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EL ESPIRITU de 1943

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PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF CLAREMONT HIGH SCHOOL, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA VOLUME 30

JUNE, 1943


SCENES

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FOREWORD The fate of the world today rests largely in the hands of its young people. The boys and girls of America are already doing the active fighting in tH.is war. The boys are soldiers, sailors, marines, and coast guardsmen, , a'nd the girls are Waacs, Waves, Spars, Marine Reserves, and Army and Navy nurses. Boys and girls alike are becoming the pilots of America, the boys of the Air Corps, and the girls of the WAFS. This closeness to the grimness of the demands of war has probably, more than any other one thing, awakened America's youth to its duty and its united ,goal. Since America is in a position to lead in the planning of the war, the peace, and the reconstruction period of the worl�, American youth has the greatest responsibility of all. .Whatever happens, the American young people of today will become the important men and women of tomorrow, and will be responsible not only for their own destinies, but for those of the people of every country of the world. This is a huge task and the older and more experienced look on hopefully as youth prepares to meet it. In El Espiritu de 1943, we are trying to show why we think that Ameri­ can youth is capable of its task. Using Claremont High School students as typical students of today, we will depict their high school life in an effort to show that the youth of today can and will meet the challenge and become ihe competent leaders of tomorrow. [ 3 ]


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* In i'vf emoriam

James .Barney Anderson

* Jose Aguilera Burritt Steward Allen Roland Bertrand Allen George Bennett Armstrong Robert Armstrong Sanford Babson Gerald Baughman Stanton Gage Baum Jerome Donald Beatty Jack Belcher George Jean Bellemin Bruce Billesbach Dana Stuart Booth Burton L. Brehaut Dan Bulkley Dwight Hatfield Bulkley Holland S. Chamness Jr. Paul Dixon Carroll Carrol L. Chidlaw Harry Kenneth Chidlaw Richard Chidlaw Stacy W Clapp Jr. Charles Raymond Clark Ernest Richard Clark Richard Harvey Clark Erwin Cooper John C. Crowell Henry Garrett Curme Eusebio Dominguez William Herbert Duddridge Harold Kenneth Duddridge John T Dunn Homer 0. Eaton Jr. Morris Eisenbrey Ferrell Ellington Geo. Prestridge Ellington Keith Stanton Ellis John D. Estep James Moles Fairchild •. ,·· Ward Jay Fellows

William H. Fellows Harold Fielder Frank S. Fills Leandro Garcia Leon Lloyd Gardner Milton Eugene Gardner Wayne Bailey Gardner Lee Adams Garner Theodore Garner Willard James Gaynor Clifford Gettman

Claire Abbott Gillette Elizabeth Gratz Ramon Hernandez Guerrero Preston Q. Hadley Harold Hager Bruce L. Harwood David Hoag David Gore Hough Robert Hawkins John Huddleston Cartwright Hunter Francis R. Hunter Joe H. Immel Chester Earle Jaeger John Jaqua William Ernest Jaqua Claude Wayne Jarvis Sayer Johns Charles Revere Johnson Roger Kendall Johnson Kathryn K. Johnson Morton Colhoun Johnson William Johnson Marian Jones Waldo Kell Albert Stephen Kelley Frank Kittinger Horace Frederick Kunkle Raymond Alfred Levick N. Clifford Lewis John William Lincoln Ida Grace Lyman Dorsey L. B. MacDonald Ben A. McBurney Bayard Harlow McConnaughey David McConnaughey David McConnell Joseph Ford McHarg Mead McNamee Thomas Corwin McNamee Donald Herbert Mead Arthur John Mertzke Joseph Daniel Mobley Robert G. Nicholl John E. Nixon Eugene Blair Nixon William Judson Oliver Jr. Alden Cass Packard Saturnino Parrilla Ralph E. Parker [ 4 J

Howard B. Parsons Charles Ashley Paul John M. Payne Donald W. Peck John Reid Pierce Harold B. Pomeroy Richard Pound ;I Edwin A. Popenoe Jr. Ward Popenoe · Marsden Price Robert Lee Ramsay Jr. Robert Reynolds John Winchester Rich William H. Richards James L. Richmond Charles Garey Robinson Henry J. Robinson James Sheldon St. Clair Maurice St. Clair Francis Wood Shaw Hugh Shaw Kermit E. Shotts Max C. Shotts Dillard Brooks Simmons Bradstreet P. Smith Bertram P. Spencer James Hubert Sprinkle Fred Louis Steves June Beatty Stokes Richard Strehle Theodore Cowan Strehle Theodore Swoveland John William Talbott William 0. Teuscher Robert A. Theunisson Mae Thompson Champ Thompson Arthur E. Tracy Ward McComas Turney Wallace Washburn Twogood Earl Vought Jr. Gerald Harvey Wendt Richard Whiteside Walker L. Whiteside - Richard Mead Woodard George Work Chas. Lindsay Workman Jr. Robert F. Yerkes Gilbert Yrigollen Stephen In� Zellarberg


LEST WE FORGET

Ensign Raymond Charlson

Lieutenant Melvin Wilby

In more genuine appreciation than words can express, El Espiritu, de 1943 is gratefully dedicated to all the grad­ uates of Claremont High School who·· have responded to the nation's call by joining the armed forces, and especi­ ally to our three teachers, Pvt: Helene Grove, W.A.M.S., Lieut. Melvin Wilby, U.S. Army, and Ensign Ray Charlson, U.S. Navy, who have sacrificed their own personal peace in order to help bring about a greater world peace.

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WE WORK [ 6 ]


WE LIVE J


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With the war American youth has grown more serious. Few are the students who waste their high school years, for each one knows how valu­ able the courses are for entrance to various fields of the armed services. The trend is toward the scientific, with trigonometry and chemistry classes large. English and history are also important, not only to students who will go on to college, but also to those planning to join the army or navy. Specialized courses are more than ever important to fill vital war jobs. First Aid. and hy­ giene courses attract farsighted students. The students themselves aid in the war effort. Student councils teach democracy to all. Stamp and bond sales rise as enthusiastic young people participate in the successful "Buy a Jeep" campaign. Red Cross and Victory Book drives and Victory Gardens become an integral part of school life. With victory in mind American youth works to win the war and the peace. The teachers also take on important duties. Store rooms become class rooms overnight as new courses are demanded by eager students. Teachers also take on the huge task of rationing, and learn how to administer first aid.

WE WORK [ 8 ]

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W O R K * .W E W O R K [ 9 ]


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS. ROW 1: E. Shaw, M. Michael, G. Mertzke, P. Britt, D. Stafford. ). Birkel, L. Olson, pres., M. Fredendall, A. Jacobson, N. While.

ROW 2: D. McComas, pres.,

SENIORS GO FORTH TO WAR The Class of 1943 has always been small, and short of boys, but the feeling of companionship has never diminished. The members of the class have set high standards during their last year for the underclassmen to fol­ low. They led the school in the sale of war bonds, and headed the student government. With the loss of Mac Saunders to the army, in the second semes­ ter, the stark reality of war drew closer. Led by Dave McComas and Locke Olson, the class has enjoyed many good times together. A weiner bake held at Dr. Thompson's started the social season. Later Ditch Day provided a rest for tired minds, and a last fling for the class as a whole. The Parents' Dinner, planned by the parents, and ex­ cept for the date, kept secret from the seniors, was enjoyed as much by the parents as by the students. The Junior-Senior Reception, given by the jun­ iors, marked the last big social event before the class separated. Out into a troubled world goes a worthy, ambitious, serious group, in­ experienced, but eager and willing to learn-the Class of '43. [ 10]


ARTHUR JACOBSON

6 years at C.H.S. Class President 3 Class Social Chairman 4 Football 2. 3, captain 4 Track I, 2, 3, 4 Baseball 3. 4 Tennis 3 "Jake," blond hair

PHYLLIS SQUIRES

6 years at C.H.S. Girls' Ensemble 4 S'.age Crew 4 r1iorus 2. 3, 4 "Phy!," Earl Ferguson quartet

J. C. SWILLING I year at C.H.S. Orchestra 4 ( horus 4 v 12 test Quiet

GERTRUDE COOPER 3 years at C.H.S. Babcock Scholarship 4 Chorus 4 • "Garry," engagement, Church choir, accent

[ 11 ]

MARY RUTH MOBLEY

6 years at C.H.S. Chorus I, 2, 3, 4 Girls' Ensemble 4 French Club 3 Hair, Earl Ferguson quar­ tet Clothes

GENEVIEVE MERTZKE

6 years at C.H.S. Annual Staff 3, Ass't. Ed. 4 Woll Packet 2 French Club 3, 4 Student Council Rep. 4 G.AA I, 2 Scribblers 3, 4 "Stage Door" 3 "Torchbearers" 4 Vivacious, dramatics

PRISCILLA BRITT

2 years at C.H.S. Class Soc. Chm. 4 Chorus 4 Annual Stall 4 "Ladies in Waiting" 4 "Torchbearers" 4 Girls' Ensemble 4 Glasses, knitting Massachusetts Finger nails

BARBARA REEVES

6 years at C.H.S. Wolf Packet Ed. 3 Annual Staff 4 St. Body Adv. Mgr 4 Chorus 4 G.A.A. I, 2, 3, 4 Red Cross Rep. 2 Girls' Ensemble 4 "Bobby," hair, personality


MARY VIRGI NIA FR ED ENDA LL 6 Ye ars or CH s GA.A I. 2. 3 Base b Mgr. 4 all Clas s Se c. 4 Stude n t Red C Councj/ Rep . ro "Hcr;,p s s Re p. 2 y," fra n k ness, Attracti v e

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SAU N DERS 51/z Years ::r t CHS. Army Meteoro logy 4 C lass Pres . 3 F'ootba11 4 Stage C "Love/y re w I, 2, 3, 4 Handicr Duck lin g· 4 af:, •,., it, ouie H e/er. J,

NAN C Y WH ITE 2½ Y eqrs at C Fren ch Hs. C Scribb l lub 3, 4 er Red Cro s 3, 4 ss R ep. 4 Wolf P acket 4 Bea utif ul, ear rin gs

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MARY M AE MI Years or C Hs CHA EL G .AA. I, 2. 3, 4 Vice-Pr e s. S t ud C lass Pre s 3 e nr Body 4 Re<i C ross R ep. 4 Spanis h Cl ub I. ' Stage 2, 3 D o o r" "Ladie 3 s in Waitin 'Torch g" 4 be Chee rfu arers 4 l, go o d SPor t

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FRANK DEME NT 2 Yea rs at C H Gradu a tion co S. Baske tb a/1 3, mmittee 4 4 Track 4 Annual S Ouie t, g ta[{ 4 ood SP ort


ELLEN SHAW

6 years at C.H.S. Wolf Packet Ed. 4 Girls' League Sec. 4 Scribblers 4 Sp. Club I, 2 Class Treas. 3 Class Sec. 4 Annual Staff 4 Quiet voice, Mead, appendix

KATIE POTT

2½ years at C.H.S. "Stage Door" 3 "Torchbearers" 4 St. Council 3 French Club 3 Giggle, wispy hair definite ideas

DOROTHY STAFFORD

4 years at C.H.S. G.A.A. l, 2, 3, Pres. 4 Class Soc. Chm. l Student Council Rep. 4 Annual Stall 4 Wolf Packet 3, 4 Spanish Club 1, 2, 3 "Stage Door" 3 "Torchbearers" 4 Determination, sense of humor

LOIS FAKLER

6 years at C.H.S. Orchestra, Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 Annual Stall•4 French Club 3, 4 Girls' League Soc. Chm. 4 Girls' Ensemble 4 "Through the Night" 3 "Nine Lives of Emily" 3 "Ladies in Waiting" 4 Art, voice, Earl Ferguson quartet

[ 13]

JULIA BIRKEL

6 years at C.H.S. Scholarship Society 2, 3, Pres. 4 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 GA.A. I, 2, 3, 4 Annual Staff 3, 4 Council Rep. 2 "Stage Door" 3 "Lovely Duckling" 4 "The Happy Journey" 4 Cooperative, good sport

WILMA CORY

6 years at C.H.S. Spanish Club 1, 2, 3 GA.A. 1, 2, 3, 4 Girls' League Treas. 3, Pres, 4 Class Sec. l Solt voice, beautiful hair Photogenic, good sport

LA DEAN HOUEY

11z year at C.H.S. Quiel, Texas accent Good sport, good natured


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UTH COO KE 6 Years at C.H .s. G AA I O rch an 2. 3. 4 d Scholarshi Chorus, I 2. 3 4 p Scribblers Society 2. 3. 4 Ann ual St 3, 4 Class Se al{ 3, Editor 4 c 2, Soc. S.B. Sec Chm . 3 3 WINNIE Dramatics 3 I Year at WILLIAMS Rex, livel y e1 !ic ie Mary Ell CH S. nt e Gla sses, n's, hair acc ent KAY JE S

6 Year s a SEN t C.HS .

Wolf Pac ke Girls' Le t 4 ague Vi " Stage ce -Pr es 4 D "La dies i oor" 3 n Wai tin Chorus 4 g·• 4 Class Soc C h m _ 2 Clothes, car, laug h

HELE N 2 Years WILSON at French C CHS. lu Scribblers b 3, Sec. 4 Red Cros 4 s Rep. 3 A nnua/ Poet ry, Staff 4 expres sio n, Mac

TEDDY SNYDE R 6 Years at C.HS . Bas eball Letterm e 3 n Spanish 's Club 4 Club I, 2 Wolf Pa ck REX H Sergeant et 4 ENZJE 6 Years Inqui sitiv at Arm s 2 at C. H.S. e, Safet y Cor S Spanish Cl p Babcock u b I, 2 S Class Pre cholars hip 3 Oreb an s. 2 d Athle tics Chorus I, 2, 3, 4 Dramatics1, 2, 3, 4 3 Student B Boys' St o dy Pres. 4 ate Rep. Tenor, ic 3 e cr eam, Ruth L OC K E OL SON 6 Years a Orches tr t C.HS. a Class Pre I 2 Lette rme s . 4 n 's C lub l 2. Pres. 4 3. "Torchb earer s 4 Scholars D AVID h 6'5", Well ip Society 4 Mce oM l Year As gro o m at ed, g oo d Sp Class Pre CH.s. 0rt s. 4 Oreb 4 "The Lov e/y D uc Track 4 kling" 4 Sc ribb le rs 4 lokes, "B Tumb li n utch" g, divin g [ 14 J


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JUNIOR CLASS. ROW I: E. Medley, f. Pott, T. Wiggins, f. Saltonstall, D. Sleeper, D. Tooker, H. Dyer, W. Hendricks, R. Webster, E. Jones. ROW 2: C. Russi, E. Colbath, M. Wagner, S. Delapp, J. Ellis, B. Carnes, B. Harper, H. Ordway, R. Healh, D. Eisenbrey. ROW 3: H. Widmar, E. Popenoe, B. Colvin, Barbara Cooper, N. Taylor, M. Stalford, E. Breitner, M. Forbes.

. JUNIORS PREPARE TO LEAD STUDENT BODY ..,,,

The Juniors started the year with Dick Eisenbrey as class president while other capable members held student body offices. Earle Jones had the big job of Business Manager, while Marcia Forbes as secretary had the job of rewriting the constitution. Annabelle Saunders had the .full time job of try­ ing to.edit the Wolf Packet with the paper shortage. Socially minded, the class under Marcia Forbes, their chairman, gave the big dance of the year with Chet Jaegar's band. The dance had for its theme a Coconut Grove motif. Many Juniors took part in music and drama. The unknown dramatic talent of Daves, Forbes, Popenoe, Mary Stafford and others was recognized in the school plays. The year was a thoroughly successful one for the Juniors. At its end they were more keenly aware than ever, of the importance of the com­ ing year and prepared themselves for the job ahead. As seniors they will have a great responsibility and they are eager and ready to accept it. The spirit of the group was typical of their enthusiasm and determination to face any future bravely. [ IS J


C.

TENTH GRADE. ROW 1: G. Colbalh, B. Birkel, I. Scott J. Spencer B. Fuller, F. Sabichi, R. Wheeler, W. Heflin: C. Hildebrand, R. Eakin. ROW 2: C. Ward, B. Binldey, Harrod, J. Mathison, H. Phillips, V. Newell, B. Parham, L. Stocks, B. Mitchell, J. Whitney. ROW 3: G. Bruner, L. Welch, R. Wheeler, R. Workman, H. Harvey, B. Martin, M. Dunn, M. Naltel, J. Curran, S. Barnes. ROW 4: A. Tuttle, P. Massey, F. Wilson, B. McCullough, P. Lee, V. White, B. Higby, L. Guerrero.

SOPHOMORES LEND TALENTS TO SCHOOL LIFE The first day of school brought forth the sophomores, swinging down tht: halls in the old routine which they pretended to know so well. Soon after class elections, they started off the social activities of the school with a bang, by giving a fast moving "Sadie Hawkins Dance" under the direction of Fern Wilson, where one of the mothers of the class was announced as "Pansy Yokum" and was presented with a corn cob pipe. Another highlight was the crowning of "Li'l Abner" and "Daisy Mae," in which one couple from each class was chosen. The student body play exhibited some of the talent­ ed actors and actresses of the class in leading parts. Under the leadership of Austin Frank, John Scott, and William Fuller, the class carried out its many activities. The G.A.A. members of this class gave the freshmen mem­ bers a never-to-be-forgotten initiation. The boys proved themselves outstand­ ing in the field of sports, especially track, and they won the interclass track meet. The students early acquired 100% in the Red Cross drive, and sold an excellent share of bonds and stamps for the "Buy a Jeep" campaign. Social Chairman, Francisco Sabichi, and his committee planned a success­ ful class party in the second semester. Putting away their sophomore note­ books, the tenth graders are looking forward to their junior victory year!

[ 16]


NINTH GRADE. ROW l· A Araujo, R. Dye ,;, B. Stankevich, D. Eakin, E. Landreth, /· Stafford, W. Pierce, D. Hall. C. Sanders. . Mock, D. Spencer, L. Burke, J. Bink ey, B. Showers, R. Michels, T. Johnson. ROW 2: R. Towne, A. Snyder, R. Mason, "· ROW 3: R. Garland, J. Palmer, M. Wilson, B. Brown, C. Ellis, L. Honaker, M. Chester, B. Tracy. ROW 4: V. Baber, A. Bradley, C. Sleeper, M. Kinney, J. Reeves, A. Henslee, M. Garris, V. Dunham, B. Root, C. Upham. ROW 5: N. Bronson, P. Michels, H. Reed, B. Sanders, I. Garcia, G. Chang, D. Scott, V, Smith, N. Michael.

FRESHMEN PROVE VALUABLE TO SENIOR HIGH The spirited Freshmen started their first year in the upper bracket with a dance in which the Thanksgiving motif was evident. The second social event was a unique carnival which promoted the sale of war stamps, as well as providing a good time. _. On the athletic field, the girls especially proved their prowess. The form­ idable basketball team almost took the championship from the senior class. In speedball, the ninth grade did win the champiol\ship after struggles with the three older teams. In other sports the ninth grade girls proved their mettle, and the boys developed some excellent athletes. The ninth grade also participated in student body activities. In the An­ nual basketball game, the girls played against the senior girls' team. On another occasion they. provided entertainment for merrymakers with a musi­ cal melodrama. Two capable presidents, Marcia Kinney and Gladys Chang, led the class of 1946 through a very successf�l year, showing its ability in i:., scholarship, art and music.

[ 17]


EIGHTH GRADE. ROW ROW 2: A. Salazar, P. Pierce, M. Cummins, M. Contreros, M. Kraus, M.

1: S. Scott, M. Porcha, R. Taylor, C. Popeno !' . C. Baber, B. Garland, B. White, V. Young (. Smith. .,_ , Hall, J. Norns, N. Parsons, D. Forsberg, J. Michels, V. Iredell. ROW 3: G. Brest, E. namer, G. Deon, J. Campbell. ROW 4: J. Straley, J. Yerkes, J. Keller, C. Unfred, R. Miller. ROW 5: L. Howell, P. Pitzer, H. Towne, J. Russi, P. White. ROW 6: B. Headland, E. Johnson, D. Mead, J. Holt.

EIGHTH GRADE HEADS JUNIOR H1GH This year the eighth grade has been very busy in social, scholastic, and athletic activities. Under the leadership of Pres. Hendricks and Vice Pres. Corson in the second semester, the eighth grade has proven itself success­ ful in the school record. In the winter, the eighth grade cooperated with the rest of the school in getting "Butch" haircuts. The eighth grade acted as guides at the Education Week program. Two parties were given for the class under the direction of Social Chairmen Rainer and Popenoe, plus one with the seventh grade. The more musical boys organized a swing band. Musicians of the class are Baber, Taylor, Miller, Johnson and Popenoe. John­ son, Cummins, Rainer, Headland, and Baber demonstrate the scholastic abilities. Some of the athletes are Russi, Headland and Clifton. At the same time, Taylor and Popenoe might be noted for their enthusiasm for dramatics. Mead, Baber and Norris excel in art. Garland and Dean should be men­ tioned for their ability in girls' athletics. The eighth grade has received its junior high training and is now ready for the senior high. [ 18]


. I

SEVENTH GRAQE. ROW I: T. Thomas, A. Sweet, C. Harrod, J. Hume. M. Fuller, S. Tuttle, B. Parham, J. Witter, T. Wolfe, C. Nelson. ROW 2: M. Woodford, I. Breitner, B. Caradine, N. Towne, M. Bruner, P. Davenport, P. Ristine, M. Campbell. ROW 3: J. Sanders, B. Drakeford, J. Mathison, H. Jaeger, B. Burke, P. Paige, J. Conry, T. Russell, B. Thomas. ROW 4: D. Rickard, E. Armendarez, M. Meredith, P. Coffey, L. Straley, B. Honaker. ROW 5: A. Grantham, C. Michael, D. Penter, E. Heath, D. Naftel, E. Schrink. ROW 6: W. Towne, R. Cory, P. Matter, B. Liles, A. Coons, R. Rathburn.

SEVENTH GRADE LEADS IN PATRIOTISM The seventh grade has already distinguished itself in the short time it has spent in Claremont High. To begin with, seventh graders sold more tick­ ets to the plays that were given by the students of Claremont High than any other class. Like the rest of the school the seventh grade joined the Junior Red Cross 100%.� The sale of war stamps by their class topped school records. Miss Allen was a wonderful help and 0 great deal of fun while supervising the Victory garden. She acted as class adviser with Mr. Spen­ cer. The officers for the first semester were Billy Schrink, president, with Ed­ ward Heath acting as vice-president. With evidence of a seeming prefer­ ence for boys, Jim Deniston served as secretary. In the second semester, ob­ vious approval of Billy's first term was shown by his re-election to office. The vice-president, Clydene Clifton, was active for the first term in the role of social chairman. The secretary was Marguerite Bruner. The class has won its place by displaying � contagious enthusiasm, so important this year. [ 19]


S. B. OFFICERS CARRY NEW RESPONSIBILITY

Rex Henzie President Earle Jones Business Manager

Mary Mae Michael Vice-President Ruth Cooke Annual Editor

Barbara Reeves Advertising Manager Annabelle Saunders Wolf Packet Editor

I 20 l

Marcia Forbes Secretary Ellen Shaw Wolf Packet Editor


STUDENT COUNCIL. ROW I L Burke, W. Hendricks, J. Deni .ton. B Schrink, G. Chana, M. Fuller. ROW 2: M. Forbes, D. Stallord, A. Saunders, B Reeves, M. Kinney, M. Howell, G. M ,rt2ke. ROW 3: R. Cooke, M. Michael, W. Cory, L. Olson. ROW 4: R. Eisenbrey, R. Heath, R. Henzie, W. Fuller, J. Staf.ord, D. McComas.

STU.DENT COUNCIL HEADS WAR PROGRAM Claremont High School's elected legislative body, in order to save time in a bustling, war-geared world, held its meetings during the noon hour this year. Through the munching of sandwiches and the-:rustling of papers, the representatives found time to thoroughly discuss with determination and vitality the many problems brought before them-stamp sales, scrap drives, and thu Annual. Notable in their achievements was the revision of the stu­ dept body constitution to fit new situations encountered by students and teachers alike. When faculty members pointed out the deplorable condition of the grounds-a problem in no way diminished by the appearance of the ice cream on the campus, "Ground Duties Chairmen," Dick Eisenbrey and Locke Olson, were elected to correct this. Many new responsibilities and problems fell on the shoulders of the council, and they accepted them with an energy and willingness to really contribute all they had to school and com­ munity life. The Student Council was given a report by Mr. Booth on the High School Victory Corps. It was voted to let the students decide individu­ ally whether they wished to enlist in the corps. With a definite purpose in mind, the Council has gone ahead and has accomplished much. [ 21 ]


Mr. William Booth Mr. Lyle Martin

Miss Gertrude D. Willows Mrs. Margaret R. Williams

Mrs. Minnie M. Howe Mrs. Ada M. S. Fitts

Mrs. Cornelia K. Hull

With the opening of school in war time, extra work, including rationing, was laid upon the faculty members, but with determination and resource­ fulness, they retained their high standards of teaching. Mr. Booth taught math classes and a new aviation course, besides acting as annual photog­ rapher and heading the stage crew. Latin and English were taught by Miss Willows who also acted as Girls' League advisor. The orchestra had a very successful year under Mrs. Howe, while Miss Grove and Miss Baughman directed the ever growing chorus. Mrs. Hull taught senior high English, be­ sides advising the Wolf Packet and Scribblers. Mr. Martin led history and social science classes, as well as coaching boys' gym classes and acting as annual advisor. Mrs. Williams was kept busy with biology and domestic art classes and heading Red Cross activities. Mrs. Fitts' work expanded when she took over algebra and geometry classes, while continuing to act as librar­ ian. Social Science was taught by Mrs. Wilby, who replaced her husband. Girls' sports were taught by Mrs. Gleason, who carried the added physical fitness program. Miss Allen, junior high English teacher, also acted as a dramatic coach and advised the Victory Gardeners. The expanded chemis­ try and physics classes were taught by Mr. Arrington, who was also a Red Cross advisor. Miss Escudero taught Spanish and French and helped or­ ganize the two language clubs. Mr. Wood, high school business manager and vice-principal, taught typing, wood shop, and mechanical drawing. The school nurse, Miss Henricus, not only filled her regular position and took care of attendance, but also taught first aid classes. The artistic efforts of the stu­ dents were under the direction of Mrs. Mclellan. Mr. Spencer replaced Mr. Charlson in junior high math and boys' gym. Thus in an atmosphere of tension necessarily prevalent amor:ig stu­ dents so closely affected by the draft and altered plans, the faculty has main­ tained the spirit of cheerfulness and courage, and awakened the students to the added importance of education at this time.


TEACHERS PREPARE YOUTH FOR WAR

Miss Jean M. Henricus Mr. William S. Wood Mrs. Mary E. Wilby Miss Jean Baughman Miss Mary ). Escudero Mrs. Phyllis K. Gleason

Miss Helene F. Grove Mrs. Margaret McLellan Mr. John V. Spencer Miss Marj?rie Allen Mr. Charles A. Arrington

[ 23 ]


The hard working secretaries, Mrs. Beck and Miss Foster were present long before the opening of the new year, straightening out students' schedules, and doing all the other in­ numerable tasks that announce the beginning of another school year. Af­ ter the first quarter, Mrs. Levick joined the office staff when Miss Foster left, after spending many faithful years at Claremont. Mrs. Johnson was kept busy checking out books after school, and trying to maintain order in the library for those who studied late. Few can begin to realize the amount and variation of the work required to keep a school running smoothly. To these workers, the students give their wholehearted thanks.

OFFICE STAFF-Mrs. Irene Levick, Mrs. Florenr.e Beck and Mrs. Jesse Johnson

MAINTENANCE CREW WORKS UNTIRINGLY GROUND CREW - Mr. Wilford Michael, Mr. Frank Gettman, Mr. Ronald Williams

The well kept high school grounds show the hours spent to good advant­ age by the busy bus drivers, Mr. Wil­ liams and Mr. Michael, when they were not carrying students to and from school. Clean school rooms and halls were the result of unlimited energy put forth by Mr. Gettman, to say nothing of his task of inventory, and odd jobs. Mr. Gettman is always associated with school dances as doorman. Our grounds and buildings are kept in a condition to be proud of. This is the result of many hours of work, and yet this group manages to do many special favors as well. Real credit goes to them, and with appreciation their worth is acknowledged.

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[ 24]


Dr. Earl Thompson

PRINCIPAL SPEAKS TO DEPARTING SENIORS The calm and business-like manner in which the majority of you have loy­ ally responded to the numerous war needs justifies confidence in you and your ability and willingness to assume your full responsibility in preserving and shaping a better world. In ad­ dition to your war-time activities, we find the achievement in regular school work is above that of normal times. A sense of personal responsibility has been very evident. Effective adjust­ ments to curtailed social, athletic, and recreational activities testify to your acceptance of fundamental iralues. May we salvage all that is good out of these experiences!

To the class of '43, congratulations. Yours is the lirst group to feel im­ mediately the induction of eighteen­ year-olds into the "Service." It is with genuine pride that I have noted your intelligent, unflinching acceptance of, and purposeful preparation for that service. May your future always be bright because of your efforts and sac­ rifices. All best wishes to each and every one of you! Sincerely, Earl Thompson. [ 25 1


In a world of fighting men, physical fitness cannot be overstressed. On new equipment, boys develop hitherto un­ known muscles and slowly acquire the physical condition that a nation at war demands of her youth.

In training for the war of today and the building of tomorrow, the mechanical drawing class under Mr. Wood de­ velops skills in drafting, well realizing the importance of the task that lies be--: fore them.

AMERICAN YOUTH The "scientific attitude" is a familiar one in the biology classroom. Through discovering its meaning, students pre­ pare to take their places in a world of science, the inevitable world of tomor­ row.

Electrons, plastics, synthetics, all are terms of today, only hinting at the vast new fields of science so soon to be opened to the world. Through the study of basic fundamentals, chem­ istry students encourage and develop their interest in this field.

[ 26]


Typical enthusiasm was the dominant characteristic of the seventh grade as they launched their victory garden. Produce sold by door-to-door sales足 manship provided ample reward for the true patriotism shown.

Boys learn the fundamentals of First Aid, always important, but today es足 sential. They make practical applica足 tion of its principles using each other as victims.

WORKS FOR VICTORY In preparation for armed service in technical fields, and with an eye to the future importance of a fast growing world, specially skilled students puz足 zle over logarithms and the slide rule.

Realizing that clothing may become scarce, sewing classes under Mrs. Williams learn to make attractive garments as well as to remodel old clothes.

[ 27]


CHORUS. ROW 1: F. Sabichi, R Wheeler, A. A:auJo, C. Russi, C. Hildebrand, R. Henzie. ROW 2: . P. Squires, M. R. Mobley, B. Reeves, G. Mertzke, B. McCullough, Miss Grove. ROW: 3: M. P. Naftel, M. S. Dunn, S. Barnes, P. Britt, J. Reeves, G. Bruner, P. Massey B. Colvin, L. Guerrero. ROW 4: A. Saunders, A. Tuttle, R. Cooke, R Wheeler, H. Harvey, P. Lee, R. Michels, D. Hall. ROW 5: B. Parham, K. Pott, H. Philltps, G. Cooper, W. Heflin, J. Whitney, B. Fuller, J. C. Sw,lhng, C. Ward, C. Sanders.

YOUNG AMERICA SINGS FOR FREEDOM With a large number of students showing an interest in chorus, the classes under Miss Grove and Miss Baughman felt that their work was very much worth while, and a great deal of fun. The Christmas program was the first main event with both Junior Hirrh and Advanced Choruses participat­ ing in the pageant and candlelight procession. Each class settled down to work, emphasizing Spanish-America n themes, religious numbers, and folk songs. Their talents were displayed in assembly, in the orchestra program, and at California Junior Republic. _ Some enthusiastic singers appeared in the spotlight with the titles of "Girls' Ensemble" and "Boys' Quintette." The ensemble was started by Miss Grove as a sextette, but so many tried out that it was hard to cut it to fewer than ten. Soon the boys felt that they wanted some attention, and formed a quintette. The groups worked many hours out of school perfecting harmony, and at last appeared at "The Lovely Duckling," Kiwanis, the Junior Women's Club, "Previews of 1943," Junior Republic, and at the orchestra program, where they sang novelty numbers. [ 28]


ORCHESTRA. ROW 1: M. P. Naftel, B V Colvin, F. Wilson, A Tuttle, B. Sanders, M Bruner, D. Bevilaqua, R. Taylor, J. Campbell, P. Colle. ROW 2: S. Barnes, R. Wheeler, E. Brown., W. Heflin, ) C Sw11linq, ). Whitney, E. Popenoe, H. Widmar, S. Scott. ROW 3: R. Rathburn, B. Birkel, M. Campbell, ). Saltonstall, D. McComas, R. Wheeler, D. Sleeper, D. Scott, C. Popenoe, E. Johnson. ROW 4: J. Birkel, I. Breitner, B. Tracy, R. Miller, Mrs. Howe, R. Henzic, C. Baber, M. Dunn, P. Pitzer, M. Woodford, P. Paiqe, R. Cooke, L. Stocks.

ORCHESTRA DEVELOPS RISING MUSICIANS The orchestra, under Mrs. Howe's direction, has had a very colorful year, playing everything from Beethoven's First Symphony to a modern arrange­ ment of "Ma Curly-Headed Babby." Because of wartime restrictions, they have had to confine their efforts to local appearances. _By providing over­ tures, the orchestra helped promote the success of the Student Body, Girls' League, and the Junior-Senior plays. It also provided music for the com­ mencement program. Early in the year, the orchestra presented an assem­ bly program, and at Christmas, a part of it aided in the pageant. The orchestra further joined in the Christmas spirit by filling sixteen gift stockings for service men. The party at Mrs. Howe's home, an event eagerly awaited each year, was held on April second. Always a lot of fun, the gathering this year was a great success. Highlight of the season was the concert, given in the auditorium on April thirtieth. The valuable cooperation of the chorus, the individual talents of the soloists, and the playing of the group as a whole made this event a great triumph, and provided funds for pins. Those who re­ ceived orchestra pins this year·were Julia Birkel, Ruth Cooke, Lois Fakler, and Rex Henzie. [ 29]


*

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'"� ,I

America needs its youth healthy and vigorous as she has never needed them before. For a successful army, strong men are needed. On the home front, men and women must be sturdy so they can back up the army at ma­ chines and on farms. The supreme importance of school athletics is to develop the young bodie•s of our nation for otherwise unbearable burdens. In team sports, strength is built, muscles are developed, and cooperation, equally import­ ant, is taught. Special gym equipment helps the boys correct individual de­ fects and develops hitherto unknown muscles. The girls have individual gymnastics to help strengthen their bodies. Photographs of each girl reveal posture defects which can be corrected to relieve fatigue. Outside activities, such as citrus picking, also aid this pro­ gram of developing and maintaining physical fitness. In the opportunity for development, youth sees both a privilege and an obligation.

WE P LAY [ 30]

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WE


P L A Y

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-W E P L A Y [ 31 ]


FOOTBALL GROUP.

A. Jacobson, captain, L. Olson, mgr., Coaches Martin and Spencer

FOOTBALL TOUGHENS BOYS FOR ARMY LIFE The football season began at Claremont this year with very few men reporting to Coach Martin for practice. There were only seven boys be­ sides four returning Lettermen, so three "X" players had to be used as sub­ stitutes. The first game with the Pomona Sophomores turned out to be a defeat for Claremont. Pomona substituted freely and thus was able to wear down the Pack to an 18-7 def eat. This game was followed by a hard fought battle against Cal. Jr. Rep. In the next game, although Claremont was con­ tinually in Webb territory, hard breaks and injuries prevented them from scoring. Webb finally rolled up a 12-0 score. Claremont ended the season with a game against Puente. The opposition had to work hard, using many reserves, but it finally won on a 21-0 score. Coach Spencer's "X" football team enjoyed quite a successful season this year. Although playing only three games, by using a "T" formation, the team won two of these. The first one, a 9-6 victory for Claremont, was with Bonita. The second, also with Bonita, was a 20-7 defeat. But the final game, with Emerson, was a 13-0 victory for the Wolfpack team.

X Football Scores

Varsity Football Scores

7 0 0 0

Claremont..............Pomona ................ Claremont.............. Calif. Jr. Rep. ...... Claremont.............. Webb .................... Claremont... ........... Puente ..................

18 24 12 21

9 Claremont.............. Bonita .................. 6 7 Claremont.............. Bonita .................. 20 13 Claremont.............. Emerson .............. 0

C 32 l


VARSITY FOOTBALL. ROW l: R. Eakin, B. Birkel, R. Wheele:, W. Pilcher, D. Tooker, A. Araujo, D. McComas. ROW 2: Coach Martin, H. Dyer, T. Wiggins, M. Saunders, R. Henzie, G Colbath, A Jacobson, captain, R. Ei senbrey, L. Olson, Mgr.

(

X FOOTBALL. ROW I: L. Burke, L. Stocks, R. Michels, J. Stafford, T. Johnson, R. Dyer. Wheeler, D. Eakin, B. Stankevich, F. Sabi ;hi, J. Pott, B. Birkel.

[ 33 )

ROW 2: R.


D in, . '·\ey , D • Eak B.1nk W M\· B kley Bin ]. BA . eis, B BA SKET K. LM L oc ' R \ch L. Burk e ,

T Johnson. tain: I . Pott, . Tooker, cap

, ach Spencer ' ROW 2: Co

ro .

"B" BASKETBALL STRIVES FOR HIGHER GOALS

The courageous "B" team had a rough and rocky season due to their team being handicapped by lack of height. Most of the players were "C" and "D" standing, (small of stature but big of heart). Their opponents were all much larger. Though the "B" team lost all its games, it gained experi­ ence that will be invaluable for the coming seasons. In all, about 18 turned out. They practiced hard and played hard. Some of these are sure to be on next year's team. This was a scrappy bunch, who had to meet, in every game, opponents who were much larger than themselves. 13 Claremont.............. Cal.fr. Rep......... 20 11 Claremont..............Webb .................... 44 12 Claremont..............Bonita .................... 44

26 Claremont..............Chino .................... 43 2 Claremont.............. Bonita .................... 38 12 Ciaremont.............. Chino .................... 44

[ 34]


---

!,f A¥K�BALL. '

.

Row l · E

''1'11ns, F. Deme t '.,fn�, R He nzie, L 01 n , . rau,o

n c , D. McCo m�� , aptain, G. Co lbath , R, E·rse nbr@y, R ow 2: Coach S pen.

BASKETBALL TEACHES SKI LL AND TEAM WORK Coach Spencer, bringing many new ideas to Claremont, was able to put a fairly successful team on the floor. Despite the lack of reserves, the team showed good spirit throughout the season. After losing badly twice, to Pomona High and Pomona College Freshmen, they began to look like a "smooth ball· club." Though the Hillers were defeated by one point in their next encounter with Cal. Jr. Rep., they were very successful in their defeat of Webb, a long standing rival. Later, they again proved their superiority over Webb by defeating them in a thriller that took two·overtime periods to decide. Though previously overwhelmed by the Chino cowboys, who aspired to be Tri-County League champions, the Hillers playing inspired ball, capped the season, by defeating the Cowboy quintette 26-25. 1.

23 12 25 21 22

ClaremonL........... Pomona High ...... 58 Claremont... ........... Pomona Freshmen 32 Claremont.............. Cal. Jr. Rep......... 26 Claremont... ...........Webb .................... 17 Claremont.............. Bonita .............,.... 38

21 34 27 27 26

[ 35]

Claremont.............. Chino .................... Claremont.............. Webb .................... Claremont... ........... Bonita .................. Cal. Jr. Rep. ........ . Claremont............. Claremont.............. Chino ....................

35 32 40 39 25


- ---

D. Eak.,n, B I· C . Ward, Burke. X TRACK. RMOW L on· ' · as Michels, R.

, R. · B Parham h Marhn, ROW 2: Coac er. Dy R. ne . h ' R . Tow Stonkev1c

X-TRACKSTERS HOLD THEIR OWN Although the team was hampered by the loss of three boys to the Varsity, they struggled along valiantly. They were paced during the season by Stankevich in the high jump and dashes, Burke in the 1320 and high jump, Dyer in the low hurdles, and Towne in the 660. In the meet at Pomona College with the tri-league teams and Pomona Col­ lege Frosh competing, two Claremont High "X" records were broken. Wheeler bettered the mark for the 660 by running it in 1:30.9, and Sab­ ichi broke the 75- yard dash record, running in 7.9 sec. Though the boys missed the Laguna and Chaffey invitational meets which were postponed due to transportation, they all participated in the Tri-County League finals. In this meet, which was held at Pomona College, Sab­ ichi won both dashes in grand fashion. Wheeler captured a first in the 660, and a second in the broad jump. The relay team, consisting of Wheeler, Birkel, Stankevich, and Sabichi, in that order, placed fourth, to make the teams total 19 points for the meet. This was good for third place behind Citrus and Chino. [ 36 J


I

I

TRACK TEAM HAS VICTORIOUS SEASON The track team with the help of "X's," Sabichi, Birkel and Wheeler proved to be a well rounded out squad. Although confined to a re­ stricted area, the boys got plenty of competition from Chino and Bon­ ita. A paper meet with Downey in which Claremonfwon 66-38, turned out to be quite a success, and will probably be used exclusively next season. The tracksters walloped Chino twice. The team also beat the strong Bonita team in a dual meet. At the Brea relays the Clare­ mont boys came through in good style, getting third in the shuttle relay and distance medley, while securing fourth in the 880 medley. In the Tri-County League finals Colbath was high point man for the season and led the team with a first in the high hurdles in 16 sec. flat and a second by a nose in the low hurdles. Other point winners were Wig­ gins, who placed second in the 440, and fourth in the 220 dash. Mc­ Comas took a fifth in the low hurdles, Araujo a fifth in the mile, and the relay team of Eisenbrey, Wiggins, Dement, and Colbath took fourth in the relay. This left Claremont with fourteen points, good for fifth place in the team totals. [ 37]


GIRLS' BASKETBALL. ROW I: M. V. fredendall, captain, J. Birkel.

ROW 2:

M. M. Michael, W. Cory, R. Cooke, D. Stafford.

SENIOR HOOPSTERS BATTLE TO VICTORY Many giris turned out for basketball with unusual enthusiasm and zest. When the teams were organized they looked equally good, and inter-class games promised to be exciting. After hard-fought battles in which compe­ tition ran high for all, the seniors rose to the top, defeating all other teams. On the senior team, Wilma Cory attracted notice for her persistent long shots, while "Happy" Fredendall is remembered for her excellent guarding and Dorothy Stafford for her never ending determination and energy. It was, however, the team working together that brought the victory, after a close game with the freshmen. Playday at Bonita, which pad been anticipated by all, proved to be great fun as always. The freshmen, juniors, and seniors all came home victorious. Although the sophomores did not win, they played a great game and displayed fine sportsmanship. Playday, with eight schools participating, brought the climax to a grand season.

[ 38 J


SPEEDBALL ROW I: V. Baber, B. Root, J, Reeves, captain; M. Kinney, A. Bradley. C, Ellis, C. Sleeper, B. Brown, N. Bronson, V. Smith.

ROW 2: G. Chong, D. Scott, M. Wilson,

FROSH DEFEAT MORE EXPERIENCED TEAMS Speedball season began with great anticipation, for each class had a fighting tea�, and each was determined to win the championship. Interclass games were played and soon all teams but the seniors cind freshmen were eliminated. The play-off between the two teams was a hard fought game which ended in a tie, but since the seniors had lost one previous game, the freshman team was proclaimed champion. Som'e of the stars of this game were: Barbara Reeves, who is noted for her excellent covering of the fullback position; Joyce Reeves and Wilma Cory, known for their long kicks, and Happy Fredendall and Julia Birkel, who are remembered for their drop kicks. The ambitious Bonita girls walked to Claremont for a speedball play­ day. Although Claremont won, the Bonita girls deserve as much credit for their sportsmanship in walking the distance they did, to prevent a break in the series of annual games.

[ 39]


HOCKEY TEAM. ROW I: H. Wilson, D. Stalford, R. Cooke, Captain: G. Mertzke, L. Holley. Fredendall, J. Birkel, M. M. Michael, B. Reeves.

RQW 2: P. Britt, W. Cory, M.

UNDEFEATED SENIORS ARE HOCKEY CHAMPS In the spring interest centered in hockey, and early in the season four class teams were organized. While they were somewhat unequal in num­ ber, skill and ability soon demonstrated that quality rather than quantity was important, and smiling faces distracted attention from the bruises frequently acquired on the field. An inter-class tournament was organized, and each team had the oppor­ tunity to play the other three. Competition was very stiff. The smaller teams, in a fine spirit of sportsmanship, used only their own players and thus contrib­ uted to the keener interest in the games. There was much discussion over which teams would play the final championship game, but it soon became apparent that the more experienced junior and senior players would be matched for the title game. The final game was a very exciting one, as there were players of real ability on both teams, and each was aware that the winning of the tourna­ ment depended on the skill and teamwork of this contest The seniors suc­ ceeded in winning the game and the title. [ 40]


r

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I

AMATEUR ARCHERS FIND FUN IN LEARNING

GIRLS' TENNIS. ROW I: K. Pott, Mgr., G. Chang, M. Forbes, M. Stafford, M. Waqner, M. R. Mobley. ROW 2: M. M. !-lichael, M. S. Dunn, Coach Wilby, J. Birkel, J. Reeves.,

TENNIS DEVELOPS IND.IVIDUAL SKILL [ 41 ]


�1 I

r

\ ICE G.A.A- OFF r. B Ha rpe

. E. RS. ROW 1.

fre dendall, 1<. Pott, M. H. Ordway, le, Tutt A es. ROW 2: s., M Dav Stalford. Pre O. e, eno p0p

G. A. A. WORKS FOR SPORTSMANSHIP The G.A.A. started the year with its officers already elected, according to the custom of voting at the end of each year, in order to permit seniors to vote. President Dorothy Stafford led the organization through a very suc­ cessful year, in spite of a small turnout. Ethelyn Popenoe was secretary, and Marilyn Daves acted as social chairman, planning the party. In charge of the various sports were: basketball, Audrey Tuttle; speedball, Betty Har­ per; hockey, Helen Ordway; baseball, Mary Virginia Fredendall; and tennis, Katie Pott. Their jobs were to arrange interclass games, to keep the equip­ ment in order, and to check roll every Monday and Wednesday afternoon. Although regular playdays were cancelled because of transportation difficuities, the Bonita girls walked or rode bicycles to Claremont for a speed­ ball playday at which Claremont was victorious. The enjoyment and the le!sons in good sportsmanship learned in G.A.A. made the girls really conscious of the value of such an organization tod�y. [ 42 J


ins, R. t fkiit . breY, T Wigg B. Birke . I: R. t,senauJo . ROW 3: CLU - ROW Ar LETTERMAN'Som a � Saltonstall, A. Potl, D. McC Dy ;; Jacobson, H.

E,_;,���j:;,

W Pilcher, 1 • er. D. Too kerG Colbath, A, . ROW '.2.· T Snyd ,' L. Olson. pres., ;i e Hen . R

lETTERMEN BUILD BODIES AND CHARACTER The Lettermen's Club had its usual successful year, beginning in the fall with the addition of ten new members, most of whom had·· earned their ad­ mission in the previous season. These compensated for the men lost by graduation in '42. The election of officers heralded the preparation for definite tasks before them and their readiness to begin. Locke Olson was elected president, with Jim Pott as vice-president. In charge of the yearly Lettermen's Carnival was Earle Jones. In keep­ ing with the times, defense bonds and stamps were sold and used for ad­ mission to the various activities. As usual, the carnival turned out to be a financial success. As has been so often true, this year any trip the club might have wished to take was somewhat curtailed by transportation problems. This organization is representative of the universal spirit in athletics, that of playing as well as working together, and the boys have all felt that real benefit has come from their work. It takes more than a war to curb the spirit of American boys with ambition. [ 43 ]


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.... ;I

The world today is grim, but students aren't letting even a war dampen their enthusiasm for living. They will always be able to relax and enjoy life, no matter what extra burdens are laid upon them. American youth will rise to any occasion. With fewer janitors on duty, students help by picking up papers in the halls and on the grounds. Deten­ tion is no longer served in the library, but on the grounds or in the building, helping the janitors and groundsmen. Teachers, with their added war duties d rr,;tioning, are relieved of the hall duty by enthusiastic student leaders. School life is now built around cooperation and unselfishness, traits vital to this modern world. Youth today dares to face a doubtful future and prepares to overcome the odds against it. Each activity at high school tends to further develop the will power and strength and to encourage the building of finer character. This creates the desire for the maintenance of high standards which permit youth to face the future with the hope of a world without war.

WE L I V E [ 44]

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L I V E

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WE L I V E [ 45 ]


A MES Dear Soldier: Last year you were one of us; now you are gone -yes, gone in body, but not in spirit. We here at C. H. S. remember our graduates, especially you who have left to serve this country we love so well. We know what you'll remember about this year. You'll recall some cold morning standing in line for a bus, a three-day nightmare with hazy recollec­ tions of shots and tests and faces, hundreds of new faces. Then home for a last-minute glance at all your beloved possessions, loosening ties of youth so soon to be broken; goodbyes, amd you donned the uniform of your country. Quite different are the recollections of those of us still here in dear old C. H. S. It's been an· exciting year, more serious, but perhaps thus giving us a keener appreciation of the simple experiences. Activities got under way with a sunny afternoon, girls in white directing the spirit of loyal supporters to united effort, green turf, and grim players battling over the pigskin, players representing Emerson and Fremont, combined against our Red and Gray. The Sophomore Dance with varied costumes, decorations of unusual figures, unmistakably an­ nounced the theme as "Sadie Hawkins bay." Soft music cast its spell over all; net result-a thoroughly successful evening. Silhouettes against hazy backdrops, soft music filtering through the auditorium, candles and a pro­ cession of singing figures-the Christmas assembly. One morning figures vaguely resembling former classmates moved in accustomed ways about the building. Their outstanding universal feature was an extremely closely cropped tuft of hair looking very lonesome and a little discouraged on the tops of their heads. In protest to these haircuts the "pigtails" became the predominant characteristic of the girls the fol­ lowing day and apparently did not pass unnoticed, for raucous laughter heralded their approach all through the d ay.

[ 46]


SAGE The ingredients: dimmed lights, figures clad in blue uniforms, bright horns, a leader in white equals the product, the Pomona College band assembly. Former C. H. S. graduates were introduced, and Lindsay Workman gave an inspiring rendition of familiar songs. Annual week was a complete success with a full schedule. Beginning with a simple skit the students were made aware of coming events and the import­ ance of the sale of annuals. Two basketball games, one featuring the faculty versus the senior boys, and another between the freshman and senior girls were played. The faculty, with loyal support, came through victorious. The senior girls upheld their prestige by winning their game also. This busy week was climaxed by a talent show. As the curtain went up the audience saw a '"mike," heard the mysterious last-minute checkups, a few trial sound.effects, the hasty bickering of the master and mistress of ceremonies, then the number draw­ ing began, and hilarious comedy and genuine ef­ fort made the show a readily acknowledged suc­ cess. At the senior assembly the coveted awards were _presented to happy recipients amid much applause. The crowning event of the year was the Junior­ Senior Reception. Lovely girls, handsome boys, all looking a bit older and extremely happy in the re­ alization of what this year's end meant. The final pageant, the graduation, girls in white dresses, red corsages, boys proud of their achieve­ ment, a deep feeling of a widening future. And so life has gone on here at C.H. S. We have taken courage from your example. To you, our symbol of all who have left, we give thanks, and · humbly pray that very soon our supreme goal may be achieved and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," the right for which you strive, may be­ come a reality in which we all shall share together again. Reminiscently, Your Chum.

[ 47]

0

{ .- :i


FRENCH

H. Wilson. zke, N White: â&#x20AC;˘ pres., G. Mert el. Birk J. udero, L fakler, CLU B. Miss Esc

FRENCH CLUB ANTICIPATES WORLD PEACE The French Club held its first meeting at the home of Julia Birkel, with only four girls present. Following the traditional procedure of all French Club meetings, elections and business were carried out in French. Julia Birkel was unanimously elected president, with Genevieve Mertzke as vice-president, Helen Wilson as secretary, and Lois Fakler as treasurer. This was accom­ plished with the usual stumbling over French verbs, and more than one had to pay the fine of a penny for each English word. With the return of Nancy White at the beginning of the second semester, the membership increased to five, but few meetings were held. Wartime restrictions made it impossible for the Club to hold the annual Mardi Gras, and they were unable to go to Los Angeles for French movies. Although these movies would have helped them a great deal in their French conversation, they obtained much in their classroom through a better knowledge of the French people and their language. In their reading they have learned to love France and better understand her. The club hopes that she will one day again take her rightful place in the world of culture and economics. [ 48]

....


Because of an interest in our Latin-American neighbors, the Spanish classes greatly increased during 1943. As a result, the first year class was unable to hold its meetings in one section, so it was divided, with Joyce Reeves ·and Dick Spencer as leaders of the two groups. Meetings were held regularly, with card playing and other games in Spanish creating much amusement. The evenings were dim.axed by refreshments served by the hosts or hostesses. Together the two sections gave a successful Spanish din­ ner. The final social event of the year was a picnic which provided relax­ ation. The second year class, headed by Betty Harper, also met once a month at the homes of its members, to spend the evening in Spanish conversation and games. With the spirit always associated with such a group, their picnic held at San Dimas Park proved to be a great success. By clubs of this type, students gain a closer relationship with teachers and fellow students, and also have the enjoyment of discovering that work and play truly can be combined.

SPANISH CLUB PROMOTES GOOD WILL SPANISH CLUB. ROW 1: D. Scott, R. Showers, H. Reed, A. Snyder, B. Brown, J. Palmer, C. Upham. ROW 2: D. Spencer, I. Garcia, R. Garland B. McCullough, P. Michels, L. Honaker. ROW 3: N. Bronson, D. Eakin, G. Bruner, K. Mock, M. Garris, R. Wheeler, N. Michael. ROW 4: L. Guerrero, E. Brown, B. Harper, M. Dunn, R. Dyer, J. Reeves, B. Stankevich, M. Chesler, C. Harrod. ROW S: V. Amader, S. DeLapp, T. Johnson, E. Popenoe, R. Wheeler, R. Towne, Miss Escudero, A. Bradley, B. Root, R. Mason, V. Dunham.

[ 49]


SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY. ROW I: H. Ordway, II. Widmar, S. Barnes, J. Birkel, pres., G. Mertzl<e, R. Cooke. B. Birkel, I. Whitney, E. Jones, J. Pott, L. Olson, D. Sleeper.

SCHOLARS SHOW THE WAY

SCRIBBLERS: D. McComas, E. Shaw, H. Wilson, N. White, R. Cooke, G. Mert:zke.

ROW 2: J. Scott,

SCRIBBLERS SEARCH FOR WIDER HORIZONS [ 50 1


GIRLS' LEAGUE OFFICERS. E. Shaw, K. Jessen, W. Cory, pres

A Saunders, L. Fakler.

GIRLS' LEAGUE ENCOURAGES FRIENDSHIP The Girls' League began another outstanding and brilliant year at Claremont High School, encouraging friendship among newer girls at the Big and Little Sister Party held on the women's turf at Pomona College. This was a popular event where the new girls became acquainted with the upper classmen, thus gaining a better start in school life. The contributions for Casa Colina grew with a successful pencil sale, a Christmas dance held in the library, and a thrilling mystery play, entitled "Ladies in Waiting." The latter resulted in a full house, and a net profit of eighty-two dollars. Although the sale of candy 'had to be discontinued for the duration, ice cream took its place, and was popular with all the students. Several important guests talked to the members; they included Mother Smith from Casa Colina, Mrs. McConnell, one of Madame Chiang Kai-Chek's press agents, Madame Barzin, and other local speakers. President Wilma Cory, with Ellen Shaw, Lois Fakler, Annabelle Saun­ ders, and Kay Jessen, has led the Girls' League through a successful year in which all the girls learned the v'alue of cooperation and good fellowship. c s1 r


__

,..._ � WOLF PAC ' - -KET . ROW l · E. Sh - -- . K Pott D Birkel. ' · Stallord, M. M. Micha"ei,' �dtr, A. Jacobson, T. Sn Yder, L. . Dunn, M. Bur ke A R. M0bl ey, K . Jessen. ROW ��· unders,. editor. M. Kin ney

ROW 2.·

M Wagn ' M· D ave s, N. White, er 1:

WOLF PACKET UPHOLDS HIGH STANDARDS With the coming of the new year, Wolf Packet troubles appeared, be­ cause of war time shortages and restrictions of many materials. However, Annabelle Saunders, the new editor, and Mrs. Hull, relieving Miss Allen as advisor, overcame these difficulties and published the paper once a month, through an eventful semester. New ideas from the artistic angles were dem­ onstrated, and also ingenuity and literary and organizing ability. The second semester brought still further restrictions. The Student Coun­ cil voted, after long controversy, to have the Wolf Packet issued only when the occasion arose where the need for the paper would be evidBnt. The concensus of opinion was that a paper held the school together. The latter was evidenced as the second semester proceeded under the able editorship of Ellen Shaw, With the combined effort of the editors, student body mem­ bers received news of scholastic interest, a calendar, personalities, adver­ tising of plays, boosting of war stamp sales, as well as information concern­ ing our alumni in the armed services.

[ 52]


With added difficulties caused by war shortages, Editor Cooke found the Annual a big problem, but due to the hard work of the whole staff, managed to publish the book. Mertzke, Assistant Editor, shared the burdens by assum­ ing charge of write-ups, writing the calendar, and taking over other import­ ant jobs. The biggest problem was advertising, but Managers Jones and Reeves succeeded in persuading many reluctant business men to help finance the book. D. Stafford and Britt raised funds with various sales, noon dances, and the ice cream machine which aided greatly. In Annual Week, a novel basketball game drew a large crowd. The talent show, directed by D. Stafford, was a huge success, dramatically and financially. When Busi­ ness Manager Saunders joined the army, Julia Birkel took over his job with expert efficiency. Wheeler and Billy Birkel struggled over sports write-ups, and Secretary Michael handled all correspondence. Billy Birkel and Forbes took charge of photography, while Fredendall and Dement planned the snapshot section. Typists Shaw and Wilson Worked far into the night during the last few weeks. Finally, Fakler and Forbes not only did all the art work, but designed the cover and helped plan the page layouts.

ANNUAL STAFF SURMOUNTS DIFFICULTIES ANNUAL STA Jones, M. Fre FF ROW l: M. Forbes de�dalJ, B. Reeves. Ro'W R· 3.Cooke, edit or, D. Sta fl o d · R· W heeler, G· Mer fzker, · B. ROW 2: p. Bi rk el · H· tiU, l. Fakler F De 1lson, E. Sh,;w, · . s/�{:: M. Michael E , . j J

[ 53 1


r

'I

I I STAGE CREW.

ROW l:

Mr. Booth, A. Tuttle, D. Sleeper.

ROW 2:

F. S�bichi.

STAGE CREW DOES ITS SHARE Although this year's stage crew was smaller than in many previous years, the few members proved themselves capable. Under Mr. Booth's di­ rection they spent many hours after school and in the evenings, making pos­ sible all the plays and special activities presented this year. Hard work and careful planning enabled them to make the sets effectively on a limited bud­ get and with less new material than ever before. The set for the Girls' League production, "Ladies in Waiting," was a typical example of the crews' abil­ ity to make a set without buying anything new. They spent much effort straightening bent nails and salvaging lumber used in previous years to make possible this and other plays, including "The Lovely Duckling," the first play of the year, a real success. Although almost all of the present members were new to the crew this year, they did their work well, and as they are underclassmen, Mr. Booth is looking forward to a good crew next year. The boys and the one girl have faithfully dimmed the lights, pulled the curtains, created sound effects, and changed the scenes, to make things tick. [ 54]


SCHOOL BOARD. Lelt lo riqhl: G. Woodford, R. Slover, R. B::ium, R. Iredell, B. McBurney.

TRUSTEES ACTIVE IN STUDENT LIFE The work of the school board of Claremont High School was felt univer­ sally throughout the campus. The activities under its leadership were as numerous as they were important. Not only were material things supplied, but often advice as to parties, local activities, drives, and all the many pro­ grams carried on and sponsored by the high school group. Because of the need of special physical development in the boys who enter the service, new equipment was purchased and installed in their gym. Under Mr. R S Baum as president, the School Board has cooperated with classes, parents and townspeople in many activities. Mrs. Reba Stover was clerk. Other members were: Mr. Ben McBurney, Dr. Raymond Iredell, and Mrs. Gwendolyn Woodford. Their wise administration of the school's fi�ances provided for all the needs of the school. It was a never ending task and we little know the real work involved. Nevertheless the sincere appreciation of all the school is extended to them, and we can say simply, thank you .

.

[ ss l


Leandro Garcia

Bernice Lacey

THE DESERVING WIN THEIR JUST REWARDS

One event each year to which the students look forward is tbe senior assembly, because then, in an atmosphere of suspense, the awards are an足 nounced. These awards are made to the outstanding boy and girl in the senior class, on the basis of sportsmanship and scholarship. The recipients are chosen by the votes of the students. There is a great deal connected with the winning of these awards, and it is the greatest compliment a class may pay to one of its members. Almost every quality of the individual is taken into account, from a high average in school work to the finest qualities dis足 played on the athletic field. From close association in sports students may clearly see the true character of their fellow-players. There is a chance for good sportsmanship, honesty, and all the qualities so necessary to the devel足 opment of fine character. For this reason much stress is placed on athletics. Taking all these factors into account, in 1942 the Rotary Award was pre足 sented to Bernice Lacey, who had shown throughout the years, that she was worthy of this high honor. The Kiwanis Cup went to Leandro Garcia with the full approval of the entire student body for he had deservingly received his reward. [ 56]


DRAMA SURPASSES ALL PREVIOUS RECORDS

As the curtain went up on the Student Body Play, "The Lovely Duckling," directed by Miss Allen, an array of new and younger faces greeted the en­ thusia�ic audience. Virginia White was newly recognized in the leading role, while Marion Wilson, Mac Sa.unders, Becky Workman, Dave Mc­ Comas, Roger Wheeler, Marjorie Wagner, Marilyn Daves, and Dorothy Ster­ rett, won much praise in their dramatic appearance on the Claremont High School stage. Experienced actors returning to take parts in the play were Genevieve Mertzke, Julia Birkel, and Earle Jones. The play was light, and the convincing portrayal of all characters made a thoroughly enjoyable eve­ ning. Cooperation, that all-essential element of a play, was so well impressed on the actors, that a smoothness was acquired which let the audience enjoy itself. Miss Allen's next task lay in the production of the Girls' League play, a thrill-packed mystery, "Ladies in Waiting." Marcia Forbes, the heroine, who was new to Claremont audiences, proved her acting ability. Ethelyn Popenoe, Helen Ordway, Harriet Beers, Priscilla Britt, also newcomers, took important roles while Kay Jessen, Mary Mae Michael and Lois Fakler re­ turned to the stage from previous productions. Because of their dramatic ability, growing suspense characterized the entire performance and made it the hit that it was. Suspicion was thrown on all players and the climax wm as baffling as it was successful. The Junior-Senior plays, "Torchbearers" and "Happy Journey" ended the year. Also on the program was an original pl ay written by Miss Allen which, with the other two, provided an enjoyable evening. By combining pantomime, comedy and real drama, the result obtained was really stimulating. Familiar faces in the casts included Earle Jones, Mary Mae Michael, Julia Birkel, Genevieve Mertzke, and newcomers were, among others, David Sleeper, Francisco Sabichi, Jim Spencer, and Dickie Bill Spencer. Although the great success of these plays is due largely to Miss Allen's splendid direction and the cast's fine acting and cooperation, the other teach­ ers and committees should receive recognition tor the job they did in holding the plays together and giving them a finishing touch. Mr. Booth should be re­ membered for his grand co-operation and patience-it was no easy task for him, at this time of shortage of materials, to get the necessary lumber and paints for the sets. Mrs. Mclellan gave a lot of time and effort to seeing that the colors and details of the scenery, as well as of the "props," were just right. Also, there should be a word of praise for the stage crew and various committees in each play who saw them through to perfection. Claremont High School has proven itself capable of undertaking difficult dramas and of putting forth a successful rendition.

[ 57]


TO THESE WE OFFER THANKS At the outset of the year, the future looked black for El Espiritu, de 1943. Prices rose and the amount of advertising fell. However, in spring vacation we were surprised with additional contracts, the result of the efforts of the advertising managers. Other devices brought more money. But best of all, Mr. Booth agreed to give up a peaceful life to do all our photography. Many are the Saturday mornings, free periods, and afternoons, he has worked faithfully on the pictures, as well as using up his gas taking the pictures to the developers. Mr. Martin, as Annual advisor, worked and worried all year. He gave up his free periods to correcting errors, and to calling the engraver to stop pro­ duction of prints which had been sent at the wrong times. Witli never-end­ ing good will he explained and taught me all the intricacies of editing an Annual. He also used his car endlessly on Annual trips. To many others, I am also indebted. Mrs. Mclellan, as art advisor, helped to plan the pictures and l ayouts. Mrs. Hull read write-ups and proof untiringly. Miss Willows spent many extra hours on thorough research for names of graduates in the Service. Mr. Kenneth Forbes not only developed many of our pictures with friendly cooperation, but also loaned us, for prac­ tically the whole year, his valuable camera. Mr. Jack Cannicott of Los An­ geles Engraving helped in every imaginable way, and was a real friend as well as engraver while untangling my innumerable mistakes. Mr. Wood Glover, of Phillips Printing Co., was also an invaluable aid. So to th�se and to the whole staff, I express my deepest thanks for making this book possible. The Editor.

Mr. Lyle C. Martin

Mrs. Margaret M. Mclellan

[ 60]

Mr. William W. Booth


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Carl Adams, Jeweler

Wong Hoo

Beamon's Sporting Goods

Isabel's Beauty Shop

Bentleys' Market

A. L Jacobson

C. V. Bertsch

J. D. Johnson

Buckley's

Jones Bros.

F. H. Catlin, Jeweler

Miller's Jewelry

Chandlers

Mission

Citizens National Bank

Parsonage Jewelers

Claremont Courier Claremont Electric & Plumbing Shop Claremont Feed & Fuel

Ray Sanders

Claremont Lumber Co.

Sievers'

Claremont Nurseries

Steeve's Barber Shop

Claremont Pharmacy

Taylor's Dress Shop &

Lemon

Association

Throne Business College Todd & Reeves

Consolidated Laundry

Triangle Shoe Co.

Crystal's Beauty Shop

Union Ice Co.

John P. Evans (

Powell's Reeves Funeral Service

Claremont Laundry

College Heights Orange

Roy "Auggie" Pierce

Vanderwood Lumber Co.

Everett's Shoe Repair

Varsity Barber Shop

Ewart's

Village Theatre

Foothill Garage

Vortox Manufacturing Co.

W. P Fuller

Warehouse Market

W. W. Hendricks

Wolfe's Grocery Store

Burton J. Henry

Wright Bros. & Rice

CONTRIBUTORS THE CANDY SHOP-111 Harvard Ave. CULLERS' 5, 10, & 2Sc Store HUBERT K. STOCKS

[ 61]


+··•-••-••-••---•■-wu-wn-•••-••n- •-••-••-••-• -••----•-n---••-••-••-•ll-••-••-••-••-••-•+• .

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HOLLYWOOD SWEATERS

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Pomona's Leading Store For Young Women WILSHIRE SHIRTS VAN RAALTE HOSIERY AND LINGERIE

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DORIS DODSON DRESSES

T AY LO R'S

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Dr. Arthur L. Jacobson

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Third and

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Alexander

Phone

62ll

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t·- - ,_.,_,._,,_.,_.,_.,_.,__________.. _____,,_,._,._.,_,._.,_,,,_.,_.,_,._,._ ,,_.,_,+. I i

RU NSVOLD'S CLAREMONT PHARM ACY • OPEN SUNDAYS, 9 A M.- 11 A.M. e PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED • OPEN DAILY, 8:30 A.M.-6:30 P.M.

PHONE 6491

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CORNER lSl&Yale

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FEED, F UEL AND PET SU P PLIES

l i Phone 3081 .i +•----• -•-

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211 Yale Ave.

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A COMPLETE FOOD MARKET

L. J. BENTLEY

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185 East Second

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Pomona

CHANDLE RS

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F OR MEN

THE HOME OF CORRECT APPAREL

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[ 62]

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must wen this war. Therefore I will work; I will saue; l will sacrifice; I will endure: I will fight cheerfully and do my ut­ most, as if the cause of the whole struggle depended on ME alone."

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1918. I commend it to every solider on the

· production front, whether he wears a uni­

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form or not. [Signed] L. H. CAMPBELL, JR.

MAJOR GENERAL, CHIEF OF ORDNANCE

AIR CLEANERS FOR ARMY TANKS

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VORTOX MANUFACTURING COMPANY Claremont, California

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DIAMONDS

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JEWELRY

F. H. C ATLIN JEWELRY and WATCH REPAIRING

TELEPHONE 280

152 West Second Street

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Compliments of .

w. � ;�:�� �o . m

WONG HOO

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PAINTS - GLASS - WALLPAPER

GA RDEN E R

329 West Second Street

.

Phone 103

Pomona

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FOOTHILL GARAGE LAFE P. SPIERS, Prop.

OF'F'ICIAL AUTO CLUB GARAGE NO. 44

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Phone 4961

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PHOENIX HOSIERY

THE TRIANGLE SHOE

co.

Pomona

181 W. Second St.

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Phone 1025

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PHONE 3202

CRYSTAL'S BEAUTY S HOP SOFT wATER SHAM POO S -

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34 Years of Service to Claremont

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Sportswear - Dry Goods - Men's Wear

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POW EL L'S

215 W. First

Claremont

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[ 64 ]


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TODD -and REEVES

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Funeral Directors

- Ambulance Service

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Phone 6406

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MILLER'S JEWELRY STORE

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215 E. Second St.

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FOX VILLAGE THEATRE Phone 5061

"THE PLACE TO GO"

3rd & Harvard

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JANTZEN BEACH WEAR

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES

JOHN P. EVANS

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-- Be Well Groomedl -

STEEVE'S BARBER SHOP

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217 WEST FIRST STREET j. j I .+•-1■-■■--■-■■-n-----·•-■ ----··-··-·•-■■-H-AM-11■-Mff-�M-■M-w11-■�-·•--■-----··-·•-11•.j.I [ 65 1


i,_.,_,._, ,_,._.,_.,_.,___

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BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '43

. •!

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UNION ICE CO.

l -1111-1111-111 -111-••-••-"•-••-"•-n-••-•-• +•-• 1 ■

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COLLEGE HEIGHTS

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ORANGE AND LEMON ASSOCIATION

THANKS TO THOSE STUDENTS WHO HELPED SPEED VICTORY BY HARVESTING CITRUS CROPS

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RAY SANDERS

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PLUMBING AND HEATING

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Best Wishes to Class of '43

!

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252 S. Main

WRIGHT BROS. & RICE

"YOUR HOME FURNISHERS" •

Pomona, Calif.

-+I

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+-.. _.,_.,_., --- .,_.,_.,_,._,._.,_,,,_.,_.,_.,_.,_ - _.,_.,_.,_,._,._,._,._,+

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Compliments of

DR. W. W. HENDRICKS 271 West Second

DENTISTRY

PHONES:

Office: 4461 Residence: 4463

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r-. _. ._________CARL ,._.,___ ,. ,._ADAMS __. __ ._, ., _- -· _,._._, ., _,,,_,_,.___T I I i

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JEWELER

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t i Pomona, Calif. Phone Porn. 1580 i j 279 East Second St. i +•-·•-.. -..-••-••-H-••-H-••----------··-..-.._,,,_.,_,,,_.,_.,_.,____.,_.,_,,,_.,+i +,,-u _,,_.,_.,_.,_,.__,____,._,._,._.,_.,_,., _ , ,._,, ,_ ,., _,,,_.,_.,_, _., _ _.,_,._,._•-•+

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DISTINCTIVE CLOTHES FOR WOMEN ! ! AT SIEVER'S i i i ,i.,_,._.,_,._,,-H-N-----·•-..-,,_.,_.,_.,_,., _, ,_,, ,__._,._ ·- _,._TI_.,_,.,_,,, _,. ,_,._,,+

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Compliments of

C. V. BERTSCH AGENT FOR

Los Angeles Times - Daily News - Los Angeles Examiner

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TAKE Y OUR GIRL

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Finest in Foods

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Phone 4601

235 W. First St.

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WATCHES

REPAIRING

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CLOCKS

BURTON J. HENRY ! j. :I -HOROLOGIST--j: !. I 153 West Second Phone 1289 Pomona j j. ! +-_,._,._ ,,_,,_,. ,_,._,._,._,._,._.,_,._,._____________,._.,_,._,,_.,_,._,._,._,._.,+ + .._.,_,,_,. ___.,_,,_,._,.____.,_,._,._,._,._,._,._,,_,.__________,._,._,._,._,._,+

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Best Wishes to Class of '43

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THE WAREHOUSE MARKET

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GOLD STAMPS

YALE AVE.

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Claremont

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THRONE BUSINESS COLLEGE

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SAYS: "BEST WIS HES TO THE CLASS OF 1943" •+•-••---------H-H-.,_.,,_,._,._,._,,_,._,,,_.,_,,_.,_.,__,_,,__ ,._,._,._,._,.__,+

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"EVERYTHING FOR THE SPORTSMAN" GEORGE

S P O RTI N G GOODS

429 West 2nd St.

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BEAMON

Phone PO. 21101

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Pomona, Calif,

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ROY (Auggie) PIERCE

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AUTO REPAIRS

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Phone 3176

Dodge and Plymo �th Service

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323 First St.

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Phone 6141

Delivery Service

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i i On Foothill between Harvard and College i i ,._,._.,_,._,._,._. _,._, ,,_.,_.,_, ,_,,,_,.,_.,_ ,_,.___ ,,,.. WOLFE'S GROCERY STORE

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CLAREMONT LUMBER CO.

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Pick up the phone and call

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310 l 1st and Berkeley A. H. Hoel I I .j.,_,._.,_.,_.,_.,_,.________., ________ - -·-·-- -· -----· _,,,._,,,,_, .,_.,_,,i.

+,,_.,_.,_.,_ ____,_,._ ·- ·- _,,_.,_., _ - ·------ ,_,,._.,_,, ,_.,_.,_.,______+' i i THE CLAREMONT COURIER ' � i' !

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TICKETS - PROGRAMS - CARDS - STATIONERY

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One Twenty-nine Harvard

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"NO JOB TOO LARGE OR SMALL"

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EVERETT'S SHOE SHOP

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EVERETT LILES, Prop.

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Phone 3276

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INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE

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J. D. JOHNSON 137 Harvard

Phone 7311

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VARSITY BARBER SHOP Brown & Fakler

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127 YALE AVE.

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BUCKLEY'S Inc.

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DISTINCTIVE MODELS

Telephone 1736

FOR THE GENTLEWOMAN 139 E. Second St.

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Pomona

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VANDERWOOD LUMBER CO.

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Alexander Avenue at Santa Fe R.R.

Phone 3701

Claremont

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CONSOLIDATED LAUNDRY

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CLAREMONT LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE

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MODERN PLANT

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PHONE: 5601

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$ABEL'S BEAUTY SHOP

119 HARVARD AVE.

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ISABEL WOODWARD

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Claremont Electric & Plumbing Shop Phone: 4271

131 Yale

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Profile for Sharon ESTERLEY

1943 El Espiritu  

1943 yearbook from Claremont CA high school

1943 El Espiritu  

1943 yearbook from Claremont CA high school

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