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Published Annually by the Associated Students of Claremont High School Volume 27

Claremont, California June 1940


94 v - 1 94 0 ,940 -19 1940 - 1940 - 1940 - 1940 - 1940 - 19 - 1940 -1940


In these troubled times when the great nations of the world are for the most part abandoning the principles of democracy, we, in El Espiritu de 1940, have endeavored to express our appreciation of the fact that our country has not lost the ideals upon which it was founded. In our comparatively small range we have tried to awaken in our read­ ers a realization of the fundamental boons of American Democracy. We have attempted this through a comparison of the functions of Claremont High School and the life of the nation as a whole. Life, Liberty, and the Pur­ suit of Happiness, have long been recognized as the fundamentals in our American way of living. It is upon these basic privileges that our freedom is founded. This year El Espiritu pays tribute to an idea and its founders-an idea that has made possible the rectlization of America as we know it today.


We dedicate this year's annual to a member of the faculty who through her deep understanding has had a vital influence on the life of every girl to graduate from C.H.S. Both on the field and in her personal friendships she has, by her own splendid example, encouraged and inspired good sports­ manship, cooperation, honesty, and clean thinking. She has been first of all a friend, secondly, an invaluable adviser, and lastly, an able and pleas­ ant teacher. As a tribute to a woman who has not only stood for the finest in our school, but in our democracy as well, we gratefully dedicate El Espiritu de 1940 to MRS. MARGARET SCHAFER


We, on the staff of El Espiritu de 1940, have enjoyed assembling this year's book, not only for the valuable experience gained from the work it­ self, but because of the opportunity to express our feelings on the basic and structural points of our A m e r i c a n Democracy, and what it holds for today's high school youth. We have found, in our cooperative endeavors, the secret of the success of the Amer­ ican way. We have met barriers, yet from each struggle we have emerged wiser and better armed. It is with the greatest appreciation of the opportun­ ities offered us in the completion of our task that we hopefully present, to faculty and students alike, our book, and your book, El Espiritu de 1940.


♦

\.


- LIBERTY

- HAPPINESS - HAPPINESS - H/ -- LIFE - LIFE - LIFE - LIE, ..:. LIBERTY - LIBEr


LIFE

"There may be mistakes made someďż˝

.- times; things may be done wrong, while

the officers of the government do all they can to prevent mistakes. But I beg of you,

as citizens of this great republic, not to

let your minds be carried off from the great work we have before us. This strug­

gle is too large for you to be diverted

from it by any small matter. When you

return to your homes, rise up to the

height of a generation of men worthy of

a free government, and we will carry out the great work we have commenced."

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.


"Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Hap­ piness in this, or any country, wane unless its citizens are informed, think and act both honestly and couragE:: ously." Each one of us is America. The security of these rights is in oµr power. In this confused age this country needs and deserves your energy and un­ swerving loyalty in order that you and posterity may continue to enjoy free-• dom. Congratulations to 1940 graduates! May succEJss in abundance be yours� Sincerely, EARL THOMPSON


MR WILBY MRS. HOWE

MISS ESCUD"RO MISS TAYLOR

MR ARRINGTON MRS HULL

MISS FRENCH MRS. SCHAFER

Versatile Faculty V Reigns at C.H. S. Faculty aids in all productions ... Without exception teachers have important sidelines ... Beginning of year finds Mrs. Fitts busy ... School librarian serves as counselor, guides students in planning pre-college curricula as querulous classmen al­ ways cheerfully answered and assisted . . . Fall spotlights Athletic Department ...Mr. Martin presents typically varied activ1iies...Social Studies Department member turns grid men-• tor, directs destinies of Wolf Pack teams...As year advances gym classes, then track team, take attention... El Espiritu also under capable Mr. Martin's advisership...Mr. Charlson, Biology instructor, helps direct boys' sports... Gym classes superseded by basketball and baseball teams as groups to receive his in­ struction and guidance...Students demand sports write-ups, bringing Miss Escudero, Wolf Packet adviser, into action... Modern language teacher finds time not only for directing activ­ ities of school paper but for language clubs as well...Lively Tuesday evening French and Spanish Club meetings under her guidance... Fall dramatic season opener brings lusty quintet to the fore...Mrs. Hull, Public Speaking and Senior High School English instructor, is genius responsible for C.H.S. dramatic productions...Direction and help make possible Student Body Ploy Tri-school Play, Senior Play...Dramatic portions of oper­ etta, orchestra program, also under tutelage...Mrs. Hull assisted by Mr. Wilby . ..Social Studies teacher demonstrates handiwork in Girls' League Play, Senior melodrama...time for directing destinies of boys' tennis also found...Claremont's distinctive stage sets due to labors of Mr. Booth . ..High School Math instructor directs corps of student technicians to lay background· for plays, operetta, orchestra program... Less conspicuous [ 12 J


Scholarship Society also recipient of attentions...Stage design and poster work done by Miss Taylor of Art Department... Fit·ting climax for programs provided by Mrs. Howe of Instru­ mental Music...High school orchestra plays at all major programs, receives justified acclaim ...Annual Red Cross drives under direction of Mrs. Williams . ..High school luncheons and dinners, costuming for dramatic productions also handled by Domestic Science Department head ... Miss French serves as guide and counselor to entire Junior High School ... English and Mathematics teacher kept busy as many accept advice and assistance offered by her, guided on their way ...Mr. Arrington of Science Department arranges for ever-important school field trips... Numerous places of interest visited by C.H.S. students under his leadership...Time also found by Mr. Arringto:;:i to direct school safety campaigns, guide destinies of Radio Club ...Mr. Wood manages school business in addition to duties as teacher of Commercial and Industrial Arts...In capacity ol school Vice-principal Mr. Wood supervises ground crew, buys all supplies, keeps books for infinite number of financial tran­ sactions of the high school ... Multifold doings of Girls' League under advisership of Miss Willows . ..English and Latin instruc­ tor and Dean of Girls busy as January "League" plays, in addi­ tion to regular dances and food sales, make innovation...All play profits turned over to Casa Colina, charity home for infan­ tile paralysis victims...Mrs. Schafer coaches Claremont teams as girls' playdays attract notice...Physical education teacher also supervises dances and other activities of the G.A.A. in addition to directing dance numbers for numerous productions ... Unforgettable "Ruddigore" brings attention and plaudits to C.H.S. vocal music department under leadership of Miss McKee ... Fine work adds final touch to excellence of school activities MR. BOOTH MRS. FITTS

MISS McKEE MR. MARTIN

MR. CHARLSON MISS WILLOWS

MRS. W!l .LJAMS MR. WOOD


first Row: L. Bronson, f. St. Clair. Second Row: B. Chidlaw, P. Speirs, J. Gardner, I. Grant, J. Barber, J. Whit­ ney. Third Row: J. Talbott, W. Johnson, S. Barnes, W. Henzie, J Richmond, E. Miller.

Upper House Cleans Up Campus Student Council concludes successful annum...Class reps and, Executive Officers carry out jobs to general approval...Gov­ erning body of students flourishes under Mr. Thompson's super­ vision...Legislative session opens, and closes, every two weeks ...Discussions held on current queries...Solutions found for numerous C.H.S. problems... Wolf Pack lacking in inspiration, house decides ... Program slated for arousing of school spirit... Sports attendance increases...Pep rallies hold sway under council plan...Color week sponsored by Wolf Packet with S.C. aid ...Students go wild-deluge ground with insignias and school colors ... Dance committees come to group for aid ... Class, and variously sponsored, "brawls" controlled by council rulings...Propositions presented for improvement of present Activity Card setup...Student body funds diminishing... School to try new system of dues payment plan instead of pres­ eni dual installments ...Campus cutups corrected by council influence...Class cutting largely abolished in school-wide investigation... Amendment passed, per new Tri-County ruling ... Athletic letter sizP- cut as league big-wigs demand...School ;tore proposed and considered... Questioning of local mer­ chants and faculty finds unexpected opposition...Measure falls by wayside... Barnes serves as first semester prexy... Bows to votes of Grant backers in quest for re-election...Assem­ blies mapped at early meeting ...Selected programs bring stu­ dent commendation...Strong support given worth-while charities...Red Cross and Children's Crusade campaigns re­ ceive staunch backing in C.H.S. divisions ...Members speak for maintenance of Little Civic Dances...Council rallies to aid of local hops... Mr. Thompson asks representatives advice on pin­ ball machine question...House divided on extent of their evils in Claremont... Interviewed delegates proud of year's achieve­ ments...Council has served as successful tie up between fac-. ul-ly, students, and school board... [ 14 J


Jr. Hi Leaders Build for Future Junior High Council opens year with new resolutions...New members arrive with varied viewpoints...Importance of organ­ ization demonstrated as younger members given voice in school government...Junior High elections conducted under auspices of council...R. Henzie easily bests rivals for Junior High presidency...Initiative taken by councilmen as effort made to change constitution...Heroic members burn midnight oil attempting to probe depths of obscure legal phrases ... Disagreements split council in constitutional controversy ...Liberal minded lower house makes drastic decision, decides to disregard old document completely ...Entirely new constitution formu­ lated by lower house...Mr. Wilby, council adviser, suggests projects for governing body...Council throws influence in sup­ port of Red Cross Drive ...Junior High Party aided by legisla­ tors... Council prepares for advent of sixth graders... Future members of C.H.S. invited for look around new stamping grounds...Council makes arrangements and carries out plans ...Sixth graders duly impressed by magnitude of establish­ ment...Chapge in constitution enables council to nominate potential Junior High officers for next year ... Merits of candidates considered by thoughtful councilmen ...Junior High considers council suggestions...Council influence great in elections ... Conscientious members present plans for new improvements ...Council year proves worthwhile... Importance of Junior Council realized by student body...Serves as training ground for younger students...Responsibility taken well by members of group...Students given better idea of how to carry on C.H.S. activities ...Coming years will see even more important position taken by Junior High governing body...

First Row: 8. Reeves, M. Forbes, P. Quick, R. Hen­ zie, S. Barnes, M. Wag­ ner, G. Mertzke. Second Row: F. Copeland, L. Fakler. L. Speirs, W. Sherman, B. A. Hockman, B. Birkel, R. Cooke, T. Wiggins.


Office Staff, Inc. Fills Niche in Student Life Efficient staff essential to smooth running school...C.H.S. secre­ tarial, transportation, grounds and buildings forces leave noth­ ing to be desired...Responsibility for thousand and one details rests on competent shoulders...All activities from issuing locker keys and absence slips, transporting nearly half of school to and from campus, to cleaning up after dances, capably handled ... Latter job usually biggest one, says Frank Gettman, for many years capable manager of Claremont High's numerous build­ ings...Transportation and grounds problems superbly handled by firm of Theunisson and Son, for many years sole contractors for these important jobs...Faithfulness greatly appreciated by all...Secretarial department presided over by Beck and Foster, Inc...Minor tasks sublet to associates Vestal, Slaughter, and Smith...Office department handles report cards, tardiness· themes, absences, money, paper clips, safety pins, and what have you... "If in Need, see office staff at full speed" slogan of busy students...Beautiful grounds and magnificent buildings of C.H.S. need protection...School special police force in per­ son of Clyde Clifton...Sight of marvelous physique causes many prowlers to forget criminal intentions...Students need have no fears over safety of belongings left in buildings... Entire force of all departments gives generously of time...All possible efforts made to keep students contented...Attitude of cheerful helpfulness always prevails... Staff willing to assist each and all under most trying circumstances...Entire student body feels, if all do not express, appreciation to "Frank," "Ten­ ny," "Bob," "Mrs. Beck," "Miss Foster," and "Cliff:' for their cooperation... [ 16 l


Alert studen.ts free­ ly disc uss c urrent world problems in S o c ia l S t u d ie s class.

In th is br ief section we have endeavored to s how the varied opp o r t u n it ie s presented by Claremont High Sc hool in the preparation of students for an active and full l ife in o ur American Democracy.

I n te r e s te d girls learn to make the ir own c l o t h in g in regular Domestic Science classes.

[ 17)


Active members of Or c h e str a ta k e part in class rou­ tine r ehearsal.

Practic al Cooking c la s s s t ude nts busy concoc t in g a n app et izi ng menu.

[ 18 ]


Clever you�g art­ is t s p r o d ucing character portraits of f e 11 ow art stu­ dents.

Observant Wood­ shop boys watch instructor's demon­ stration on use of lathe.

[ 19 )


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....

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Typing s t u de n t s i n cre a s e t h e i r speed technique in Business Training classes.

[ 20]

Scientifically mind­ ed Ph y s i c s class completes interest­ ing experiments.


·--P to date Biology :.ass members per­ ::::>r m one of ·many exp er i m en t s on ::ompa rative fo o d -·alues.

J\dvanced Mathe­ matics s t u d en t s discover short cuts to the solutions of intricate problems.

[ 21 ]


Student dra ftsmen turr: out deta iled plates ir. M echan ical Drawing class es.

Con c e n tr a t e d study of En gl i s h and Modern Lan­ gu a ge s go e s to complete the well­ rounded education o f Cl a r e mon t's young citizens.

[ 22 J


The hub of Claremont High

School life.


JOHN TALBOTT President

JEAN CLEVELAND Secretary

[ 24 ]

PRISCILLA SPEIRS Vice-President ELMER MILLER Business Manager

J!M RICHMOND Annual Editor

LEISA BRONSON Advertising Manager


Jean Whitney William Johnson Barbara Briggs Bruce Billesbach

Gerald Baughman Virginia Edwards Jim Richmond Nancy Reed

Constance Hockman John Talbott Priscilla Speirs Leisa Bronson


Roland Allen Hazel Smith Doris Hernandez Mildred Raisbeck

[ 28 l

Mary Duddridge Donald Beatty Barbara Slaughtnr Jean Barber Stanley Barnes

Herschel Wheeler Phyllis Popenoe Marjorie Morrison Betty Chidlaw


Guthrie Darr Frances Vestal Kenneth Chidlaw Genevieve Wood

Janet Sanford Donald Wheeler Nancy Bybee Bryan Johns

[ o:1ald Peck Emily Ann Ament Edwin Popenoe Dorothy Young

[ 29 J


Juniors Point

T. Gutierrez, B. J. Swarts, J. Dolcater. M. Bulkley, M. St. Clair.

Juniors start year with no limit to pos­ sibilities ...Class united on important issues . . Miller, outstanding choice for presidency, rides easily into office . . . Nicholson drafted for position of social-chairman . . . Social activities immediately gotten under way as en-­ terprising class gives first dance of year . . C.H. S.social whirl given flying start with Junior "Hard Times Party" ... Atmosphere of secrecy pre­ vails as arrangements made for secret sweater arrival . Class in conflict over choice of color Radical classmen wish to dazzle Seniors with loud sweaters . . Juniors undisturbed by derision of upper classmen .. . Disre­ gard futile attempt of Seniors to re­ spring old sweaters . . Zero hour approaches as teal-dad members as­ semble in hall ... Silence predomin­ ates as unsuspecting student body studies on . . . Signal given to launch attack ... Confusion reigns as entire C.H.S.taken by surprise . . Seniors alone feign indifference to occasion . Class congratulated by rest of student body on novel sweater . Junior influences in school increases as year progresses .. Superior Junior athletes often take spotlight for out­ standing feats . . Great promise shown for victories in coming year ... Ranks of Scholarship Society enlarged by Junior master-minds ... Mid-year elec[ 30 l

A. Paul C. Vestal K. Duddridge A. L. Vought

E. Morrison M.H.Lim R. E. Nicholson B. Sanders

A.Cox G. McCrossen I. Talbott F. Contreras


for Forty-one

J

Cleveland P. Pierson M.Genung J Sawyer

M. Oliver C. Hudson B. S. Mobley R. Chidlaw

L. Workman D. L. Boileau H Keller F. Billesbach

B. Brooks, E. Miller, D Steudler. M. Opperman, M. McConnell.

tions prove strength of incumbents ... Miller's popularity shown as office re­ tained . . . Nicholson to undertake management of reception . . . Class acllvity redoubled as time passes ... Noon finds business minded members reaping m profits from doughnut sales Reception looms as big event on class horizon . . . Committees have frantic conferences . . Class meetings scene of feverish activity ... Treasurer Billesbach figures madly ... Tri-Schoo: play profits to fill Junior coffers . . . Drama minded juniors take prominent parts as play gives three crack per­ formances . ·: . Senior ditch day pro­ vides Juniors with opportunity to exert leadership and position .. Class con­ fident of ability to step in Senior shoes . : . Reception now given undivided attention by persevering Juniors . Members of class have preoccupied mr of mystery ... Seniors show unmistak­ Big momeni able signs of curiosity arr ves as Class of '41 pays tribute to graduating Seniors ... Greatest expec­ tations fulfilled as Reception over­ whelming success . . . Juniors look back over year's accomplishments ... Prospects loom for greater future tri­ umphs . . Members able to point with ·pride to results of eventful year . . . Class united in purpose and determi­ nation . . High standards set by seniors will be lived up to by Class of '41 [ 31 )


First Row: D. Knott. B. Yerkes, S. Lee, S. Boake, C. Fredendall, M. Cooper, Fr. St. Clair, R. Sulzbach, J. Gardner, J. McCrossen. Second Row: B. Mei, B. J. Garris, D Johnson, P. Robinson, M. Bulkley, M. Bronson, fl. St. Clair, B. Cottam, C. Griffi}h, V. Williams. Third Row: F. Baum, L. Wood, P. Kimball, A. Wagner, M. McNamce, J. Caldwell, J. Holt, A. Rowand, G. Gonzales. Fourth Row: N. McCrossen, L. Garcia, S. Parrilla, W. Twogood, C. Allen, P. Sherman, T Garner, V. Johns, R. Dunn. Fifth Row: G. Yrigollen, E. Lorbeer, W. Poper.oe, D. Healy, E. Parker, C. Jaeger, W. Henzie, E. Dominguez, T. Gonzales.

Sophomores Finish First Year's Test More spirited, public minded classmen enter Senior High... Busy year off to flying start with class elections...Ever popular Henzie stands on usual platform, sweeps field of opposition, hailed as president by jubilant classmates ... Men of 42 add brilliancy to valiant C.H.S. grid machine...Other loyal members bolster team with unusually loud and witty remarks from sidelines... Girls of class unflinchingly aid in great work .. . Bruised grid heroes quickly soothed by feminine admirers .. . Class represented by brilliant group of intellectuals on Scholar­ ship Society...Gaps left in brass and string sections of orches­ tra capably filled by Soph musicians...Class represented by brilliant interpretation of "brat" bit part in Student Body Play ... "B" basketball team composed largely of tenth year men.. . · Forward McCrossen achieves fame for Wolf Pack ...Controver­ sial issues in riotous mid-year elections appear sure-fire mate­ rial for '42 student body elections... Outstanding civic ability and depth of thought carry presidential candidate McCrossen victorious through hectic campaign...Second semester marked by ever-increasing tenth year prominence...Scribblers-Sanc­ tum Sanctorum of literary circle-invaded by Sophomore prod­ igies...Brilliant tenth year brains on exhibition at gigantic C.S.F. Regional Convention in April...Bronson's preparations for annual Soph Dance intensive... Local girls rush for leap year dates...Social committees scramble as night arrives... Dancing augmented by games, music, food...Congratulations in order as happy throng breaks up...At year'9 end class members win prominent place in student body elections... [ 32 J


Ninth Grade Shines at Halfway Mark Class of '43 enters last step in Junior High ... Year marks end of carefree days... "Industry" is class motto as end of Senior High preparation in sight...New fields ahead for members of exceptional class...First semester election returns put Copeland out in front...Stocks selected as vice-president... Privileged class participates in Senior High activities...Orchestra supplemented by brilliant ninth grade artists...Social chairman Jessen supervises outstanding Junior High Party...Members of class show marked athletic abilities... Boys able to begin prac­ tice with first string clubs...Look forward to day when full­ Hedged membership allowed...Girls take prominent place in inter-class competition ... Give Seniors uneasy moments... Semester votes give Sherman presidency...Class takes stand on important student body issues... Frosh influence in Junior Council felt as class leads lower house to new conquests... Members give wholehearted support to Red Cross and Chil­ dren's Crusade drives...Novel idea hit upon for annual "shin­ dig" ...Fairmont Park, usual scene of class revelry, abandoned ...All time high in parties hit at Frosh hay ride...Class united in determination to enliven Senior High...Fine standards of achievement to characterize class...Graduation exercises im­ patiently awaited by near sophomores... Eventful year con­ cluded with rush for diplomas ...First part of High School jour­ ney completed...Success of year due to cooperation and guidance of capable advisers, Miss Willows and Mr. Charlson

First Row: G. Mertzke, K. Jessen, H. Carter, M. Timmons, V. Aguilera, P. Timberlake, E. Shaw, M. Allison, K. Walton, M. R. Mobley. Second Row: M. V. Fredendall, D. Stafford, F. Copeland, B. Reeves, R. Cooke, M. M. Michael, E. J. Birkel, E. L. Rohrs, P. Squires, W. Cory, L. Fakler. Third Row: T. Snyder, L. Olson, M. Saunders, M. Cole, R. Henzie, A. Jacobson, G. Reid, D. Harrod. Fourth Row: R. Holtz, L. Guevara, A. Salazar, M True, W. Sherman.


First Row: E. Popenoe, B. Cooper, H. Widmar, B. Colvin N. Taylor, J. Hamilton, B. Billes­ bach, H. Ordway, L. Tucker, M. Forbes, P Strong, K. Garris. Second Row: C. Allen, U Lopez, E. Martinez, L. Medina, M. Wagner, M. Koch, B. Chance E. Colbath, V. Fields, G. Cooper. Third Row: E. Bre1tner, P. Hudson, J. Ellis, B. Carnes, B. Cooper, M. Burgess, B. A. Hockman, M. Daves, S. deLapp, A. Saunders. Fourth Row: C. Russi, E. Jones, R. Sanders, L Stafford, R. Heath, 0. Hicks. A. Felix, J. Williams, D. Tooker, T. Wiggins, B. Cory. Filth Ro-•.,: W. Hendricks, J She rman, T. Marquis, D. Towne, J. Saltonstall, L. Perron, H. Dyer.

Second Yearmen Hit Their Stride Eighth grade completes second year high school prep course... Age mellows, experience purifies finished grammar school prod­ ucts...Exuberance of youth modified as coat of sagacity and experience applied... Full-fledged high school upper classmen now ready for production of C.H.S. assembly line ...Class meets to consolidate lines after summer's heat ...Irresponsibile Wig­ gins "blitzkreigs" rivals for presidency, immediately assumes office with characteristic vigor, brilliance...New regime gives much demanded action... Social season send-off sees scramble for dates for Junior High Dance ...Success of sparkling affair largely due to eighth grade cooperation...Wide-awake social committee visits Douglas Aircraft factory...High school fledglings gape at production of latest type fighting craft... "U.S. to be invincible in air if far-seeing production methods utilized by Douglas prevalent in all aviation enterprises of nation" declares average eighth grader upon return...Science teacher Mr. Ar­ rington also leads trips for scholastically minded class members ...Griffith Park Observatory goal of grueling trek...Weariness forgotten as wonders of the universe displayed before mar­ veling C.H.S. audience ...Return trip finds students massaging overly strained necks from gazing heavenward...Los Angeles Museum also paid visit by class members...Despite fine show­ ing, male regime of Semester I replaced by female regime in Semester II under ingratiating Barbara Hockman...Second Junior High Dance also achieves success...Uproarious May social wind-up held at Fairmont Park...Willing worker Wagner wins praise for preparations. .. [ 34 ]


Grads Leave Grammar School Behind C.H.S.invaded by grammar school graduates ...Ranks of Woll Pack swelled by infiltration of new members ...Under capable leadership of Prexy Birkel 7th graders assume position in life of school ...Newcomers' apprehension turns to characteristic assurance as months progress ...Men of class become active members of victorious Jr. High teams ... Slippery hipped rookies steal show from elders as jay-hi football team has smashing season ...Girls train diligently for athletic conquest two years hence ...Civic minded classmen participate in Jr. High Council ...Thoughtful seventh graders propose worthwhile measures ...Work to improve school for six year stay ...Interest in schol足 astic activity runs high .... Seventh grade guys and gals look forward to jay-hi dance with anticipation ... Social committee works feverishly on plans and preparations ...Great day arrives and class members thrill at dazzling event ...Fine show足 ing made by mob at first Jr. High "ankle flip" ...Public-minded. seventh graders enter into Red Cross drive ...Xmas boxes filled to overflowing by generous studes ...Mid-year mark approaching ... Semester election results heatedly contested ...Clas3 split into bitter factions over several important issues ...Quick comes through with victory ...New feeling of solidarity reunites class behind Quick's shining leadership ...Class looks ahead for inspiration ... Sight of upper class leadership in musical, athletic, and dramatic fields causes seventh grade determina足 tion to surpass present standards of excellence ... Spring brings speed-up of social activity ... Seventh grade once more takes prominent position ...Jr. High hop repeated at Women's Club ...Year nears end--class feels fully prepared to assume more responsible position . : . First Row F. Lopez, 8. L. McCullough, P. Quick, S. Whihng, M. Naftel, L Welch, S. Barnes, M S Dunn, V White, B J Higby, L Stocks. Second Row: P. Lee, R. Workman, F. Sabichi, C. Harrod, W Heflin, C Gutierrez, L. Guer足 rero, E. Contreras, R. Wheeler, V. Diggle. 8. L. Bissell, F. Wilson, J. Whitney. Third Row: S. Clark, R. Achaves, A. Gutierrez, R. Smith, 8. Birkel. H Coffey, R. Wheeler, 8. Fields, L Speirs. Fourth Row E. Martinez, A. Dominguez. T Quick, J. Morrow R. Gunther G. Colbath, C. Manker, j Rankin. D. Brown, J Spencer, B. Julian


l


- LIFE - L, Y - LIBERTY

- HAPPINESS - HAPPINESS - H/

- LIFE - LIFE - LIFE - LIF' ' .- L I B E R T Y - L I B E r


LIBERTY "During the throes and conuulsions of

the ancient world, during the agoniz­

ing spasms of infuriated man, seeking through blood and slaughter his long lost

liberty, it was not wonderful that the agitation of the billows should reach euen

this distant and peaceful shore; that this

should be more felt and feared by some

and less by others; and should diuide opinions as to measures of safety; but every difference of opinion is not a differ­ ence of principle."

THOMAS JEFFERSON.

..

r 38 1


,-

From these we chose the things wedo


JIM RICHMOND Editor-in-Chief

M. R. VANDERWOOD Advertising Manager EDWIN POPENOE Snapshot Editor

ISABELLA GRANT Assistant Editor

BRUCE BILLESBACH Art Editor

GERALD BAUGHMAN Sports Editor

KEITH ELLIS Photography Editor

RALPH BRADLEY Advertising Manager WILLIAM JOHNSON Business Manager

HENRY CURME Calendar

LEISA BRONSON Literary Editor

JEAN BARBER Student Life Editor

Staff Members Bring Task to Close

( 40 1


Wolfpacket Blossoms 1n 1940 Wolf Packet to appear semi-monthly... School expects grea: things under Editor Chidlaw... Brilliant staff assembled... Enthusiastic members work on first edition...Violent expres­ sions emerge from Wolf Packet room as mimeograph machine and stapler jam... First edition appears... Overworked Editor Chidlaw suffers partial breakdown...Juicy advertising con-· tracts accepted...Controversial "Question of the Week" intro­ duced...Candy bars presented to lucky certificate-holding subscribers...Profitable deal with candy company elates school ...Friday the thirteenth backward issue appears...Color Week sponsored by school paper...Colorful costumes captivate cam­ pus ... First Wolf Packet party held ... Bronson hostess to local journalists ... Hollywood sends glamorous delegation...Serial •story stuns subscribers...Nominees Oliver, Popenoe take defeat gracefully as Barnes elected second semester editor ... School applauds Chidlaw for excellence of work...New editor makes innovations, inaugurates comic strip...Wolf Packet sponsors popularity contest...Vanderwood hits jackpot... Darr chosen most handsome boy in school... Students protest as results of "best necker" race withheld...Staff spends day on desert... Officer gently reprimands driver Baughman for speeding... Call of the wild attracts local scribes...Kluk-kluk klub receives new members ... Staff remains mute on activities of trip... Scribes Barnes, Bronson, Chidlaw, and Wheeler attend Red­ lands editors' conference ...Stimulating effects noted in follow­ ing issue... Wrathful students object as intimate secrets printed in gossip columns...Mammoth edition produced as final issue ...Paper becomes vital part of school activities...All express gratitude to adviser,. Miss Escudero... Wolf Packet sets high standard for next year to duplicate ...

First Row: D. Johnson, F. Vestal, M. Cooper, M. Vanderwood, Miss Escudero, J. Sanford, M. Pierce, P. Speirs, E. Morrison. Second Row: R. Baughman, D. Chidlaw, P. Robinson, L. Workman, K. Jessen, E. Popenoe, G. Mertzke, D. Wheeler, I. Grant. ';'hird Row: B. Billesbach, B. Reeves, R. Cooke, S. Barnes, B. Chidlaw, L. Bronson, G. Baugh­ man.


First Row: N. Reed, E. Popenoe, J. Whitney, H. Curme, E. A. Ament, P. Pierson, R. Sulzbach. Second How: M. Buckley, U. Morinaka, M. Genung, M. H. Lim, L. Workman, R. E. Nicholson, J. Sanford, G. Darr, J. Sawyer. Third Row: F. Contreras, C. Hos:;kman, R. Chidlaw, I. Grant, M. Oliver, J_ Cleveland, D. Steudler, J. Aguilera. Fourth Row: V. Edwards, G. Wood, P. Popenoe, J, Richmond, P. Jones, S. Nelson, Miss Escudero, P. Speirs, B. Chidlaw.

French Club Trips Prove C.H.S� Highlight

Bi-monthly "seances" attract majority of school's French scholars ...Students descend upon fellow members' homes lured by prospects of conversation and refreshment...La langue fran­ caise spoken exclusively for forty-five minute duration... Club treasury soars as fines increase...Investigation of rules infrac­ tions by Treasurer Contreras nets huge sum from English whis­ pering club members...Official business easily taken care of by smooth-speaking "Frenchman" Curme...Glib-tongued prexy overwhelming choice for both semesters...Meetings marked by vigorous arguments and riotous games...Trend of modern youth clearly shown in taste of entertainment... "Concentration" supplants "Je suis alle(e) a Paris et J' ai achete-" as favorite occupation... "Thought is cheap everywhere" says Adviser Miss Escudero...Meeting disrupted at Sulzbach residence ...Fumigator invades home of club member...Sabotage sus-. pected as self asserted bee-banisher gasses linguists through partition... Hostess signs treaty and ritual continues ... Festive air often augmented by appearance of evening dresses and tux­ edos on concert nights... Members Chidlaw and Workman lead group to musical heights as song books acquired ...Taix Restaurant sends bill for French bread shortage after club descends en masse...C.H. S. returns bill for Talbott's tooth... Incident forgotten as club thrills to immortal French film.. . "Harvest" seen on same eve as French dinner...Social chair­ men Popenoe ard Speirs conceive novel idea for Mardi Gras ... Members wildly enthusiastic over plans for taxi. dance and blackouts, until weather and lack of dates forces cancellation ... "Port of Shadows" viewed at Esquire as year draws toward a close ...Romantic influence of Gabin and Morgan in pnze­ winnmg film enjoyed...

-[ 42]


Spanish Club Splits as Numbers Rise School Spanish courses attract throngs...Spanish club draws large gate with social activities, refreshments...Group becomes unwieldy, jams most commodious domiciles...Miss Escudero worried by situation, decides separation into two sections only solution...Bi-weekly meetings replaced by monthly confabs, a.s groups divided...Business and games conducted in Spanish ...English whispering culprits cracked down upon, sign lan­ guage also prohibited...High points of sessions reached as refreshments to be given ravenous members unveiled...Both sections collaborate on Spanish dinner...Torrid Latin recipes chosen by social chairman and committee...Banquet prepared as publicity build-up campaign turns on heat...Leathery­ tongued gourmets enjoy offerings, food too hot for layman... Proceeds put apart to bloster exchequer for spring carryings­ on...Meetings now devoted to Olvera excursion...Social com­ mittees untangle red tape as plans for trip prepared...Dinner at "La Golondrina" provides Spanish atmosphere...Crannies of Olvera Street explored by more inquisitive members... Few util­ ize tiffs with peeved inhabitants as opportunity for real-life con­ versation ... Spanish movie attended, some attempt at compre­ hension made...Club takes over booth in Letterman's carnival ...Balloons and darts decided on by chairman McCrossen... Priceless family heirlooms go at sacrifice as local homes ran­ sacked for booth's white elephant prizes ... At year's end re­ flective club members decide more opportunities for meetings desirable ...Despite this fact, club alumni to meditate with fond­ ness upon year's activities, find selves well equipped for conver­ sation with neighbors to the south... First Row: E. Dominguez. F. Billesbach, R. Henzie, D. Stafford. D. Beatty, Miss Escudero, E. Morrison, K. Chidlaw, D. L. Boileau, H. Wheeler, M. McConnell, W. Popenoe. Second Row: L. Garcia, I. Talbott, T. Snyder, M. Michael, J. Adams, B. S. Mobley, N. McCros­ sen. M. Opperman, M. McNamee. J. McCrossen. Third Row: E. Parker. M. Bulkley, M. St. Clair, B. Cottam, T. Garner, J. Dolcater, G. Reid, _. B. Sanders. A. Rowand, D. Peck. Fourth Row: W. Henzie. W. Cory, J. Talbott, I. Grant. G. Yrigollen, B. Johns, C. Hudson, J. Caldwell, R. Allen. F. St. Clair, C. Clark, R Yerkes.


First Row: N. Bybee, M. Pierce, E. Morrision, M. Cooper, M. Bronson, L. Bronson. Second Row: J. Barber, I. Grant, C. Hockman, J. Lee. Third Row: S. Barnes, E. Vought, E. Popenoe, H. Curme, J. Richmond.

Scribblers Finish Big Twelfth Year Scribblers in 12th year... Adviser Mrs. Hull leads new membership drive...Variety of presentations cultivated... Members meet to organize-hear product of summer's work ...Applicants Grant, Lee, and Pierce submit work anonymously...Air of mystery prevails as Mrs. Hull reads unknown compositions... Applicants anxiously await verdict ...Scribblers sit spellbound -say nothing-as reading of compositions ended... Grant, Lee, and Pierce jubilant, heartily congratulated over penetration of select literary circle ... Ex-member Hawkins incorporated into club in advisorial capacity ... Immediately assumes prominent position with stories, poems, and essays...Senior Shakespear­ ean study stimulates semi-skillful simulations of Stratford's Bard ...Special notice given "To Be or Not to Be"-by member Bar­ ber ... Wench pulls faint at self-same meeting... Barber cooled by torrid tales ...Irate member Curme threatens resignation if incident repeated ...Sparks fly as play and meeting schedules clash... Members struggle to preserve creative output ... Com­ plete year passes without prosecution on club's only ruling ... Not one called on "three meetings without contribution" regu­ lation ... Scribblers cooperate closely with Annual staff ... Cream of literary crop chosen for El Espiritu...Club honored as Scribblers' contributions make up majority of literary section... All-Senior group looks for new blood ...Junior Morrison taken into ranks...Sophomores Cooper and Bronson join all-time literary greats Page, Dunn, and Curme as Sophomore prodigies ... Literary and lexiconical heights scaled on beginning of fourth page of Hawkins' forty-five minute Philippines travelogue ... Novel Scribblers' booth attracts throngs at Letterman's Car­ nival... Next year's members look forward with optimism de­ spite loss of over three-fourths of group with class of '40... [ 44]


Convention Fills Scholarship Society Calendar Convention holds important place in Scholarship Society activi­ ties ...Members madly rush preparations for arrival of delegates ...Date set for April 20th ...Pomona agrees to cooperate and offers facilities ...Delegates arrive in droves from one hundred and twenty Southern California high schools ...Last count shows over eleven hundred ...Authorities impressed by Schol­ arship Federation ...Assembly and business meeting opens day in Big Bridges ...Claremont's Curme presides in admirable fash­ ion ...Meeting breaks and members separate and go to differ­ ent panel discussions ...Attempt made by youth to settle prob­ lems of today's world in one sitting ...Convention discussion theme-"America's Place in a World at War" ...Delegates forget problems in afternoon's entertainment ...Brains spin in swing time at Student Union Hop ...Science wonders exhibited by college students ...Dr. Whitney demonstrates giant pendu­ lum amidst "ohs" and "ahs" in Bridges ...Manual Arts submits bid for next year's convention ...Mob dispersed in record time ... Claremont chapter continues regular activities ...Amend­ ment proposed to constitution ...Executive officers to be allowed one scholarship point in entrance requirements ...School for­ gotten in various outside trips ..."Gone with the Wind" seen by first semester members ...Preparations made for alumni lunch­ eon ...Mr. Forney, last year's adviser, invited to attend ... Important topic of general interest selected for visiting speaker ...Adviser Mr. Booth receives vote of thanks from current members ...Banquet provides successful reunion for many ex-C.H.S. noteworthies ...Society congratulated on success of convention ...Society's year draws to a close as luncheon passes ... Mem­ bers Ament, Edwards, Grant, Wood, Curme, and Ellis receive gold seal of life membership at graduation ...

First Row: J Whitney, G Wood, M. Bronson, J Gardner, F St Cla1r, J Gapp, V Edwards. Second Row L. Bronson, l Grant, P. Robinson, B. Brooks, J. Cleveland, E Ament. Third Row· C Allen, S. Barnes, Mr Booth, H. Curme, L Workman.


First Row: G. Yrigollen, J. Talbott, H. Duddridge, W. Johnson, D. Beatty, S. Barnes, C. Baughman. Second Row: S. Parrilla, B. J. Swarts, E. Vought, D. Peck, B. Johns. G. Darr, H. Keller, J. Aguilera, C. Gettman. Third Row: Mr. Martin, R. Chidlaw, R. Dunn, K. Chidlaw, G. McCrossen, R. Bradley, B. Billesbach, C. Clark, R. Guerrero.

Lettermen Welcome New Faculty Members Lettermen's ranks swelled by influx of Soph and Junior athletes ...Exclusive clique of three-year lettermen resentful as new C.I.F. ruling prohibits school financial aid in purchasing sweat­ ers ...Nevertheless record display of maroon and grey illumines campus ...Industrious athletes do or die for C.H.S. as foes en­ countered on gridiron, tennis and basketball courts, track and baseball fields ...Time still found for vigorous club activities ... Aggressive athletes act inspiredly as grid hero Johnson chosen president ...Local damsels thrill to display of lettermen's brains, brawn, brilliance at November Football Banquet ...Husky high school heroes parade grace and charm, refute jealous claims of social ineptitude ...Year sees arrival of more members ... Fledglings look forward with apprehension to spring party as veterans anticipate merry, merry horseplay ...Woodshop lathes, bandsaws, run at full capacity, record turnout of pad­ dles achieved ... Special rituals devised for faculty members Mr. Wilby and Mr. Charlson in initiations ... ,Bradley's Big Bear cabin chosen as site for festivities ...Initiates royally enter­ tained at Friday evening feast ...Entertainment committee member Billesbach serves honors with paddles ...MM. Charlson and Wilby honorably mentioned ...Overly feted members given time to cool off with romp through weekend of fishing, skating, swimming ...Annual Lettermen's Carnival comes at year's close ... Varied attractions of gay event draw throngs ...Proceeds split with closely cooperating annual staff ...Graduating ath­ letes leave permanent contribution as long hoped for football field fence fund founded ... [ 46 J


G. A. A. Has Best of Years Girls' Athletic Association organizes girls for team sports ... C.H.S. amazons prove unfaltering devotion to local cause ... Monday and Wednesday practices draw big turnouts ...G.A.A. membership on competitive basis ...Girls battle from start for coveted titles ...Points given for effort expended in organization activities ...Five hundred points give members letters; one thousand brings pin ...Girls look forward to time when season's achievements to be recognized as awards presented at Senior Assembly ... Athletic Department works out inter-class game schedule ...Increasing rivalry brings heated contests ...Bas-• ketball, speedball, hockey, and baseball under regular supervi­ sion ...Tri-County League play-days climax each major sport ...Tennis placed on different schedule ...Invitational matches with League schools set up for successful racquet squad ...Bus rides highlight trips to and from outside combats ..."Babes in brawl!" says Wolf Packet as songs resound from bus ...Spreads held near year's end for G.A.A. participants ...Initiation of new members important event in closing months ...Sophomores take over important part of organization ritual ...Sprightly neophytes don glad rags for big day ...Greet early students at C.H.S. por­ tals as compelled ...Autographing eggs highlight of gala pro­ gram ...Ritual ends with food and fellowship ...Morrison serves supreme in spreads ...Girls spring sweater innovation idea ...Orders long in being filled ... Hockey playday finally brings out jackets ...Time arrives for next elections ...Capable leaders cop in contest ...Year draws to a close ...Club makes bow to Mrs. Schafer ...Leadership and cooperation big factor in best of years ...

First Row: P. Kimball, J. Gardner, C. Hudson, E. A. Ament. Second Row: E. Morrison, M. Morrison, Mrs. Scha­ fer, I. Gront, M. McCon­ nell.


D. L. Boileau, C. Hudson, /. Barber, M R. Vanderwood.

Girls' League Widens Social Scope Girls' League composed of Senior High girls... Big year enjoyed under effective administration of Prexy Barber and Social Chair­ man Vanderwood... Miss McKee joins Adviser Miss Willows as organization counselor... Football banquet looms as first important League activity ... Trouble rises as library withheld for gridders' feast... Hall converted into banquet scene by re­ sourceful committee...Coach Heath gives interesting pigskin talk...Elections held as after-dinner feature...Captain-elect and most valuable man receive ovation...Evening ends with pleasing rhythms of Koontz band at Little Civic ...League handles daily candy sale... Profits go to Casa Colina...Members decide on program of one-act pl ays as money-raiser .. . Bronson-led committee searches country for suitable dramas...· "Command Performance" and 'Teapot on Rocks" enthusiasti­ cally received by audience ... Box-office draw swells funds... Girls work on...Cake sales bring in large profits ...Kitchen clean-up crew brings Mrs. Williams' approval...Valentine Dance proposed...Violent argument as to type of "shindig" ... Girls' choice source of controversy...Date bureau settles ques­ tion to general satisfaction...Decorations committee labors... Vanderwood in quandary as use of bus restricted... Potted palms imported regardless...Difficulties conquered and dance is hit for all... Candy disappearances worry League, and treas­ ury... Output for glass case proves worthwhile investment... Increased income for year...Sizable gifts to Casa Colina and Red Cross... Cooperation of members plus helpful as_sistance of advisers results in job well done... [ 48)


Spotlight Finds Stage Crew at Last Stage crew given ever-increasing amount of publicity on "for­ gotten man" score... "Men behind the set" as famed as dra­ matic brethren...Appearance of piano-pushers Yerkes, Ellis, Johnson, invariably draws thunderous applause ... Fame due in large measure to C.H.S. sets, stage work hailed in 1940 as finest ever...September sees organization and efficiency pro­ moted as membership slashed ...Saturday mornings find mem­ bers straggling onto stage after strenuous Friday night date... Compact group does excellent job on "June Mad" ...Elaborate set fitting background for work of cast...Between-production­ times see crew busy with movies, assembly spotlights and cur­ tains, dance lighting...Girls' League duo of January furnishes diversion before titanic operetta set constructed...Chief de­ signer and director Booth produces for "Ruddigore" most beau­ tiful set yet seen on high school stage ... Entire crew wins plaudits for work in this extravaganza ... Stage Manager Ellis' cynical comments, "It ain't worth it all," "Nobody appreciates us" sound unconvincing in face of evident exuberance, smashing success...As year draws to close and gradua­ tion of senior crew members looms, Mr. Booth tears hair over next year's crew ...Tri-school trio followed by Senior plays ... Day of play finds crew members on stage applying finishing touches to sets...All classes forgotten...Mr. Booth calls "Cur­ tain," Ellis brings up lights...Johnson handles spot from projec­ tion booth... As Yerkes bounces down final curtain the 1940 stage crew careers end.. Crew makes collective bow... "That's another one" is cryptic comment as members emerge for refresh­ ments and congratulations...

first Row. M. St. Clair, B. Slaughter F Vestal H. Keller Second Row: R. Yerke!'!, E. Dominguez, P Pierson, M. Saunders. Third Row: E. Miller, Mr. Booth W. Johnson.


.

Front Row: B. Yorkes, D Knott, P Kimball, W. Henzie. Secona Row: P. Jones, C. Allen, J. Whitney, V. Edwards, G Wood, N. Reed, C. Hockman, E. Popenoe, B. Johns Third Row: D. Wheeler, G. Baughman, D. Peck, K. Chidlaw, Mrs. Howe, G. Darr, C. Jaeger, W. Poponoe, P. Sherman,;-S. Barnes, H. Curme.

Orchestra Completes Full Schedule

Newly formed instrumental groups highlight Senior Orchestra's successful year ...Woodwind-string combination leads off in renowned style ...Quintet aids chorus and soloists at impressive Xmas program ...Presentation of Girls' League plays ani­ mated by full orchestra's rendition of Saint- Saens' "Baccanale" ... High school audience electrified as "Moon Love," "18th Cen­ tury Drawing Room," and "Our Love" bring modern tempo to orchestra ensemble in February ... L. A. Philharmonic member inspires C.H.S.string quartet for presentation of Hayden's "Lark" at Women's Club, April orchestra assembly, and Music Festival ...Woodwind trio successfully interprets difficult Italian cham­ ber music in numerous programs ...Difficult task assigned members as presentation of "Ruddigore" approaches ...Glory of production reflected upon assisting artists from orchestra department ... Delegate to be chosen for National Music Edu­ cators' Conference ...Violinist Edwards achieves supreme suc­ cess in representing C.H.S.at L. A. get together of nation's best musicians ... Hasty call to orchestra as Tri-School play reaches completion ... Soaring melodies of Wagner's "Lohengrin" inspire performers to greater heights as joint-program holds sway on April 5th ...Members selected to represent high school in Scott combo ...Local musicians contribute to outstanding success of Southern California High School Symphony Orchestra ...Edwards and Ellis play in college group with eye toward future ...Local boy Darr signs with Koontz pickup band ... Graduation nears and Leader Mrs. Howe looks with apprehen­ sion at diminishing ranks for coming year ...Junior members provide fitting climax to elders' career at Senior Graduation ... next year's orchestra resolves to carry on with previous stand­ ards of excellence despite fact that over half of group taken as class of '40 leaves school .. .

[ 50]


Jr. Orchestra Discovers Talent Baseball teams have extensive "farm systems" ...Purpose to develop rookies, give them experience, confidence, training ... Claremont High School's Senior Orchestra has its "farm" ... Junior High Orchestra serves to introduce young musicians to orchestra work ...Teaches cooperation, skill with instruments, gives confidence necessary for good performance in Senior High ... Some members learn very quickly ...Augment Senior Orchestra for several important public appearances ...Mem­ bers Taylor, Sanders, J. Sherman and W. Sherman found inte­ gral part of special operetta orchestra ...Entire Junior Orchestra receives thrill of their lives ...Allowed to play with Senior group at orchestra assembly in February ...Violaist Taylor and Violinist Sanders bow for famous string quartette ...Clarinetist Sherman adds to perfect harmony of new, but equally renowned woodwind trio ... Junior High Playnight audience enjoys music of Junior Orchestra in first solo appearance of year ...Enthusi­ asm so great return engagement played ... Horn player Olson stars on mellophone at Boy Scout Court of Honor ... Receives much applause ... Seventh grade orchestra provides place for beginning instrumentalists ...Ably taught by Mrs. Howe ... Rounds out C.H.S. fine instrumental department ...Claremom High School's fine orchestras traditional ... Senior Orchestra need have no fear of talent shortage ...Fine musicians m Jun­ ior High School entirely capable of filling shoes of graduating Seniors ...Orchestra entitled to pat on back for fine showing in 1940 ... Firs! Row: L Welch N. Taylor, M P. Naftel. S Whitinq A Wagnf'r, L Folder, B Cooper, 8. Colvin, S. Barnes, R Sanders, W. Hefhn, F. Alvarez, L. Stocks. Second Row· M. Gaves, H Widmar, E. Popenoe, J. Whit�ey, R. Wheeler, A. Gutierrez, J. Shem m, H Carter, R. Wh eler B L Mc ,ul101.::gh Third Row· B. A Hockman M. S. Dunn, R Cooke, W Sherman, M True, J Saltonstall, R Heath, W. Birkel. L Olson, R. Hcnzie, E. Jones. E. Birkel, Mrs Howe


First Row: P. Robinson, R. E. Nicholson, M. McConnell, D. Knott, Fr. St. Clair, M. Cooper, P. Speirs, J. Whitney, B. Brooks Second Row: D. Johnson, M. Genung, D. Steudler, D. Young, S. Boake, S. Lee, B. Yerkes, M. Vanderwood, B. Chidla:or, J. Sanford, G. Wood, V. Edwards. Third Row: Miss McKee, F. Vestal, Fl. S. Mobley, L. Wood, J. Gardner, C. Hockman, FL St Clair, F. Baum, B. Slaughter, P. Popenoe, N. Reed, J. Sawyer, E. Popenoe. Fourth Row: W. Twogood, C. Gettman, S. Barnes, R. Bradley, D. Wheeler, E. Vought, S. tfonce, K. Chidlaw, L. Workman, E. Miller, H. Keller.

"Ruddigore" Features Chorus Work

Miss McKee's Claremont teaching debut makes favorable impression ...Aspiring songsters rally around standard of new instructor ...Enthusiasm marks beginning as big year looms ahead ...Fall devoted to religious anthems as well as usual gay numbers ... School waits expectantly results of first public appearance ... Students give chorus go-ahead signal as full, wellbalanced melodious harmonies float from balcony at Thanks­ giving program ... Soloists Chidlaw, Steudler, Workman, Barnes, Wheeler try for Yule-tide atmosphere in alternate cold and December heat wave ...Impressive tableaux and appro­ priate music by chorus highlights C.H.S.Christmas program ... Gilbert and Sullivan "Ruddigore" chosen as chorus stand-out spring operetta ...Classes read over score and libretto, hopefuls assemble for tryouts ...Leads "Oakapple" and "Maybud" go. to vocalists Barnes and Wood respectively ... Rehearsals ad­ vance, entire school subordinated to chorus as days for presenta­ tion approach ...Mrs. Hull coaches leads as Miss McKee leads songsters and Mrs. Schafer drills dancers ...Orchestra, stage crew offers fullest cooperation ...Group receives first rewards for labors in visit to Hollywood costuming house ...Dress re­ hearsal onlookers dazzled at beautiful array of Cavalier and 18th century garments as boys completely outshine girls ... Final presentation universally acclaimed ... Success of under­ taking mirrored by gay Wheeler-Barnes sponsored party ... Chorus achieves additional honors ... High School talent Chid• law and Workman chosen for parts in Community Players "Bohemian Girl" ...C.H.S. vocal music department sends se-• lected songsters to L. A. National Music Conference· ...Thirty­ four members of chorus attend Tri-County League musical extravaganza at Chino ... All hail Miss McKee as year ends ...

[ 52]


Econ Club Forms Corporation Economics Research Corporation gives students insight into economic relations...Object of the course is better understanding of such activities...Problems of the day taken up in class discussions ...Corporation formed by members...Class con­ ducted on self-government basis ...Committees formed for dif­ ferent functions... Classifications patterned after departments in system of large organization...Board of trustees elected... Each member given definite assignment... All departments satisfactorily handled by able staff...Arrangements made early for numerous field trips... Transportation on ventures provides main barrier...Early visits made to banks...Better understanding of banking and monetary systems gained as · foundation for later work...Citrus associations provide facts on exchange and large scale buying and selling in changing mar­ kets...Trip to early produce markets in Los Angeles and the Federal Reserve Bank prove stimulating... Factory visits to General Electric plant, Pomona Pumps, Paper Mill, and Vortox show business routine from extreme beginning... Merchandis­ ing followed through all elementary steps... Fact-seeking stu­ dents gain valuable information pertaining to economic life of community ... Special committee goes to work on club scrap­ book...Interesting facts and objects preserved for posterity­ and later use... Clippings of local economic interest included ... Book serves as worth-while record of year's transactions in Claremont... Students get lowdown on current activities in Southern California... Such trips outstanding part of year's opportunities... Group proves one of most valuable... New slant on important ·modern transactions given members... Students emerge with greater understanding of life in our demo­ cratic community...

First Row J. Talbott, D. Davy J Barber, M Pierce L Bronson. D Beatty Second Row C. Gettman. K Chidlaw. R. Yerkes, R. Allen, B. Johns. Third Row. D. Wheeler, R. Bradley. Mr. Martin, S. Barnes, E. Vought.


Coveted Cups Fill Senior· Minds 1939 seniors experience last assembly...Speculations made as to cup winners...Breathless silence engulfs auditorium as Ki­ wanis Club presents trophy ... Award made to senior boy on basis of sportsmanship and scholarship...Outstanding boy of graduating class chosen by fellow students ...Audience grows impalient as name withheld by speaker ...Big moment arrives and Joe MacHarg mounts stage to receive cup... Applause rocks assembly hall...Rotary delegate presents like trophy to outstanding senior girl ...Award made on same basis... Audience 100 per cent enthusiastic as Suzanne Caillet receives honor...Last speaker ascends stage to present D.A.R. award ...Trophy given to girl rated highest by class in citizenship ... Expectations of student body realized as Mary Adeline Cooke called to platform ... Dr. Thompson congratulates winners ... Sincere effort deserves credit ...Student body enthusiastically accepts results...Three students represent highest ideals in C.H.S .... High standard now set for future members of student body... Seniors leave last assembly with mingled feelings ... Cup winners heartily congratulated by fellow students ... Local American Legion chapter furnishes additional source of recog­ nition...Trip to Sacramento Boys' State inaugurated last year . ..Two boys chosen for 1940 journey...Ashley Paul and Garner McCrossen to represent Claremont ...Plans under way for Girls' State representative at press time...Thanks due Legion Auxiliary as Cecile Hudson selected for honor ...

[ 54 l


\Ve uoice our thoughts with­ out rebuke


EVEN UNTO THIS

Soft green carpets and books, hundreds of them-just as Otto had said, except that the trophies in the glass case were more splendid than he had imagined. He longed to look at them more closely. Perhaps the Fraulein would let him later, he thought, but now all he could do was to wait until she finished using the telephone. School must be a pretty busy place. The girls in the outer office were also using telephones and typewriters. And there were papers all over everything-much worse than on the Fraulein's desk. His glance strayed to the open window behind her head. The spring breeze was blowing the curtains so that they resembled the sails of a ship l:iillowing, the ends snapping close to the Fraulein's ear. He watched them, his eyes willfully interested. Perhaps they would snap and touch her ear. But no-the breeze died down. Nol Here it came again, stronger and stronger, puff­ ing out the faded curtain till it curled at the end and wavered. Maybe if he ran around in back and blew too, it would reach. Maybe it would reach if he would ar-"Ullie l Ullie, I'm speaking to you. Pay attention!" He wrenched his fascinated eyes from the curtains, and collecting himself, bowed. "Good morning, Fraulein," he offered apologetically, smiling into her angry face. No smile responded. She sat in her chair, a sheaf of papers in her hand, and watched him-watched him in silence-and hated him. "Ullie, you must leave school. We do not want you here," she said cruelly. The silence broke around him, jarred him with the words, "We do not want you here, we do not want you here"-quivered. died down, and returned again, louder, more merciless, "We do not want you, want you, want you!" He stared, unbelievingly. His fingers touched the edge of her desk, his stiff body leaning slightly towards her. "What have I done?" he whispered through tortured lips His fingers digging into the polished wood, he waited, staring. Her mouth laughed at his ignorance. Her eyes seared his features contemptuously, flicked over his brown hair and eyes, his chin and mouth, and rested for a moment on his nose-a proud nose, aquiline, and like his father's. Her lips moved, but her heart did not. "Your name is Ulrich

[ S6 l


Rubin, that is enough. And your face-" she laughed, coldly. A shiver ran through his body. Something mercilessly cold had bruised his heart He did not understand. Through the mother of pearl vagueness within, something stirred. He hadn't realized before-he hadn't known! His eyes narrowed slightly. He shivered again. "Ach, Gott!" MILDRED COOPER.

RUBEN'S "PORTRAIT OF OLD PARR"

Old man, the time to stop is close at hand; Your long and weary journey soon will end. Too !flUCh of life has passed before your eyes; Great emperors and kings have come and gone Yet you live on. And Death, your friend and not Your hangman, passed you when you should have gone with him; And Life has long ago abandoned you. The Youth that filled you once with burning fire Of expectation left you tenantless. Your apprehensive look is justified, For you must see the nearness of the hour When your last friend will turn on you, old man. Your vigor and your spirit both have gone And left you feebly leaning toward the grave. EDWIN POPENOE

[ 57]


TELEPHONE CALL

Jake was exhausted. 'This last hectic week everything had happened at once. His wife had suddenly become very ill, neces­ sitating an emergency appendicitis operation. Ethel wasn't as strong as she might be, but the operaiion had been successful and she was convalescing at the hospital. However, it had af­ fected the budget seriously. Jake had been helping to support his :r::arents and Ethel had gone to work too-she'd been swell about it. So the operation had not only added expenses but had cut down the income with which to pay that expense. When Tony came down with the flu, Jake had been very glad to take his friend's night job of truck-driving. But visits to the hospital, added to the seventeen hours required by the two jobs, left him almost no time to sleep. Tonight there had been a blow­ out, taking at least an hour to repair. It wa nearly seven when Jake unlocked the door. Stumbling into his room, he threw off his shoes, and crawled into bed. How good it felt to lie with his back on the soft mattresses after bending over that tire. This was his day off-a whole day to sleep. Realizing that with the extra money earned from the trucking job, he ought to be able to make ends meet, he closed his eyes. Ethel was out of danger and would be home soon. At the hospital, Ethel woke with a queer feeling in the pit of her stomach and an ache in her head. Gradually she became con­ scious of being very warm. Pushing off a blanket, she sank back. Her legs ached. Stretching them, she rolled on her side. Then she felt too cool and pulled up the blanket. Still she was uncom­ fortable and turned to her other side. How hot it wasl Too tired to push away the blanket she lay there sweltering. Then, unable to stand the heat any longer, she pushed the cover down. Now her head felt queer-hot, dizzy. If only she could sleep! Cold again, she pulled up the blanket, lay back, and tried to think of something peaceful. She seemed unable to lift her eyelids. Those voices-what were they saying?-"rheumatic fever-serious." This heat, this confusion-something cool grasped her wrist, then dropped it The words jarred her rapidly-seven-sinking-phone. She felt so very tired-almost as though if she relaxed completely, stop­ ped breathing, she would drift away. At the flat, Jake was dreaming of an enormous horse-fly buzz­ ing in his ear-buzzing, buzzing. Would it never stop? He shook his head violently. The buzzing resolved itself into the telephone bell. Why must people call at such times? Well, he wouldn't answer. He buried his head in the pillow, but he couldn't shut

[ 58)


out the noise. Finally, exasperated, he stumbled into the hall and picked up the receiver. "Hello?" There was a silence, then, "Number, please." He slammed down the receiver, and going into his room, pulled the covers furiously over his head. Cold, angry, thoroughly awake, it was an hour before he slept. EMILY AMENT.

THE CHANGELING

I had a changeling for a child. They stole her long-so long-ago. Still floats her laughter sweetly wild To chill my heart like flakes of snow. My little changeling child I see, On garden wall in early morn. I call her, "Come again to me!" She laughs and leaves me most forlorn. Like Puck or Pan she can't resist A night and morn of pranks and play. 'Nhen sun shall lift the shade of misf, My child and dew drops fade away.

JUWE LEE

[ 59]


REMINISCENCES Sept. 18, 1989

I am resting for a few minutes. The air moves in shimmering heat waves before my eyes so I close them. The similarity of this day to a September day exactly fifty years ago brings back clearly that long past vear--a landmark m my life.

Even then I was showing signs of my multifold genius. So let me take you back to that year which marked the beginning of my amaz­ ing career. It was a year ol clamor, tumult, uproar, change ...Inter­ nationally raged World War II. National election-year oratory roared. So through the decades that year has come to us as the YEAR OF THE BIG NOiSE But far from being so-called from the tumultuous world-wide events which happened during it, the real reason for its name was far dillerent. as you shall see...

During the first weeks ol school the weather was hot and languid. But languid is hardly the word to describe my actions I readily ad1us!ed myself to the pulsating achvities of that famous year and was soon in my full rhythmic stride.My chest still swells with pride as I recall how I transformed a valiant little band ol football players into a grid machine which toppled opponent after opponent by shee.r will power and deception. My play was outstanding, baffling the bes1 players of some of the mightiest schools of the section, and my fame spread far and near. No, our record was not unsullied-our goal line WAS crossed But I point with pride not only to our success as an eleven man team, but also to our long chain of victories as a six man squad a form of the sport just then coming into prominence. Al­ though the season officially ended with that most royal of leasts, the Foo1ball Banquet of November 10, football was king until Thanks- giving vacation

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But football was by no means the only activity of the first period o' that school year The YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE was famed for its dazzling social functions, the first of which was the beaulllully simple Junior Dance. My position as athletic hero made me incredibly popu Jar, and since the dance was a "Girl's Choice" I was simply delugeci with invitations and was forced to make my decision early so that


my deserving classmates might also be asked. But that memory of the good h.m of a group of close friends-a group of which I was naturally the center-will always be dear to me.

In those days two colorful annual ceremonies were enacted. The appearance of the Junior Class sweaters had been a custom for many years. In the YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE these Junior sweaters were a loveiy shade, and their symbolic presentation was impressive, al足 though I and other members of the Senior Class had just "resprung' our own stunning powder blue creations.

The other ceremony-the quaint custom of wearing for a week the school colors in some form-was inaugurated in November of the YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE. I, of course, attracted much attention m my beautiful soft gray wool cape with the scarlet lining.

Now winter, with its brilliant program of theatrical and social events, was here. I now took my role as the dashing man of the theater, since my handsome profile and beautiful clear voice suited admirably my part as lead in the Student Body production of "June Mad," played before a packed house on December second. Omitting all mention of the bravos which a wildly cheering crowd gave me (and the rest of the cast) once the spell of the acting had been broken, may T only say that this performance has long been remembered as one of the outstanding productions of the year.

The season's first formal social function was the sparkling Senior Formal-a dance made greatly successful by its motif as the Captain's Ball. Besides me, the soft lights, good music, and the usual array of well dressed men and beautiful girls all contributed to the outstand足 ing success of the undertaking.

The 1939 portion of the YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE concluded with a Christmas program in w_hich I took little part, for I very generously agreed to let some one else star, for this one program at least. Whether or not the presentation suffered by my absence, it is not mine to say. There remain to be mentioned in this first period only the two school sponsored trips to places of interest and educational value, the first one on November 3rd to Mount Wilson, the second in December to one of the large oil refineries of the section.

It was with pleasure that I noted that the tempo of my living defi足 nitely speeded up during January. This month the basketball season hit its full stride, and although this was not my best field, rather than see the team go down in defeat I became a member of the team. In quick succession came games with the foremost schools of the league, and I and my team mates fought valiantly. If my great playing was not shown by the scores it is only because our opponents far sur足 passed us in size and manpower. We had a good season, although not the phenomenal success that we had had with football.

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But, as had not been true with football, other complications arose which ma"de difficult devoting myself to all that was desired of me. After trie brief flurry created by the appearance of the senior rings on January 10, all my time not devoted to athletics and study was given first to Annual Weet in mid-January and then to the presenta足 tion of the highly successful Girls' League plays, in one of which the girls had requested me to appear as the suave, handsome leading man.

And finally the orchestra program marked the end of this semester of ever-increasing activity and tumult-of which I was always at the Jore-and the end of the first half of the famous YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE.

February was one of the busiest months of the whole busy year. Basketball games with Chino and Bonita still remained to be played --games in which we men of Claremont fought a valiant if losing battle against greatly superior forces. But my playing had its usual brilliance, so much so that the date bureau was swamped with re足 quests for my name for the Girls' League Dance.

Then came four weeks of rehearsal for one of the top musical pro足 ductions of the season-the Claremont High School Operetta. I have always suspected that Gilbert and Sullivan's "Ruddigore" was chosen , with an eye toward me for the hero's role. The rehearsals required time, causing me to miss both the Scholarship Society trip and the first league track meet of the year-that with Puente. But despite the lack of their decathlon champion, the teams of the Wolf Pack were victorious, and it was with a clear conscience that I sang that glorious music at those glorious presentations of the 7th and 9th of March. When the briefest possible cessation ol activities-spring vacation -(March 15-25)-stimulated vigorous protests from both the English and athletic departments, I resolutely laced the realization that a man of ability cannot rest, devoting afternoons to track and evenings to coaching the one-act play scheduled for April 5th. Both efforts re足 warded me handsomely. Too, apparently, I was still able to inspire in the others the spark of my genius, for the joint program of plays was such a tremendous success that we were asked to repeat the performance at other schools on the following weeks.

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Pride and the knowledge of a job well done prevent my omitting mention of my crowning achievement of this YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE. Yes, Claremont High School, with the aid of Pomona College, reached the climax of its wonderful scholastic record on April 20th when she played hostess to the Regional Scholarship Federation. Such a meeting of talented intellectuals has perhaps never been equaled in the history of Claremont. Musically I was brought to the attention of the entire Southland at THE musical event of the year-the Tri-county League Music Festival, where my renditions, sometimes spritely and gay, sometimes haunt足 ingly sad, thrilled the section's best musicians.

My final dramatic appearance of the year was overwhelming. (The occasion, of course, was the Senior Plays of May 24th.) I chose as my vehicle stark drama. making my audience live with me the Russian Revolution in a way that they cannot yet have forgotten. Even with these feats in the process of completion, I shared with my classmates such joyous functions as the gay and successful Letter足 men's Carnival.

Then the boseball season came and went, and suddenly with a pang I realized what the terrific commotion had caused me to forget-my high school days were ending. My classmates and I experienced those awful conflicting emotions of pride and sorrow at the Senior Assem足 bly of June 7th. The next night I and the happy, happy girl of my choice attended that last, most important, brilliant social climax of the year-the Junior-Senior Reception. Then in swift succession came the Parents' Dinner, the Junior High School Commencement, and finally on June 12th, graduation. Then-the Senior party, and in a blaze of glory my YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE should have been over-

As a wheel tends faster and faster to revolve about its exact center, so the activities of the school tended increasingly to revolve about me, until finally, amid the clamor and tumult of the end of Claremont's YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE, stunned, we left our high school as if we had been thrown from it by the very force of our activities. But in the moment of transition when all should have been quiet, the tumult and clamor stayed with me, and suddenly, in a blinding flash, I real足 ized that it was for me-FOR ME-that the YEAR OF THE BIG NOISE had been named. I was the BIG NOISE OF 1940.

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\PPINL - LIFE - L, Y - LIBERTY - HAPPINESS - HAPPINESS - H/ - LIFE - LIFE - LIFE - LIF ',- LIBERTY - LIBEr


PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

''Happily, the present situation in the

i,uorld of affairs affords us the opportun足

ity to retrieve the past and to renrfer man足

kind the inestimable service of proving

that there is at least one great and power足

ful nation which can tum atuay from

programs of self-interest and deuote itself

to practising and establishing the highest

ideals of disinterested service and the con足

sistent maintenance of exalted standards of conscience and of right."

WOODROW \VJLSON.

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Our source of health and happiness


First Row: J. Aguilera, H. Keller, L. Workman, K. Chidlaw, D. Peck, F. Saunders. Second Row: G. McCros­ sen, R. Guerrero, R. Dunn K. Duddridge, L Garcia, S. Parrilla. Third Row: W. Johnson, B. Billesbach, R. Bradley, D. Beatty, B. Johns, W. Hen­ zie, E. Parker, Mr. Marlin.

Hiller Gridders Rejoin Tri-County League Wolf Pack Varsity rejoins Tri-County League...Hillers return to scene of former triumph after two year's absence...Local gridders start slowly, due to inexperience...Team recovers to win five out of eleven games ...Small squad reports to Coach Lyle Martin and co-captains Johnson and Talbott at start of season...Ranks of this year's varsity seriously diminished by graduation... Members of lightweight division recruited for first string use... As in past years C.H.S. forced to consolidate two squads because of scanty turnout...Drafted fly-weights drop team average below one hundred and fifty pounds... Seven "overstuffed" regulars from last year's team report for conditioning exercises ...Johns and Dunn, other returning award winners, show value of experience...Team proves suc­ cess in different light... Individual achievement and not the scoreboard highlight Wolf Pack tilts... Members of this year's eleven have tough time...Players forced to learn fine points of game the hard way...Self-protection when outclassed, the spirit to carry on when facing a heavier and more learned opponent, the ability to take defeat with a smile when you have given your all, proved but a few of this season's valuable experiences...Players presented with elaborate banquet as season closes...Girls' League fetes gridders at schedule's end ...Gala evening highlighted by Coach Heath's talk and annual elections... Team members elect most valuable man and next year's captain in private confab before fiesta...Results given in much-awaited talk by Coach Martin...Garner McCrossen, transfer from Laguna Beach, elected captain for next year... Kenneth Chidlaw, hard charging lineman, unanimously selected most valuable senior player... [ 68 J


Bonita 25

Claremont 13

Pack plays first night game in several years...Hillers take on biggest rivals, Bonita Bearcats, under arcs on La Verne College gridiron...Enthusiastic crowd turns out for first league tilt... Bleachers overflowing and sidelines packed at kick-off time... Bonita starts fast, catches Wolf Pack off guard...Forney breaks away for initial Bearcat touchdown... Determined drives push two more scores over scrappy Hillers before midway mark... Half-time finds C.H.S. on short end of 18-0 count...Hillers open up as second half begins... Pack tallies twice as passers Baughman, Dunn find mark...Talbott receives, as gains by air set up both scores...Pass interceptions break up Claremont rally...Bonita hits pay-dirt once more before game ends... Gun halts belated march by Wolves... Chino 22

Claremont 13

High riding Cowboys hit Claremont war zone...Chino title hopes at peak as C.H.S. territory invaded...Spirit high as game time nears ...Girls' drill team makes initial appearance... Porn porn parade adds to colorful day... First half gives year's

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JOHN TALBOTT BRYAN JOHNS RALPH BRADLEY

BILL JOHNSON BRUCE BILLESBACH DON PECK

GERALD BAUGHMAN KENNETH CHIOLAW DON BEATTY


· biggest scare to Chino club... Claremont enthusiasm uncon­ trollable as Pack holds surprise lead at half... Baughman-­ Talbott pass gives Hillers touchdown... Baughman trapped punting behind goal in second period...Wolves hold 6-2 advantage as gun ends first half...Spirited Pack continues winning ways as third quarter begins...Long pass sets up second score ...Talbott romps seven yards to counter ... Claremont converts and hopes are high... 13-2 lead rapidly diminished as Chino alternates two teams in desperate attempt to regain prestige... Fast charging Cowboys drive for three scores before final gun to snatch victory from weary Wolves_ .. Citrus 25

Claremont 0

Claremont's pint-sized Wolf Pack invades territory of Citrus Cougars...Hillers take field minus services of hard-fighting cocaptains...Injuries force Talbott and Johnson to sidelines... Spirit and determination of local boys hits season high...Under­ rated gridders hold Cougars to 6-0 half-time lead...Highly re­ garded Citrus machine jammed for first half by head-up Hillers ...Pack maintains jinx through hard-fought third period... Lack of substitutes begins to tell on Wolves...Only two reserves available for Citrus crucial... Weary Wolf Pack slowed to standstill in final canto_ ..Hillers smothered by superior num­ bers... Cougars tally three times in last period...Billesbach, converted tackle, shines as leading ground-gainer in Claremont backfield...

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Downey 32

Claremont 0

California Junior Republic O

Claremont 8

Puente 19

Claremont 0

Record crowd fills Claremont bleachers for 1940 Viking inva­ sion...Despite huge throng Hillers take season's worst thump­ ing at hands of Downey gridders ...Powerful Downey squad hangs 32-0 pasting on hapless Wolves...Bradley, Claremont stellar flankman, joins Talbott, Johnson on inactive list...Neck injury benches Wolf Pack star ... Weakened Hillers easy prey for fast stepping Vikings ...Alert play by C.H.S. gridders holds first half score to 13-0 ... Wolves' first stringers feel pounding in second half as reserve strength lacking...Alternating Downey teams rush three touchdowns over tiring Pack in last two quar­ ters...

C.H.S. ent�rtains Cal Junior Republic in non-league tilt... Republic eleven offers strong competition with improved brand of ball...Game proves wide open affair as both clubs substitute freely...Hillers use all available men in effort to find winning combination...Pack proves merit of passing attack again... Baughman hurls sixty-yard pass to Talbott...Play gains seven­ ty yards for game's lone touchdown...Chidlaw garners two points for Wolves... Tackle blocks punt early in first period... Automatic safety results as ball rolls beyond end zone...

Last league game of 1940 season with Puente Dons...Windup tilt on local turf...Dons by no means weaker club... Puente held Colton's championship aggregation to three-point victory... Visitors drive at Hiller's flanks ...Word of tackle-end material weakness reaches Puente ears... Continuous battering at reserveless positions has telling effect on Wolves...Sheer fight keeps score at final mark...Pack holds rampaging Dons to three tallies...

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As Tri-County season closes C.H.S. schedules exhibition tilts ...Pack to play two six-man games with Valencia High ...Boys from Placentia drop opener to Hillers 8-6... Wolves make clean sweep with 14-12 win in last game ...Claremont proves pioneer in Southland six-man football...Junior-Senior contest in 1938 inaugurated game for Southern California...

First Row: D. Tooker, F. Lopez, J. Rankin, L. Stocks. R. Wheeler, F. Sabichi. Second Row: J. Williams, T. Wiggins. D. Briggs, L. Sta,fford, A. Felix, J. Morrow, J. Kraft. Third Row: L. Olson, R. Holtz, A. Martinez, ). Saltonstall, N. Stocks, G. Colbath, Coach Charlson.

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....,7· •·--

...

first Row: B. Johns. R. Guer­ rero, Mr. Charlson, R. Dunn, G. McCrossen. Second Row: J. Talbott, E. Wheeler, D. Beatty, R. Bradley, G. Baughman,

Charlson Molds Casaba Club Opening practice session brings out three complete casaba teams... Wolf Pack looks forward to successful season under able tutelage of Coach Charlson... Hopes high despite poor turnout of last year's lettermen... Difficult task confronts Claremont's new basketball coach...Untried players molded into experienced unit... Hard practice and determination foundations for creditable season... Hillers enter Chino Tournament in quest of valuable experience...Powerful San Diego Poly drawn as Wolves' first opponent...Tournament winners prove more than match for C.H.S. five...Claremont entertained by Citrus in Chino Consolation Round... Tri-County rivals hand Wolves second impressive defeat...La Verne Tournament pits Chino against Claremont in pre-league tilt...Revengeful Hillers al­ most spill classy Cowboys in closely fought battle ...Rugged league play enables Claremont to make formidable showing ... Puente, Downey, Corona and Chino closely pressed by C.H.S. hoopsters... Baughman named as All-Tri-County League second string center ...Pomona College Fraternity champs chal­ len ged for city championship... Hillers climax season in grand style...Wolves hand Sig Tau's one point setback in last ten second . .. Garner McCrossen stars in sinking winning field goal... Practice Game Scores ClaremonL.-. ..16 ..20 ClaremonL . ClaremonL. . _ .25 Claremont........ .. 26 ClaremonL. ..... 32 . 36 Claremont. Claremont___ _ __...21 Claremont .37

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Pomona Frosh -· ... 31 Chino ,.... ...26 San Diego Poly... .40 Citrus .........._ ...48 Chaffey Sophs .... 23 Cal. Jr. Rep. .. 22 Fremont ..... -····-_] l Sigma Tau ......._36

League Game Scores Claremont.............28 Claremont.. ....-.. 19 Claremont ·-···-· -··28 Claremont.. ....... -... 25 Claremon L.... ••··-··32 Claremont............. 16 Claremont_ ._...._27

Puente .... - · ···-···37 Citrus ··-··········-···39 Colton ················-·· 63 Downey . -··········32 Corona �-_..35 Bonita -·············-···52 Chino ... . ····•······-··33


Lightweight "B's" Prove Scrappy Five Coach Charlson calls "B" weight team out for practice... Highly enthusiastic squad prepares for gruelling league sched­ ule... Disappointing number of players fight hard for first string positions...Wes Henzie, McCrossen, Rex Henzie, Parrilla, Aguilera, Gonzales, Timberlake and Jacobson members of high spirited squad...Ten scheduled tilts played by Claremont's un­ daunted hoopsters... Wolf Pack's inexperienced lightweight aggregation play creditably throughout League competition... Claremont names one man for All-American honors in spirit and determination ...Wesley "Satchel" Henzie outstanding...Con­ tinuous chatter and forceful play brings Hiller forward into spotlight ...Humorous antics on court win applause of crowd ...Minimized scores undaunt popularity of Wolves "B" weight combatants ...Team proves itself fully capable to represent red and gray where sportsmanship and fight are concerned... Squad draws plaudits around league circuit as starting five goes route in almost every game... "B" Scores

Claremont_............! 9 Claremont... ····-· 7 Claremont.. . .. 5 Claremont...... . .. I I Claremont . JO Claremont._......... .14 ClaremonL...........18 Claremont............. 17 Claremont............ .11 Claremont......... _ 12

First Row: S. Parrilla, M. Timberlake, Mr. Chari• son, N. McCrossen, G Gonzales. Second Row: W. Henzie, A. Jacobson, J. Caldwell, D. Healy, L. Garcia.

55 Puente Citrus .......... . .. ...32 Colton ... ... ..38 Downey ..31 .. Cal. Jr. Republic..39 Webb ...28 ..12 Webb ..... 22 Corona ........... ......... .... . 36 Chino Bonita ...... . .........44

Claremont.. Claremont Claremont Claremont Claremont.

"C" Scores

IS ... 16 .... 14 ... .. 7 ... .. 7

Fremont ...... ·•-···-21 Cal. Jr. Republic .. 27 Cal. Prep ....... ID Fremont ·······-··-15 Emerson ...... 26

"D" Scores

Claremont 2 Claremont.... 2 Claremont ... .. 7 Claremont...... . 17

Emerson .. l 1 Fremont ......19 Emerson .... .... .19 Cal. Prep ... 2


First Row: G. Darr, B. Johns, H. Duddridge, S. Barnes, J. Talbott, H. Keller, H. Chidlaw.

Second Row: Mr. Martin, J. Adams, K. Ellis, E. Par­ ker, B. Billesbach, G. Baughman, G. McCros­ sen.

W olfpack Tracksters Small squad competes during successful season... Few tracksters in evidence for Hillers' first test of year ... Experienced Wolves host in four-way meet...Wolf Pack astounds spectators by all-around strength...Point winning material displayed in almost every event... C.H.S. sweeps meet in grand style... Local lads mass total of 63½ points, to 27½ for Webb, 25½ for Emerson and 17½ for California Junior Republic...Potent first place point winners for Hillers responsible for large score... Second and third lines of defense weak, cannot be counted on for additional points ...John Talbott easily captures both dashes ... Bruce Billesbach displays potential power in 440 and broad jump... Gerald Baughman cops both jumping events...Ken­ neth Duddridge, versatile Hiller star, takes both hurdles and shot put... Barnes, Rex Henzie, Parker, Jaeger, Ellis and Reid addi­ tional point winners for Wolf Pack...Hillers lose one league dual meet in season's schedule ... Mighty Bearcats closely con­ tested in 53-46 trackfest... Chino and Puente dual meets end in 52-52 deadlocks...Downey scares Pack in close decision, 54-50

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Star on Cinders ...Johnny Talbott steps 100 dash in 10.2 seconds...Billesbach timed in one-tenth second slower in same Chino meet...Hunt足 ington Beach track meet finds ace Hiller sprinter copping second in 100 and first in 220 ...Talbott runs 220 in 22.8 seconds at Beach... Fastest time made all year in Tri-County League School competition... Baughman captures fourth in broad jump in Southern Counties Meet... Claremont qualifies five men in Tri-County Leaque trials... Elsworth Parker out of League meet ...Four-man track team places sixth...Billesbach runs fifth in 220...Talbott finishes .close third in both sprints...Baughman leaps his way to third in broad jump...Relay team with Baugh足 man, Billesbach, Duddridge and Talbott, running in that order, places fourth ...Hillers relay team breaks school record of 1 :36 by six-tenths of a second at Brea Relays...Four-man track team brings back grand selection of medals from Laguna... "X" team stars in Laguna meet...Timberlake cops third in 100 and first in 660...Rex Henzie, Wesley Henzie, Gene Reid, Locke Olson, and Ashley Paul, consistent winners for Wolf Pack lighi.足 weiqhts in regular season...

First Row: L. Olson, R. Holtz, M. Timberlake, J. Caldwell.

Second Row: Mr. Martin, A. Paul, W. Henzie, L. Work足 man, G. Reid, R. Henzie, L. Guevara.


First Row: J. Talbott, L. Guevara, N. McCrossen, J. Richmond, M. Timber-­ lake.

Second Row: D. Healy, S. Parrilla, L. Garcia, K. Duddridge, R. Dunn, G. Gonzales.

Third Row: Mr. Charlson, G. Yrigollen, L. Work­ man, E. Parker, T. Gon­ zales, G. Baughman, A. Jacobson, W. Henzie, R. Guerrero.

Claremont Nine Star.ts Out on Rampage

I 78 l

Seventeen players greet new mentor for 1940 edition of base­ ball squad...Pre-season predictors anticipate strongest team in several years...Ten varsity players from last year's team pro­ vide material of championship calibre... Hillers prove strength in early season tilts ... Infield combination made up of seasoned, experienced members... Pitching and catching positions ably filled by last year's returning recruits...Fly chasers cover out­ field in grand manner... With inducement of another trip to Catalina Island, Wolves pelt ball hard...Twelve carefully selected Hillers to make channel trip... In hopes of boat ride batting averages take decided jump... Hitting and fielding of ' players hits new high... Pomona Frosh handed decisive 6-5 setback...Older opponents handcuffed by six-hit pitching performance... Wolves score five runs in second and third innings ... Frosh even up score in last frame as defense weakens... Hillers score last minute winning run to capture top honors for the day...Wolf Pack takes on highly regarded California Polytechnic School of San Dimas... More experienced lads dealt surprise by Wolves' 5-2 win... Baughman, regular catcher, baffles Poly with tantalizing slow curves... Three-hit pitching and six timely Hiller bingles provide margin of victory...Clare­ mont encounters Downey Viking nine on home diamond... Baugh, visitors' ace pitcher, belted hard by Wolf Pack in first league tilt...9-8 lead blown in last inning as invrn;iers cross plate three times...Tri-County's stellar pitcher nicked for twelve safeties by Hillers ... Downey finally bests Wolves by 11-9 count...


Veterans Mainstay Tennis Squad Coach Hugh Wilby's 1940 version of Claremont's tennis team opens with five returning prospects...Earle Vought, Stanley Barnes, Gerald Baughman, Clifford Gettman and Guthrie Darr bolster Wolf Pack chances...Experimenting with host of talent, vacant positions filled by inspired newcomers...Duddridge, Wheeler, Olson and Beatty, alternating, take up new duties... Practice again hindered as in past years... Track and baseball squads have first call on net toppers...Racqueteers develop hard-pressing game...Force opponents to limit in staving off Hiller onslaught...Team travels to Downey April 11 for first league match ... Wolves' strength at low point of season ... Scheduled baseball game on same day, lures regulars away , from first encounter... Substitute team gains knowledge needed in future careers ... Downey clean-sweeps match as opening tilt of season uneventful...Colton Yellowjacks travel to Hillers' courts for second league match...Strong opponents almost swamp Wolves...Stanley Barnes captures lone session of day for Wolf Pack... Ace net star emerges victorious in third singles position...Coach Wilby desperately juggles players in attempt to find suitable combination ...Players interchanged from singles to doubles...Wilby's final arrangement places Earle Vought at first singles; Clifford Gettman, second singles; Guthrie Darr, third singles; Stanley Barnes, fourth singles; Kenneth Dud­ dridge and Gerald Baughman, first doubles; Donald Wheeler and Locke Olson, second doubles...

First Row: K. Duddridge, L. Olson, S. Barnes. Second Row: Mr. Wilby, G. Darr, E. Vought, D. Wheeler, G. Baughman, C. Gettman


P. E. Builds For Future Stars Gym class boys in spotlight...Old activity receives new spirit ...P.E. sportsmanship and training evident on varsity teams... Besides training in athletics, boys receive periodic physical check-ups...Close watch kept on all health records...Touch football schedule opens with howling success... Seventh and eighth graders divided into teams...Instructor Charlson organizes teams according to ability...Pint-sized squads clash for touch football championship...Ninth-tenth and eleventh-twelfth grade teams also begin first round... More advanced members pass into varsity football ranks...Coach Martin heads basket­ ball period...Rough house gang displays football tactics in opening week... Gym teams develop snappy offense and de­ fense...Several drafted for use on Varsity and "B" squads... Recruits work way to first string berths... Worn tennis shoes discarded for spikes... Cinder path circled by over-anxious track-minded youths...Mr. Charlie Horse has field day at tracksters' expense...School recognizes ability of gym class performers...Varsity track team badly in need of strength... P.E. classes come to rescue with unsung track heroes...Horsehide and hickory take beating as baseball season opens... Favorite sport greeted heartily by enthusiastic boosters... Little World Series anticipated by battling nines... ( 80]


First Row: J. Sanford, M. Raisbeck, I. Grant, E. A. Ament, Mrs. Schafer. Second Row: H. Smith, F. Vestal. M, Morrison, P. Jones, M. Bulkley, L. Bronson.

Local Girls Show Strength Afield Basketball season opens with bang...Gym is scene of in­ tense practice... Sophomore team thought superior in early skirmishes... Determined seniors snatch victory from aspiring tenth graders, but have narrow escape in Frosh game...Three out of four teams victorious at Bonita playday... Mrs. Schafer foresees close contest for speedball championship... Sophs beat previously undefeated Seniors but lose to Frosh...Results fail to impede progress of tourney...Final score gives sophomores 4-1 victory over seniors...Playday given by Chino cowgirls...

First Row: B. Cottam, B. Mei. D. Knoll, B. J. Gar­ ris, F. St. Clair, B. Yerkes, L. Wood. Second Row: J. Gardner, P. Kimball, M. Bulkley, R. Baughman, C. Freden­ dall, M. Bronson, J. Gapp, Mrs. Schafer.


First Row: B. Mei, R. Sulz足 bach, D. Knott, F. St. Clair, B. Yerkes, B. f. Garris. Second Row: J. Gardner, C. Fredendall, M. Bulkley, R. Baughman, M. Bron足 son, F. Baum, Mrs. Scha足 fer.

Claremont teams return with speedball and volleyball ribbons ...Hockey season opens with rush for shin guards...Sophs inspired by recent success, launch smashing drive against seniors...Seniors rally in second half but shut out 2-0 by tenth graders...Claremont plays host to schools for hockey combat ... Local girls come through in both hockey and tennis... Baseball shares spotlight with tennis in last quarter...Numer足 ous tennis matches with other schools arranged...Tearn slow to get into stride but picks up speed as season progresses... Schedule concluded in blaze of glory ...Badminton tournament novel feature of year... Birds battered in gym as mixed doubles teams vie for honors... Tournament to become annual event ... Successful year brought to close as baseball team members make good showing in color playday...

First Row: B. Yerkes, J. Gapp, M. Bulkley, M. R. Vanderwood, P. Speirs, E. A. Ament. Second Row: Mrs. Schafer, I. Grant, E. 1. Birkel, P. Jones, M. Pierce.

[ 82]


Pleasures of the after-dark.


Plays Take High school thespians off to brilliant start...C.H.S. scoops valley dramatic circles ... Mrs. Hull, adviser, achieves impossible, secures "June Mad" before publication...Sparkling work of "First Love" authors Ryerson and Clement given valley premiere in local auditorium...Artistic proclivities manifested as rivalry for parts keen ...Surprise-choice Boileau proves brilliant success opposite trouper Richmond... Mrs. Hull as director enlists aid of battery of assistants... Cast settles down to six-week grind...Difficulties one by one overcome...Group easily plays summer scenes to accompaniment of night rehearsals, chill November air... Final barriers surmounted week before deadline...Well-oiled C.H.S. publicity machine jams, ballyhood men disap­ pointed as Oxy rally conflicts with play scheduled for same night ...Tem­ peramental actors chafe under seemingly needless delay...Final decision sets date as December 17 ...Great night arrives...Last minute rush super­ seded by tense silence at curtain time...Richmond's 'Aw, the heck you did!" in response to Boileau's dynamite-laden "I got you, I did, did, did!" breaks ice, gets cast and audience in rollicking mood...Tremendous suc­ cess of premiere augmented by Barnes brand "To You," Talbott-Cooper humor...Three curtain calls go to cast... Flowers presented to Mrs. Hull for fine directorship after final close...Girls' League makes debut as little theater group...One-act play program decided upon for opener...Heavy tragedy of "Command Performance" relieved by airy comedy of "Teapot ·on [ 84]


the Rocks" ...Ranks of upper classmen combed for suitable material... Workman pulls down Maharajah--Kimball-Bronson duo sparks Mr. Wilby's "Teapot" ...Local moppets quake as Workman-model Rajah heartlessly revenges son's death...Worldly-wise Bradley draws tears from many at untimely end...Pundit Kimball brings smiles to audience at clever quips ...Casa Colina sole beneficiary of this January program... Mrs. Hull now turns playwright ...Junior committee unanimously acclaims English department head's "The World's A Stage," selects it for Tri-school program .. . Bonita, Puente, Claremont cooperate closely as wide variety presented... Luster of visitor's plays dimmed by glory of local offering... Fragile C.H.S. maidens swoon at sight of hero Beatty caught semi-clad by best girl-similar results reported elsewhere...Stand-out presentation also highlighted by Baughman, Richmond, Billesbach combination... Advertising Manager Bronson predicts record gate as Senior play committee disregards royalties, picks "name play" for season wind-up... Outstanding Senior thespians bow out with Maxwell Anderson's "Second Overture"...May 24 sees Curme­ Barnes-Richmond trio rise to new heights in stirring tale of Russian Revolu­ tion...Same program finds manly hero Jack (Wheeler) foiling despicable cad Talbott with "He Ain't Done Righ by Our Nell" as vehicle...Mr. Wilby's direction acclaimed along with that of Mrs. Hull as yearly dramatic season closes with final curtain ...High school theater group sad at departure of familiar Senior theatrical personali lies...

Upward Swing


Dances Feature C.H.S. socialites plan for brilliant season...Juniors set ball rolling with Hard Times Party...Women's Club is scene of festivities... Fun-loving dancers arrive in rags and patches...Refreshment concession in basement handles large turnover of cider and doughnuts, nets substantial profit for class ... Chidlaw duo entertains with "Blue Orchids" ...Alumni Whiteside and Duncan cop prizes for most delapidated costumes... Spectacular grand march adds to hilarity of gala occasion... More exclusive socialites clamor for for­ mal function...Seniors meet demand with Captain's Ball...Quick change artists turn library into ship with use of signal flags and fish nets...Floor show stars Workman and Chidlaw...Jones scores triumph at piano... Upper-classmen rumored to have imported salt air from Newport Beach to create special atmosphere... Formal dance declared equally entertaining ...Public School Council generously sponsors "Little Civics" for enjoyment of community...Dances find liberal portion of high school represented ... Popular Koontz band featured...Business tycoon McNamee obtains refresh­ ment concession for self-same events...Girls' League works intensively for Valentine day dance...Ever popular event promises to draw mob... Date bureau established in expectance of record turnout ...Noon sessions see


matchmakers handle claim-office business ...General satisfaction with arrangements expressed...Cotton dresses and cords prevail as night for dance arrives ... Cardboard hearts dangle from potted palms and shrub足 bery...Dancing as well as better parlor sports enjoyed amidst stimulating environment... Sophomores give dance in latter part of year...Semi-sport idea is popular with local jitterbugs...Non-dancing participants hold Chi足 nese checker tournament in hall ...Red checked tablecloths add color and zest to evening... Refreshment committee serves sandwiches and pop to eager crowd...Afternoon dancing big feature of Scholarship Convention ...Student Union dance well patronized by less serious minded brainstorms ...College provides free nickels for music as sweet rhythms heard for blocks around...Annual Letterman's Carnival big event on social calendar ...El Espiritu and Lettermen combine to make carnival best ever...More active organizations of school obtain booths from Lettermen ... Barkers em足 ploy little shell game on unsuspecting members of gathering...Junior足 Senior Reception winds up as brightest star in social galaxy...Class rivalry dispersed by scintillating rhythms of music...Good fellowship is keynote of evening...Reception proves fitting climax to C.H.S. gala year ...

Social Whirl


Index To Advertisers *

*

T. V. Allen-C. W. Ritter Co. Alpha ..Beta Food Store

Dr. W. W. Hendricks Burton J. Henry

C. V. Bertsch Betsy Ross Bixby's Bob Bolinger

Isabel's Beauty Shop

Casa Flores F. H. Catlin Chamberlain Athletic Co. Citizens' National Bank City Dairy Claremont Bakery Claremont Bowling Center Claremont Courier Claremont Dairy Claremont Feed and Fuel Claremont Laundry Claremont Lumber Co. Claremont Pharmacy Colcord's Taxi Service College Book and Drug College Cleaners Consolidated Laundry Cooper's Foto Shop Crystal Beauty Shop Dunn's Richfield Station J. P Evans Everett's Shoe Shop Ewart's Fielder's Bargain Basket Foothill Garage Fox Grill Fox Theatre W. P. Fuller

[ 88]

*

Dr. Arthur L. Jacobson J. D. Johnson Jenny Light's G. E. McKay Milliken Nurseries Mission Lee Myers Frank Ordway Oxford Inn Peck Studios Roy "Auggie" Pierce Sanitary Laundry Standard Station J. W. Starr Steeve's Barber Shop Sugar Bowl Swarts Cafe The Triangle Shoe Co. Vanderwood Lumber Co. The Very Idea Village Theatre Warehouse Market Wolfe's Grocery Store Wilson's Wright Bros. and Rice


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Compliments of

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CITY DAIRY, Inc. POMONA

PHONE 1255

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FOOTHILL GARAGE LAFE P. SPEIRS, Proprietor

OFFICIAL AUTO CLUB GARAGE No. 44 •

Phone 4961

Day and Night Seruice

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Fox Theatre II

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FmEITIN SCREEN ENTERTAINMENT

HOME OF THE BIG PREVIEWS

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THE PLACE TO GO

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Dr. Arthur L. Jacobson Dentis1

Third and Alexander

Phone 621 I

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CHEVROLET

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SERVICE

Claremont

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THE CLAR EMONT C::OURIE R

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TICKETS - PROGRAMS - CARDS - STATIONERY

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One Twenty-nine Harvard

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CRYSTAL'S BEAUTY SHOP 24 l Harvard

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DELIVERY SERVICE

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WOLFE'S GROCERY STORE

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On Foothill Between Harvard and College

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Congratulations and Best Wishes to the Class of '40

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Good Shoes - Phoenix Hosiery - Hand Bags

THE TRIANGLE SHOE CO.

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181 West Second Street

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TANDARD STATION Authorized Distributor M. C. ROCKWELL

First and Yale

Phone 6 6 86

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COLLEGE BOOK

3rd 11 Harvard

Claremont. Calif.

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Compliments of

CONSOLIDATED LAUNDRY

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CLAREMONT FEED � FUEL STORE Hay, Grain, Poultry Supplies, and Fertilizers

PHONE 3081

211 YALE AVENUE

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[ 91 ]


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145 Harvard

PHOTOGRAPHY

1940 EL ESPIRITU PHOTOGRAPHER

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Phone 4041

FRANK ORDWAY

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TRY OUR HOT FUDGE SUNDAES

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Pomona

Next to the Theatre

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WATCHES

REPAIRING

BURTON J. HENRY

Phone 1289

15 3 West Second St.

HOROLOGIST

CLOCKS Pomona

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Compliments of

C.V.BERTSCH 161 W. SIXTH

Los

Agents for

ANGELES

TIMES

PHONE 4362

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[ 92]


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FOR

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PLUS

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LIGHT'S CORSETRY - LINGERIE - HOSIERY READY-TO-WEAR

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ECONOMY

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Pomona j

( Fox Theatre Building)

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Casa Flores Shop 121 Harvard Avenue Claremont. C.1lifornia

TELEPHONE

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i1 PECK STUDIOS il 139 Harvard Avenue

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Flowers Gifts Greeting Card, j ' Perfumes

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BOB BOLINGER MEN'S WEAR

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116 Harvard Avenue Claremont. California

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T. V. A,llen - C. W. RITTER Company 2922 South Main Street

MANUFACTURERS

DIPLOMAS ANNOUNCEMENTS - CARDS STA T[ONERY

Los Angeles. California CLASS RlNGS � PINS MEDALS - AWARDS TROPHIES

OFFICIAL JEWELER

CALIFORNIA SCHOLASTIC .FEDE�ATION

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JOHN P. EVANS

269 W. Second St., Pomona

Arrow Shirts

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Nunn-Bush Shoes

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CLAREMONT BAKERY

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W. J.

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Phone 3 171 . . . Before 11 : 00 A.M.

HUDQLESTON

199 YALE

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BE WELL GROOMED

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Remember: "It's better to make a good impression

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than to live down a bad one"

STEEVE'S BARBER SHOP

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First Street, Claremont

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SERVE

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BETSY ROSS ICE CREAM .. OFTEN ..

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225 N. GAREY

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POMONA 1499

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PHONE POMONA 8687

CLAREMONT DAIRY

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Delicious GUERNSEY Milk and Cream from Our Own Herd Grade A Raw and Pasteurized

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BREAKFAST

ICE CREAM

LUNCHEON

S W A R T S' C A F E

· 114

YALE

DINNER

CANDIH

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WILSON'S

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BREAKFAST. LUNCH AND DINNER SERVED 6:30 A.M.to 10:00 P.M.

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Only Fresh Vegetables

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Expert Kodak Finishing

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Kodaks and Films

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Supplies

COOPER'S FOTO SHOP 224 YALE AVE. Artistic Picture Framing

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WATCHES

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DIAMONDS

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JEWELER

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Pomona

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"America's Passport to Health and One of the Most Fascinating of Sports"

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CLAREMONT BOWLING CENTER

247 First Street Special Rates For Bowling Parties

Francis E. Wilson,

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W. P. FULLER f1 CO. Paints ...Glass ... Wallpaper ... Lacquer

329 W. Second St.

Pomona

Phone 1781

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THE 235 West First Street

DANCING

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Confucius say: See dentist without delay. in end. cost you less pay.

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2 71 W. Second St. CLAREMONT

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DR. WESLEY W. HENDRICKS

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DENTISTRY

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RAWLINGS ATHLETIC GOODS

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EQUIPMENT FOR ALL SPORTS

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CHAMBERLAIN ATHLETIC CO.

720 E. Colorado St.

Pasadena, California

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CLAREMONT LUMBER COMPANY

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Pick up the phone

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A. H. HOEL, Owner

CALL 3101

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First and Berkeley

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ROY (Auggie) PIERCE Phone 3176

AUTO REPAIRS

DODGE AND PLYMOUTH SERVICE

Union Gasoline

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THE OXFORD INN

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ALPHA BETA FOOD MARKET A

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"The Best For Less"

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BIXB y SERVES YOU RIGHT sabel's Beauty Shop 119 Harvard Ave.

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Phone 6371

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CLAREMONT

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Milliken's Nursery

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QUALITY NURSERY STOCK

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South side of Foothill Blvd.

Across from the High School

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RENTAL LIBRARY

NEWEST FICTION AND NON-FICTION AT

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THE VERY IDEA

150 West Third Street

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VILLAGE THEATRE

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CLAREMONT

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SINGLE FEATURES ONLY

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In Southern California's Most Colorful Setting

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18 YEARS' EXPERIENCE

135 Yale

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COLCORD'S TAXI SERVICE

235 West First Street

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Phone 4871

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VANDERWOOD LUMBER COMPANY

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Alexander Avenue

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Claremont 3701

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CLAREMONT. CALIFORNIA

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Claremont Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service

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232 North Alexander Avenue

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CLAREMONT

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Curries' Ice Cream

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301 Harvard -::- Phone 33-+6

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300 East Commercial

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TELEPHONE

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AUTO REPAIRS

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CLAREMO NT PHAR MACY and BEAUTYPARLO R Harold S. Runsvold, Pharmacist

Phone 64 91

Josephine D'Ante, Beautician

OPEN EVENINGS

First and Yale

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YALE AVENUE

CLAREMONT

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Best Wishes to The Class of J 940

WRIGHT BROS. AND RICE ''YOUR HOME FURNISHERS''

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Pomona. California j 252 South Main Street j +-- -------··-··-··-··-·•-··-··----··-··-··---- -----·-··-··-··-··-•·-••·-•+

PLEASE SIGN MY BOOK

[ 101 ]


We, the staff of El Espiritu de 1940, wish to express our most heartfelt thanks to:

Mr. Jack C a n n i c o t t, of Commercial Art and En­ g r a v i n g Co., an ever­ ready counselor and the best of friends.

Photographer Frank Ord­ way, for his redoubled efforts on El Espiritu's be­ half.

M r . Wo o d Gl o v e r, o f Phillips Printing Co., with­ out w h o s e e x t e n d e d cooperation El Espiritu could never have come to pass. C 102 J


Profile for Sharon ESTERLEY

1940 El Espiritu  

1940 yearbook from Claremont CA high school

1940 El Espiritu  

1940 yearbook from Claremont CA high school

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