the planes in the World Trade Center had taken off from their own runways, Logan went into lockdown. Soon, all airspace was shut down and people began to panic. Lola’s phone rang almost immediately; friends and family wanted to know if she was all right. Most indelibly, and before even leaving the terminal, she happened to pass the inconsolable customer service agent who had boarded the terrorists during their layover from Maine. Needless to say, she recalls, the woman’s reaction is just too much to talk about and the scene was as unsettling as it was sad.

she felt empathy for so many people who were clearly in distress, but unfortunately had no real perspective on the scale of the situation from inside a single airport. She knew intuitively they were also reacting out of shock, grief and confusion. Weeks and months went by in a blur in the airline industry. She attended friends’ memorial services all over the country and also the ceremony at Shanksville, Pennsylvania. When she arrived, there were already hundreds of tokens for the victims. Lola brought with her a United Airlines uniform dress, which she put on a hanger and hung on the temporary memorial, next to wreaths and United wings. She found out years later her gift was the subject of a published poem simply called “The Dress”, written by Rhonda Whetstone Neibauer after seeing it moving in the wind. Neibauer later recalled, “Of all the things at the memorial, it was that dress that haunted me the most; it seemed to really ‘bring it all home’ to me.” Not incidentally, Lola was a cheerleader for the Washington Redskins and United Airlines actually changed corporate policy to allow her to make her own schedule (unprecedented) in order to be at rehearsals and home games. “They decided allowing one of their own to go above and beyond in service to and as a part of the national morale was more important as a symbol of patriotism and constancy.” For the airline, Redskins football, representing the nation’s capitol, and “America’s Cheerleaders,” required no other endorsement.

The crew were told to stay in uniform, but everywhere they went, stranded passengers stared at and even screamed at them, somehow under the impression that they must know something but were ignoring passengers’ plights. Lola said

This boulder near the Flight 93 Memorial in Shanksville, PA marks the impact site. Only family members are allowed to approach and leave tokens.

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CHET GARNER THE DAYTRIPPER

1.

Was it always your plan to be “The Daytripper”?

I’ve never been the guy who plans too far in advance, but I always jump in and work as hard as I can. I’m actually an attorney as a safety net—but I love what I do and there’s not much call for ‘barbecue law’. This started out as “The Austin Daytripper” and we just built it one brick at a time. Now, it is a four-bedroom house, and maybe, I hope, we’re building a castle. If my campfire ever goes out, I’ll go find another campfire to sit around.

2.

What do you do in your free time?

(laughs...) There is no off season for the show, so we are scouting, traveling, taping and producing year-round. Plus, the show is just one piece of the brand. We also have an in-demand commercial production company and the retail store. When I do have a day off, I really love to put my family in the car, take off for someplace new and just enjoy it without worrying about documenting the drive or getting good B-roll. I don’t have a favorite place because I always want to go somewhere new, eat something I haven’t had before, and have a new story when I’m done. It’s funny; I created a television show to inspire people to get away from their TVs, go out and see Texas and enjoy it like we do.

Is it fun to be a celebrity?

3.

I don’t feel like one, although people do greet me on the street like we’re old friends because I visit their homes on a weekly basis. I believe God gifted me with this life and I’m just trying to be a good steward of His gifts in the best way I can; always trying to be better. When we get comfortable, that’s when I change it up because no one wants to eat the same soup year after year.

WATCH EPISODES ON KLRU THURS 8:30PM, SAT 10:00AM SUN 10:30AM, WED 5:00AM THE DAYTRIPPER SEASON 11 PREMIER PARTY! OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 8TH STREET DOWNTOWN THURSDAY, OCT. 3 AT 8:30PM

4.

What are some of the challenges of TV production?

5.

Will there ever be a...Georgia Daytripper or other places?

Logistics. I start each season with a big map of Texas, stroke my beard, and work out the plan to disperse our content geographically, deliciously, and historically. We don’t want calls from the Panhandle because we focused too much on the Hill Country, for instance. If you don’t like “the road,” this job will lose its luster quickly. The toughest part is being away from my family; it’s good that we film all year, so I’m not gone for a solid 2-3 months, but it is a busy lifestyle and I couldn’t do it without my amazing wife who manages the chaos better than I do. I love Texas and will never leave. People have approached me about doing shows in their own states but we haven’t found the right fit yet. For now, I just want to recognize that we, everyone, sometimes get stuck in our own bubble, and there are world-class and wonderful things here that people spend money to come see from all over the country. I’m here to show off Texas and help folks enjoy what is in our own backyards.


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advertorial T h a n k Yo u F o r 2 5 Ye a r s !

T o o u r Va l u e d Customers, Employees & Friends: My wife, Brenda and I purchased Interstate Transmission in September of 1994. The business was originally located on the frontage road of IH-35 by American Fence. A few years after purchasing the business, along with the land and building, we were approached by TXDoT that the 130 Toll Road would require taking our land and building, meaning we would have to relocate our business. After two long years of dealing with the State on the purchase of our property, we relocated to our current location on Austin Avenue into the building originally owned by Buddy Glass of Glass Wrecker Service. We renovated the building to what it is now, putting careful consideration into the renovating process. We knew we wanted to be a family-owned and operated business with a hometown feel. We changed the name to Georgetown Interstate Transmission & Auto Repair, Inc. It was important that we offer our customers comfortable seating with TV and Internet access, along with a nice restroom facility. Having three girls of our own, it was also important to us to provide a kid-friendly space for parents with children to play and be entertained

1002 N. Austin Ave. 26

Georgetown

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while they wait. We also value our employees and wanted to provide them with a comfortable lounge area where they could eat or just relax. The main consideration when designing our new location was making it as comfortable as possible; we know that everyone has a busy schedule, and no one really likes having to sit and wait while having their oil change or vehicle worked on. We have been very blessed for the past 25 years in business and would like to thank all our family, friends, and customers for their continued support and business. Last, but not least, we would like to thank all our employees, both past and present, for helping make our business a true success for the past 25 years! Joe Bob Kay Owner

512.863.4308

GeorgetownAutoRepair.com


the other side

For Nyle Maxwell, Life is Quite a Ride

Y

ou can’t live in Central Texas without knowing his name. He is a former Mayor of Round Rock and his family of car dealerships is among the largest in Texas. But underneath it all, Nyle Maxwell is an authentic Texan who embodies generosity, loves God and his family, and is someone you can just hang out with at a barbecue or a Formula 1 race. Nyle grew up in Austin and moved his family to Round Rock in 1990, then moved to Georgetown in 2018. “I love my neighborhood of Cimarron

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Hills and, as a bonus, two of my general managers and some of my family members live here now too. There is a wonderful camaraderie and I love the downtown square.” He has been in the automotive industry since age 25, and still manages many duties at the dealership in addition to overseeing the family ranches. But, he says, “You can’t always do it all. I’m not ready to retire yet, but my wife and I may be ready to take up tennis; or maybe pickleball.”

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Ann Marie Kennon AnnMarie@gtownview.com

WE ARE PROUD OF OUR 34 YEARS IN THE CAR BUSINESS. COMFORT AND SUCCESS IN BUSINESS COMES WITH A RESPONSIBILITY TO THE PEOPLE YOU LOVE, YOUR COMMUNITY, THOSE WHO WORK FOR YOU, AND THOSE YOU SURROUND YOURSELF WITH.


CARS, CARS, CARS Not surprisingly, one of his great passions in life is classic cars and he has created what could conceivably be the world’s greatest man-cave just off of I-35 in south Georgetown. Not only does it house his many classic vehicles, it has an upstairs with bistro tables, leather couches, three huge flat screens and a bar. Named “Vehicles Unique” in honor of the first used car operation he worked at in 1982, his personal showroom is a place for indulging in the best memories of his youth, enjoying time with his family, and providing a means for dozens of local non-profits to raise money in the community. “This is my favorite office because I’m a collector of classic cars; I love Detroit muscle and everything in between. But this is not a museum; we can take these things out and drive them around for fun.” Most of his cars are road-ready except for a few he keeps at zero miles to maintain their value. He and his sons enjoy some quality family time racing at 160MPH or better on Track Day at Circuit of the Americas; choosing between the Vipers, Porsche and Ferrari. “You won’t see many imports here though. Most are from the era of big-block engines; they are a part of America that goes with John Wayne, the Super Bowl, and hamburgers.”

GIVING BACK Nyle and his wife, Nancy began their supercharged philanthropy journey on their eldest son’s birthday; November 30,1990. Nyle saw his friend Judy Maggio on the six o’clock news asking for help to buy an iron lung so a young boy at The Children’s Hospital of Austin could go home for Christmas. “Something hit me. I have two darling, healthy children and what have I done? I picked up the phone and told Judy, ‘It’s done.’ That began our relationship with the hospital, which was later renamed Dell Children’s Hospital. As we raised up our heads, we saw so many needs; I realized when you create wealth, you have a responsibility to share it.” Though he is too humble to mention his many “...of the Year” awards and philanthropy accolades, he and Nancy have turned their quest for purpose into a lifetime of generosity, to the benefit of so many all over Central Texas. Many is the fundraiser with the Nyle Maxwell corporate logo or the family name on the sponsor banners. They have big hearts for children and Veterans, and

have been great supporters (and admirers) of everything from Boys and Girls Clubs to Brookwood in Georgetown, and they have personally sponsored six flights for Honor Flight Austin.

IT ALL COMES TOGETHER Marrying the two passions began in 2015. Nyle and Nancy converted Vehicles Unique from a vacant auto upholstery plant into a destination spot for friends and family. But they also throw open the doors as a cleaning-fee-only venue for local non-profits and small charitable organizations. “Market price for a place like this could be as much as $5,000 on a weekend,” he says. “Nancy and I believe there are many worthy groups out there that can not afford a place like this. We have helped people raise several hundred thousand dollars, and it makes us really smile to put the space to its best use.” The facility is not open to the visiting public and the family is selective about fundraisers because they do not want to overuse it, but Nyle says he would like to see it used more. “People worry for me that someone might damage the cars, but they are just things, and at the end of the day, folks are very respectful and even too careful. If you can create things that put a smile on your face, the faces of the people who are important to you, and people in the community...why wouldn’t you?” Any city would be glad to be home for a corporate citizen like the Nyle Maxwell Family of cars, but it’s even better when his kind of personal largesse comes with it.

PEOPLE ALWAYS ASK ME WHICH CAR IS MY FAVORITE? NO ONE REALLY HAS A FAVORITE CHILD... YOU LOVE THEM ALL FOR EVERYTHING THAT MAKES THEM UNIQUE.


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The BiG Cause and Effect

Tracie Jack • Tracie@gtownview.com

BiG’S NEXT STEPS ARE... WELL... BIG!

B

rookwood in Georgetown, known locally as BiG, offers a vocational community for adults with intellectual disabilities and special needs. An expansion of the Brookwood Community located near Houston, BiG began their pilot program in March of 2011. Since then, BiG has been wowing the world with a new, innovative community that continues to grow. From gardeners, artisans, and bakers to card and jewelry makers, BiG offers its Citizens the opportunity to express their innate worth with dignity and purpose. Just off I-35, BiG operates a café with catering, a boutique, and a greenhouse. Visitors may eat onsite at BiG Café, an ideal location for a casual lunch or for coffee and conversation; shop in the charming BiG Boutique for the beautiful, handmade wares the Citizens have made; or prepare for any holiday season with the variety of plants and garden items in BiG Greenhouse. The BiG community even invites visitors to “sample some of our famous homemade fudge while you’re here!” Founder and director Erin Kiltz says, “There’s not a happier place to be than at BiG. Everyone feels it. People sense the love.” John and Erin Kiltz know, first-hand, the heart of love behind this community. They didn’t just build the program in Georgetown; they planted their own hearts and lives into the BiG dream for the sake of their daughter’s future.

THE KILTZ’S INSPIRATION Rebekah Grace “Gracie” Kiltz was born with Down Syndrome. At the age of two, she was diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia, and at age 3, Gracie suffered a tragic complication that left her with a severe brain injury. Doctors told Gracie’s family she would never smile again.

But believing in better things, Gracie’s older siblings prayed God would give their little sister her smile back. Six months later, Gracie made a miraculous recovery: she got her smile back. “God restored so much of her personality, her beautiful smile,” Erin says. “Over the years, she has been like a magnet for people. Without one word, she would draw people to herself.” Gracie’s smile—described as contagious by those who had the opportunity to interact with her—had the ability to light up the entire room. It was a smile that reached past the moment, deep into the hearts and lives of thousands for the next two decades. On September 8, 2018, Gracie departed this world, but her legacy of purpose lives on. “It’s one of those things we are in awe of now looking back at her entire life,” Erin says. “From most people’s standpoint, she would be looked at as a broken life; left with a very weak future and prognosis. The world would see her as someone to be pitied; a defect, or just a broken body. She couldn’t move or walk or talk. But I think there’s this broken mercy of grace for this entire community. As a family, we experienced that grace in such a powerful way in that Gracie was the greatest professor I’ve ever had. Her brother and sister would say the same thing. She taught us what was really important in life, what needed to surface and be held onto, and what would guide us through life.” The BiG community is quite aware of the “big” part Gracie played in their hearts, lives, and future. “She paved the way,” Erin said. Adele Brown, Program Director at BiG, said, “Gracie is the reason we all have jobs, that we all get to find purpose in our lives... and that fact is not lost on our Citizens. In fact, I think they know it more than we do, sometimes...Gracie was my best friend. And that is an honor I share with so many people.”


“When Gracie smiles, there’s this unadulterated joy. That’s the thing you see. It’s transcendent to the moment. It’s bigger than a person—you see into the eyes of God in that moment.”

Gracie’s life and legacy have given a future and a hope for more than 75 Citizens, as well as staff and volunteers who work at BiG. Erin added, “Even our volunteers will say, ‘I didn’t know what I was going to do when my husband died, and then I found BiG. And now I have a reason to get up.’ It’s not just about our Citizens and their respective families. BiG truly is a gift to our entire community. And now we have the honor to train other start-up communities all over.”

CONTINUED GROWTH Some big news for the BiG community is their replication and expansion to multiple locations. According to Erin, several families have moved from locations around the country just so their son or daughter

Gracie’s Legacy

52 CITIZENS SUPPORTED

can be part of BiG. But, as Kiltz pointed out, not everyone can move to Georgetown, Texas, so they are training people in other communities who have fallen in love with the model and want to know how they can replicate this incredible community. Erin and the team at BiG continue to expand and mentor new satellites with the original model of eight Citizens in a free, church space. They look for other partnering churches who will say, “Yes, we realize the need is there. Come, you can have two to three classrooms for a vocational day program,” which is exactly how BiG began— meeting at Georgetown Church of Christ in 2011.

► THREE LOCATIONS

17 CITIZENS EMPLOYED

“She had a BIG heart in that little body.” “My favorite part about Gracie was her smile.” ~quotes from a Tribute Video presented to the Kiltz family


In 2014, BiG moved to its current location on N. Church Street, and has since grown to 52 Citizens. In the last year they have planted two new satellite programs. The first, BiG Light, is located at Georgetown Church of Christ and gives meaningful employment to 17 Citizens; the newest, BiG Bee Cave, has eight Citizens in its program. Here in Georgetown, thanks to a $4 million capital campaign, construction is already underway for a 7,500 square foot work space expansion to accommodate the outgrowth from the current building. Upstairs will be administrative offices and downstairs will offer more work space for the Citizens. Erin indicated they while they are looking at other churches in the Austin area and beyond, the vision for the Georgetown campus is to develop about 100 acres for a full vocational and sustainable residential community. It is their hope that the bigger vision and community of 100 acres will be within ten minutes’ drive of their central BiG location in Georgetown. “The exciting thing is that we are more committed now than ever to Gracie’s legacy. We know, first-hand what our families face and how scared they are of the future. The number one fear of a parent with a child with special needs is wondering what happens to that child when they are gone. Brookwood in Georgetown has given them such hope for the future, a bright future.” According to Erin, rather than being pigeonholed as recipients of mundane custodial care, or being occupied with mindless tasks in uninspiring surroundings, the Citizens of BiG are “truly celebrated in all their God-given abilities. We are tapping into those and we are allowing them to become all that God has created them to be. They’ve been given this opportunity and community with their peers they would have never had.”

Citizens have posted video testimonials on their website and declare who they are! I am an artist, an artisan, a gardener, a skilled glazer and potter... I am creative, valued and treasured. I am a joy! BROOKWOODINGEORGETOWN. ORG/MEDIA-2/

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I am changing the way the world views adults with special needs.


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Greta Bauer • Greta@gtownview.com

WHO BETTER TO

Matt Gardner lives in Georgetown. He is a pilot and First Officer for a regional airline based in Dallas.

GET YOU THROUGH

ABIA F

THAN AN AIRLINE PILOT?

irst and foremost, do a little more planning than buying the ticket. Mr. Gardner recommends FlightAware.com for live flight tracking. Their app includes a “misery index” to let you know how things are going at ABIA or in whatever city you’ll be connecting. At ABIA and for any domestic flight, give yourself at least 60 minutes for a layover. Travel sites will always sell you the ticket, but they can’t tell you whether you’ll be sprinting a half-mile to make it to the gate a minimum of 10 minutes early. You may also want a time buffer in case there is weather. More than half of all airline travel is for business, so if you want to miss “rush hour,” find a trip that avoids Monday mornings and Thursday/Friday afternoons. The opposite is true for holiday weekends; many people leave work early on Thursday to take advantage of the three-day weekend off, so book your flight one day early or one day late to avoid the vacation rush.

Download a terminal map at to see where you will need to be before you arrive. There are expansions underway at ABIA; construction and the new parking lots require a bit of extra walking. Also, the southern terminal IS NOT at the airport. Those airlines—Frontier and Allegiant—will eventually move to the main terminal, but, for now, add another 30 minutes for the off-property shuttle. We’re well past 2001 when you needed to arrive two hours early for every flight, but if you roll up 45 minutes before takeoff, don’t expect good things. When you arrive at ABIA, remember there are three security lines; one in the middle and one on either end. It is uncommon for all three to be crowded at once. Find or ask which one has the shortest wait time. On a personal note, understand 99 percent of delays have nothing to do with the person you talk to about it. Mr. Gardner recommends, “Be the one person who sympathizes with the gate attendant. Even bring extra chocolate or cookies with you as a token of empathy. A little kindness will likely put you first in line for whatever fix the airline comes up with.” When in flight, new FAA rules say as soon as the wheels touch the ground you can turn on your phone. You can start looking at your airline’s phone app for your connecting gate so the flight crew can do other things and you’re not creating a traffic jam in the jetway or at the counter outside. Pilots and regular travelers all agree it is worth the price to get a TSA Pre-check ($85 for five years) and it is only for checkpoints 1 & 2. It doesn’t guarantee that you won’t wait or have frustration, but it really cuts down on both. Also, do yourself a favor and have your digital boarding pass QR code on your screen when you approach the checkpoints. No one wants to be behind the person swiping and tapping for two minutes.

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advertorial

here’s a new entertainment opportunity coming to the Georgetown area, as HighPointe Estate introduces its HighPointe Supper Club.

“Our friend Larry Kille at Sterling Events Center has been a force in the Austin hospitality and entertainment scene since the 1980s,” said Clark. “And many engaging events have been staged over the years by Larry and the team at Sterling.

HighPointe Estate is a new premiere wedding and event venue being developed 15 minutes west of Georgetown, near the intersection of Ronald Reagan Blvd and FM 3405.

“Often, however, people aren’t excited about making the trip into Austin to attend dinner and a show, so we asked Larry and his team to help us bring their Supper Club experience to HighPointe Estate!”

“Our supper club celebrates the nostalgia and history of old-fashioned supper clubs,” said HighPointe Estate Founder Dawson Clark. “Early supper clubs gained notoriety in the days of prohibition, and later came out of the shadows as a destination where patrons would spend a whole evening, from cocktail hour to nightclub-style entertainment after dinner. “It’s in this spirit, that we bring supper club to Williamson County,” Clark said. “Each supper club event will feature a themed culinary or entertainment experience. And the evening will be planned to allow old friends and new friends to leisurely meet together, harkening back to the early days of relaxing supper clubs.” HighPointe Supper Club was inspired when Clark and his wife, Leanne, attended a similar club at the Sterling Events Center in Austin.

The inaugural HighPointe Supper Club will be held at HighPointe Estate’s Moonlight Bungalow on Friday, September 27. The event is entitled Tiki Tiki Luau, and will feature a full Hawaiian Luau feast, complete with a roasted pig. After dinner, the garden will be filled with drums and music as Hawaiian fire and hula dancers entertain to the delight of attendees. In November, the club will celebrate “a night in old Barcelona,” with Spanish tapas on the menu and a Flamenco guitar concert. Then in December, talented musicians will channel their very best 1960s impersonations for “a Rat Pack Christmas,” while patrons enjoy a scrumptious holiday feast.

“Everything we’re doing in these first three supper club shows is aimed at paving the way for much larger offerings in The Great Hall,” Clark said. “We can accommodate up to 300 patrons for a seated dinner in The Great Hall, and still have plenty of room for a dance floor. If this goes the way we are dreaming, we hope to be hosting a supper club gathering every month or so with world class entertainment and food.” Tickets for these early events will be $60, which includes a 3-course dinner and a great show. A cash bar will also be available, with special themed cocktails available to match the event. For more information, visit www.HighPointeSupperClub. com. There you can sign up to receive updates on supper club shows and buy tickets for the first three shows. Additional information is available on Facebook at: @HighPointeSupperClub

The first three supper club shows will be staged in HighPointe Estate’s intimate Moonlight Bungalow, with attendance limited to only 50. However, early

5 5 5 5 Cou nty R oad 2 5 8 42

plans are underway for a special supper club show in early 2020 as HighPointe Estate will be opening and introducing its Great Hall facility to the region.

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Libe rt y Hill, TX 786 4 2

512.6 36 .9 200


AUSTIN’S NEWEST PREMIER WEDDING AND EVENT VENUE

W W W. H I G H P O I N T E E S TAT E . C O M 5555 COUNT Y ROAD 258 • LIBERT Y HILL, TEXAS 78642 • INFO@HIGHPOINTEESTATE.COM

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We’re celebrating the nostalgia and history of old-fashioned supper clubs. Inspired by the supper clubs of those times, HighPointe Supper Club is hosted at HighPointe Estate, a new premier event and wedding

A NIGHT IN OLD BARCELONA Friday, November 1, 2019

venue, located just 15 minutes west of Georgetown. Supper Club creates an experience that will delight gastronomes, epicures and aesthetes. W E C O M E T O G E T H E R t o E AT

A RAT PACK CHRISTMAS Friday, December 6, 2019

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OPIFEX GLOBAL

Astronaut Training...in Georgetown!

Barton Bollfrass, like many of us, grew up on the thrills of

House that training one astronaut does not have to cost taxpayers $50 million (the current price tag). The impact of that number becomes even greater when you answer the question he asks with a grin and a Spock-like eyebrow: What do you call a person who went through a $50 million training program but never goes into space? ... An astronaut.

Barton just may be Texas' answer to Elon Musk, and he is as much a philosopher about space flight as he is a business man. Thanks to Barton’s common sense approach—and some important folks in Washington D.C.—what has previously been the purview of billion-dollar government contractors may be within reach for his Opifex Global astronaut training program right here in Georgetown.

He proved his training model, partnered with the appropriate EVA suit manufacturer, then...

space travel, moon landings, and shuttle programs. More recently, he has enjoyed reading about and watching the modern breakthroughs of SpaceX, including the Tesla convertible now orbiting the sun at seven miles per second with a Starman mannequin at the wheel.

At a recent meeting in Washington, D.C., Opifex demonstrated to the National Space Council (NSC) and the White 44

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He got the ‘GO’ decision from the NSC to respond to an RFP that would allow Opifex to provide astronaut training for future space flights for a lot fewer of your tax dollars.


Ann Marie Kennon • AnnMarie@gtownview.com

BUT OUTER SPACE IS EXPENSIVE, ISN'T IT? Using the photos at left, Barton explains the physical and physiological similarities between working on the moon and working underwater. As a former Navy diver, he began applying the same training principles and equipment to both. "The astronaut helmet was literally designed as a bubble to copy Flash Gordon. The underwater diver has a small faceplate so he can focus on the work in front of him. Both suits are pressurized to keep the occupant alive. The big difference? Oh yeah, the spacesuit costs $13 million for some extra layers of fabric." So, Opifex can prepare an astronaut for flight for $50,000. That's 1/10th of one percent of what the government currently spends. "There is no reason for space flight to be so expensive. Opifex is changing the paradigm on astronaut training and we're enjoying being disruptive in what has traditionally been a 'spend more for better' program," he says. "If you think about it, space travel is the only technology that has not gotten any smaller or cheaper. Sadly, there are many individuals and vendors who have made a lot of money for decades on space equipment and machinery. Taxpayers deserve better." With Opifex’s more-reasonable plans and programs, money could be spent elsewhere in the space program; e.g., building a station on the moon that can be a starting point for Mars and beyond. "It takes 17,000 miles worth of fuel just to get off the Earth," Barton adds. "Imagine how far we could go if we had a gas station on the moon to start from. Too often we hear about a company that invented a 'spaceflight rotary boring auger'... it's a drill! They just call it a spaaaace drill and put a million-dollar price tag on it." Barton uses his own pool design to train astronauts for zero gravity work and insists space travel is not just for pilots. "We only need two pilots to get the technicians there and back. We need many more specialists who can focus on the work to be done on the moon. We built a neutral buoyancy tank and filled it with water. It's not special space water and we put on the same harness and suit the government does.

We found a company to make the suits, and, like diving, it's just a personal life support system with a coverall made of heavy fabric that is airtight. We pressurize it so you can just get to work. Then we train specialists to: 1. Not take off the helmet; 2. Don't touch the dials; and 3. Just get to work. "There's nothing else you need to know. When you ride a roller coaster, you don't need to understand engineering. Just don't let go. Ironically, it's not rocket science at all." Barton hopes his and other companies that are helping privatize space exploration will allow NASA, and mankind, to arrive at the moon to collaborate as benign entities and eventually share in the benefits to be had from reaching other planets, rather than just building space stations merely to give the rockets a place to go. Visit OpifexGlobal.com for more on these and other amazing endeavors.

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why is this a thing?

CBD OIL Greta Bauer • Greta@gtownview.com

I

f you know a half-dozen people who are suddenly selling, using, or talking about Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, you are not alone. CBD oil has become the hot new product in many states, including Texas, and it has been anecdotally credited as a natural alternative to everything from pain management to ADHD to sleeplessness. Experts say the evidence is scant for most of these, but many people have reported better quality of life based on myriad needs and uses. So far, the scientific community has only produced evidence to support its use in the treatment of epilepsy. In July, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended approval of a CBD medication to treat two rare forms of childhood epilepsy. Further studies have produced too little evidence to make a firm conclusion for other uses. In any case, Governor Greg Abbott signed House Bill 1325 into law in June, which legalizes hemp farming and the sale and possession of hemp-derived CBD oil containing less than .3% of THC, the compound that produces a ‘high’ in marijuana.

WHAT IS IT? CBD oil is extracted from the flowers and buds of the Cannabis sativa plant. It does not produce intoxication because CBD oil only contains trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical responsible for marijuana’s “high.”

CBD oil can be more effective than isolate CBD-only oil for treating inflammatory conditions. But if you prefer to have zero percent THC, you can choose an isolate product. It is recommended users read the contents and percentages listed on the bottle. Many in the health care industry are also concerned about how the oils are produced. Because it is a new product, there are not many regulations in the plant growth or harvest, so it is feasible your next door neighbor could grow and process a supply of oils for sale. Experts recommend purchasing the product from a trusted brand or label so you know whatever the label says is what is in the bottle. Also look at the ways the plants were grown. Plants absorb what is in the soil and it is wise to consider what contaminants (pesticides) may be present in a non-regulated growth process. The Mayo Clinic also asserts, while generally safe to use, everyone responds differently and there are reported side effects, so it is important to ask a medical professional and discuss possible inter-reactions with medications.

Still, individual results tell a good story... The best thing ever!! I have rheumatoid arthritis and have tried many medications. On my 5th day after starting CBD I felt better than I have in years. ~Carol M. I was willing to try whatever to get hold of my anxiety. CBD oil seriously gives me such an overall sense of calm and better well being, not to mention a RESTFUL sleep. ~Hallie

WHAT TO KNOW Some experts suggest, if you decide to try it, there are different means of extraction. The “whole plant” utilizes everything, including terpenes, which are the anti-inflammatory agents within the plant and research shows full spectrum Georgetown View is not recommending or discouraging use of this product. This column is intended only to provide data and shed general light on a topic we find to be trend-worthy for entertainment purposes. SE P T E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO W N VI EW

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save the planet

MONARCH BUTTERFLY HEROES

M

onarch butterflies are perhaps one of nature’s most beautiful and peculiar creatures. Science still struggles to explain the complexity of their annual migration between Mexico and Canada; a journey that takes up to five generations to complete and, along the way, provides great value to our environment and ecosystems. Two years ago, Mayor Dale Ross took the pledge for Georgetown to help the monarchs on their journey. With a 90 percent decrease in the monarch population in the I-35 corridor over the last 20 years, conservation is essential and Monarch Heroes are needed.

Since then, the monarchs have received a great deal of support from work done by Kimberly Garrett at Parks & Recreation as well as teachers and students at Tippit Middle School. Help is needed because monarchs lay their eggs on milkweed plants—and nothing else. Once hatched, caterpillars are nourished by the nectar, which also makes them poisonous to predators. But, because milkweed is an invasive plant, farmers have cleared the plants to a great degree, depriving the monarchs of their opportunities to reproduce.

Tracie Jack • Tracie@gtownview.com

many of the parks’ trails, and at the Creative Playscape. They are now planting milkweed across the 525 acres of Garey Park; plenty of nursery space for future monarchs. Mayor Ross says, “It is a very inexpensive way to help save the planet. We don’t take census numbers of butterflies, but we know it’s working because we can see them.”

WHAT YOU CAN DO Residents can help support the Tippit Garden; “We need monetary and in-kind help,” history teacher Timothy Boswell says. “And we will put the word out when we have community work days.” Call 512-943-5040 to help or donate.

Butterfly habitats, including the other wildflowers they use for nutrients, have disappeared on a massive scale, which affects the butterflies’ ability to survive. Beyond contributing to pollination and natural pest control, butterflies add value in many areas of life, from their beauty to the value they offer in ecosystems, science, and education.

HEROES IN ACTION Students and teachers at Tippit built a garden habitat on school grounds. Robin Blankenship, 8th grade science teacher said, “The biodiversity [in the garden] has increased ten-fold. Birds bathe in the water feature, which has fish swimming in it. We’re seeing caterpillars and butterflies, including a few monarchs.” Kimberly Garrett reports her staff have successfully grown new milkweed habitats at the VFW, on

Homeowners can be a hero for Monarchs by planting milkweed. If pesticides must be used to take care of the pests in your wildflower garden, consider non-toxic varieties. The butterflies and beneficial bugs will thank you.

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worth the drive

Central Texas Olive Ranch

Just ten miles from downtown Georgetown, the Central

Texas Olive Ranch is as versatile a destination as you could want for an evening out or an all-day event. Olive expert Josh Swafford is the sixth generation of his family to farm the land that now boasts more than 23,000 olive trees, a very successful olive oil business... and so much more.

Kids can leave the screens behind — wander and run through the orchard.

Josh says the growth of the agritourism business inspired him to evolve his flourishing farm into an event center. The Ranch is now a popular choice for families, clubs, businesses, and folks of all ages to enjoy the peace of the Walburg countryside with the perks of good food, games and plenty of space to entertain in all seasons.

BIRT

WHAT DO TO AT THE RANCH RE

HDA YS FUNDRAISERS AT S W E D D I N G S TRE

The Ranch is open Thursday through Sunday for activities and retail sales of their popular olive oils, which are pressed right on the property and come in flavored varieties like chipotle, garlic and more. During happy hour, guests are encouraged to sidle up to the bar for wine tastings, as well as fresh French bread dipping in any of the flavored oils and Tuscany spices on the side.

Plus, knowing that it has been used in beauty products since the days of ancient Egypt, the Ranch has olive oilbased soap, serum and lip balm available too.

RELAX & CELEBRATE Guests on Friday nights get a steak-to-order dinner cooked on an open fire right outside the dining room; dinner begins at 6pm until the chef runs out. Josh recommends arriving early! After dinner on Friday and Saturday nights there is live music and even a chance the kids might get to see a demonstration from the oil press in the dining room. Outside, there is a 4,000 sq/ft patio with nine fire pits and plenty of seating. Just a step further you’ll find Texas-sized

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Ladder Ball and other lawn games, plus plenty of space to walk and see the olives up close. Once a month, there is an outdoor projection Movie Night, as well as special events for Sun City residents and additional senior discounts on planned events. Check their web calendar for updates. Tours of the ranch are available on Saturdays from noon to 9pm. Josh says they frequently entertain field trips, car clubs and corporate events and retreats. “We have a lot of great space, and we are happy to close to the public for private events. We invite people to have whatever kind of event makes them happy; fundraisers, dinners, weddings, graduations and more.” Fall is a busy time at the Ranch and with the holiday season approaching, Josh says the calendar will be filling up quickly with special events and parties. He recommends reserving your date by October 1 to get your first choice. Tables and chairs are provided and guests can invite a caterer of their choice.

Mark your calendar for the 2019 Olive Fest, October 19th F R E E A D M I SS I O N : L i ve M u s i c, H ay r i d e To u r s o f Th e O rc h a rd, Food Tr uc k s, l o c a l B e e r a n d Wi n e, Pu n k i n C h u n k i n’, R a f f l e Pr i ce I te ms, f re s h O li ve Oi l Ta s ti n g s, Co o k i n g D e mo n s trati o n s, B o u n ce H o u s e s, Cra f ts a nd more

The Expert Says... Josh says, “Olive oil is a ‘healthy’ fat. The predominant fatty acid in olive oil is a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid, which helps reduce inflammation. It also contains lots of antioxidants and protects your blood cholesterol.”

With 23,000 trees, the Ranch expects to glean about 6,000 gallons of oil per year and often gets much more; sometimes as many as 15,000. In 2019, Josh says, the crop wasn’t as high as expected because the orchard got plenty of rain. “So much rain is really good for the trees, but it is hard for the fruit.” Our olive scientist explains that the trees grow olives as a defense against dry periods. The trees produce more fruit to hold water in reserve when rain or moisture is more scarce.

VISIT THE RANCH 5251 FM 972 GEORGETOWN TXOLIVE.COM

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poppy talks

Poppy Pearls I

’m not a wise person, so I can’t take credit for most of the pearls I live by. I am, however, smart enough to have remembered them when I found myself chewing on the rough side of my own foot or stuck in an awkward moment. First, it never hurts to stockpile questions or responses in case you find yourself back-pedaling. I’ve been on the receiving end of an awkward question or two, so I have conversations in my head all the time to avoid it. People ask me how old my grandson is; I reply, not uncurtly, “He’s my son and he’s 9.” Thus, when I see any adult and child together, I never presume to know their relationship and simply say “What a cute little boy/girl, you look happy together.” My friend Tod gave me help on gift giving. I was struggling to find a gift to impress a new boyfriend. Tod said, “If you don’t know yet what is important to him, give him something important to you so he’ll think of you.” The boyfriend turned out to be a sociopath, but Tod is still my friend and his advice is still good. Always go to funerals. People who never met my father came to his services out of respect for me and it is those people I recall vividly, 25 years later, because it was a warm surprise to see them. I sometimes ask a person who is grieving to tell me their favorite story about that person. Or what was your favorite thing about him/her? What did he/she love to do most? Bringing love and happiness to mind is a relief, even momentarily. Moms, remember to get your hair wet. I recently mommy-shamed myself when joking with a friend that I love the pool, but never want to deal with the hassle of re-doing my hair. She recalled hearing her own son; “Don’t bother asking my mom, she won’t play because she wants to keep her hair dry,” she realized how many moments she had missed for the sake of a hair dryer. I suppose I can deal with the chlorine for the sake of my son remembering that I was fun sometimes. I discovered something to explain nearly anything to my child when I have to say, ‘No.’ Now I just say, “I have three jobs; to keep you safe, healthy and happy. If you keep eating candy, it is not Healthy; you will feel sick and you will not be Happy.” “Yes, you have to hold my hand because it is not Safe to cross by yourself.” Nearly everything in the realm of discipline can be put into one of those buckets and even the youngest or simplest child can understand three things. 56

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I had occasion to be friends with WWE champion John Layfield. He is also a finance guru who had a regular spot on Fox News and his pearl was profoundly helpful in my younger years. “When you get out of college, or any time, look around the home you grew up in and resolve NOT to go out and duplicate that in a hurry. Your parents took 30 years to earn that and you’ll just dive into debt if you try to do it any faster.” Speaking of famous people, Chet Garner shared a pearl with me. It’s kind of awkward to introduce yourself to a famous person when you *clearly* know the celebrity’s name already. Chet says it’s still the polite thing to do because it allows famous people to let you know their preference. So where I might say, “Pleased to meet you, Sir Awesomeness!” The other person could respond, “No, it’s just Mr. Eastwood, or Clint.” One thing I am proud to have taught myself is how to recognize, acknowledge and be grateful for the things I am *not* good at. Realizing that I am a Do-er and not a Decider saved me from banging my head against a wall throughout the second half of my life. When I was an EMT, I possibly, literally, saved lives by not being in charge or making decisions, and just performing important tasks as instructed. Letting go of things I’m terrible at—not swimming upstream­—was a huge relief. Connecting what I am good at has made me supremely confident in my ability—in the right time and space—to create, execute, and produce great things. I no longer waste time trying to be something I’m not. It’s quite liberating. So, while my pearls will not make you rich, or necessarily happy, I hope maybe they help someone avoid a future random awkward moment. That’s a pretty nice reward too.


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food In 1992, the Organic Trade Association dubbed September Organic Harvest Month™; a widespread promotion of organic food and agriculture. These recipes will allow you to take advantage of fruits and veggies that are especially ripe in September, and since Texas allows us to blend summer grilling with the fall harvest, it’s the perfect time for some organic experiments! Did you know you can grill watermelon? A sweet and savory side to your meal. Speaking of sides, acorn squash fries are a delightful (and healthy) alternative to potato fries. You may also want to incorporate in-season herbs. While you’re at the grill, add an onion for Roasted Onion Mayo; great for beef, chicken, or veggie burgers, or as a pita chip dip.

Bon appétit!

Preheat oven to 425°F. Prepare a baking sheet with cooking spray. Spray squash pieces with cooking spray to coat; transfer to a bowl. Season squash with parsley, kosher salt, and black pepper; toss to coat and arrange onto prepared baking sheet. Bake in preheated oven 15 minutes, turn with spatula, continue baking until soft in the center, about 15 min more.

GRILLED WATERMELON SALAD INGREDIENTS 1/2 (5-lb) seedless watermelon 1/4 c balsamic vinegar Extra-virgin olive oil 1 c goat cheese, crumbled Kosher salt & fresh finely cracked black pepper 2 c fresh baby arugula, washed and dried Stand watermelon, half-cut side down, on a cutting board and slice away the rind. Turn the block on its side and cut into eight squares, roughly 3”x3” and 1” thick.

For fresh ingredients, visit...

Pour vinegar into a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Cook until reduced to a thick syrup consistency. Set aside.

Wolf Ranch Farmers’ Market Saturdays • 9am-1pm 1015 W. University Dr.

Heat a non-stick grill pan over medium-high heat. Drizzle enough olive oil over watermelon slices to thinly coat then place on hot grill pan. Grill each side about 2 minutes until grill marks appear; transfer to a plate and season with salt.

Georgetown Market Days on the downtown Square, second Saturday of the month March-October 9am-4pm

Sun City Open Air Market Tuesdays, 9am-Noon #2 Texas Avenue, Sun City

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SQUASH FRIES INGREDIENTS Olive oil cooking spray 1 small butternut squash; peeled, seeded, and cut into French fry-like strips 1 tablespoon dried parsley 1 teaspoon kosher salt ground black pepper to taste

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Assemble 1/4-c of baby arugula on a serving plate, followed by a grilled slice of watermelon in the center, and top with 1tbsp of crumbled cheese and another 1/4-c arugula. Add watermelon slice and another tbsp of cheese. Repeat with remaining ingredients. Finish each salad with a very light drizzle of olive oil and balsamic syrup. Dust with black pepper and serve immediately.


Y o u c a n st i l l cel ebrat e O r g a n i c H arves t month even if you are not a fan of raw foods!

INDULGE YOURSELF TAKE A LONG BATH IN WATER SCENTED WITH ORGANIC OILS. NIBBLE ON RICH ORGANIC CHOCOLATE. SIP ORGANIC WINE, BEER, OR A MARTINI MADE WITH ORGANIC VODKA. BUY YOURSELF A BOUQUET OF ORGANICALLY GROWN FLOWERS. CUDDLE IN A TOWEL OR ROBE MADE FROM ORGANIC COTTON.

GRILLED ONION MAYO INGREDIENTS 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp chopped parsley ¼ cup lime juice 1/3 cup parmesan cheese

1 1 3 1

large sweet onion, peeled and halved cup mayonnaise tablespoons snipped fresh parsley tsp ground black pepper

Heat grill to medium-low. Combine oil and 1 tsp. snipped parsley; brush over onion. Grill onion 15 minutes or until tender and slightly charred, turning once. Transfer to cutting board; cool. (As an alternative, slice and cook onions on the stove top over medium heat. Cover and cook in the olive oil and ¼ tsp chopped parsley 15 mins, or until tender. Then uncover and cook another 3-5 minutes until golden, stirring frequently; cool.) Place the onions into a food processor or blender, add the mayonnaise, lime juice, 3 tablespoons parsley, parmesans cheese, and pepper and puree until smooth. Season with salt to taste. Cover and chill until ready to serve. Store in the refrigerator. SE P T E M B E R 2 0 1 9  G E O R G E TO W N VI EW

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parting shot

8th Annual Georgetown 9/11 Stair Climb Since 2012, members of the Georgetown Fire and Police Departments have “responded” to the GISD athletic complex at Georgetown High School to walk the stadium bleachers until they have reached the equivalent of 2,400 stairs; all 110 floors of a World Trade Center building. The Stair Climb is in remembrance of the 343 first responders’ lives lost on September 11, 2001 in New York City. As the sun rises over the fields, firefighters and police officers are typically joined by members of Team Red, White and Blue; State Police officers and SWAT, and others from around Central Texas. Members of the community are welcome to attend this memorial event but, for safety reasons, participants are limited to Fire, Police, EMS and Military. They also ask that guests remember the solemnity of the occasion and maintain decorum. This is not a timed event or a race of any kind; just a simple way to honor and remember others who made the ultimate sacrifice. It is also a wonderful way to communicate the commitment and dedication to duty of all first responders and armed forces. Firefighters typically wear and carry their full complement of equipment, as their brothers did in the towers, and law enforcement wear their vests and helmets as well. Some carry flags, and some may even carry a lifelike dummy for part of the climb. Visit FireHero.org to find similar climbs around the country for yourself, if you’re out of town that day, or for family members who may be interested.

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georgetown view P.O. Box 2281, Georgetown, TX 78627

POSTAL PATRON GEORGETOWN, TX

A Standard of Pet Care that’s Literally Out of This World Zoot Pet Hospital, meet NASA and the US Space program. Zoot has just added another experienced veterinary doctor to their staff, one with quite an exciting and unexpected background. Before her veterinary days, Ericka A. Davis, DVM worked with NASA and the US Space Program. With all the variety, intensity and moving objects that a NASA engineer encounters every day, making the transition to work in a busy animal hospital caring for pets was actually a lot smoother than one might think! While at NASA, Dr. Davis was one of the lucky few to experience testing in zero-gravity, scuba diving with astronauts at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory, and working with Extravehicular Activity (EVA) related tasks for the International Space Station.

Ericka A. Davis, DVM • DVM, Mississippi State Univ. in 2012 • B.S. Texas A&M, M.S. Embry Riddle • Joined Zoot Pets in December 2017

Always feeling the call to veterinary medicine, Dr. Davis left NASA after eight years to pursue her DVM degree. While grateful for the unique and amazing experiences in her early career, she hasn’t looked back since becoming a veterinarian seven years ago and considers herself fortunate to be practicing in this rewarding field.

• Former NASA Engineer for 8 years

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Georgetown View Magazine • September 2019  

Georgetown View Magazine • September 2019