Page 1


'


EL

ESPIRITU DE 1 9 3 6


EL ESPIRITU

DE

1936

Published Annually By

The Associated Students of

CLAR�MONT HIGH SCHOOL Claremont, Ca lifornia

Volume 23

,,

June I, 1936


F 0 R

WO R D This past year has been most successful for Claremont High School and it is the hope of the Annual Staff that we may • have presented a worthy review. We hope that you will find El Espiritu de 19 3 6 a pleasing and enjoyable book.


F A C ULT Y CLASS E S ACTIVITIES LI TE RARY FE ATU RES

C 0 N T E N T

s


I.

All of us have at some time during the course of our high school careers felt the value of his guidance as teacher and as counselor. For his willing and unstinted assistance in the de­ velopment of our school projects, we have been continually grateful. Those of us who leave the school this year feel that a friendship has been formed which will not end with gradu­ ation. We of the Annual Staff are happy to dedicate this year's El Espiritu to Mr. William W. Booth.

6


Probably there has not been a time in history when world affairs have been so complicated and critical as at present. This, so far as the United States is concerned, is no doubt due in a large part to inadequate training for straight thinking and right-action on the part of individuals. Such a situation offers a real challenge and great opportunity to energetic young people. May each of you choose to make the preparation for action which will contribute most to the welfare of the world, and therefore to the enrichment of your own life! @ I wish to congratulate the Class of 193 6 and extend to them best wishes for health, happiness, and success in all worthy things in future years. We shall follow with considerable interest the progress of each graduate. To all the students I desire to express appreciation for helpful cooperation in making Claremont High School a good place in which to live and develop. The great gain which students can make physically, mentally, and morally, from seventh to twelfth grade, inclusive, is of utmost importance. I hope each will find the most friendly and help­ ful associates for the desired maximum improvement while a member of the Claremont High School. EARL THOMPSON 7


Mrss MARY ESCUDERO French, Spanish Ninth Grade Adviser

MR. WILLIAM W. BOOTH Mathematics

Mrss MARGARET ANDERSON Physical Ed. for Girls G.A.A. Adviser Sophomore Class Adviser

MISS KATHLEEN G. RYE Chorus Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs

MR. CHARLES A. ARRINGTON Mathematics, General Science, Chemistry, Physics, Junior Class Adviser, Stage Con­ struction

MRS. MARGARET WILLIAMS Domestic Science Junior Class Adviser

MR. BURTON E. FORNEY World History, American History, Civics. Economics, World Problems. Biology, Scholarship Society Adviser, MRS. ADA S. FITTS Sophomore Class Adviser Counselor Librarian Curricular Adviser

MRS. MINNIE M. HOWE Orchestra MISS ELEANOR A. FRENCH Mathematics, English Eighth Grade Adviser

8


MRS. CORNELIA K. HULL MR. LYLE C. MARTIN

Physical Ed. for Boys. Social Science, American History, World History, Letterman's Club Adviser, Freshman Class Adviser, Wolf Packet

English. Dramatics. Scribblers. El Espiricu Adviser, Senior Class Adviser

MR. WILLIAM S. WOOD

Vice-Principal. Bus. Mgr. Mechanical Drawing, Typing, Woodwork. Eighth Grade Adviser MISS ANNA K. PETERSON

Social Science, History Seventh Grade Adviser MISS GERTRUDE WILLOWS

English. Latin. Dean of Girls. Girls' League Adviser MR. ORVILLE G. THOMASON

Oral English, Remedial Eng­ lish, Physical Ed. for Boys. Seventh Grade Adviser, Dra­ matics MISS GRACE ESCHELBACH

Art, Stage Design

MR. ALFRED D. EWINGTON

French, Spanish _

9


EXECUTIVE

BOARDS

The Executive Boards of the Junior and Senior High Schools are the only administrative groups of the Student Bodies. Their meetings are held following those of the Student Coun­ cils of which the Executive Boards are members. Here recom­ mendations of the Councils are made effective by the action of the boards. @ Members are chosen at general elections held in May preceding the term of office, the president of the Senior High Student Body taking office on receiving the gavel at Senior Assembly in June. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL President Vice-President Secretary Annual Editor Business Manager

Joe Crutcher . Jean Miller . Emily Price John R. Pierce John Lincoln

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

10

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Social Chairman

Louise Van Voorhis Mary Bulkley . Maria Miller Arthur Tracy Dorothy Duncan


CLASSES


,


SE N FIRST SEMESTER

Emily Price

0 R

CLASS

OFFICERS

SECOND SEMESTER

Emily Price

President

. Champ Thompson

Max Massee

Vice-President

Alice Miller

Secretary

Esther Robbins

. Treasurer

John Pierce

Esther Robbins . Frances Bernard

Social Chairman

Champ Thompson Student Council Rep.

Frances Bernard David MacHarg

The members of the graduating class have been fellow travelers along the school highway for some years. Along with the pleasant stretches of road have been steep grades, detours, and washouts. The last miles have been difficult but now we stand at the top of the hill where we pause, not only to view the alluring valley ahead before we travel the unknown road but to look back and consider what we have accomplished in our journey together. ® Perhaps this class will best be remem­ bered for its athletic prowess. The team which won the Tri­ County League Football Championship for the first time in thirteen years, included ten seniors. Life pins in the Scholar­ ship Federation were awarded to three from our number. Like­ wise, in other school activities the class of 193 6 has played an _ important part. ® Before we go forward to new and un­ charted experiences in life, we wish to leave behind us, to those who have blazed the trail, a knowledge of our apprecia­ tion for the help and guidance they have shown us.

11


JOSEPHINE G. BALLMAN Wolf Packet 4 Glee Club 4 Oratorical Contest 3 '"Pinafore" "Tune In"

RICHARD POST El Espiritu 4 Wolf Packet 3 Class Secretary 3 Scribblers 3. 4 Radio Club 4

BURTON BREHAUT Class Treasurer 2 Football 3, 4 Track 3, 4 "B" Basketball 3. Captain -¼ "Pinafore"

MARGARET BUSBY G.AA. l. 2 Glee Club 1, 2, 4 Fashion Show I, 2, 4 "Pinafore"

GRACE CLARK G.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4 Wolf Packet 3, 4 Glee Club 3, 4 Social Chairman 2 "Pinafore"

JOSEPH CRUTCHER Student Body President 4 Vice-President 3 Class President l Tennis 1, 2. 3, 4 Orchestra 1. 2, 3, 4

JOHN THOMAS DUNN Athletic Manager 4 El Espiritu 4 Wolf Packet 3, 4 Basketball 4 "The New Bride"

MARIA LUZ GUERRERO Fashion Show 2, 3, 4

EDGAR LEE HALL Football 3, 4 Basketball 4 Track 3

JEAN HELMICK El Espiritu 3 Wolf Packet 3, Editor 4 Class Social Chairman 1, 3 Girls' League V.-P., Soc. Ch. "The Late Christopher Bean"

12


3ILL TEUSCHER Oass Vice-President 2 Track 2, 4 Football 2, 3 Letterman's Club 2, 3, 4 Tune In"

MAXINE E. RIDGWAY Speedball 4 "Growing Pains" "The New Bride" "Murder in Hollywood"

HORRIS E. SWOVELAND Class Vice-President 2 Letterman's Club 1,2,3: V-P. 4 Football 1, 2. 3, 4 Basketball 2. 4; Captain 3 Baseball I. 2, 3, 4

JOHN REID PIERCE Business Manager 3 El Espiritu Editor 4 Scholarship Society 2, 3; Sec'y 4 Letterman's Club 4 "The Lare Christopher Bean"

FRANCES BERNARD Student Council I, 2. 3 Class President 3 Class Social Chairman 2, 4 Girls' League President 4 . . Tune In"

DAVID MacHARG Sen. High Stu. Council V-P. 4 Scholarship Society 2, 3, 4 Tennis 2. 3, 4 Football 3, 4 "The Late Christopher Bean"

ROBERT L. RAMSAY Entered '35 Football 4 Track 3, 4 · Baseball 3, 4 Letterman's Club 3, 4

ANNAMARIE ZIEHLKE G.A.A. Letter Fashion Show 2, 3 "Pinafore" '·Tune In"

::t.OBERT GORDON NICHOLL Football 3. 4 Basketball 2, 3; Captain 4 Track 3, 4 Baseball 2, 3, 4 'The New Bride"

MAX WALTER MASSEE Class President 3, Vice-Pres. 4 Baseball I, 2, 3, 4 Football 3, 4 Tennis 2, 3, 4

13


MURIEL F. WHEELER Glee Club 2, 3 Fashion Show 3, 4 "Confessional" "Pinafore''

RAYMOND V. HOLTZ Senior High Council Rep. 3 Football 4 Basketball 2, 3, 4 Orchestra 1, 2. 3, 4 Letterman's Club 3, 4

DONALD MORRISON Letterman's Club 3, 4 Baseball 3. 4 Basketball 2

ALICE MILLER Class Secretary 3, 4 Girls' League Secretary 3, 4 "Seven to One" "Tune In" "Pinafore"

FRED STEUDLER Football I, 2. 3, 4 Basketball I, 2. 3, 4 Baseball 2, 3 Track 3

WARREN C. TABOR Football 2 Basketball 2 "Tune In" "Pinafore"

HELEN STYS G.A.A. Pin 3 Basketball Manager 3 Fashion Show S. C. High School Orchestra 3, 4 Orchestra Program 2, 3. 4

JOSEPH HERBERT IMMEL Lightweight Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 Track 2 Orchestra Program 2, 3, 4 Glee Club 4 "The New Bride"

CHAMP THOMPSON Letterman's Club I. 2. 3, Pres. 4 ' Football I , 2, 3; Captain 4 Basketball 2, 3, 4 Track 3, 4 "The Late Christopher Bean"

ESTHER ROBBINS Pres. Jun. High Student Body Class Treasurer 4 Class Secretary 4 G.A.A. President 4 '"The Late Christopher Bean"

14


!lOYAL DEMING Tennis 2. 3, 4 Football 3, 4 Track 2, 3, 4 ..Pinafore" "'Tune In"

EMILY PRICE Secretary Student Body 4 Class President 4 Scribblers 3, 4 Scholarship Society 2, 3: Pres. 4 "Growing Pains"

LUCILE HOPKINS Glee Club 2. 3, 4 Fashion Show 1, 2, 3, 4 G.A.A. 'Pinafore" "Tune In"

DAVID McCONNAUGHEY Wolf Packet 2. Editor 3 El Espiritu 3, 4 Senior High Student Council 3 Scholarship Society 3, 4 Scribblers 3, 4

FREDERICK KUNKLE Letterman's Club 2. 3, 4 Track 2. 3. 4 B�sketball 3. 4 Baseball 2. 3, 4

GERTRUDE METCALF Class Secretary 2 Glee Club 2. 3, 4 Fashion Show 3, 4 "The New Bdde" "Confessional"

HERBERT PHEYSEY Entered '33

TED CURTIS KAYSEN Entered '35 Scribblers 4 Orchestra Program 4 "Confessional"

JACK OLIVER "Pinafore" "Tune In"

15


J

u

N

0

FIRST SEMESTER

R OFFICERS

. President

C

L A

SECOND SEMESTER

Holland Chamness Dwight Bulkley Eloise Bills Alexander McKenna Vice-President . Loudelle Jacobs Richard Strehle Secretary Jack Wiley Treasurer Marion Jones Emerson Hiler Social Chairman Jean Miller Emily Johnson Barbara Laney Student Council Rep.

16

The Junior Class is rapidly progressing toward a lead in school activities and success as a class of Claremont High School. It was somewhat inactive during the first semester but regained momentum by giving a successful barn dance in the girls' gymnasium on February 29, and a ship's dance a few weeks later. On March 5 the play "Wild Hobby-horses" by John Kirkpatrick was produced as a pay assembly, the pro­ ceeds swelling the class fund for the Junior-Senior Reception. @ Great pride was manifested in the emblem sweaters, which were sprung after some amusing maneuvers. @ We had the pleasure of being the first class to experiment in the correlation of United States History and English as a basic course. We found the plan greatly to our advantage. @ Juniors-For­ ward March! Turn neither to the right nor to the left, but keep to the road! ... Halt! Retrospect! Resume your march!

s s


R�vnolds. Robinson \loblc)' Quarles \\'.1hon. Cooper RJymond C �rk, Nance Lincoln. N Jdal. \\'cndt. Cleo Cl,uk. Lake. Daniels. St. Cl.1ir.

\',inderwood Blanchud. Russell. F.iscnbrcy Nichols. Kelley. \\'huncy RichJrd CI Jrk lngr.1m. Booth. Driver. R. Johnson. D.wis, Underwood. 17


s

p

0

H

0

M

0

R

E

OFFICERS SECOND SEMES)"ER FIRST SEMESTER President Bill Richards Judith Page Vice-President Helen Crowell . Virginia Davis Treasurer Barbara Matthews Clark Bradley Recording Secretary Doris Caillier Virginia Pierce Class Secretary Mary Roy Mary Roy W off Packet Reporter Ruth Tabor Carrol Roy Student Council Rep. Carrol Roy . Donald Mead Social Chairman Morton Johnson . Ruth Tabor Four years ago the Class of '38 entered the portals of Clare­ mont High School. True, they entered as lowly seventh graders but it was the first step toward the superior position of Seniors. This past year has been an eventful one for the Sophomore class, sharing Claremont's success in athletics and other school activities. The Class of '38 always stood for good sportsmanship and good fellowship and we hope to live up to this reputation in the future.

I

IN MEMORIAM ToMHITT

I

L. Hall. Lindsay, H. Landreth. Hardy C. Roy. Burbank. Daves. Keast, Tileston. Stys. Page, C. Bradley, B. St. Clair, Mead, M. Roy. Crowell, Colbath. S. Johns, M. Johnson, Richards, R. Clark. Baum, Shotts, Knott, E. Miller, D. Garner, C. Bowman. \Vooten. Oliver. Cai\\iet. B. Reynolds. V. Pierce. B. Do!cater, J. Wheeler. R. Weinberg, D. Peck. Caldwell K. Taylor. Fakler, Bertsch. Teuscher, Matthews, Tabor, Wagner, Gunther, Griffith, Briggs. Gapp. 18

s


F

R

E

FIRST SEMESTER

s

H

OFFICERS

M

N

E

SECOND SEMESTER

President Erwin Cooper Vice-President June Beatty Secretary Janet Davis Treasurer Eunice Raisbeck Chairman Social Billie A. Gillette Louise Van Voorhis Student Council Rep. W off Packet Reporter Richard Pound

Billie A. Gillette Frank Kittinger Oreta Waller Priscilla Chaplin Arthur Tracy Richard Pound Maria Miller

This year has spelled both welcome and farewell to the Class of 1939. It marks probably the greatest change in high school -the end of Junior High, the entrance into certain Senior High activities, the acquaintance of new teachers and new sub­ jects, and the introduction to broader vistas of learning. The responsibility of the Christmas play, "Christm:as Eve" by Seumas O'Brian, was borne almost entirely by the ninth grade. ® As the first semester's get-together, a costume party was given, and the beach party of the secoQ.d semester is always eagerly anticipated. The willingness of the Class of 1939 to assume responsibilities has already been demonstrated. Its members will continue to cooperate with the rest of the school in achieving ends for common benefit. Welch. C. W•agner, Morrison, Hockman, Duddridge, Pound, W. Lake. J. Mobley, Hough. Chaplin, D. Dunn, Raisbeck. J. Robbins. M. Dunn. Van Voorhis, N. Pike, Waller, Beatty. Story, Henard, M. Miller R. Sherman, Cooke. McConnell, Colunga, H. Bradley, Belcher, Sprinkle, Gonzales, Mcrtzke, Tracy. Talbott Guevara. Stedman, Cullen, Duncan, Rugh, Gillette, Tompkins. Cailliet. Davis. D. Stewart.

19


G

H T H

Gerald Baughman Burbank Curtis Genevieve Wood Henry Curme . Emily Ann Ament Martha Vanderwood William Johnson

OFFICERS

G

R A D

. President Vice-President Secretary . Treasurer Social Chairman Junior High Council Rep.•: Sergeant-at-Arms

Hockman, M. Morrison, D. Peck, K. Chidlaw, R. Barnes, G. Baughman, Wheeler, Clark, C. Hall. M. Duddridge, Slaugh­ ter, B. Haynes. R. Allen, R. Bradley, G. Darr, B. Johnson, Campbell, Rankin, Comer, D. Sanders, Yerkes, J. Talbott, R. Greathouse. M. Bulkley, G. Wood, M. Pike, M. Vanderwood, V. Ed­ wards, M. Raisbeck, Strong, W. Clark, J. Whitney, P. Popenoe. L. Mosier, D. Beatty, B. Johns, S. Nance, F. Burbank, H. Curme, Young, F. Russell, C. Gettman. Salazar, Ament, Gutierrez, M. Coldiron, B. Briggs, N. Reed, M. Pierce, D. Johnson.

20


s

E V E N T H

OFFICERS

Betty Greathouse Richa.rd Chidla w George Kewish Harold Duddridge Billy Ordway

G R A D E

. President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms Junior High Council Rep.

Richard Chidlaw, Roy Thompson, Eloise Morrison, Dorothy Steudler, Irene Talbott, Andrew Torrez, Billy Joe Swarts, Hayden Walton, Jean Cleveland, Geneva Haynes, Ann Roberts, Betty Greathouse. Beulah Sanders, Elias Guevara, Homer Scott, Dora Louise Boileau, Cecile Hudson, Josephine D�lcater, Mary Landon, Raymond Guerrero, Elmer Miller. Betty Sue Mobley, Fay Perdew, Billy Ordway, James Carter, Freddie Contreras, Ashley Paul, George Kewish, Harold Duddridge.

21


K

22

WA N

s

C

u

p

The highest honor bestowed upon any student of Claremont High School is the Kiwanis Cup award, made annually to the young man who most nearly conforms to the highest possible standards of sportsmanship, achievement, and character. Last year this award was made to Frans Nelson, student body president, and football captain. In addition to maintaining a very creditable record in academic work, Frans was a main足 stay in the field of sports, making his letter three years in foot足 ball and basketball, and two years in tennis. He was a member of the Letterman's Club for three years and was elected to the presidency as a Junior. As a Senior, he was given an all Tri足 County position in basketball in recognition of his straight, clean, hard-fought game. @ He was also active in school dramatics and music throughout his years in Claremont High School. 速 The school and all with whom Frans came in contact are proud of the fine example of clean sportsmanship and high scholarship which he set, the goal of those of us who follow.


CTIVITIES


I


A N N

u

RICHARD POST

Organizations Editor

S T A F F

A L JOHN R. PIERCE

DAVID McCONNAUGHEY

Editor

Assistant Editor

EMILY PRICE

JEAN VANDERWOOD

Literary Editor

Art Editor

•Sports Editor

Business Manager

Photograph Editor

DONALD MEAD

Advertising Manager

BETTY INGRAM Secretary

Art .. Editor

JOHN DUNN

RICHARD STREHLE

RICHARD CLARK

NILES DAVIS

RICHARD POUND Sales Manager

HOYT LANDRETH Cartoonist

23


w

0 L F

p A C K E T

When school opened on September 16, the students. were greeted by the first issue of the school paper, the Wolf Packet. The new year saw a change in the advisorship of the paper, Mr. Martin succeeding Mrs. Hull as director of the publication. Having been an active student in journalism in college, Mr.. Martin has proved to be an inspiring and capable adviser. ÂŽ Although the bi-weekly paper is a small one, it serves the purpose of keeping the students well informed as to their school activities and gives them an opportunity for expressing themselves. Special features of the paper included Alumni, Gossip, and a column devoted to the literary attempts of the more ambitious students. ÂŽ Jean Helmick, editor in the first semester, and Emily Johnson in the second, have worked hard to make the paper worth while for the students. Although the Wolf Packet is principally a Senior High School project, it reflects the interests of the whole school and it is hoped that the Student Body will continue the undertaking in the future.

J. Helmick, F. Bernard. E. Robbins. A. Miller, D. MacHarg, R. Strehle. J. Dunn. E. Price. E. Johnson. G. Clark, A. Nichols. J. Ballman. R. Whitney, M. Massee, J. Miller. F. Griffith, N. Davis.

24


SCHOLARSHIP SOCl�TY The purpose of the Scholarship Society is to provide not only an added incentive to good work but also a chance for broader education. The group began the year with so few members that they drew straws to decide on the officers: Emily Price, President; Joseph Crutcher, Vice-President; John Pierce, Secretary-Treasurer. As other students discovered themselves eligible, however, the membership increased, and in the second semester was larger than it had been for some time. ® The first semester was marked by an eventful trip to the Exposition at San Diego. The choice was a happy one, and. the all-day excursion threatened to set a precedent. In the Sp�·ing another trip was taken. ® The Chapter sent delegates to the South­ ern California C.S.F. convention of which Emily Price is Secretary. At the end of the year the life members were enter­ tained at a luncheon given by the rest of the group. Officers for the second semester were: Dwight Bulkley, President; Virginia Pierce, Vice-President; Joseph Crutcher, Secretary­ Treasurer. MacHarg. Mr. Forney. J. Pierce. Ra. Clark. Price, V. Pierce, B. St. Clair. McConnaughey. D. Bulkley. Crutcher.

25


G IR L

s

J

L E AG

u

E

The Girls' League this year, as previously, has been one of the most active organizations in the school. The most interesting project undertaken was the annual football banquet which was followed by a dance in the library. Another important event in the life of Claremont High School is the Formal sponsored each year by the Girls' League, this year unique in that it was a leap year dance. This also was held in the library. @ Another interest of the year was the organization developed for the benefit of the new girls who enter school each fall either as seventh graders or as new-comers to Clare-¡ mont. In May a one-act play, "Look Pleasant, Please," was given as a pay assembly. Ž Two conventions of the Girls' League of Southern California are held each year. Claremont High School was represented at the Fall Convention in San Diego. In the Spring a convention was held at Huntington Beach. This was the social session of the year and the day was devoted largely to swimming and other sports. Frances Bernard, President, and Jean Helmick, Vice-President, were delegates. Other officers for the year were Secretary, Alice Miller. and Treasurer, Emily Johnson. 26


s

C

R

B B L

R

s

Pegasus is way up there; I am way down here; It must suffice to catch a hair That happens to fall near. I only write of sunsets Of the vivid evening skies. To tell the truth, I sleep too late To see the sun arise. Scribblers is a carefree organization made up of students inter� ested in creative writing. They meet twice monthly at the home of a member, and their contributions are read anony� mously. Then they are open to criticism. This is the most interesting part of Scribblers. Each member wonders how the others will interpret his work, hoping that they will laugh at his humor, appreciate his tragedy, or perhaps be shocked. ® The members are grateful to Scribblers' mothers, who have so added to the enjoyment of the meetings by their gracious hospitality. Post, Chamness, Price, Robinson, Laney. Strehle, Kaysen. Page. McConnaughey.

27


S�NIOR HIGH STUD�NT COUNCIL The Senior High Student Council, organized in 1932, feels that, with the hearty cooperation of the Student Body, this year has been well spent in furthering the cause for which it was established, student participation in school government. ® The organization is composed of the executive officers of the Student Body, together with the president and an addition­ al representative of each class. The editor of the Wolf Packet is also a member. Officers of the council for the first semester and second semester were presidents: Joe Crutcher and Jean Miller; vice-presidents, Jean Miller and David M·acHarg, and secretaries, Emily Price and Judith Page. ® In the meetings, which are held the second and fourth Tuesday of each month, the problems of the students are brought up and taken care of to the best of the council's ability. ® It is the hope of the organization that the Council will improve as much in the years to come as it has developed in its first four years of exist­ ence, and that it will become possible to do those•things here­ tofore unaccomplished.

28

J. Lincoln. C. Thompson, D. Mead, C. Roy, H. Chamness, E. Johnson, D. Bulkley, J. Helmick. B. Laney. B. Richards. J. Pierce, J. Page. J. Crutcher. Dr. Thompson. J. Miller. E. Price. D. MacHarg.


JUNIOR HIGH

STUDENT COUNCIL

The Junior High Student Council which has successfully completed its fifth year of service is made up of the Junior High Executive Board together with the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade presidents, and representatives from each grade. At the beginning of the school year the following officers were chosen: .Arthur Tracy, president; Janet Robbins, vice-presi足 dent: and Maria Miller, secretary. 速 Beside the discussion of immediate school problems, this Council also engages in char足 itable activities. It successfully sponsored the Red Cross drive in the Junior High School, and filled the Christmas boxes for the poor. It was also in charge at Thanksgiving time of boxes which were given to the various charitable organizations in the valley and distributed by them to the n_eedy. The Christ足 mas play, presented each year by the Junior High as its chief contribution to the student body as a whole, was sponsored by the Council. @ We feel that this organization is very worthwhile and we hope it will continue in proportion to its success in the past five years. Tracy. Pound, Vanderwood, Duncan, Ordway, Baughman. Van Voorhis, Cooper, B. Greathouse. M. Bui kley. M. Miller, Robbins.

29


s

T A

G

C R

w

E

The stage crew started the year under new direction, Mr.

Charles Arrington being faculty sponsor for this activity. The first event of interest on the schedule was a trip to the Cali足

fornia Exposition at San Diego, where a special display of

lighting was studied. Some of the devices exhibited have been tried out and have proven practical and effective.

The

major projects of the crew have been the sets for the Student

Body Play, "The Late Christopher Bean," and the Orchestra Program, "Carnival on High C." In the latter the deck of a

passenger ship served as the setting for the evening's action. Lighting and sets for five one-act plays were provided.

Early in the year all of the old sets were recovered with new canvas and some other effective improvements in equipment

and arrangements were made. A visit to the California lnsti足 tute of Technology stage craft department is anticipated. Wiley. Lincoln. H. Bradley. Reynolds, Chamness. Mr. Arrington.

30


R A D

0

C

L

u

B

The Radio Club is a new organization in Claremont High School, having been in existence only this school year. Quite naturally the membership is small, which is an apparent ad­ vantage. Care has been taken to include members from as many grades as possible, to insure continuation of the club when members leave it through graduation. ® The first pro­ ject of the club was the construction from basic parts of a modern all-wave radio to be used in the Physics department. This has been completed and others will be undertaken. The club is also able to make itself useful about the school attend­ ing to odd jobs where electrical apparatus and radio are in­ volved. At the end of the school year a demonstration by the club is contemplated. ® The group has been assigned a small room in which are facilities for radio work. Meetings are also held in this room, which adjoins the Chemistry Laboratory, generally during a free period or after school hours. R. Peck, Post, Mr. Arrington, C. Bradley (absent-D. Peck).

31


GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The Girls' Athletic Association has been very active since it was established. The purpose of the organization is to pro­ mote sportsmanship, cooperation, and physical well-being among the girls. 0 To become a member, fifty points must have been acquired, which means that a girl must have made at least one team. An initiation is held at the end of the hockey season, in conjunction with a spread, which is held after every sport. When a girl has earned five hundred points she receives a letter, and for a thousand points, a pin. ® This year "after school sports'' were held twice a week. In the course of the year five sports-basketball, hockey, speedball, tennis, and baseball-were taken up. At the end of each season a Tri­ County League Play Day was held. This year, because several new schools were added to the League, it was not possible for all the schools to meet at one place, and so two play days were held. ® The Claremont girls had an outstanding year but they were particularly successful in hockey which was their home play day sport. The hockey team was under the manage­ ment of Jane Fakler this year. The managers for the other sports were: Carol Libbey, basketball; Alice Miller, speedball; Helen Stys, baseball; and Niles Davis, tennis. H. Stys. Fakler. Crowell. Robbins. A. Miller. N. Davis. E. Johnson.

32


LETTERMAN'S

CLUB

The Letterman's Club of 1936, with Champ Thompson as president and Joseph Crutcher as secretary, was composed of a fine, energetic group of boys, whose activities were outstand足 ing in all branches of athletics. The association started the year with a large project before them. In previous years the club had awarded sweaters to athletes winning three major letters in a single sport. This year, the group_ found that twice the usual number would be required for this purpose. @ To increase their revenue the boys set to work to construct a fence around the athletic field, and aided by Teuscher and Lake, as mounted guards, admitted only those who purchased tickets to the games. Later an exceptionally successful carnival was made possible by the efforts of the group. @ As a climax to the year's activities the club made its annual trip to the beach where new members were formally initiated. Those receiving honor sweaters for four years were: Steudler, Thompson, Swoveland, Crutcher, Massee; for three years: Libbey, Dem足 ing. Nicholl. Kunkle, MacHarg; for two years: Ramsay, Bre足 haut. Morrison. Pierce, Stys. Teuscher, St. Clair. Lake. MacHarg, Thompson, Mobley. Mr. Martin, Walton. Swoveland. Nicholl. Crutcher, Steudler, Kunkle, Deming. Blanch足 ard. Hiler. Holtz. Massee, Brehaut, Ramsay, Bradley. Coldiron. Kelley.

33


S E N

0R

ORCHESTRA

The Senior Orchestra, consisting of twenty-six instruments, has had a very satisfactory year under the direction of Mrs. Howe. The first public appearance was made on the occasion of the American Legion program during Public School Week, and later in the fall music was furnished for the Student Body Play. ® In January the two orchestras presented a very interesting program, "Carnival On High C." The Ship's Orchestra, in distinctive costumes, was so popular that follow­ ing this event it appeared by request on a number of programs in the community. ® The Music Festival, which was held late in April. was the work of the combined chorus and orches­ tra. Here the orchestras made a very valuable contribution to the evening's entertainment. Later appearances were on the occasion of the Senior Play Program and Commencement. ® Those receiving orchestra pins were: Helen Stys, Gertrude Metcalf, Alice Miller, Joseph Crutcher, John Pierce, Joe Immel, Raymond Holtz. Dolcater, J. Pierce, Lincoln, Mrs. Howe, Bertsch, Holtz. Mead, Bulkley. A. Miller, R. Johnson, Bills. Knott. Chamness, C. Bradley, R. Whitney, H. Stys, Metcalf, Crowell, Fakler, Munn, Immel.

34


ORCH�STRA The Junior High School Orchestra has had an unusually large membership, finishing the year with an aggregation of forty­ five players. Throughout the year they have furnished excel­ lent music for assemblies and other special programs such as the Christmas play. ® In the annual Orchestra Program this organization presented several numbers. A violin ensemble and a string trio, chosen from its members, took part in the "Carnival in High C." These special groups have made several other appearances both in assemblies and on the programs of other organizations. The year has been a very successful one. Chaplin, E. Morrison, Tracy, Comer, Baughman. Mrs. Howe, Wheeler. J. Talbott. B. Johns. Curme, Barnes. Mosier. R. Bradley, Ament, Duncan, Pound, Beatty, Strong. Chidlaw. I. Talbott. D. Johnson. D. Beatty. K. Chidlaw. D. Stewart, D. Steudler, Welch, Campbell, Van Voorhis. Edwards. Rugh. Cullen, J. Whitney, Popenoe, Wood, Ordway, Gutierrez, Reed, Mobley. 35


THE LATE CHRISTOPHER BEAN· By How ARD

SIDNEY

Friday Evening November 8, 1935 Dr. Haggett Susan Haggett Abby Mrs. Haggett Ada Haggett Warren Creamer Tallant Rosen . Davenport

THE CAST

Champ Thompson Jean Vanderwood Barbara Laney Esther Robbins Jean Helmick Stephen Kelley John Reid Pierce . Donald Libbey . David MacHarg

Music by the High School Orchestra under the direction of Mrs. Minnie M. Howe. THE STAFF

Business Manager Advertising Manager Property Managers Stage Manager Assistants Bookholders Stage Construction Sta�e Decoration Makeup General Direction 36

Jean Miller Alexander McKenna Grace Clark, Alice Miller Robert Reynolds Holland Chamness. Jack Wiley, John Lincoln, Morton Johnson Emily Price, Cleo Clark ·Mr. C. A. Arrington Miss Grace Eschelbach Mr. Stanley Larson Mrs. Cornelia K. Hull


ORCHESTRA

PROGR AM

PART I

La Rosita Blue Waves Waltz Plantation Echoes

Flores arr. by De Lamater arr. by De Lamater

JUNIOR ORCHESTRA

The Talisman Overture Faust Selections

Brockton Gounod

SENIOR ORCHESTRA PART II

Captain First Officer Steward Miss Smith Betty Lou Irene Miriam Sara Tom Jack Jim

A CARNIVAL ON HIGH "C" Holland Chamness Dwight Bulkley Arthur Tracy Alice Miller M�ry Bertsch Helen Crowell Jane Fakler Gertrude Metcalf John Reid Pierce Joe Immel Ray Holtz

Ship's Orchestra: Joseph Crutcher. John Reid Pierce, Roger Johnson. Charles Bowman.

Clark Bradley, Frank Knott, Ray Holtz, John Lincoln. Joe Immel, Eloise Bills. @ Nautical Ji/ls; Tap Dancers: Ruth Whitney and Jean Whitney. @ Tri-Sails String Trio: Laurence Mosier, Henry Curme, Mary Bertsch. Stowaways: Morton Johnson, Dana Booth. Max Massee, John Dunn. @ Vagabonds: Stanton Baum, James St. Clair, John Lincoln, Laurence Mosier. @ Two Pianos: Mary Bertsch and Alice Miller. @ Tapping Barnacles: Dorothy Duncan, Louise Van Voorhis. @ Bow­ sprites-Violin Ensemble: Clark Bradley, Frank Knott, Don Mead. Helen Crowell. Jane Fakler. Gertrude Metcalf. Marie Welch. Richard Pound, Frances Griffith. @ Rollicking Rovers. Trumpet Trio: Roger Johnson, Charles Bowm1n, Don Mead.

37


C

L

G

L

u

B

It has been customary each year to select groups of boys and

of girls from the advanced chorus to form the glee clubs. This

year the numbers have been increased to form larger groups than previously.

ÂŽ

Under the capable leadership of Miss

Rye, these organizations have worked diligently during the

year. They made their first appearance at the Armistice Day

Program on November 13. Other appearances of the groups

have been made throughout the year.

Tracy, Immel. \V. Tabor, Baum. C. Bradley. R. Johnson, J. St. Clair, Hiler. McCon­ naughey, J. Dunn, Chamness. Pound, Holtz, M. Johnson. Crowell. V. Pierce, B. St. Clair, J. Miller. Qua des, Booth, Bernard. Busby. Tileston, E. Miller, Golbath. R. Tabor, Griffith. Ballman. M. Wagner, C. Clark. Daniels, Nance. D. Peck. A. Nichols, Gunther. Metcalf, Ridgway. Whitney. Helmick. F. Cooper. A. Miller, G. Clark, Jones, Hopkins.

38

s


SPECIAL

ACTIVITIES

Junior High Christmas Play ''CHRISTMAS EVE'' By SEUMAS O'BRIEN

Mrs. Mulvaney Maureen Cassidy Peter Kenny Mrs. Kenny Michael Bernard Mulvaney

December 20, 193 5 CAST

Velma Tompkins Dora Louise Boileau Richard Whiteside Richard Pound Janet Davis Arthur Tracy Willis Lake

JUNIOR PLAY

"WILD HOBBY HORSES" By JOHN KIRKPATRICK

Mr. Carewe Mrs. Carewe Nurse Torrance Donald Arthur Anne Martin Emma

March 5, 1936 CAST

Raymond Clark Niles Davis Cleo Clark Burton· Blanchard John Lincoln Marion Jones Emily Johnson

GIRLS' LEAGUE PLAY

"LOOK PLEASANT, PLEASE" By CORNELIA K. HULL

May 14, 1936 CAST

Peggy Lee Dora March Miss Francon Merna Larry Mrs. Gordon Randolph Hunt Sarah Marie Hunt Leslie Freeman

Margaret Briggs Ruth Whitney Lucile Hopkins Frances Griffith Niles Davis Betty Jane Gapp Ellen Miller 39


SENIOR PLAYS

"MURDER IN HOLLYWOOD" By WILBUR BRAUN

Merle Young Ella Jumps Mona Heartburn Greta Joy Alice Smith Clinton Vale Nick Johnson Fox E. Keane

May 22, 1936 CAST

Esther Robbins Jean Helmick Maxine Ridgway Frances Bernard Emily Price John Dunn Joe Immel John Reid Pierce

''CONFESSIONAL'' By PERCIVAL WILDE

Martha Baldwin Eve Baldwin John Gresham Baldwin Robert Baldwin Maid Marshall

CAST

Alice Miller Gertrude Metcalf Ted Kaysen David MacHarg Muriel Wheeler Champ Thompson

SATURDAY FIELD TRIPS During the second semester Mr. Forney, Mr. Arrington, and Mr. Booth conducted trips on Saturdays to points of interest in Los Angeles County. These excursions were open to Jun­ iors and Sophomores. About twenty from each class were taken in the school bus once a month. Everyone participating in the excursions found them interesting and worthwhile. ® The places visited were: Cudahy Meat Packing Plant­ February 8; National Schools, Exposition Park-March 14; California Institute of Technology-April 14; Planetarium -May 16. ANNUAL FASHION SHOW In May the annual Fashion Show was given by the girls of the Sewing and Physical Education Departments before an appreciative audience of other girls and many mothers. In groups and singly, the girls modeled an array of good-looking clothes from pajamas to suits and dresses.' Graceful dances added beauty and interest to the program. 40


---THLETICS


,


VARSITY

FOOTBALL

"In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is hit the line hard, don't foul and don't shirk, but hit the line hard." -Theodore Roosevelt. ® On the west wall of the boys' locker room this motto confronts the student. It was placed there by Coach Lyle Martin soon after the building was occu­ pied, and it embodies the principle of his coaching-a good, clean, �ard game, and may the best team win. ® For twelve years Claremont has watched the Tri-County League Foot­ ball Championship go to the other larger schools of the League, and yet each September has seen the football squad start out with renewed determination to win if good sports­ manship and hard, persistent effort could win. This year the splendid coaching of Lyle Martin and the fine, cooperative, fighting spirit of the team under Captain Champ Thompson succeeded, and Claremont, the smallest high school in the League, won the championship. All Claremont was proud. The service clubs, Kiwanis and Rotarian, joined in presenting to each player on the team a gold football in recognition, not only of the winning of the championship, but of the fine spirit he had shown. The football season of 1935 was a memor­ able one. Coach Martin, Blanchard, Mobley, Stys, Pierce. Hiler, St. Clair. Steudler. Kelley, Nicholl, Swoveland, Thompson, Coldiron, Hall, Brehaut. Deming, Bradley, Walton, Holtz, Ramsay.

41


CORONA

CLAREMONT 19-CORONA 7

Claremont High School Wolfpack won its opening football tilt in the Tri-County League, by defeating the Circle City eleven 19 to 7. ® At the opening of the first quarter neither team was able to penetrate the other's line, but the second quarter found Claremont leading by a margin of 6-0. Claremont again scored in the third canto, increasing its margin to two touchdowns. Steudler opened the fourth quar­ ter by intercepting a pass intended for Captain England of Corona, to score, giving the Wolfpack a still larger margin of 19-0. Corona took advantage of its only chance to score in this quarter when the Wolves fumbled on their own ten-yard line. The game ended with the score 19-7 in favor of Clare­ mont.

°

DOWNEY

CLAREMONT 7-DOWNEY 6

Claremont's second Tri-County League game was at Dow­ ney. It was a hard-fought struggle for both teams. 0 The Wolfpack scored first in the second quartei:. They started a steady drive down the field which was halted on the six-yard line. The team having beep. penalized to the eleven, Steudler took the ball to the six, and on the fourth down threw a pass to Joe Crutcher in the end zone to score. Steudler also kicked the placement for the extra p;int which soon became the slim Coach Lee William's margin of victory for Claremont. Vikings returned in the third to score. Starting on Claremont's forty-five-yard marker, three passes put them on the Wolf­ pack four-yard stripe from which Captain Parslow scored. Their try for the extra point was a line plunge which was halted by Captain Champ Thompson with only inches to spare. The score was still deadlocked 7-6 in favor of the Wolves as the final gun sounded ending the game.

°

Capt. Thompson, Deming. Brehaut, St.eudler. Massee.

42


CHINO

CLAREMONT 1 2-CHINO 6

By scoring in both the second and fourth quarters. th2 Clare­ mont High School Wolfpack defeated Coach Otis Brooks' Chino Cowboys 12-6 for their third straight victory. Both teams showed fight and played a great game. ® The first quarter ended with neith_er team scoring. The Wolfpack opened the second by Steudler's passing to Deming, who ran twenty-four yards for a touchdown. Thus the half ended 6-0 in favor of the Wolves. The Chino Cowboys came back in the third to tie the score from a blocked kick. ® In the fourth quarter Claremont, with the determination to win, started its final march to victory. With the ball in the hands of the Cowboys, one of their aerial attacks was intercepted on their twenty-nine yard line. The Wolfpack then opened another aerial attack with a pass, completed on the five-yard line. Steudler then took the ball over center to score. His place-kick for the conversion was wide, as the game ended. BONITA

CLAREMONT 3-BONIT A 0

On the afternoon of November 15, 1935, Claremont jour­ neyed to La Verne to meet a still undefeated Bearcat eleven. On this occasion the Wolfpack not only defeated the Bear­ cats but also broke the jinx that has held the Wolves for thirteen straight years. To give any individual players the credit for the game would be unfair, because the entire team played consistently throughout. There was cooperation from every member of the team. ® The first half found neither team penetrating the other's fifteen-yard line. with both teams doing considerable kicking. 0 Opening the second half, Blanchard blocked a Bonita punt and Swoveland recovered. Then the Wolves marched down to the Bonita fifteen where Nicholl, realizing that the Bearcats might hold them, gambled Ramsay, Holtz, Nicholl, Swovel�nd, Pierce.


on a place-kick by Steudler from the Bonita twenty-nine yard line. To the frantic cheers of the crowd the ball sailed between the goal posts. With four minutes left to go, Bonita opened up an aerial attack which took the Bearcats from their fifteen to the Claremont twenty-five. The last-minute thrust failed when the pass fell incomplete in the end zone and the gun sounded. PUENTE

CLAREMONT 20-PUENTE 6

With the Tri-County League championship within reach, Claremont entered its last game determined to win. However, neither teiim was able to score in the first quarter. Opening the second canto, Peterson, Puente fullback, intercepted one of Claremont's many aerial attempts and ran forty yards down the sideline for a touchdown. Their attempt to convert failed. ® To open the third quarter the Wolves kicked to the Dons, who fumbled, and Claremont recovered on Puente's fourteen-yard marker. In four downs Claremont made seven points. Three plays later Fred Steudler inte.rcepted Serrano's pass and scored from Puente's forty-yard line. The conver­ sion was also good. For the final six points, Steudler broke loose to run forty-five yards for a touchdown. ® The fourth quarter was like the first, neither team being able to penetrate far into the other's territory. Thus Claremont High School defeated Puente to win its second Tri-County League cham­ pionship in school history. S.C.I.F. PLAYOFF

Ending a most successful season, which brought them the championship, the Wolfpack entered the S.C.I.F. playoffs against the Southem California Military Academy of Long Beach. This game was a good battle for both teams, with Claremont holding the lead at halftime 7 to 0. ® In the second half Claremont revealed its strength, beginning a steady drive which resulted in three touchdowns, making the score 28 to 0. This brought to a close the 193 5 football season with Claremont in possession not only of the Tri-County League championship but also of the S.C.I.F. championship in the minor division.

44


EVER ON As long as San Antonio Rears crowned head on high, And with a courage born of years, Stands forth to meet the sky, Fling wi-0e the colors of your heart, The flaming red and gray, And keep them with the souls of Spartans Fast from shame alway. CHORUS:

So on, on, on, to win for thee, And if not victory, to breast defeat. Claremont, yours our loyalty, Yours a spirit none can meet, Ours the task to foes defy, Ours the will to ever cry, On, on, on, though strength be gone, gone, gone, For Claremont ever on. As long as there is left a breath, To speak for Claremont's name, Till only spirit's very death Make deeds proclaim her fame, Cry loud the name of Claremont High, Voice loyalty in praise, Till courage flushes every eye, And spirit carries days. So Claremont, heart and hand to thee, When from thee we are sent, An eternal thing our loyalty, Forever still unspent. May Claremont ever loved be, Defended till the end, Till e'en her proudest enemy Her spirit shall commend. -KATHRYN JOHNSON,

1933 45


LIGHTWEIGHT

FOOTBALL

Football season opened this fall with fourteen players in suits. Under the leadership of Coach Orville Thomason, the light足 weight boys won two practice games, tied one and lost one. They defeated Victorville 12 to 0, Cal-Prep 19 to 13, tied Fremont 12 all, and lost to Emerson 6 to 0. In league compe足 tition the team fa_iled to click in spite of consistent effort. In their third game, which was with Chino, Claremont scored in the second quarter but failed to hold this lead as their oppo足 nents started a march to the goal which was not to be stopped. This was the first time in two years that Chino, who, incident足 ally, won the championship in the lightweight division, had been scored upon in league competition. Outstanding for Claremont were George Walton, fullback; Richard Strehle, end and halfback; and John Lincoln, halfback. Credit must also go to the boys in the line who did their share so that the backfield could score their touchdowns. Corona ______________________20 Claremont Downey ____________________ 6 Claremont Claremont Chino ________________________ 13 Bonita ________________________21 Claremont Forfeited to Puente

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

Tracy, H. Bradley, Knott, Lincoln. Baughman, Baum, Clark, Rankin. Guevara, Young, Garner, Comer, B. Johnson, Beatty. Duddridge. 46

0 0 7 7


VARSITY

B A S K � T B A L L

In starting practice this year, the Wolfpack Varsity bad more than two teams reporting, six men of which were lettermen. Their first league encounter was against the unknown Citrus boys. Under Captain Robert Nicholl the Wolves won easily 44 to 19. The strong Corona five was likewise defeated in the second game 28 to 21. Downey next encountered the Wolves and after leading most of the game Claremont lost 3 5 to 28. Chino, playing a very consistent ball throughout, won easily from the Pack, which was not bitting its stride, by a score of 31 to 21. Bonita's league champions next easily defeated the Wolves 41 to 20. A much improved Claremont.- team jour­ neyed to Puente the next week, defeating the Dons 40 to 28. In their final game with Colton, the W�lfpack had the ball consistently rolling in and out of the hoop, defeating them 40 to 28. In the Tournament, Claremont again defeated Cit­ rus 44 to 21, but lost to Chino the following day 56 to 22. The Varsity finished the season having won seventeen games and having lost nine. Coach Martin. Hiler, Crutcher. Steudler, Thompson, Massee, Swoveland. Kunkle, Blanchard. R. Johnson, Libbey, Captain Nicholl.

47


Captain Brehaut (insert), Coach Thomason. Hall, Eisenbrey. Holtz, Dunn. C. Bradley, Bulkley, Immel. E. L. Hall.

Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont

Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont

29

13

21

13

"B" BASKETBALL ____ Citrus 31 Claremont 28 __ Bonita 30 - Corona 14 Claremont 25 __ Pue11,te 29 _ Downey 16 Claremont 31 _ Colton 29 _ __ Chino 30

"C" BASKETBALL ______________________2 0 Citrus ________________________ _} 2 ______________________ l 2 Corona __________________________28 ______________________ l O Downey ________________________ 3 0 ______________________ l O Chino __________ _________________22 Bonita ________ _________________ l 3 ______ _______________ 9 ______________________ 12 Puente _________________________ 41 Colton _________________________ l 9 ______________________ 9

Knott, forward: J. Mobley, center: Tracy, guard; Hough, guard: Garner, forward.

48

•


Johns. Strehle, H. Bradley. M. Johnson. Shotts. Palmer, Bowman.

''D'' BASKETBALL ______________________18 Citrus ___________ ___________ _____ 22 ________ ___ _ ____ 24 Cotona .. . .... ___ _ __ _ ___ 10 ··········------ 20 Downey __________________________ 21 ______ _____ _________ l 0 Chino ___ _______ _____ ______ _ 12 ______________ __ _ __13 Bonita _ . ________ ___________ . 20 ____________ _________ l 3 Puente ---· __ ·----- __ __ ___ _____ 23 ______ ···---- ___ 18 Colton _ 9 "X" TRACK 50 yard. Time 5.8 ___ ___ _________________________ Walton (1st) 100 yd. Time 10.6 ... . . Walton (1st) 330 yd. Time 39.2 ____ ___________ ____________________ Bradley ( 4th) High Jump 5'7 ¼" _______ _____ ___________________ Sprinkle (3rd) Broad Jump 20'7"__________ . _____ ______________Walton (1st) Relay. 46.4______________________________________________ .Claremont (2nd) Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont

Walton. Garner. Strehle. Johnson. Landreth. Whiteside, Pound. H. Bradley, Knott. C. Bradley. R. Clark. Duddridge. D. Lake.

49


VARSITY

TRAC K

This year's track team proved very successful in league com­ petition, making a fine record in the Tri-County. Claremont was defeated in only one practice meet. They lost their last league meet to Puente, 55-49. The first meet, with Downey, they won by a large margin, 68 2/3-24 1/3. In the second Chino was taken easily, 54-36. Nicholl was high scorer for the Wolves, with a total of 44 ½ points. In the Tri-County League meet he broke two League records, the quarter mile and the broad jump. This qualified him for the Southern California meet at Long Beach where he took second in the 440 and third in the broad jump. In the California State Meet at Gridley he again took second in the 440. ® Others placing in the Tri-County League meet were: Deming, first in the pole vault; Blanchard. second in the half mile; Strehle, tied for second in the high jump; Kunkle, third in the mile, Thompson, third in the shot put; and Massee, fourth in the shot put. The relay team placed third in the meet. In the total scores Claremont was barely nosed out py Corona. 33-31. Walton, Brehaut, Landreth, Nicholl, Blanchard, Strehle, Ramsay, Kunkle, Thomp­ son, Massee, Crutcher. R. Peck, Teuscher. Hiler. Coach Martin.

50


VARSITY

BASEBALL

Claremont opened its 193 6 baseball season with seven return­ ing lettermen reporting for duty. The Wolfpack started off on the right foot to ':Vin one of its initial practice games 3-2 against a strong California Junior Republic nine at Chino. 0 On April 24 the Wolves opened their league schedule with Corona invading Clarem9.nt and defeating the hosts 14-4 in a seven-inning game. 0 Traveling to Downey for their sec­ ond game, the Wolves again met defeat at the h,mds of the Downey Vikings. In this game the Claremont Wolfpack opened the first inning to score three runs. However, Dow­ ney came to bat in the last part of the first inning to tie the score at three all. Downey continued scoring runs inning by inning and was able to build up a lead which was not threat­ ened througho�t. Claremont started a rally in the sixth but failed to tally a score, the final outcome being 10-3 in favor of Downey. Games still to be played by the Varsity are Citrus, Chino, Bonita, Puente, and Colton. Coach Martin, Mobley, Ramsay, Coldiron, Dunn, Swoveland. Morrison. Holtz. Pound. Nicholl, Massee.

51


JUNIOR VARSITY

BAS�BALL

For the first time Claremont has had a Junior Varsity baseball team; that is, a team consisting of eligible ninth and tenth graders who are not capable of making the Varsity team. Fourteen fellows reported to the call of Coach Martin and donned suits ready for duty. Working out with the Varsity boys, the Junior Varsity was made ready for its first league encounter scheduled for April 23. Claremont journeyed to Corona for this game which was lost to the Circle City Junior Varsity by a large score. Coming to Claremont as their second league opponent was a strong Downey nine which went home victorious over the Claremont boys. Most of the fellows on this team have never played baseball l?efore and are showing �oach Martin the material which i,s on its way to the Varsity 9e_rth. Games still to be played as the Annual goes to press are: Citrus, Chino, Bonita, Puente and Colton. Hardy. Shotts, Whiteside, H. Bradley. Knott. Hough, Duddridge. Baum. Garner. Landreth. Richards, M. Johnson, Strehle, Johns.

52


VARSITY

T�NNIS

When Coach Martin called for practice for his 193 6 tennis team, four lettermen reported for duty. They were Royal Deming, Max Massee, David MacHarg and Joe Crutcher. ® After much experimenting, the four positions made vacant by last year's graduation were fill�d by newcomers: Dwight Bulkley, Arthur Tracy, Robert Nicholl and Burton Blan­ chard. ® Claremont High broke even in its first two league matches. In their initial contes( they were defeated by the Corona netters 6-19. The following week the Wolfpack came back to make a clean sweep of the Downey_ squad by a 23-2 score. ® Opening the season, Joe Crutcher played first singles, with David MacHarg following at second singles, and Dwight Bulkley and Arthur Tracy bringing up as third and fourth singles respectively. First doubl�s were composed of Royal Deming and Max Massee, while Robert Nicholl and Burton Blanchard were secopd doubles. Games still to be played this season are: Citrus, Chino, Bonita, Puente, and Colton. Coach Martin. Blanchard, Massee, Crutcher, Hiler, MacHarg. Bulkley. Nicholl, Deming, Tracy.

53


G

R LS

I

T E N N IS

The Claremont girls' tennis squad lost their. first league en­ counter with the strong Corona team, April 24, when the Circle City team trimmed the locals, 25-0. Captain Niles Davis played first singles against Corona. In their second con­ test, with Downey, the Claremont netters were again defeated, as the Downey girls took the match, winning easily, 25-0. After some experimenting, Miss Anderson sent the following team against Downey: Jean Driver led the netters at first singles with Grace Clark in second singles, and Emily Johnson and Jean Vanderwood playing in third and fourth singles. Ellen Miller and Jane Fakler composed the first doubles team with Captain Niles Davis and Janet Davis playing in the second doubles position. The following games remain to be played before the close of the season: Citrus, Chino, Bonita. Puente, and Colton. J. Davis, E. Miller, J. Vanderwood, G. Clark. J. Miller, N. Davis, E. Joh:ison, Driver, Pierce, Fakler.

54


I


GOLD For six years Ed Ruxton had roamed the plains of Arizona. He had farmed, teamed, staged, punched cattle and worked as a day laborer in the mines. For the most part his wages had been good and his friends true. He had, it seemed, no reason for his discontent­ ment. Yet from the time he had left his home in the East there had been this feverish thirst for something-gold, he thought-but no, it wasn't gold. And even if he had a fortune he wouldn't keep it long. He saw no reason why he should. Perhaps, as he said, it was just that he liked the excitement of being right up against the earth, trying to coax her gold away, to scatter it. But whatever the urge was, it was irresistible. He felt that another of those endless night shifts in the mines would be unendurable.

Ed had worked hard. He neither drank nor gambled nor squan­ dered his money in other ways. His six years of hard work had yielded him a savings of three hundred dollars, enough to fit him out with a crack prospecting outfit.

So he set out one morning, just as -the sun was coming up over the Buttes. With his burros, his rifle, canteen, and prospector's pick, and about thirty dollars in cash, he was headed for the Huachuca Moun­ tains, where he intended to prospect.

Eight days of toil across the burning desert, and Ed was behind the first range of the Huachuca, ready to pitch his permanent camp. He chose a cave under an overhanging ledge, out of range of the blazing desert sun. The entire region was infested with Apache Indians, so every evening, about nightfall, he tied his burros at the mouth of the cave. In this way none could enter without disturbing the animals, thus warning him of their approach.

For months be lived there, alone in the mountains, seeing no white man, save a few desert-hardened old prospectors. Even they were few and far between. Then, just at sundown one evening a scouting party passed. There was a girl with them,. the first white woman Ed had seen for months. She seemed to him· very beautiful.

The days dragged on as Ed started out hopefully each morning with his pick, canteen, and rifle, only to retl!rn at night tired, almost despairing in his fruitless search. One evening, however, he returned with some samples that did look promising. The ore was available in seemingly unlimited quan­ tities. Ed was greatly excited. He was sure he had made his great strike. Early the next morning he started across the desert for Tucson, and the assayer's office, with his best samples in a bag strapped securely to his shoulders. In his haste it was necessary for him to leave his tent and most of his provisions inside the mouth of his cave,

55


with only the unwritten law of the desert as security for their safe­ keeping. At noon of the second day he was entering the door of the assayer's office. "Howdy, Ed," greeted Dick Gird, the assayer. "Got some samples?" "Yeah." The furnace was still hot, so Gird pulped a piece of the ore and "put it through." 'TU have a report for you in ten minutes, Ed." ''I'll wait." The ore had "gone through." The assayer was checking his table. "Ed, these samples assay about fifteen dollars to the ton. In plain language, these rocks are practically worthless." "I-I'll be going." Ed stumbled toward the door. "Where are you going, Ed?" 'Tm going back. I've found nothing so far, but I will find some­ thing some day." It was late the next afternoon when Ed arrived at his cave. Imme­ diately upon entering he was conscious of another presence in the cave. A voice spoke. It was the sound of a young woman, and Ed's heart thrilled at the sound. She was telling him now, how her father had headed the scouting party that had passed Ed's cave only two weeks before. She was relating how the Indians had attacked their camp only two nights since; how her father had led her to safety behind a great rock, from whence she had seen him fall with an arrow through his heart, as_ he turned again to the aid of his men. Finally she told him how she had discovered that she alone survived, and how, in her extremity, she had dragged herself the endless miles back to Ed's cave in search of food and shelter, only to find it apparently deserted. Ed offered his few quiet words of sympathy and was off to the spring after water for the evening meal. He returned just as the sun sent its last lingering rays into the canyon from between the two rugged peaks to the west. The mountains dropped their shadows across the face of the girl who waited at the mouth of the cave. Now Ed caught her trusting gaze. He looked into her eyes long, and deeply. He knew that his search was at an end at last. Ed Ruxton had found his "gold." James St. Clair, '3 7

56

'\


DEFEAT

The night of December third was known for the worst storm in twenty-five years. Travelers, who were fortunate enough to find cover, told of their harrowing experiences from the blizzard which raged up and down the McKenzie River.The thermometer dropped rapidly from ten degrees below zero to fifty-three below.Old King Winter had the Northlands fairly in his grasp and was striving to tear everything down before him.The great trees groaned and bent beneath his icy blast. In a snug little one-room cabin, seemingly lost in the great wilder足 ness of the north, four men sat around a roaring, crackling fire. "Old 'Kananka' is sure blustering through his whiskers tonight. He sounds as if someone had stepped on his toe." "Well. this is one fire he won't get." "Oh, I don't know.We haven't much meat left, only enough for tomorrow, and our wood is running low.If this storm doesn't let up by tomorrow one of us will have to get wood, and two others, meat. It's best for two of us to go together. There's less chance of accident. I'll go for the meat. Who wants to go with me?" All three men voiced their eagerness to go. "We'll draw straws.The one who gets the shortest straw will stay to watch the fire. After we draw, we'll see that the dogs are all right and turn in." The next morning the storm was as bad as ever.Having finished breakfast, the three men set out; the man who was to get the wood, with the sled and dogs. In a few hours the man returned with his sled piled high with wood. "By gar! Me deeg down t'rough snow.Find plentee wood." About noon the other two staggered up to the cabin and fell against the door, exhausted.They were carried inside and warmed by the fire.As soon as they were able to talk they told their experiences in short. clipped sentences. "No luck. Couldn't see anything if you stepped on it ...The storm almost got us." Several days later the men were mere gaunt shadows of them足 selves and were getting weaker as the storm ,seemed getting stronger. They were too weak now to try to get food.They had plenty of wood so that there was no danger of freezing.But death from starva足 tion was staring them in the face. That night one of the men went mad and had to be tied down.He died short! y before morning. "By gar!" mumbled the halfbreed through thick, swollen lips, ''We all be dead by'n bye.'' One of the other men was pretty far gone.He lay on the bed, too weak to move.His breathing, no longer regular, soon ceased alto足 gether. 57


"Dat bird, la'k de crow, wit one eye, bring bad luck," muttered the halfbreed over and over again to himself. The third fellow died that night. The halfbreed forced his eyes open in the morning and dragged himself over to the stove. He dropped a few pieces of wood on the glowing coals and sank back in a stupor from the effort. He stayed by the fire half-conscious all day and at night dragged himself into his bunk. The wind outside seemed to be howling and shrieking with joy. 'Tve got you. I've got you. I've got you." About one o'clock the fury of the blizzard reached its highest pitch and then quickly subsided, leaving soft, white snowflakes drifting downward through the trees.

The sun rose on an endless world of white. Here a bird darted in and out among the sunbeams filtering through the snow-laden branches of the pines, and there a squirrel climbed to the top of a forest giant, chattering with delight at the warmth of the sun. Sud­ denly, from the rear of the little cabin, where he had taken shelter from the blizzard, a buck leaped forth into the sunlight. He listened a moment for sounds of life within, but silence prevailed. Winter, the King of the Northlands, had triumphed again. SAILS

Richard Strehle, '37

Oh, I shall set sail for the Land of Dreams On a quest that will not be done. Just one perfect poem's my ship, it seems, And so I must pick out the One. Now would I be choosing a fragile bark To be taking me far from home? A gossamer thing that will leave no mark When it melts like the soft sea-foam?

Nay, rather a galleon, tall and strong, With the wind in her mighty sail, And I shall set forth with a laughing song, And a thought of some sea-dog's tale.

But yet I shall think of the sea-foam's thrill, Or else naught shall intrigue my mind But gossamer shining upon the hill. When my galleon's left behind.

58

Judith Page, '38

/


SMARTER THAN THE LAW "Some dinner, huh, Killer?" said the small man, pushing aside his plate, which only a moment before had been heaped full of steaming food. "Yeh, that chicken and cranberry sauce really hits the spot," re­ plied the large, coarse-looking individual sitting opposite him, who was known to his friends as Killer Johnson. "Bring out the bottles, Butch, and let's get started on them." "Okeh," answered Butch, taking a long drink and passing the bottle to his friend. The large man also took a long drink, after which he sputtered and spoke, ''--! What vile stuff! Still, it has a kick, and a kick is what we're after tonight, eh, Butch?" "Yes," agreed Butch, "a kick is what we're after. How about a toast for you, Killer? A toast to the law of the land?" The large man laughed, a loud, boisterous laugh. · "That's rich, that is. The law! Say, the law is the biggest laugh I know of in this country of ours. Did you ever know any smart copper or any brilliant detectives? I never have seen one yet. Why, anybody with even two-bits worth of brains can outsmart the police. Say, in my day I've gotten away with a few things." "Yeh, me too," joined in Butch. "Let's hear about some of your jobs, Butch; we have lots of time, and nothing said here tonight will ever be repeated. "Well," began Butch, after taking another deep swig, "I've been in all the rackets, but the juciest was lifting 'rocks.' I would crash some high-class party on Millionaire Row, and after spotting some woman wearing a valuable bunch of pretties, I would find the master-switch, or if one wasn't handy, would cut the wires, and when the lights went out I would snatch the 'rocks' and put them in a nearby vase or anything handy. Then when the lights came on and they searched everyone and found nothing on me, I would calmly walk out with the rest of the guests. The next day I would come back as a telephone repairman, and afte� getting into the house I would grab the diamonds and scram. And that was all there was to it. "This racket worked swell until my last job. After that affair I went back the next day as usual, but the mug who opened the door was a friend of the dame whose party I'd crashed. I saw right away that he recognized me as one of the guests of the night before, but he didn't let on that he recognized me, and he started a conversation. As I didn't care about taking any chances, I slugged him the first time he turned his back. Then, loading him into my car, I went into town 59


and rented another. After that I took a little ride in the country and ran the car and the stiff gent over a cliff. That was all there was to it. Smooth, huh?'' "That was plenty smooth, all right," agreed Killer, "but that was nothing compared to a job I did for a pal of mine. This pal was a big shot in the numbers racket, and he had a federal dick on his trail. The copper had found out a little too much about my friend and had to be gotten out of the way. I was snagged to do the job for two grand. It didn't take me long to get on the trail of the dick, and after finding out where he lived I got an apartment in a hotel next to his, with rooms right across¡ from him. "After trailing him awhile, I found that he followed a regular plan at night-coming home at seven and taking a bath, then leaving again at eight. :so I decided on a plan to rub him out. "The first thing I did was to get to know some respectable people in the hotel. This was a cinch, and it wasn't long before I was nightly playing bridge with a retired merchant, his son who was a doctor, and an old friend of theirs. "Then, one night I invited this group to come up to my apartment to play, telling them to come about eight o'clock. I made sure that the dick was in his room taking his bath, and I ran down the back stairs of my hotel and up to his room. I used my skeleton key, and, stepping inside, I quickly hid myself behind some drapes and waited. He came out of his bath as usual and at exactly seven forty-five he was dressed and ready to leave. But as he passed by me on the way to the door, I let him have it straight through the heart. Then I took the silencer off my gun and clasped the gun in his right hand. I searched him and found a little notebook in which he had written all the facts about my friend. Next I opened his bathroom window about six inches, and then I scrammed, letting the door lock itself behind me. I walked quickly back to my room, and when my friends came at eight I was playing a game of solitaire. "We started our rubber right away, and in a few hands I was dummy, so I excused myself, and going into my bedroom I took from my bureau a firecracker that I had bought especially for the job. Lighting the extra-long fuse, I tossed it into the open bathroom window, which was only about four feet away. "When the cracker went off I was dealing the cards at the table. The merchant thought it must have been a shot, so we went into the hotel and explained to the manager that we thought we heard a shot from a room across from ours. The manager soon found the right room, and after he opened the door with his pass key we went in. As the others all grouped around the stiff, I slipped into the bathroom and quickly stuffed all that was left of the firecracker into my pocket, and shut the window. When I came back, the doctor and 60


the others were positive it was a case of suicide,and I had three good witnesses to prove that at the time we heard the shot I was playing cards with them." "Very neat,very neat," said Butch, "a perfect crime." "That's what I thought,but it beat me." "Well, Killer, I guess it won't be long now. Our party ends at daybreak, you know." "D' ya think we' 11 feel it?" asked the Killer. "Naw, not much," replied Butch, "just one shock and it's all over." Burton Brehaut, '36 FLICKERING CANDLE

He, himself,was almost past middle age. His mother was sitting in a chair,gazing out of a window and making a soft clicking noise with her mouth. "Arthur. see the cows out on the hill." "No,Mother,they only look like cows." "Arthur." "Yes, Mother." "I want to go home." "You are home. Mother." "No,this isn't home; I despise this place.I want to go home." "But this is your home." "No, I have to go home." She had risen,trembling,and shuffled from the room towards the hall closet.This happened almost every day now. There was noth­ ing f9r it. Her fingers eager with anticipation,she put on her hat and shawl. The sound of the slow opening of the outer door ... Shuffling footsteps on the porch. Her son rose and followed. She could not be allowed to go far ... After a few minutes, their footsteps returning, slowly. They enter.She has been unable to find home-her §obs are barely audible. Then his voice, a high falsetto"Did ze little muvver want to go home, hey? Vis iz her home. Muvver wants to stay here with Arthur.Does ze little muvver love Arthur " ... gradually the sobbing is replaced by a thin semblance of a laugh. The son reenters and resumes the book he had been reading. From the adjoining room can be heard,over and over, the refrain from an old hymn. David McConnaughey, '36 61


"FOR ANN"

The year 1928 was drawing to a close. The scene was in New York City on one of the most fashionable streets, in a house of the period just passed, when houses were built to look much larger than they really were, by means of false fronts. The house around which this story revolves was too big for the people who lived in it despite the fact that it looked even larger than it was. The front door was massive, with a big, shiny knocker screwed securely on its front. When one had entered, he came upon a hall of considerable length with a winding staircase on the left, going up to the regions of the house that were built for comfort, not at all like the stylish but un足 comfortable first floor. To one's right was a room hung with heavy red plush curtains and cluttered with numerous pieces of furniture that did not look as if they would hold the portly lady who was descending the steps. Mrs. Willoughby, upon coming down stairs, sat in one of the impossible pieces of furniture, which miraculously held up under the strain. She was thinking of all the new friends that she had made on her recent trip. She supposed that Mr. Willoughby had made some him足 self. She was startled out of her reverie by the insistent pounding of the knocker. James would answer, but who could it be at this time of night, just before supper? There, James was letting the person in. It was a man; who could it be? James entered the room followed by a stranger, probably one of the new friends that Wilbur had made, and had invited out to supper and had forgotten to tell her about. She greeted him grandly, and said, "Of course you will stay to supper." The stranger agreed. He was tall and spare and very dark-com足 plexioned, with iron 1sray hair. He was dressed in immaculate dinner clothes. They chatted for a while, but when they heard a puffing on the stairs Mrs. Willoughby was greatly relieved. Wilbur would take the man in hand. When he came in ( a little man with a big bald spot and a great many pounds that he shouldn't have had), Mr. Wil足 loughby jumped to the conclusion that the strange man who was talking so confidentially to his wife must be one of the friends that she had made while she was away. Dinner was announced, so that Mrs. Willoughby had no chance to ask her husband about the strange guest. After dinner they chatted about the weather and everything that they could think of except the stranger. They did learn that he was leaving town at midnight, whither or how they had no idea. At eleven-thirty the man called Mr. Willoughby aside, and in a very confidential tone asked, "And how is poor dear Ann?" 62


Now Mr. Willoughby was quite taken aback and gave the most plausible answer that he could think of, "Why, as well as could be expected," whereupon the man went out to get his coat. As he went through the door, he gave the butler an envelope. Then he climbed into a waiting taxi and drove away. As soon as he had left, both Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby started talking at once, inquiring who the other's friend was, and, upon finding that neither one knew anything about him, they were astounded. But when the butler came in with an envelope marked, "For Ann," and investigation showed that there were five one­ hundred-dollar bills in it, they were overcome. The next morning Mr. Willoughby went to all the newspapers in town and put in personals for the man who had dined with them the night before. They waited for weeks and weeks, but the man had disappeared completely, and they could not find any trace of him; so they gave the money to an orphanage. They are still wonder­ ing if "poor Ann" needs it very badly. Evelyn Oliver, '38

PALACE I live in a house 'most a mile high I guess, 'Cuz when I look down, things look So small, Like playthings that have come alive. Yesterday I took a walk down in the park, And people looked at me sorta wonder' n' like­ Guess they musta thought I was a queen or sumpin'. But I'd rather stay at home, Where people don't watch me so. I like to play in the street with the other kids, And there are such swell places to hide. 'Most every day the baker up-town Lets us kids watch him make the cake. It sure looks good, But my mom says that's for the Rich People. I feel kinda sorry for the Rich People, though. 'Cause I bet they don't live in a swell house like mine, Way up in the sky. Betty Reynolds, '3 8 63


NIGHT SONGS

Speed bowls a thousand cars down the long highway. A glare of white -a great roar-and they are eaten by the ravenous night. And still another car rolls by me on its giddy way to feed the greedy ogre.

The murky night is drugged. It dreams of tawny moons and stars that are re­ :-flected in a stagnant pool like sequins. It stirs and sighs but sleeps again, for the wind is a subtle opiate.

I came upon the mountain and the valley in a close embrace. It was dark and they did not see me. The grass was soft so my foot steps didn't sound. I was alone and envied them, but I turned and stole away. They never knew I saw them there.

The eucalyptus trees are afraid. They are cowards afraid of the dark. I always thought they were brave. They quiver in the night wind and make small sounds of fear that break the silence of the neighboring orange grove.

I am going now. The night is almost over. I shall pick the five morning stars with long stems. I think they will be lovely in the cerulean blue vase. Barbara Laney, '3 7

64


RANGE BUM Talkin' of bronc riders there's one that stands out in my memory like the crimp ears of the sorrel he rode. I met him first in Montana while ridin' for the ole Double H. He was ridin' fer the Turkey Track. Most everyone knew of him and he was considered a shore 'nuff top hand. I only knowed of one man who knew of Mack's pedigree, and he rode over the Great Divide with the secret tied on behind. After the fall round-up Mack and I just kinda drifted apart and I never seen 'im ag'in for along about two years. In my ramblings I'd drifted onto a boss outfit and thirty dollars a month down New Mexico way. It was a large spread and the ole man raised the finest bosses then raised in the southwest. If I remember correctly, must have been along about Spring of '88. Well, you can easy see, havin' such a pretty spread and bein' such a fussy ole codger, the ole boy was shore particular about his help and he had about six of the finest hossmen it's ever been my pleasure to run up ag'in. One in particular, a fancy looking feller that was awful easy on the eye, shore put on a show when he forked a bad one. We called him "Pretty Boy" 'cause seein' him ride on that silver-mounted outfit was like lookin' in a jewelry store winder. As I said before, the ole man had some mighty big fine bosses an' being raised on the range the way they was, most of them were plenty salty and would give even the best bronc-twister a powerful good fight. In one bunch was a crimp-eared sorrel that had earned a reputation of never bein' rode, and that was in the days when a rep like that was mighty hard to live up to. I'd been there about a week when the ole man got bull-headed and decided to have Cririip Ear broke. Naturally the job fell to Pretty Boy, bein' as how he was the best rider. Pretty Boy made as fine a ride as he ever made that day, but the sorrel knowed a trick or two that Pretty didn't, and bein' just a little too much boss it wasn't long and we had what was left of Pretty propped up against a tree lookin' mighty peaked, with bits of his silver-mounted outfit scattered all over the corral. In the excitement of the moment we hadn't noticed a stranger among us but when we did, I recognized Mack, the range bum. He just looked at me kinda funny, then asks the ole man, could he try the sorrel? Turning to Pretty with a crooked smile, he says, "Take a lesson, sheep-herder," and he makes ready for the fight. 65


It wasn't long an' Mack was deep in the wood, and as I live to tell you, I never saw an exhibition that could hold a candle to that ride in fifty years on the range from Mexico to the Canadian line. That sorrel knew every trick in the books and a few of his own ;ind he had what it takes to back them up. When the sorrel was <loin' his worst, Mack just reached up an' took the hackamore off and threw it to the sky and hollered fer the sorrel to come on an' buck. Every once in a while we could hear Mack holler above the thun­ der of Crimp Ear's hoofs, "How do you like your lesson, Silver­ mounted?" or words to that effect, but he might as well have saved his breath 'cause time the sorrel raised his head and stood a' shakin' and a'sweatin', Pretty Boy had passed over the hill to the Big Pasture. I've often wondered what was between them two fellers, but I'll never forget the ride that Mack made on that crimp-eared sorrel 'til I'm herding stars around in the Great Beyond with Pretty Boy.

Bill Teuscher,' 3 6 FIRST SNOW A never-ending stream of glistening flakes filtered through the trees and brushed past the frost-etched window panes. It was Vienna's first snow. Already the large, bronze, Napoleonic eagles of Schon­ brunn were dressed in white; the Gloriette had lost its delicate shape; and all through the city small clouds of smoke were rising, breaking, forming once again to forge ever up through the descending flakes.. I left my room, and putting on a heavy coat and muffler, walked out into the active buzz of evening traffic. Tires sang dully to the slush-darkened pavement, and rubber galoshes crunched in the small, wind-blown drifts along the grotto of the Opera House. The lamp­ lighter was making his evening rounds to lift the city from darkness to a luminous haze of gas lamps. I stopped under the time-worn portals of the Kapuziner church to buy a cone of chestnuts. How good they smelled ... The charcoal fire blazed red in the descending dusk. I moved off munching the steam­ ing chestnuts, and, turning the corner by the Regina Hotel, entered Liberty Square. The snow was coming down in large, crystal-like flakes. The air was still and crisp. From the little park in which I stood, I looked out upon a panorama of sparkling white and emerald. Small tufts of shrub, prickly spears of fir, and naked limbs of maple pierced the carpet of winter. The age-mellowed voices of bells came to me, ringing out the day.

Ted Kayser., '3 6 66


FLIGHT

I am a worshiper of the Sun, And of the Wind and the Stars. They carry me with them, away To the land where I alone can go, Where I can dream at peace, And all my dreams come true. And when earth calls me back, I am still a worshiper of the Sun, And of the Wind and the Stars.

Mary Alice Robinson, '37

PARADE

Here they come, two hundred and fifty of them, a crack company parading around the square. All big, fine, husky youths ready for anything. Tomorrow they are going to France; there they will need all the strength and training they have had. But look at them now­ all in perfect step, a beautiful sight. Oh! Isn't war grand?

Here they come again, back from the war, the same company­ all seven of them. Two of these are in wheel-chairs. All are old, hag­ gard and worn. They have just returned from France, where they have been killing, and have seen their comrades killed. Look at them plodding along! Isn't war grand? Sayer Johns, '3 8

UNSUNG

This is my song. I made it. .: I wrote the words to the melody of the sky. The words were inspired by the wind. My song is fragrant. • Because it was mine I shook lilacs into it On a m:)oned night.

It is exquisite, my song, But I cannot sing it, And another would not understand.

Oh, well-I shall give it back to the skies; Soon I suppose the stars will burn it for incense.

Barbara Laney, '37 67


c· A

L E N

D A R

SEPTEMBER

16-I must go down to the C.

H.S. Again, in all its power, The ruling voice of Study Hall Rings forth this opening hour"All right, now, folks; I've spoken for the last time."

20-Here's to the hue of it, Black Swedish blue of it, Would that we knew of it, From whence it came! OCTOBER 5-Time: Just preceding a scene. He: Going to the Senior dance? She (hopefully): Why, I-I-I hadn't planned to. He: Well, if you do, you can buy your ticket from me. Curtains 2 2-The Chrysler comes On big rubber feet, And stops, waiting, At Yale and Eighth, And then moves on. 26-I will arise and go now, and go to Red­ lands town And hear a lecture made there by a speaker of renown. There was a four-bit seat where I was in­ nocently led, Only to find his accent blotted half of what he said. NOVEMBER I-Bertie with the crushed skull Was taken to the hospitul. People heard him groaning say "Sic transit gloria Friday." 68


C A L E N D A R 1-Odd dressed damozels stepped out, Each athletic Jane and Helen Try to outdo the other, But the prizes went to Ellen. 8-A maid whose initials spell "ear," Cried "Dear me, Oh dear me, oh dear. For what people will say When they see in the play My new dress, I should not like to hear." 11-''When it is peace, then we may view again With new won eyes, each other's truer form, And wonder. Grown more loving kind and warm, We'll gr_asp firm hands and laugh at the old pam, When it is peace." Between 4: 3 0 and 5 : 00 o'clock The sound of the maidens' shower Is heard, - for again has come that time That is known as the hockey hour. 1 2-A scurvy trick we calls it, Scarcely worthy of narration: The springing of their sweaters In vacation. 15-Together we to victory Shall carry Claremont High, The glorious cry flung to the sky Is echoed back again. Once more today the Red and Gray Is out to do or die. Bonita fear! We're here to cheer You, Claremont Var'sty men. Casabas, hoops and extra digits, Dribblings up and forward midgets Notwithstanding and withal We'd better stick to football. 69


L E N D A R DECEMBER

7-Who is George? What is he That all the boards commend him? Alas, the greater chumps are we Who thought we had to come to see.

25-"Oh Holy Child of Bethlehem Descend to us we pray. Cast out our sin, and enter in, Be born in us today." JANUARY

6-The halls resound with the hearty yells Of students newly met. Three hundred minds with a single Thought, "Hey, whaja get?"

23-And may their lives exemplify the same High qualities of sportsmanship and fight As do the golden symbols of their game.

2 7-Out of the night that covers me, A murmur, growing to a roar -! The next reel's on; and Byrd resui:n,es His talk where he left off before. Step right up folks; now's the time! Clark's selling handshakes for a dime!

3 0-Ebon billows dashing on the strand, The grand arpeggio of flashing stars A glorious Carnival upon High C, Of surging sound waves crashing on the bars. FEBRUARY

5-A gentle moonlit scene in fragile blues, Is flooded with a sudden light. As crashes the blue filter on the stage. - For it is Madame Butterfly tonight. 70

Spikes and hurdles, cinder tracks; Dashing sprints and pistol cracks.


C A L E N D A R 8.-0 girl, I cannot swirl thee fast rnough, Those wide grey eyes That roll and rise The beauty of the evening holds me thrall, Especially since you have paid for it all.

MARCH 5-Oh for a hobby for hubby! The brothers are bothered, And mother, who fathered The plan's in a pother. Again do we look up to see Our athletic betters In noble line upon the stage, Receiving honor sweaters.

I , ·-:'-:-�

2 I-Little fish that splash and swim, And flash and sparkle, leap and glance, Who would have guessed that you would . be A door prize at a Junior Dance

APRIL 10-Something there is that doesn't like a test. See last year's ad preview for all the rest. The Cast is getting horsey Waitin� for the missing one. While frantic Mr. Thomason cries "Come; Have Dunn, have Dunn!" 11-·-Seductively the camera ogles; Mightily the movie mo�uls Shoot the flower of C.H.S. Arrayed all in its party dress. 71


� ":\!

r

'

• : ✓

'/" , \ �..$ � , .., -===-----

C· A L E N D A R The scene is in a palace, (But it's only just in sport), For it's Joseph who is serving In a Royal court.

I never could quite figure baseball out. (My verse here hits rock bottom.) 'Tis odd they try so hard to catch the flys After they swat 'em. MAY

--=--

1-The mountain streams are choked with trout. A blessing on the powers that be That let us out.

Classic Irony: Post and Clark surveying their work, "And they call ·these 'snap' pages." JUNE

In reminiscent mood

3-'Twas the night before deadline, and all through the staff, Not a chortle was stirring ,not even a laugh. The dummy was placed in a corner with care, And the rest of the staff was engaged in prayer, While Johnnie was quietly tearing his hair. The hour was one, the work was done, The adviser tore about the floor, As, quoth she raving, "Nevermore."

72

l 0-"O young mariner Down to the haven Call your companions. Launch your vessel And crowd your canvas, And, ere it vanishes Over the margin, After it, follow it. Follow the Gleam."


·················································································································•111••···································· ..

Ask Any Man over 50 "What gives middle-aged folks the greatest sense of personal security?" The chances are he will say, "A reserve fund of money earning com­ pound interest in a good, sound bank." Old-fashioned thrift is never out of date. Get back to fundamentals. A Savings Account here points the way.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF

5 i

CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA

-=...=..:::.:::,.,:::.,:::.,:::,.:::,.,:: .=..:::,.:::.,:::.,:::.,:::.,:::.,:::. ..:::,.:::,.:::,.:::.,:::.,:::.,:::. .:::..,::c,.:::.,:::.,:o:.,:::.,:::.,::::.,:=.,,::c.,:::.,:::.,c:-:.,:::.,=..=..:::,.,=..:::.,:::..=.,:::.,:::.,=.,,=:::.. ..:::.,:::.,c:-:..:::.,:::.,:::.,.:::..:::,.:::.,:::.,:::,.:::.,=••.::•..=.,:::..

:::,.:::.,:::.,:::.,.. -=-:a'!

The matter at hand has been reduced to two syllogisms (see Webster). The first is in "droll." 1. The annual staff has spent weeks trying to fill up this space. 2. The annual staff is tired of reading one mixup seventeen times. Ergo: The student body should be better acquainted with the twins. The second is contained in "Balboa Island." l . No sweater wearer dares venture to the beach party. 2. No annual board member can stay away from the mainland. Ergo: It's high time this went to press.

············ ················ ······· ··· ············· ·· ···········································································································"ii· THE M0U5E OJI," SERVICE:

{

W£ WOAK WITH YOU RATHE� THAN FOR YOU

HILLIPS P �RINTING O">MPANY MUT.;AL 7270 MUTUAL 7279

ENCRAVIEAS 0: PRINTERS IN ONE OR MORE COLORS FOR PAATICU LA R PEOPLE ..

l1l

CATALOGUE S, BOOKLETS. BOOKS, P UBLICATIONS, AND OJl'P'ICE Jll'ORM9

238 TO 250 EAST FOURTH ST. Los ANGELES, CAL. !11••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

73


74


...............................................····································•·······································································: Watches

Repairing

Clocks

BURTON J. HENRY HOROLOGIST

Telephone 1289

Pomona

l 5 3 West Second St.

�-······················································································································································� . ······················································································································································•·'-" ONTARIO�UPLAND CREAMERY PHONE Ontario 76 and 77 711 West A Street

Ontario, California

.............................................................................................................................................................

�,

THEY GET MIXED UP ON: John Lincoln-The number of facets in a fly's eye. Loudelle Jacobs-Which is me and which is Josephine. Frances Cooper-Spaghetti. Eloise Bills-Whether turquoise is more green than blue. �lien Miller-Saying "aluminum." Margaret Briggs-" " Stan Baum-Undoing a cellophane bag. Barbara Ilsley-Stalactites and stalagmites. Barbara Dolcater-The various blondes in the movies. Alice Nichols-Whether I am eating "spinach" or "greens." Esther Robbins-When it helps the salesman to give him the extra penny . . •••··•·····························••··································

.

.......•..............•......•....................•..................... .

,

Compliments of

THE CITIZENS' NATIONAL BANK OF CLAREMONT

DR. ARTHUR L. JACOBSON Dentist • Third � Alexander Phone 6211 ¥ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• .,..

··········································································•1e••······························································...............� FIELDER'S GROCERY MEATS 143 Yale

LUNCHES

GROCERIES Phone 5611

,............................................................................11••······························..···········································� 75


........................................................................................................ .................................................., !

i

Compliments of

W. P. FULLER � CO. PAINTS 185 E. Second

GLASS

LACQUER

WALLPAPER

Phone 1781

Pomona

Cleo Clark-Oral themes when Mrs. Hull takes notes. Steve Kelley-On what my aunt tells me I get mixed up on. George Walton-Which foot to limp on when I have a sprained ankle. Jack Mobley-Which way Charlie Chaplin is going. Edward Eisenbrey-Which way to dodge when meeting women teachers in a crowded hall. Holland Chamness-The difference between a bird's eye view and a worm's eye view. Marion Jones-I get in mixups with my teachers. Niles Davis-Humidity and humility. Burton Blanchard-The correct time on a Roman-numeraled wrist-watch.

r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

m...........................................

"All Lumber and Building Materials at Los Angeles Prices"

• Vanderwood Lumber Co . • TELEPHONE CLAREMONT 3701

ALEXANDER AVENUE AT SANT A FE RAILROAD CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA

----················································································--··········-·························································· 76


·············································�··························· D. B. MILLIKEN'S

,........................................................................ 1 !

: j

!

Claremont Nursery DEALERS IN QUALITY NURSERY STOCK

North side of Foothill Boulevard One Block East of High School r.••••.•••••••••••,••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••:

I

We were pleased with the resuits we received from this ad last year, so are repeating.

I

I I I

J. CARSON BOWEN MEN'S WEAR

I

. . .�:.�.-�.::.�:. .:.��.:.�:. �.:�-�. ::.::.��-·j

r·····························································..·· ···························································································1

WIL KIN S O N t S

PLUMBING AND PLUMBING SUPPLIES 169 West Third Street, Pomona Phone 1285 •···········••••··••••································•·······················..············································································•'Teddy Strehle-Girls. Virginia Pierce-Which man was killed and which did the killing when trans­ lating Latin. Kermit Shotts-The Virginias in the Sophomore class.

............................................................................................................................................................ W. P. RUSSELL ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE

r·· -· · -· -- · - -·-· ·-· ��!�!�-i���.�����;-·-· ·-- - -· -· ·-· ·-· - Claremont

: i

Phone 3984

W. J. Huddleston

Phone 3171 Before I I :00 a.m.

California

I 99 Yale

1.L,,.-,....-.,....- ..-..,- •• .- ,.-,..-, ,-,,.=,.,=,. ,= ..=,.,=,.=,.,=,.,=,. ,= .,=,,.=,. =,,.=,.,=,. =,.,=..,=••=..,=..,=,.=,.. =..,=,.=..,=....,== ..,=,.=..,=..,=..,=..=..,=..,= ..=,..=..,=,.=•..= ..� ...=,..=,.� .......

················· ···························································-············································································� CLAREMONT SHEET METAL WORKS HEATING AND VENTILATING

I 1 6 ¾ Alexander Ave.

Phone 6682 77


········································................................................................................................................., Compliments of

:

FULLER RANCHO DAIRY "Uniform High Quality" Serving Claremont and Pomona Districts Phone Pomona 1 711

: •••••••.. ··•••••••••••••••••••••••·••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••.••••••••••••••••• J.

Ruth Tabor-When to laugh and when not to.

Don Mead-Trying to look out of the window and at the teacher at the same time.

Charles Keast-Whether the ceiling is the floor or not when I wake up after taking gas.

Muriel Wheeler-Nearly everything at one time or another.

Ted Kaysen-Page 6, column I, Sec. 3 of the Sunday paper.

Josephine Ballman-Which boy friend I got mad at last.

...........................................................................i

B

Wheels Aligned

E

I 3 3 7 W. Second St.

I

YA�NS

�Je y�ur RAKES tested at ILL'S BRAKE SHOP

E

:••······································································ .

Claremont

PECK STUDIOS :

I

139 Harvard Avenue

. �i�------------� ..............................................................................•;,i

!•••••••••••·••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••l

................................................··········································································································•t REYNOLDS SERVICE Phone 6962 345 West Second Street PLUMBING ELECTRIC FULLER'S PAINTS LOCKSMITH AUTO PAINTING Claremont, California

;,;;i --.•=...--...=•.=...=..=...--..-...�..-...-...-..-...-..-...-..-...-...-••-...-••-•••-..-...-..-...-•....-...-..-...-•.-...-.....-.....-•••-..-...-..-...-.....-...-..-...-..-...-.....-..-...-...-..-...--' ..... 78


······················································································································································· ' ;f_ :

.:::i!

ALPHA BETA FOOD MARKET A Complete Food Market "The Best for Less"

:,1,■•• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••11111111>■■,,•••••••••a•••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••• ,,11111�

.................................................................................................................................................. .......... � CLAUDE C. BRADLEY INSURANCE REAL ESTATE CITRUS, BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES Phone5471 Claremont l!0Yale

································································�··········································•11••············································ Frances Bernard-Whether you cut your lettuce with your knife or fork. Judith Page-If a man flew westward faster than the earth turns, would he get back before he left? If he did, would he meet himself starting out? Richard Strehle-and seventeen other people-Which twin is the other one?

ort••·····························································..···········..······················································..........................; CLAREMONT LUMBER CO. Pick up the phone -

Call 3101 and we will try to please you. A. H. HOEL, Owner �••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ....•••u11•.. •••••••••••••••••••••••• ..• ..••••••••••••••••••••••••• ..•••••.. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••�

!'..................................................... .. . .............................................................................................. Best Wishes from

SANITARY LAUNDRY ,

.................................................................................................,............................................................. 79


.;o••·····•••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• .. ········································• •..-:

Compliments of

THE UNION OIL COMPANY •••••••••·••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••n•••••·••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.. ••·••••••••· •••••••

............................................................................................................................................................... . DINING

THE

M ISSI O N

235 W. First"Street

DANCING

Phone 4601

·······················································································································································-·· Carrol Roy-The Dionne Quintuplets. All of us-"I" or "me:" history and other dates; French and dial telephones; escalators; revolving doors; feeling way through the house· in the dark when getting home late; starters in new cars; daylight saving time on radio: which door opens into Mrs. Hull's room.

······················································••.i••················ 1-••··································································· .....:

Shoe Repairing Have your shoes repaired at Immel's and be sure that your footwear will be at its best for school days. We feature repairing of children's shoes and also dye light shoes to match fall costumes. Complete shoe sewing at

Immel's Shoe Hospital 144 YALE AVE.

• The Only Refrigerator that is : c Silent. Will Operate for 2¢ per Day. Continuous Refrigeration. Fine Ranges and Water Heaters.

Claremont ApplianceShop 114 Yale

Phone 3206

PHONE 3217

�••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a,

r··························································································································································.. All Types of Dancing Taught

Special Rates to Students

D ORO THY WIL LIAMS' D ANCE STUDIOS 147 BONITA STREET ONTARIO. CALIFORNIA PHONE l 056

80

222 SOUTH THOMAS POMONA. CALIFORNIA PHONE 1079


.

-· '·,..

.

�<;;: --1)

,../f(, ,· .

�I t

, •

,J,

81


1••·····················································································································································• ,!

Your 19 3 6 Annual Photographer

G. W. GILLESPIE 160 W. Second St.

Phone 822

Pomona

·····································································································"····················"···-···-············"Don't be false to your teeth and they will not be false to you."

DR. WESLEY W. HENDRICKS DENTISTRY

721 W. Second St. Claremont .t,i.••••

Office Phone 4461 Residence 6226

• ••••••••••••• •••• • •• •• •••• •••••.••••••••••••••.•••••••.•••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••• • •• •t,. •••••• • • ••• ••• • • • • • •• •••

POEME HEROICA Ere school doors yet were opened well The presses' columns yelled to tell Of Martin's block and tackle team, -Of football's crop the finest cream-

................................................................................................................................................................ F. J. LUNCHES

M OO R E

GROCERIES

FILLING STATION

Foothill and Mills

Phone 5636

............................................................ ...............................................................................................

,:.

COLCORD'S TAXI SER VICE 235 W. FIRST ST.

PHONE

4871

l'I••····························································································· · · ······ · ···················································

• ••• • • ••• •• ••••••• • •• i.o • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •• • •••• • • ••••••••• ,

REMI NG TON POR TABLE'T YPEW RI TER S KODAK FILMS

Cooper's POTO Shop

82

224 Yale Avenue


........................................ . ..... ....................... .. ........................................... ............ ................... .. . . } .. .

.,

S E RVI C E

Q UA L I T Y

!

Telephone 5 6 81

120 Yale Avenue

-==•=..,=,.=,..=...=,.=,..=,,.="•=••=•H=•,.=,.=..,=,.=..,=..,=,.=..,=•••=,.,=,.=,.,=,.=..,=,,.=,.=..,=••=.. ,=,..=,.=..,=..,=,.=..,=,,.=,.=..,=,.,= ,.m= =m=..=..,=..,=.,=,..=,.,=,.=..,-..,-.,-,.,-..,__J• ························"···················-····-··································································································

!i

■-••;

CLAREMONT FEED AND FUEL STORE

FUEL FEEDS GARDEN HOSE 345 W. Second St.

FERTILIZER DOG FOODS

POULTRY EQUIPMENT INSECTICIDES, ETC. Phone 3081

............................................................"···········..············· ············..···························"·········································� Which was to bring League victory. Back to the wearers of the "C." Corona first, four more to go. Hark! How the prophet trumpets blow! Downey, too. There was a fall! As yet, the sweetest thud of all.

"'···································································......................................................................................... Best Wishes to the Class of 1936

WRIGHT BROS. AND RICE "Your Home Furnishers"

Pomona, California

252 South Main Street

....................................... .........................................................................11••·············································••IP. �···········································································..··········································································•"BE WELL GROOMED REMEMBER: "J 1' s better to make a good first impression than to Jive down a bad one."

STEEVE'S Barber Shop

• First Street, Claremont

r··: :·: :·:� :- ·- · -·����;:�i��;�:;·- · -· -· : : :-:· : -·-· �

............ .........................................................................�... ................................................................., . 83


..........................................................................................................................................................

Everything in Reliable Equipment for Schools, Auditoriums and Public Institutions ... Direct factory representatives and distributors of movable and fixed seating . . . Science Furniture . . . Blackboards . . . Stage Equipment . . . Drapes and Scener)' . . . Portable Bleachers . . . Steel Folding Chairs . .. Venetian Blinds and Shades .. . Steel Lockers ... Gymnasium Apparatus ... Playground Equipment ... and School Supplies.

School Equipment Co. 759-761 North Spring Street

Phone Michigan 6291

Los Angeles

Califqrnia

,...........................................................................................................................................................1

Across the wash, in yellow bus, Came Chino's team to clinch with us. Alas for them 1 They rue the day. But still Bonita's left to play. Grim pantomime, 'neath eerie light, Foretells the coming fray aright.

84


!.......................................................... ............ ........................................................................... ..................... : : :

I

ROY (AUGGIE) PIERCE AUTO REPAIRS Union Gasoline Phone 3176

341 W. First

::::., .::::,..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=...=...=..= ....=...=...=...=... =.... =...=...=...:::...:::..=...=...=...=...=...=...:::...:::..:::...=......

�.;-;;,..;;;,..:::,..::: ..:::::,,,;:: ,..:::: ,..::::., .:::: ,..:::c,..;-;;,..;::.,::: ...::: ...:::: ...

= ..= ...::: ... :=:: ..

. ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 "It Pays to Look Well"

VARSITY BARBER SHOP BROWN AND FAKLER 127 Yale Avenue

t••································..···························"··························································································· -All Claremont saw the fearful fight And celebrated half the night. 'Tis said the coach due to his chest Has had to get him a new vest.

P.S. Puente, too, has been sent west .

........................................................... ,................................................................................................. ... SLADE'S CHOCOLATE SHOPPE STUDENT LUNCHES

392 W. Foothill

FOUNTAIN SERVICE

Telephone 4967

. ..........•···-··························..··· ····..·····...................................................................�........••....................•....

:••···························.. •••••• ..••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ...........................................................................1

Compliments of.

CITY DAIRY, Inc. POMONA

PHONE 1255

.......................................................................................................................................................................... 85


.r . . . . . . . . . .;;�.�:�;���:;. ·�-;�;;;�. . . . . . . . . . . .� j

TICKETS -- PROGRAMS -- CARDS -- STATIONERY ONE TWENTY-NINE HARVARD

I

i................ ............................................................................................................................................... ..

.............................................................................................................."············---····-············...··· ·"· GEORGE CREE AGENCY LILLIAN WARE, Agent Insurance - All Lines

122 Yale Av/

Phone 4241

••·•••••·•··•····························•··•••••···················•••••••••······················•••· ••············•· ··············································· DODGE

The editor's car's quite perfection

Except at remote intersection;

Where there' re plenty of cops His speedometer drops,

And his rate still evades their detection.

--· ·;�;�-;��;�;-· "-· ·-· ·-· · -·-· ·-· ·-· -· - · -·-·-·;·�:;��: �·-;· ;· -· 1 J. Ralph Shoemaker 1 2 I Harvard Claremont, California

=. . . . . . . . .

r.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .=·;;�;:��{�-�-�;��-;. j

LAFE P. SPEIRS. Proprietor Official Auto Club Garage No. 44

Cosmetics

Telephone 7271

i i·:

Day and Night Service TELEPHONE 49 6 I j=== ...........................................................................................................................................................

86


'\a·•··································································································································"················ -- THE MAY GARAGE -J. W. STARR, Proprietor

241 W. First Sc.

Phone 4441

-"··························································································································· ..·····························--' IF If you can drive your car with care and safety And give the laws that govern all who drive; If you can cross that busy intersection And find yourself (and engine) still alive; If you can learn to keep a proper distance, To miss the car in front, and keep your temper sweet; If you can quote the ordinance, for instance, That governs parking in Pomona's street: If you can pass a car and keep the left side, Or keep the right-hand lane without request: If you can answer all the traffic questions, You'll get an A in that World Problems test. o,••••••··•··•••·•··••••••••••••••·••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••·•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••c

Best Wishes to the Class of 19 3 6

FOOTHILL GROCERY 8 MARKET Foothill Boulevard at Indian Hill

Priuate Dining Rooms

.: Phone 5271

Dancing

ST. CHARLES GRILL Phone 1295

158 W. Holt Ave.

87


88


..........................................................................................................................................................

,

GRAYCO SHIRTS AND TIES HART. SCHAFFNER� MARX CLOTHING

EWART'S, Pomona "It's Smart to be Thrifry"

All-Star-Award-Letterman's Sweaters

Cooper's Jockey Shorts

-'-..-..,-.-....- -....- ..-••-...-..-...-..=...=..=...=..=.•••=..-,--..--...=. =,..-,--,.--..,=..--...--.=..--...-,-.,--,-..,-,-.,- ..-...- ..-...- .-..--•..- ..•- •.-...- ..- ..-. .- ..--,-...- .--...•- •--...=..--...=.=...=..---c.,,:-:: .,:-:-:,.:-::..,==-: ••••i

i:-

PRE-EXAM THOUGHTS I think that I shall never know What makes these curious teachers go. Who knows what things each question hides? I'd like a look at their insides. I sometimes think I know them through, And tell you just what each will do. But when I find the crisis met, All calculations are upset. Then I. alas, am all at sea. I wonder what they think of me. Ah, one may sing one's own sweet praise, But only teachers hand out A's .

.,

.................................................................······················································..............···················� POMONA VALLEY CREAMERY Ouer Z O Years of Faithful Service

PURE MILK BUTTERMILK

BUTTER CREAM COTTAGE CHEESE

We Would Appreciate Your Patronage

··•·•················••··•·••••·••••·•·······························•······ ·••············ ····-·-························································•'-� 89


................................................................................................................................................."··· ·

.,

I

i

The Season's Best Wishes from

Ia

THE CLAREMONT LAUNDRY

ii

I

YOUR TOWN LAUNDRY

It was a pleasure and service to do your towels this school year. You kept clean and we have endeavored to come clean with you. PHONE 5601

336 WEST SECOND

····"·········· ····························································································..····"·········· ·· ····"·· ·············"········-1: if if you would write in free or blank verse, meaning that it takes a mind free from all thought and totally blank, to write it, take some sweet and gentle topic like babbling. bubbling brooks, or budding posies, or crystal dewdrops hanging pensive from the ends of chinaberry leaves or some such twaddle, and read it in a soft, low voice so as to bring out its full hid exquisite beauty, and all will look down thoughtfully and one will softly say, "That's good."

�······················································································································································· . STETSON HATS

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES TIMELY CLOTHES JANTZEN BEACH WEAR

JOHN P. EVANS 269 W. Second St., Pomona

ARROW SHIRTS MCGREGOR SWEATERS

NUNN-BUSH SHOES INTERWOVEN HOSE

............................................................................................................................................................

:

90


r. . . . ._. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i TYPEWRITER SALES AND SERVICE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..1 134 W. THIRD ST.

PHONE 1007

POMONA

I

May 18 'Tis the day after Beach Day And all through the school Not a student is moving, Not one knows a rule. Their swimming suits hang on the clothes line with care, And each hopes that no one to touch him will dare.

•·••···•··················•···•·•······•••• ....................................................................................................................................................................._.....................................� UNDIVIDED RESPONSIBILITY Every Club Pin, School Ring, Medal and Trophy, Graduation Announcement we sell is Made in Our Own Factory A Caltfornia Industry

Founded 19 12

THE T. V. ALLEN CO.

i i

School Jewelers and Stationers

81 0- J 6 MAPLE AVENUE

Los ANGELES,

CALIF.

I

■■■■, ......................... ,.................................. ,■■■■............... a■■■■ ................................. , ,a■■■1■1,........ ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••............., .............. ...,.,.,

...............................................................................................................................................................................................................

1 J.D.INSURANCE JDHNSDN s

Co"''LET

E

RE AL ESTATE

E"�•ct

PHONE 1311 · RES. Hll 1:17 HARVARD AYE. • UA REMGNT, CAL, SERVIN& CLAREMONT JO YEA/ii

•·······••·····•••·•••••·•··••·····•••·····•·····························•··•·••·•········ •·····••••••••• ••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••n•••••••••·••a

91


. .........=::::•••..............................................................

M................................................................ �

LEE MYERS

. . . . . . . . .-.. . . . . ��;;;�;�;:[i�;;;:�· · · . · · · · · · · -. · · 1

: :

AUTO REPAIRS

262 W. Fourth St.

Phone 3543

!

California

j

,:;;..=...=...=..=...=...=...=.=...=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=.=...=...=...=..=...=...-...--..--...=...=...--...--.=...=...cc-...:-••-._=.,.=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=·..··-i

Claremont

.-;;..=...=...=...=...;;;;..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..:::...=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=..=...=...=...=...=····A Their pockets are empty, And bandaged the· r feet: Each Junior is sunburned: No one wants to eat. And all are so sleepy They're not even scared-

............................................................................................................................................................, Sporting

S. P. HUNSAKER 429 W. Second St.

G o o d s

Pomona 6967

II ••••••••1111111111■■■11■■■■.lllllll■IIIIIIIII■■■■■ ■l■lllllllillll ■IIIIIII 10'111 ■llll■■ •••••• •■■l■l■l■l■l■l■l,i■■I■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•••••••••■■■■■■■■■■JI

........................................................,.................................................................................................i MEN'S FURNISHINGS

!

POWELL'S DEPARTMENTSTORE 21 5 W. First St.

DRY GOODS

Phone 3181

! l

ii••················....................... ································.................................................................................:

92


93


r· ·".. . . .. . . ......... ... . ... ... . ... ... . ...... . ... . . . . ... . . . . .... . .. .... . .. ... . ....... ...... . . .... . ...... -.. ... ... ... ..... .... . . . . 1. I I BETSY ROSS ICE CREAM i Serve

f

I

I

Every Day in the Year

225 N. Garey

Pomona 1499

I

.................................................................................................................................................. ............ ................................................................. .................:I

:

:

There's only one answer, "I am not prepared."

The annual staff's broke

And they hate all blue Mondays;

There'll be no more house parties

For a month of sundaes .

........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ . JOHN S. WEISBROD Class of '2 6

LIFE INSURANCE AND ANNUITIES

l:

321 First National Bank Building

Pomona 1179

..... ....................................................... ................................................................................................................................. .,

.............................................................................................................................................................................................. .. "No Job Too Small or Too Large."

EVERETT'S SHOE SHOP

Telephone 3276

EVERETT LILES, Proprietor

122 Yale

., ..........................................................................................................................................................................................11'!

Claremont Pharmacy, Inc. W. S. WALLER, Mgr.

The Glad-to-See-You Store We fill ANY Doctor's Prescription

first & Yale, Claremont, Cal., Phone 6491

......................................................................................................................................................................... 94


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The staff of El Espiritu de 19 3 6 haue appreciated the cooperation giuen by those aiding in the pro­ duction of this annual.

MR. JACK CANNICOTT Los ANGELES ENGRAVING Co. MR. WOOD GLOVER PHILLIPS PRINTING

Co.

MR. G. W. GILLESPIE PHOTOGRAPHS

95


Profile for Sharon ESTERLEY

1936 El Espiritu  

1936 Yearbook from Claremont CA high school

1936 El Espiritu  

1936 Yearbook from Claremont CA high school

Advertisement