Page 1

1

Bradford CHA R A M B L I N G

&

S O C I A L

C L U B

A U T U M N

2 0 1 0

CONTENTS Social Secretary’s Report………………………………………………………2 CHA Book Club………………………………………………………………….2 Material for inclusion in the next newsletter can be sent hand-written, typed or e-mailed. Please send contributions for the next Issue to the Editor: Mick Melvin 35 Northfield Grove Wibsey, Bradford, BD6 1LD admin@bradfordwalking.org Mobile Phone Number 07504066476

Book Reviews………………..…………………………………………………...3 CHA Calendar…..………………………………………………………………..3 From the Membership Secretary.…………………………………………….3 Can You Lead a Walk...………………………………………………………...4 From the Treasurer………………….………………………………………….4 Shipley Slide Shows..…………………………………………………………….5 From the Sunday Rambles Secretary...................…………………………..5 Saturday Secretary’s Report & Christmas Dinner…………………………6 From the Editor.…...…………………………………………………………….7 Pennine Way Finale.…………………………………………………………….8 Aviemore Holiday 2010...………………………………………………………9 Notes for Walk Leaders….…………………………………………………….9 Llanberis Weekend 2011.……………………………………………………..11 Sunday Rambles Christmas Dinner…………………………………………12

A Message From Your President Over the summer period we have enjoyed a variety of activities. Our sincere thanks to Andrew Hudson for the valuable map reading day which has given members so much more confidence in understanding maps. Congratulations to all those members who succeeded in achieving the Morecambe Bay crossing in terrible weather conditions. Our visit to the East Coast was enjoyed in good weather, a lovely walk, ending with a delicious High Tea supplied by the Hawkser WI. A second East Coast destination was to Spurn Point with a charming finish at Kilnsea. The Keswick Weekend will soon be here. Send your booking! Meryl Beyond the Speyside Way The northern end of the Speyside Way is at Buckie, one of many fishing towns and villages along the Moray coast. We arrived there with the club at Spring Bank Holiday this year and like many of the group we thought reaching the wild and undeveloped coast was a highlight. The stone marker for the end of the Speyside Way seemed as if it should be the start of something else. So, after completing the Speyside Way

with the club at Spring Bank, we returned to Buckie in July to walk a little further along this excellent coast. It is famous for its dolphins and whales, plus the fact it is the sunniest part of the UK. Famous in Moray that is, as noone much beyond the locality knows anything about this area! All the villages and towns are made of similar one-storey fishermen‟s houses, but in different arrangements so they all look unique. All have specially built harbours to protect


2

Beyond the Speyside Way continued: the ships from the northerly winter gales, and each village has a „Seafield Street‟ in honour of the Lady Seafield who endowed much of the development in the mid-19th century when fishing used to be a big industry here. Only a little remains so tourism is now the main hope for work. The tourists are mostly heading north and west and Moray remains well off the beaten track, so it is still a nice and quiet coast. However, we were surprised to find a few West Yorkshire folk have made it and set up cafes or work in pubs. The two day stretch from Buckie to Portsoy is a fascinating rocky coast with sea stacks, natural arches and caves. There are some „Giants Steps‟, man made from huge rocks in an exciting rocky setting. From Portsoy to historic Banff the walking is more of a wilderness adventure. The paths are thin, steep and rough. The whole stretch is rich with wild flowers and sea birds. The high cliffs beyond Macduff beckoned us on, but we will have to return later to continue on to Fraserburgh and maybe Aberdeen and Dundee. Ray Wilkes

Social Secretary’s Report Hi to all you evening ramblers, if your not one you should be! We have had a lovely summer and lovely short evening rambles with no rain that I can remember, and enjoyed by all. The food has been varied from Chinese to chilli, then corned beef to pie and peas, and salmon fishcakes served on a black slate also curry and a pint. Thanks to Jackie Hotchen, Jackie Walters, Patrick Swithenbank for their input to make these nights a success, as twenty five or more people have supported them each month. The only one left this year is the meal at the Ital restaurant on the 20th Oct [please note the mistake I made in syllabus] so last date to book is the 13th Oct If you would like to lead a short walk for me please let me know, always looking for something new. That‟s all folks Bye from Sheila

CHA Book Club A reminder of our new meeting place, the Sir Titus Salt pub on Morley Street, a couple of minutes walk from the Alhambra. Because we have our own room it is much quieter than where we met before and has a good choice of food and drink if needed, so we are well satisfied. New members are always welcome to join us. Dates and books chosen for the coming months are: Monday 18th October: The Birthday Boys by Beryl Bainbridge chosen by Ann Newmark Monday 15th November: The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate chosen by Anita Cook Monday 13th December: to be chosen. if you want to find out more please ring Jackie Walters 01274 824298

www.bradfordwalking.org


3

Book Reviews I Have looked at and read the books below and found them entertaining yet quite different. Somehow they are all to do with walking! Map Addict: A Tale of Obsession, Fudge & the Ordnance Survey [Paperback] by Mike Parker I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I love maps, but am not a map-nerd and so probably wouldn't read a more factual account of map-making history, use etc. However, this book proved to be a clever ploy on the part of a selfconfessed map addict to make sure I did learn rather a lot about the history and use of maps, borders, and geopolitics in an entertaining and very funny way. Knowledge clearly gained over many years is passed on lightly and with plenty of wit, but with no diminution of the subject matter. I especially enjoyed the author's references to the role of maps in his own life. Not only did these make me laugh, allowing me to engage with maps, their (often surreal) uses and importance in the world, but helped to cement what in other hands could have been dry recitation of facts. The author's passing references to his less than enthusiastic partner provide a salient reminder to us all that our particular obsessions are not necessarily shared by those who have to live with us. I give full marks to Mike Parker for sharing his thoughts in such an entertaining and interesting way. The Hills are Stuffed with Swedish Girls [Paperback] by Richard Happer What's it about? Three old university mates walk the West Highland way in search of birds, booze and adventure, and try to answer a few more challenging personal questions at the same time. It's a bit "Three Men in a Boat" gone mad. To cut a long review short, this book brought back all those wonderful student memories flooding back - overenthusiasm, rubbish ideas, bad behaviour, beer, last minute trips, romance and heartache. It was a bit like listening to one of those songs from your long distant past that stirs up all your emotions and memories. Recommended as an ideal stocking-filler for anyone - yes, anyone - who likes exploring the Scottish countryside, getting drunk, and still remembers what it feels like to be blown away by something as simple as a view - of girls and / or mountains. Hint: I hear the Finnish Female Rambler's Club is tackling the Southern Upland Way next year. (Reviewer) Malcolm Walters From the Membership Secretary Good discounts for Club Members "Yet another good reason to be in the CHA. If you take your membership card in to SPORTS SHOES on Hall Ings Bradford, it will entitle you to 10% discount on all full price products!" CHA Calendar 2011 Please note that the deadline for submitting photographs for the 2011 calendar has been extended. Photos must be with me by 24th October latest please. Only 6 photos per person please put your name and a description on the back. I will make sure all photos are returned after selection. If any club member is interested in helping with the final selection, they will be welcome at my house at 7.30 on Wednesday 27th October. (Please let me know beforehand). Rita Schofield 41 Beacon Place, BD6 3SH


4

CAN YOU LEAD A WALK IN THE NEXT SYLLABUS ? If so please use the form below (duplicate if necessary) and submit to the relevant Rambles Sec. Thank you to all our leaders who have led walks in the past and present syllabus.

Day

Date

Bus No. And Destination From:-

Dates to Avoid Train

Time

Coach

To:- Where to get off

Name of Walk

Map No

Walk Starts at

Time

Walk Finishes at Circular\Linear

Approx Miles Sundays ‟A‟ or „B‟

Climbing

Leaders Name

Address

Phone

Other Information

Day

Date

Bus No. And Destination From:-

Dates to Avoid Train

Time

Coach

To:- Where to get off

Name of Walk

Map No

Walk Starts at

Time

Walk Finishes at Circular\Linear

Approx Miles Sundays ‟A‟ or „B‟

Address

Climbing

Leaders Name Phone

Other Information

Postage of paperwork to Sunday walks leaders The cost of postage has risen considerably for the present financial year and to try to arrest this increase the committee has agreed, that rather than posting the paperwork on every occasion, I should where possible, deliver these by hand if either I or the walk leader is out on the preceding week’s walk. If I do not see them on that Sunday then there is still sufficient time for the correspondence to be posted. Ronnie Wade (Treasurer)


5

From Peter Mann, Shipley Slide Shows: A u t u m n Friday 15th October Keith Preston `Settle Carlisle Railway' Discover more about this remarkable railway and the country through which it passes Friday 5th November Ian Dewhirst `Yorkshire Life Between the Wars' The ever popular Ian returns to present another humorous glimpse of life in bygone days. This talk is not accompanied by slides

2 0 1 0

Friday 19th November John Holroyd `Isle of Man' Another chance to enjoy John's superb photography on a visit to this interesting and unique island All shows start at 7-30pm in Shipley Library Prices Admission £1 Accompanied Children Free Tea / Coffee and biscuits included

From the Sunday Rambles Secretary In the last newsletter I managed to repeat my report and send in „previews‟ of walks which had already taken placeapologies for that to those who noticed! Interestingly, coach turnouts have been improving despite the nonappearance of encouragement via these „highlights‟. Perhaps people prefer a surprise. When you get this newsletter, the next syllabus will be under construction, so please remember to send in walks you would like to suggest or lead, and thanks to those who already have done. Maybe the highlight of the past quarter was the Morecambe Bay walk. The organisation of this definitely strengthened my view that we should stay a “just turn up” club, as dealing with all the different payments, requests and deposits needed to ensure seats for all took on a life of its own. The day itself was so windy and wet that we were sure the guide would be obliged to cancel the event, but all went ahead as planned and our participants swear that they enjoyed the experience (except for one, who nevertheless is at least satisfied that the walk lived up to his expectations of horridness). Once the clocks alter, as is usual, our evening departure time on Sundays will be 5pm. Some prefer this, others don‟t, but with any luck the walks chosen will fit into the shorter time. 24th October: I called my walk „At the Foot of Some More Howgills‟ as we approach Sedbergh from the West this time, to differentiate it from the one approaching from Cautley. I didn‟t know that the „Spout‟ one was going to go UP anything, but mine certainly won‟t be. 31st October: how corny is this? Who could resist putting a walk in Pendle country on Hallowe‟en? We are almost certain not to see any witches on broomsticks, but we could, instead, contemplate the role of ignorance and superstition in modern life. 14th November: Malton is a good winter finishing point as it‟s a little „different‟ and a surprisingly short run, as well as an interesting area for walking and translation. 5th December: sometimes we just can‟t resist finishing at Castleton at this time of year. Come and be amazed at the number of Christmas trees that decorate the village. 12th December: look out for the Christmas Dinner booking form for our old faithful Golden Lion, with a good choice of walks tailored to conditions at the time. Please note that this year it leaves us with one more coach walk before Christmas (Pateley Bridge, also nice for Christmas trees) but nothing on Boxing Day. Normal service resumes on January 2nd. Jackie Wilkes


6

Saturday Secretary’s Report It has been a mixed summer weather wise, it started with a spell of hot dry weather in June then returned to the usual sunny intervals with showers for the rest of the season. However the Saturday walks have all been reasonably dry and the attendance has remained good with all walks averaging between 18 and 22. We have some good walks coming up. On the 9th October Ian Stainton is taking us from Harewood to Barwick in Elmet. On the 16th October we can enjoy Aire Views with Roy Hudson. On the 24th October we will be visiting Cue Gardens with Rita Schofield. On the 30th October we will be travelling from Chair to House with Mike Smith. On the 6th November John Stewart is taking us to the Crossroads. On the 13th November we will be climbing Castle Hill with Jean Moxon. On the 20th November Jackie and Keith Hotchen will show us where they found the Cannon Balls. On the 28th November we will be enjoying Worth Views with Peter Normally. On the 4th December is the Christmas Dinner at Cleckheaton Golf Club. This will be the last time we will enjoy their excellent food and service as I am changing the venue next year. So if you have not experienced this exceptional Christmas Dinner now is the time to book. The price is £14. 50 for a three course meal with mince pies and coffee. There is a booking form in this newsletter, please let me have them in good time. Thanks again to all the leaders without whose help none of this would be possible. Stuart Saturday Walks Christmas Dinner On Saturday 4th December 2010 Starters: Prawn Cocktail Carrot & Coriander Soup Melon Fan Garlic Mushrooms Main:

Roast Beef Roast Turkey Haddock stuffed with Prawns Mediterranean Wellington (Veg)

Sweets: Xmas Pudding Vanilla Slice Fresh Fruit Salad Please tick one course from each of the three courses The cost is £14. 50 per head Name………………………………………… Address……………………………………….. ……………………………………….. ………………………………………. Please make Cheques payable to Bradford CHA Rambling & Social Club And send them to : Stuart Blaylock 32, Thorndene Way Tong Bradford BD4 0SW.


7

From the Editor. William Wordsworth in Yorkshire One of the most rewarding pleasures of walking in the countryside is to follow in the footsteps of distinguished writers, and accordingly to see the scenery and environment through their eyes. Although the relationship between the Lake District and William Wordsworth has been well documented by walking book writers, his visits and walking tours to Yorkshire and particularly Craven have been largely overlooked. William Wordsworth is recognized as a founding father of romanticism in British Literature, it was his search for the picturesque and the sublime in nature that inspired his many walking tours and his early trips to Yorkshire. One of the earliest known visits which Wordsworth made to Yorkshire was shortly after he returned to England from France in October 1793. William arrived in Yorkshire in February 1794 to stay with his sister Dorothy, who was living with her aunt, Elizabeth Rawson (formerly Threlkeld), at the Rawson family home Mill House, Triangle near Halifax. William stayed with his sister and the Rawsons at Mill House for six weeks before departing with her for the Lake District in early April. During his stay William and Dorothy explored the lovely Ryburn Valley with its riverside walks and superb woodlands. While it is appealing to speculate that William climbed the steep wooded hillside behind Mill House to Norland Moor, and the vista of the moors and Blackstone Edge beyond, there is little or no documented evidence of his short sojourn at Triangle. William embarked on many excursions across the Pennines in the latter years of the 18th century and the early part of the 19th. Several of these journeys were made to the Hutchinson family and in particular to call on the Hutchinsons‟ daughter Mary, whom William later married and took back to Grasmere to live with him and Dorothy. In December 1799 returning home on foot to Grasmere, after a visit to the Hutchinsons, who at that time were living on the family farm at Sockburn-on-Tees County Durham, William and Dorothy, visited Aysgarth Falls on the river Ure. On their journey through Wensleydale they stopped at the village of Askrigg and later explored Hardraw Force. Continuing on their journey towards Grasmere they passed through Garsdale and on into Sedbergh. In a letter to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, written over Christmas 1799, four days after settling into their new home at Dove Cottage, William describing the journey home wrote “Well!, we rested in a tempting inn, close by Garsdale chapel, a lowly house of prayer in a charming little valley, here we stopped a quarter of an hour and then off to Sedbergh seven miles farther in an hour and thirty five minutes, the wind was still at our backs and the road delightful”. In October 1802 when returning home to the lakes following his wedding to Mary Hutchinson at Brompton by Sawden near Scarborough, William, Dorothy, and his new bride Mary rested their horses at Kirbymoorside. Passing the time there, they sauntered around the local churchyard in the sunshine, reading the gravestones. The group stayed overnight in Helmsley where they visited the castle, the next day travelling on to Rievaulx Abbey and Duncombe Park. The party stopped to look at “a wild and bottomless tarn” Lake Gormire lying in a natural hollow beneath Whitestone Cliff, before spending the next night in Thirsk. On this occasion the Wordsworths returned home to Grasmere along Wensleydale passing through some of my favourite walking country, Middleham, Leyburn and Aysgarth. The newlyweds broke their journey home through Wensleydale to once again visit Aysgarth Falls. Dorothy later wrote in her journal, “There was too much water in the river for the beauty of the falls”. Two years Earlier, in May 1800 on a walking tour to the Yorkshire Dales, William and his brother John visited Yordas Cave in Kingsdale, Gordale


8

Scar and Malham Cove. He returned to the area again in 1807 with his sister Dorothy to spend some time with the Marshall family in Kirkstall. During a stopover in Wharfedale on their way home, Dorothy and William visited Bolton Abbey and Barden Tower, from where they walked up the river Wharfe to Burnsall, then over the moors to revisit Malham Cove and Gordale Scar. On returning home to Grasmere after this visit to Wharfedale in 1807 Wordsworth wrote The Force of Prayer a poem which tells the Story of William de Romilly, the boy of Egremont who, as legend has it, died in a vain attempt to jump the Strid at Bolton Abbey. As he attempted to jump the gorge, with his dog on a lead, a leap which they had made on many previous occasions, the greyhound held back and pulled the boy into the water where he drowned. In the poem Wordsworth describes how the boy‟s mother Lady Alice de Romilly, who owned the site of Bolton Priory, gave the land in memory of her son to the Augustinian canons who built the priory there. It was this same visit to Wharfedale that inspired Wordsworth‟s narrative poem The White Doe of Rylstone. He weaves two legends into the tapestry of the poem which gives an account of The Fate of the Nortons, a wealthy catholic family living at Rylstone Hall. In1569 they were dispossessed of their lands (attained) and charged with treason after their part in a disastrous attempt to re-establish the catholic religion and free Mary Queen of Scots from her imprisonment. Thomas Norton and his nephew Christopher were executed for their part in the rising of the north, and a second nephew Francis was slain by Royalist soldiers. The poem recounts the legend of the White Doe which made a weekly journey from Rylstone Hall, the home of the Norton family, across the fells to Bolton Abbey to visit the grave of the Norton‟s only daughter the fictitious Emily. In life, the White Doe was her constant and devoted companion, following her everywhere. Emily was a regular visitor to Bolton Priory in the company of the Doe, Wordsworth wrote of her walks on Rylstone Fell and to Norton Tower, the ruins of which can still be seen high above the valley, on the edge of the fell. Nor lacked she Reason's firmest power; But with the White Doe at her side Up would she climb to Norton Tower, And thence look round her far and wide I have always valued the poetry of William Wordsworth; if as you walk the crest of a broad ridge in the Lake District or hike down a picturesque valley, you start to recite a piece of poetry inside your head. I cannot think of a better travel companion than Wordsworth. Mick Melvin (Editor) Pennine Way Finale Mayday 2011. The last three walks. Plans have been made to finish the walk over a three day period, commencing Friday 29th April to Monday 2nd June in 2011. In order to maximise the daily walking times, it will be necessary to set off on the Friday evening. This will give us an early start on the Saturday morning. The walks will be of a similar grade to the Once Brewed w/e or the Knock Fell ascent from Dufton, and will take us into the magnificent scenery of the Cheviot Hills, the highest point of which is The Cheviot at 2676 ft. Because the YHA accommodation is limited we do need to know how many people wish to use the Hostel. It would also be helpful to know how many will be using B & B. The cost of the coach at the moment is around £38. The higher than usual coach cost is due to the total mileage and the extra night away. The booking form will be printed in the December issue of the Newsletter. Prior to that, a £10 deposit (cheques paid to Bradford CHA) will secure you a place on the coach. Send: to Frank Starr, 23 Otley Road, Eldwick, Bradford, BD16 3EB Tel.: 01274 776706. Best Wishes Frank


9

Aviemore Holiday An Appreciation from Janet Hall What a fantastic holiday it was! I really had never been so far north in Scotland – the furthest before was when I went on the Melrose holiday with you all on the coach (in 2003 I think). This year I travelled from my home in Essex by train and had an amazing journey, sitting so comfortably and watching the changing scenery pass me by. It‟s always great when I arrive and meet up with my sister and all you Bradford CHA members, and this year was no exception. Although we were in two centres – the McDonald centre and the youth hostel down the road – it seemed to work well and I enjoyed spending time in both “camps”. The Speyside Way was far more enjoyable than I had imagined, although it certainly wasn‟t as “easy” as I had hoped. One day in particular I was really “tested” and I thought I wasn‟t going to make it! (Such a soft southerner not used to hills!) The trip up the funicular to the top of the Cairngorms was a memorable day and the whole experience was great – seeing the fantastic views, the snow and feeling the extreme cold! Walking along the coastal route into Buckie on the last day was, I think, my favourite, seeing the seals basking in the sunshine and finally arriving at the sign which marked the end of the Speyside Way – great!. I say it every year – but I‟ll say it again and I mean it most sincerely - THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO ORGANISES THE HOLIDAY – from deciding where to go, choosing the accommodation, planning the travel and arranging and then leading the walks. It‟s always done so well and I really appreciate the hard work that goes into it. I am so privileged to be amongst you all every year, so thanks to my sister for continuing to invite me. I hope to see you all again in 2011 in Tenby.

NOTES FOR PROSPECTIVE CHA WALK LEADERS The Club always needs new walks leaders, but some people are dubious of their abilities in this direction. To help those who are unsure here are a few simple tips which may be of help and encouragement. Map and Compass Work:A good expensive compass is a valuable asset which will greatly impress your friends. They are very good at pointing, but usually not in the direction in which you want to go. With practice, however, it is possible to tell the time with them. The really dedicated leader will equip himself with one of the new GPS navigation aids. These require an IQ of


10

Notes for prospective walk leaders continued: 450 to operate, but I believe that Bradford College has a 3 year full time course for prospective users. It is also possible, with a bit of fine tuning, to to pick up Test Match Special with this equipment. A good map is essential – one of the extra large double sided 1:25000 series is preferable. Walks should be planned so that the route passes from one side of the map to the other, necessitating the map being taken out of the map case, opened out fully, then re-folded before being put back into the map case. If this is done on an exposed ridge in a stiff breeze much fun can be had by the party members, and several new words introduced into the English language. Magic Tape is very good for repairing damaged maps. The correct use of maps should be practised at all times. This could include forgetting ones reading glasses and/or magnifying glass so that small map details disappear. Leaving the map on the coach is also a very helpful practice or, as a last resort, a map for a different area altogether should be taken. Party Organisation:A good leader will know, to within a dozen or so, how many people he has in his party. The numbers should be checked periodically during the day, and in the event of the numbers being the same on two or more occasions celebrations should be held necessitating the purchase of Champagne etc.. Leaders should also ensure that the rear of the party is completely out of sight within the first mile of the walk. This adds to the pleasure and sense of adventure for these people, especially in forested areas. Lunch stops should never be taken until several of the party are nearing collapse. Always choose the most suitable spot to stop – close to wasp or ant nests, or down wind of a farmers midden are favoured, but areas used as a toilet by cattle or dogs may also be used. Always set off at most 30 seconds after giving a “five minute warning”after lunch, then immediately climb the steepest hill available at maximum speed. Comfort stops for the female members of the party should be taken on a flat open moor so that they can enjoy the extensive views whilst seeing to their needs. Male party members should be made aware of the wind direction prior to their comfort stops. Good leaders can, with practice, introduce the right amount of interest into their walks. This can be achieved by always taking the lower wetter path rather than a higher dryer one, or taking a cross country route through waist deep heather rather than an adjacent track. Ensuring that several barbed wire fences have to be climbed is also an essential element of every good walk. No doubt experienced members of the Club would be willing to advise prospective leaders of other exciting possibilities. So you see, leading a CHA party is not so difficult. Using the above hints anyone can do it. Don‟t delay, approach one of the Rambles Secretaries today and offer your services. __________________________________ The above article, a reprint from 1997, was obviously written “tongue in cheek”, although most of the incidents referred to have actually happened during Club walks. However, there is a serious side to party leadership. Although leading walks for the Club is pleasurable and rewarding, leaders should be aware that they are responsible for the safety and well being of every member of the group. They must keep in contact with all of the party, ensuring that the back markers are in touch and aware of any changes of direction. If a little care and common sense is applied, everyone can have a safe and enjoyable walk. Mike Smith


11

BRADFORD CHA RAMBLING & SOCIAL CLUB LlANBERIS WEEKEND MARCH 2011 FRIDAY 11TH TO SUNDAY 13TH MARCH Snowdonia in North Wales, especially the mountains, fells and valleys around Llanberis offers a wide variety of easy and hard walks together with places to visit and things to do. As usual the Youth Hostel wants details of numbers well in advance so please help by booking early and BEFORE SATURDAY NOVEMBER 14TH. MAPS: Snowdon OL 17 TRANSPORT DETAILS. Coach will depart JAK Garage at 18.00 hrs, picking up at Bingley, 18.05 hrs. Saltaire at 18.10 hrs. Departing Bradford Nelson St. at 18.30 hrs. PLEASE ALLOW TIME FOR LOADING LUGGAGE. Coach fare: £26 pounds. ACCOMMODATION At the YHA or your own choice of B&B. YOUTH HOSTEL CHARGES.

Accommodation

£ 18.00

Breakfast

£ 04.95

Dinner, Saturday

£ 09.25

Coach

£26.00

2 bunk private bedrooms are £45 per night. YHA packed lunches available if required at £4.50 to £5.50, to be ordered and paid on the weekend. Towel hire is available at £2. PLEASE BOOK EARLY. ========================================================================= BOOKING FORM for LLANBERIS WEEKEND, 11th TO 13th MARCH 2011 Weekend Coordinator: Frank Starr, 23, Otley Road, Eldwick, Bingley, BD16 3EB. Tel. 01274 776706 To book please send a £10 deposit, non-refundable, to the above address. Also a SAE if a receipt is required. Last booking date is Sat. November 14th, 2010. Final payment is due by Sat. January 15th, 2011. I/We would like to book :

2 nights YHA accommodation @

£36.00 p.p.

2 breakfasts

@

£09.90 p.p.

1 dinner YHA @

@

£09.25

Coach @

@

£26.00 ----------

Total of YHA & coach, p.p.

£ 81.15 ----------

Coach only, (own B&B)

£26 .00

Please indicate your requirements and any special needs, e.g. Vegetarian meals, private room. Deposit / Full payment of £……. …. is enclosed.

Name(s)……………………… Address ;………………………

Date: ………… Contact Tel. no…………………


12

SUNDAY RAMBLE CHRISTMAS DINNER THE GOLDEN LION HOTEL SETTLE 12 DECEMBER 2010 MENU STARTER

Home-made country vegetable soup Cheese baked smoked haddock and spinach pot Chicken Liver Parfait with Onion Marmalade MAIN COURSE Roast Turkey, Bacon, Sausages, Sage & Onion Roast Top Side of Beef with Yorkshire Pudding Pan-fried fillet of Scottish salmon Baked wild mushrooms in filo pastry All served with fresh vegetables and potatoes

( ) ( ) ( )

TWO COURSE MEAL PLEASE tick (√) YOUR CHOICE CHOOSE EITHER

( ( ( (

) ) ) )

STARTER AND MAIN COURSE OR MAIN COURSE AND SWEET

SWEET Traditional Christmas Plum Pudding & Brandy Sauce ( ) Winter Berry Pavlova, raspberry sauce ( ) Cheese & Biscuits with apple chutney & celery ( ) INCLUSIVE OF HOT BEVERAGES AND MINCE PIES DINNER AND COACH

£ 17.95 PER HEAD (inclusive)

NO. OF PERSONS _______________

AMOUNT ENCLOSED £ …….. Cheques payable to Bradford CHA

NAME

____________________________________________________

ADDRESS

____________________________________________________

———————————————————————————————— POST CODE ________________

TEL. No. ________________________

LAST BOOKING DATE .... 29th NOVEMBER 2010

Please forward booking form and payment to: Irene Hudson, 37 Myrtle Avenue, Bingley BD16 1EW Tel. no. 01274 568933

Bradford CHA Rambling and Social Club Newsletter Autumn 2010  

The Autumn newsletter of Bradford CHA

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you