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Treat your Kitchen

Come and discover what makes Miele so special Miele is one of Europe’s leading manufacturers of premium domestic appliances with a reputation that’s unrivalled. In Norwich, you’ll find a state of the art showroom like no other you’ve experienced. Gerald Giles is Norfolk and north Suffolk’s Miele Centre, with over 60 appliances on display. You can experience live, working demonstrations by our friendly, knowledgeable staff of nearly every appliance type, from ovens to warming drawers, washing machines to dishwashers, coffee machines and everything in between.

We also offer a comprehensive installation and repair service, meaning customers are supported from selection and purchase to running and maintenance. Miele appliances are designed, tested and engineered to last for up to 20 years and set the standards for durability, performance, ease of use, energy efficiency, design and service. Treat your kitchen to the Best Home Appliance Brand on the market*. Ask us for a Demonstration today. * Which? *Which? named Miele thenamed Miele the Best Home Appliance Brand 2015 Best Home Appliance Brand 3 years running

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The Tiguan.

Solutions Personal Contract Plan* representative example subject to 8,000 miles per annum + for a Tiguan SE NAV 1.4 TSI 125 BMT

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Customer deposit

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Retail cash price

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Optional final payment

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Option to purchase fee

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Total amount payable

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Representative APR

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Rate of interest (fixed)

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Excess mileage charge

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*At the end of the agreement there are three options: i) own the vehicle: pay the optional final payment; ii) return the vehicle: subject to fair wear and tear, charges may apply; or iii) replace: part exchange the vehicle. †Exclusive to Robinsons Volkswagen. ^Available on Solutions Personal Contract Plan. 18s and over. Subject to availability. Finance subject to status. Terms and conditions apply. Offer available when ordered by 30th June 2018. Offers are not available in conjunction with any other offer and may be varied or withdrawn at any time. Accurate at time of publication [06/2018]. Freepost Volkswagen Financial Services. We can introduce you to a limited number of lenders to assist with your purchase, who may pay us for introducing you to them. Standard EU Test figures for comparative

5.4% APR

purposes and may not reflect real driving results. Official fuel consumption in mpg (litres/100km) for the Tiguan range: urban 31.0 (9.1) – 49.6 (5.7); extra urban 44.1 (6.4) – 67.3 (4.2); combined 38.2 (7.4) – 60.1 (4.7). CO2 emissions 123 – 170g/km.


FEASTNORFOLKMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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E D I T O R ' S

L E T T E R

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YIPPEE! It is the holiday season - we hope you are all looking forward to glorious summer days in Norfolk - not many places beat it. It is the time of year to get out and enjoy the county. Have you discovered the coastal bus service - Coastliner and Coasthopper? Run by two separate companies, it is a ‘hop on,hop off’ service which is great for walkers who want to explore the coastal path. And for us foodies who love to head out to eat and have a drink or two. We also celebrate gin - a perfect summery drink, whether it is served straight up, with tonic or used in cocktails. Norfolk has an ever growing number of artisan gin makers and we celebrate many of them. Mark Nicholls meets Rob Jackson who runs the food hall at M&S in Norwich, and we preview just some of the numerous festivals and shows taking place this summer, including Aylsham Show on Bank Holiday Monday. I get to stay in, or rather experience, The Wallow, a new spa suite at The Pigs, near Holt, and indulge my love of hot tubs, while we also eat out at Jarrold’s new Exchange restaurant. Make diary dates for the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at Holkham Hall on September 1 and 2, and Porkstock food and drink festival at the Norfolk Showground on October 13 - we will be at both. Our competition this month offers a family pass and a few other treats at Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham, which is a really beautiful spot. Last month’s winner of a posh BBQ, courtesy of Norwich Camping and Leisure at Blofield, near Norwich, was Sarah of Strumpshaw. Well done to her. As usual, we are taking a bit of a break and will be back with our September issue, out at the end of August. I am heading to Scotland for a week, and having a few days in Suffolk at a hyper dog friendly cottage. But, we will be working away, redesigning our website, and giving the magazine a bit of a refresh, too. In the meantime, enjoy this issue - and the summer. Now, where’s my G&T?

SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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RUINS OF CARTHAGE

Andy Newman heads to the Eternal City of Rome for a foodie break

ABOUT US 05 Editor’s Letter WHAT’S ON 14 Keep up-to-date with our comprehensive What’s On guide to the region’s best events and activities 16 The summer is packed with foodie festivals: read our preview 19 Sarah Hardy looks at the cookery demonstration stage at this year’s North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival in September 23 Pippa Lain Smith tells us about some of the leading lights at this October’s Porkstock, a food and drink festival in Norwich 24 The news and gossip spread has all the latest on new products, restaurant openings and more

COVER STORY

69 If you do nothing else this summer - enjoy a G&T. Raise a glass to our gin special

FEATURES 08 Mark Nicholls heads to Carrow Road to meet head chef Nigel Ramsbottom at Delia’s Restaurant and Bar 28 The coastal bus service in Norfolk is great fun. We tell you where and why to hop on and off this summer 42 Emma Outten visits Eastgate Larder near Reepham, to learn about making jam

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EATING OUT 36 The Exchange is Jarrold’s latest foodie venue in their Norwich store. We try it out 38 The Gin Trap Inn in West Norfolk is a feast for the eye and tummy, says Sarah Hardy INTERVIEWS 46 Mark Nicholls meet Rob Jackson, who looks after the food hall at Norwich’s M&S REGULARS 40 City College Norwich offers a comprehensive apprenticeship scheme, reports Mark Nicholls 48 Emma Boubaker, who runs her own catering business, answers our chef Q&A this month 52 Free from recipe writer Sara Matthews has three recipes this month, including a rather tricky but delicious macaron one 58 Jamie Oliver’s new cookbook on all things Italian tops the list of new cookery releases this summer 62 Archer’s Butchers in Norwich is the best in Britain - it’s official 76 The gadget and gizmo page helps us enjoy our G&Ts 98 Our Proudly Norfolk column meets the Crown family from West Norfolk who are creating a new gin, Whatahoot


46 53 57

RECIPES 13 Enjoy a tasty chicken dish and summer pudding with Delia’s Restaurant and Bar 51 Emma Boubaker has a lamb recipe, using meat from her brother’s own flock in Norfolk 61 Lucy Bartlett magics up meringues for us - with plenty of strawberries and cream 95 Ellen Mary shares her recipe for stuffed aubergines with red peppers, tomatoes and quinoa DRINK 70 Sarah Hardy catches up with Bullards Gin to hear about their new plans, which include a new Old Tom gin 73 St Giles Gin offers up two cocktail recipes, using both their hand crafted gins 74 Black Shuck Gin has a passionate new member of the family! 75 The Chambers Cocktail Company in Norwich has two gin cocktails, both with a wow factor 78 Andy Newman loves his home - all because it has a cellar for that precious wine collection! 81 Steve Hearnden has a few ideas for summer drinking, including a rather lovely fizz

COLUMNISTS 21 Charlotte Gurney is under starter’s order for the Aylsham Show at the end of August 57 Julia Martin tells us that preserved lemons are a key part of her vegan diet 60 Andrew Jones of Farmyard in Norwich and The Dial House in Reepham has the giggles this month - and TripAdvisor is the reason 67 Roger Hickman answers your culinary questions and offers us a chicken parfait recipe 80 Daniel Matthams of Green Farm Coffee tells us how to look after coffee - and he doesn’t want it anywhere near the fridge 83 Small business owner Elaine Reilly is both coffee bar supremo and tourist guide TRAVEL 91 Sarah Hardy wallows in The Wallow, a super special spa room at The Pigs in North Norfolk GROW YOUR OWN 94 Ellen Mary teaches us all about the growing and eating of aubergines 96 Rachel Birtwhistle plans to gorge on strawberries all summer - grown on her allotment, of course COMPETITION 90 Win a year’s family pass to Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham

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THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Scott Nicholson, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Diane Green Brand Manager | 07988 867483 diane@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

Andy Newman, Mark Nicholls, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Charlotte Gurney, Daniel Matthams, Andrew Jones, Roger Hickman, Elaine Reilly, Sara Matthews, Roger Hickman, Julia Martin, Eve Stebbing

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FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

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DINING AT DELIA'S MARK NICHOLLS MEETS NIGEL RAMSBOTTOM, HEAD CHEF AT DELIA’S RESTAURANT AND BAR

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S P O T L I G H T

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VISIT

www.deliascanar ycatering.co.uk

NIGEL RAMSBOTTOM looks up slightly as we pass through the door to the restaurant and nods to the name. It’s a reminder that when you run the kitchen of a restaurant that bears the name of Britain’s best-known chef, you know that standards have to be high.

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diners also enjoy canapés, petit-fours, and coffee. And while Nigel, who has held the post for the past four years, oversees the kitchen and designs the menus, Delia Smith is omnipresent with her influence flowing through the dishes. ‘What we cook is to Delia’s own specifications and drawn from her large repertoire,’ he continues. ‘We create a menu and then send it off to Delia to be approved. ‘But on a personal level, she is there for everybody to approach and speak to and is always available for all aspects of Delia’s catering.’ Delia Smith was a household name chef long before her high profile role at Norwich City, but she has brought a new dimension to cuisine at the club with the showpiece restaurant as a showcase for her recipes. Nigel adds: ‘I am there to make sure that what we get on the plate looks pretty much like the recipe in whatever book we take it from.’ Before joining Delia’s, Nigel ran the renowned Swan Inn at Monks Eleigh in Suffolk with his wife Carol. ‘We sold the business and the plan was to sail off into the sunset and put our feet up, but then this opportunity came along four years ago and I am still here!’

"I am very aware that the doors to the restaurant have Delia's name above them"

NIGEL RAMSBOTTOM

Nigel, however, does have a pretty good track record of his own in the kitchen but even so, he acknowledges: ‘I am very aware that the doors to the restaurant have Delia’s name above them.’ Delia’s Restaurant & Bar at Carrow Road serves fine gourmet food, carefully-selected from her extensive catalogue of recipes. Open on Friday and Saturday evenings from 6.30pm, with last food orders at 8pm, there is a menu of five starters, five mains, four desserts and one cheese for £39.95 and with that,


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S P O T L I G H T

The Swan Inn was a village pub which the couple revived and transformed into a leading gastro pub and food destination, achieving two AA rosettes and winning East Anglia pub of the year in the Good Food Guide. Now 56, he oversees a team that can deliver up to 130 covers each Friday and Saturday evening.

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‘Most people seem to book but what we do want to emphasise is that people can also simply walk in for a table.’ The menu at Delia’s, which opened some 18 years ago, changes every six weeks with an emphasis on local, seasonal produce. The latest menu includes main courses such as char-grilled matured entrecote steak with aioli and hand-cut chips, chilled fresh salmon with avocado and crème fraîche sauce or marinated chicken with honey and ginger, with mango and sultana salsa. Starters include courgette soufflé, fried halloumi and roasted tomato soup, while among the desserts are English summer pudding and warm four-nut chocolate brownie. The cheese is Norfolk White Lady. Suppliers include Masterson’s in Lowestoft for fish, vegetables through Accent Fresh in Downham Market, cheese from the Cheese Truckle in Norwich and local butchers such as Archer’s, which Nigel favours for sausages. ‘We use local produce as much as we can,’ says Nigel, who, when he is not in the kitchen, is menu planning or liaising with suppliers. There is also a real effort to accommodate allergies and dietary requirements, such as baking gluten-free bread in house. As well as Friday and Saturday evenings, the restaurant can be booked for specific lunches or dinners for groups or private functions and the football club also hosts a number of special event evenings such as An Evening of Abba on August 3, or Classic Christmas Party Nights.

RECIPES OVERLEAF

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MARINATED CHICKEN

with Honey & Ginger served with Mango & Sultana Salsa This has Caribbean overtones. Ginger and lime have such a wonderful affinity and the honey gives it a lovely stickiness. A perfect recipe for summer! EQUIPMENT You will also need an ovenproof dish measuring 20 x 15 cm and 4.5 cm deep

All recipes can be found at www.deliaonline.com

[Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 4 bone-in chicken breasts, skin on, weighing about 175g each; salt and freshly milled black pepper For the marinade 2tbsp of runny honey; 2.5 cm piece root fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated; 1 level tsp of ground ginger; 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed; zest and juice of 1/2 a lime; salt and freshly milled black pepper

ENGLISH SUMMER PUDDING

For the salsa 1 medium or 1/2 a large mango; 50g of sultanas; zest and juice of 1 lime; 1/2 a red pepper, deseeded and chopped; 1/2 a medium red onion, peeled and finely chopped; 1 medium green chilli, deseeded and finely chopped To garnish 10g of fresh coriander leaves

SERVES SIX

If you’ve never had ‘homemade’ traditional English Summer Pudding, you must try this. It’s the best combination of summer berries we know. And it needs lots of thick Jersey cream to mingle with juices

METHOD Begin this by making 2 cuts in each chicken breast, about 5 mm deep, then place the chicken breasts neatly in the ovenproof dish. Now combine all the marinade ingredients in a bowl, whisking them together, then pour this over the chicken breasts, turning them around in the marinade to get them well coated. You now need to cover the dish with cling film and leave it in the fridge overnight. Next, place the sultanas for the salsa with the lime zest and juice in a small bowl so they can plump up overnight. Cover them with cling film and store in the fridge. When you are ready to cook the chicken, pre-heat the oven to 220°C. Then remove the cling film from the chicken and baste each breast with the marinade. Bake on a high shelf of the oven for 20-30 minutes. While the chicken is cooking, remove the skin from the mango using a potato peeler or sharp knife. Then slice all the flesh away from the stone and chop it into small pieces – about 5mm dice. Then add it to the sultanas, along with the remaining salsa ingredients, and garnish just before serving with the coriander leaves. Serve the cooked chicken with some of the salsa spooned over and the rest served separately

INGREDIENTS 7 slices of white bread (crusts removed with a serrated knife); 225g of redcurrants; 110g of blackcurrants; 450g of raspberries; 150g of golden caster sugar EQUIPMENT You need a pudding basin with a capacity of 1 litre, lightly buttered

METHOD The best way to separate the redcurrants and blackcurrants from their stalks is to hold the tip of each stalk between finger and thumb and slide it between the prongs of a fork, pushing the fork downwards and pulling off the berries as it goes. Now rinse all the fruits and place in a large pan, together with the sugar. Cook over a medium heat for 3–5 minutes until the sugar has dissolved and the juices begin to run (be careful not to overcook and so lose the fresh flavour of the fruit), then remove the pan from the heat. Now trim one slice of bread to fit the base of the pudding basin, and cut 4 slices in half to line the side of the basin, overlapping them at the straight edge with the rounded side down, and sealing well by pressing the edges together. Fill any gaps with small pieces of bread, so that no juice can get through when you add the fruit. Pour the fruit and juice in – except for about a cupful – then cover the pudding with the remaining bread and place a small plate or saucer (one that will fit exactly inside the rim of the bowl) on top. Place a 1.8kg scale weight – or some other heavy object – on top of that and leave in the fridge overnight. Just before serving, loosen the pudding all round using a palette knife, and turn it out onto a large serving dish, then spoon the reserved fruit and juice all over, to soak any bits of bread that still look white (a pastry brush is useful here). Serve cut into wedges, with some cream on the table

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GUIDED TOUR

The final concerts at Newmarket Racecourses this summer are: Craig David (sold out) on July 20; Plan B on July 27; the Magic of Motown on August 3; Nile Rodgers and CHIC on August 10; George Ezra on August 17, and The Vamps on Summer Saturday Live on August 25. The Jockey Club racecourses have world-class customer facilities, featuring award winning restaurants that cater for all tastes. Visit www.thejockeyclublive.co.uk

NILE RODGERS

RACECOURSE CONCERTS

Enjoy a guided tour of the Millennium Garden at Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham, on August 18. Join head gardener Jonathan Pearce, for an early evening walk around world-renowned plantsman Piet Oudolf’s first public UK garden. The tour includes a glass of Prosecco - dinner is optional. Visit www.pensthorpe.com

OPEN AIR THEATRE

The critically-acclaimed Pantaloons present their innovative open-air version of Shakespeare’s timeless comedy, As You Like It, on August 8, in Deepdale Orchard at Burnham Deepdale. Bring your own picnics, chairs and rugs, plus there will be a bar serving beers, wines and soft drinks. Deepdale Stores will be open during most of the performance for extra snacks. You can pre-order picnics from Deepdale Café. Visit www.dalegatemarket.co.uk

MILLENNIUM GARDEN, PENSTHORPE NATURAL PARK

DIARY DATES BEYOND ALL THE FESTIVALS AND SHOWS THIS SUMMER, THERE’S PLENTY MORE TO BE GETTING ON WITH, SAYS EMMA OUTTEN

GARDEN PARTY

The Assembly House in Norwich stages its second Great British Garden Party on August 27. A special afternoon tea will be available in the restaurant, Norwich Makers’ Market will be in the Ballroom and there will also be garden games, a beer tent, live music, children’s games and more. Admission to the event, which runs from 11-5pm, is free. Visit www.assemblyhousenorwich.co.uk

BREAD MAKING CLASSES

Bread Source, an artisan bakery in Upper St Giles in Norwich, has award-winning baker and author Emmanuel Hadjiandreou holding one-day workshops. Emmanuel is originally from South Africa, trained in Germany and has worked from Gordon Ramsay. The classes cost £120, run from 10am–5.30pm, and the next ones are on August 5 or 6. Visit www.bread-source.co.uk

Drove Orchards in Thornham is hosting a wildlife event, Go Wild at Drove, in association with the Norfolk Ornithologists’ Association, on August 4. The event is free and aimed particularly at families. There will also be bags of information about the local produce at Drove Orchards, the wildlife at the farm and at the nearby NOA reserve at Holme Bird Observatory. Visit www.droveorchards.com

ON THE MARSHES

The White Horse in Brancaster Staithe is holding a ‘Marsh Side Braai’, on July 7. Relax on the bank whilst enjoying meat, fish and vegetables cooked over an open fire, braai-style. There will also be a Wolf Pack Brewery Landrover Defender pop-up. Do check out their six weeks of summer events, including the annual Oyster and Champagne Festival on August 10. Visit www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk

PICTURE BY BOBBY BURRAGE

GO WILD


WHAT 'S ON

tHIS

SUMMER

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE

The Hoste of Music programme continues in Burnham Market. Step back in time and enjoy a vintage performance from 'Miss Lola Lamour' on July 20, taking on classics from the likes of Peggy Lee, Kay Starr, Ella Fitzgerald, Django Reinhardt and many others. Guests can also enjoy a three-course dinner in the stylish Burnham Market Brasserie restaurant at The Hoste. Visit www.thehoste.com

GIN MASTERCLASS

On July 7, from 4-6pm, The Beechwood Hotel, in North Walsham, has teamed up with events company Gin Temple to host a Norfolk gin tasting masterclass, tasting six local gins. It is £30 a head and is set to be held in the hotel’s gardens. Also, on the same evening, is a four-course Taste of Norfolk dinner at £40 per person, starting at 6.30pm. Visit www.beechwood-hotel.co.uk

GARDEN SCHEME (pic left)

It’s the height of summer and Norfolk NGS is celebrating by featuring 15 gardens full of peak season colour and interest, including: Tyger Barn near Beccles on July 8; Dale Farm in Dereham (children can play with the remote controlled boats on the pond and who can resist fresh baked sausage rolls and cheese scones for a morning snack?); and Holme Hale Hall near Bradenham, both on July 29. Visit www.ngs.org.uk

CELEBRATE WIMBLEDON

SUMMER FETE

Titchwell Manor’s Summer Fete, a family friendly festival of food and drink, takes place on July 22. Back for its sixth year, the fete promises to be another fun filled day of food, chef demonstrations, bouncy castles, hot dog eating competitions, Pimms, live music, and more! The event raises money for chosen charity: Tapping House, the Norfolk Hospice. Visit www.titchwellmanor.com

AND DON't FORGET... …The Nelson’s Journey Purple Picnic takes place between July 9 and 15. Visit www.nelsonsjourney.org.uk ...Three summer food fairs, showcasing local food and drink from the Food Hall at Bakers and Larners of Holt, take place on July 29, August 12 and 26 in Bakers Court. Visit www.bakersandlarners.co.uk

Celebrate the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at The Crown at Woodbridge, Suffolk, between July 2 and 9, where a special menu has been prepared by Head Chef, Darran Hazelton to mark the tournament. Featuring local, seasonal produce and some summer favourites, the set price menu will be served for lunch and dinner in the contemporary inn’s AA two rosette restaurant. Visit www.thecrownatwoodbridge.co.uk

TREAT YOURSELF TO A ‘CRAFTY’ STAY IN BURNHAM MARKET With a modern contemporary vibe and various pops of colour, Lavandula is the perfect holiday retreat for a group of friends or a couple wanting to simply get away from it all and enjoy Burnham Market’s craft fair; this property is truly unique with quirky wallpapers, ceramics and art. Just a few minutes away from the fabulous restaurants and shops that Burnham Market is so well known for, you’ll never want to leave. Lavandula is available either as a sleep four or sleep six option. A three-night stay at Lavandula starts from £448 (sleep 4) and £660 (sleep 6).

Visit www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk Call 01328 887658 Email enquiries@norfolkhideaways.co.uk www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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DON'T MISS

August 27 The Food and Farming Area at the traditional one-day show on August Bank Holiday Monday has become the fastest growing area of the show and is packed with the best Norfolk has to offer. Our very own Feast Norfolk columnist, Charlotte Gurney, is the Food Hall Head Steward so we know it is in good hands! Expect a fantastic range of locally produced food, including a good presence from White House Farm. The show is also home to a very popular cookery demonstration theatre, where several of the area’s chefs share their skills. www.theaylshamshow.co.uk

GIN FESTIVAL

July 6 to 8 The UK’s first of its kind is making a visit to Norwich’s The Halls. As well as the opportunity to try a huge variety of gins from all over the world, there will be live music, great food and a gin cocktail bar. There will also be gin masterclasses and the opportunity to meet gin distillers in person, try free samples and chat about their gins. www.ginfestival.com

PAMELA SHAW, HOLT FESTIVAL

AYLSHAM SHOW, BLICKLING ESTATE

FESTIVAL FEVER

Summer’s here and the time is ripe for checking out the various food-related shows and festivals taking place in this part of the region, says Emma Outten

ELVEDEN COUNTRY AND CRAFT SHOW

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

LATITUDE FESTIVAL

NORTH NORFOLK RAILWAY BEER FESTIVAL

July 7 and 8 The Elveden Country and Craft Show takes place at the Elveden Estate, and also includes the Festival of Dogs. Expect cookery demonstrations from the likes of Italian chef and forager Claudio Bincoletto; mother and daughter duo Julie and Bethany Foster; and Torte Cake Art - twin brothers Artak and Arsen Poghosyan, originally from Armenia - who have a great passion for baking. www.elvedencountryshow.co.uk July 12 to 15 Latitude Festival takes place in the stunning grounds of Henham Park, Suffolk, and headliners for this year include Solange, The Killers, and Alt-J. New to Latitude is the Theatre of Food, and local Suffolk food heroes will join the cast, including chocolate guru Lynn Lockwood. Then there will be Street Feast at Latitude, with festival-goers treated to culinary delights from all corners of the globe. www.latitudefestival.com

July 13 and 14 The UK’s premier all male theatre company, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, returns to Norwich Cathedral to perform Shakespeare’s masterpiece, The Tempest, amidst the open air surroundings of the Cathedral Cloisters. Refreshments will be available to purchase from the popup Refectory Café/Bar before the performance and during the interval you are welcome to bring a picnic. www.cathedral.org.uk

July 13 to 15 Beer, food, drink and entertainment will be all available over the three days at Sheringham station - expect more than 120 beers and ciders. The frequent service on the Bittern Line from Norwich via North Walsham, Wroxham and Cromer to Sheringham means that festival goers can safely drink without driving. Hot food will be available both during the daytime and the evening. www.nnrailway.co.uk

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WOLTERTON PARK SUMMER FAIR

July 15 Wolterton Park, a 150 acre park on a 500 acre private estate in the Bure Valley between Holt and Aylsham, is holding a Summer Fair of Norfolk food and drink with artisan stalls. Expect cookery demonstrations, live music, a dog show, sheep shearing, plus vintage cars and military vehicles. It will be a rare opportunity to explore the park at the privately owned historic estate. www.woltertonpark.co.uk

JIMMY’S FESTIVAL

July 21 and 22 At Jimmy’s Festival at Jimmy’s Farm near Ipswich, on the Woodforde’s Wherryfields Main Stage, Paul Young will headline on the Saturday then Happy Mondays on the Sunday. Wherryfields is also where you’ll find street food galore, from BBQ with style, to plant-based options and bars serving a range of craft beers. And the Woodforde’s Kitchen will be graced by a line-up of chefs, including Jimmy’s Farm’s Head Butcher, Jonny Farrell. www.jimmysfestival.co.uk


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WORSTEAD FESTIVAL

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Chantelle Nicholson on the Sunday. Expect a piazza, huge food halls, a food roadshow, fruits de mer restaurant, and real ale marquee. www.livingheritagefoodfestivals.co.uk

WAYLAND SHOW

August 5 The agricultural show is a great day out for all the family. Expect the Taste of East Anglia Marquee and a Horticulture, Cookery and Crafts Marquee, plus the many varied trade displays that will provide an unforgettable day. www.waylandshow.com

July 28 and 29 One of the main attractions of the village festival, which has been running for more than 50 years and attracts nearly 20,000 visitors year on year, is the Best of Norfolk Food and Drink Marquee. Inside, you will find artisan producers and masterclasses with some of the region’s best chefs in the Kitchen Theatre, including Feast Norfolk columnist Roger Hickman on the Sunday. www.worsteadfestival.org

BURNHAM MARKET CRAFT FAIR

SANDRINGHAM FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL

SUSHI AND SAKE FESTIVAL, OPEN NORWICH

August 4 and 5 This popular show offers a full day out for all the family, and features celebrity chefs Levi Roots, Ursula Ferringo and Richard Bainbridge on the Saturday, and Matt Tebbutt, Phil Vickery and

AYLSHAM SHOW

August 18 This will be the 43rd year for the Burnham Market Craft Fair, which consists of more than 100 carefully selected stalls which are set out over The Green. Local fundraising stalls offering refreshments will be available and there will also a hog roast stall and ice cream stations. The craft fair is a non-profit community development fundraising event. www.theburnhammarketcraftfair.co.uk

August 25 And 26 An indoor street festival celebrating the best of Japanese cuisine and culture takes place at OPEN Norwich over the Bank Holiday Weekend. Showcasing some of the best regional and national sushi restaurant brands, with tastings and masterclasses, Japanese beers, cocktails and sake will be served from various vendors along with live music and DJ throughout the weekend. www.opennorwich.org.uk

CACTUS AND CHILLI FESTIVAL, URBAN JUNGLE SUFFOLK

August 27 to September 2 This is a week-long festival celebrating all things spicy and spiky. Wander the Edible Jungle and discover hundreds of brightly coloured chillies. There will be expert talks on growing and harvesting chillies, and you can find out which chillies are right for your favourite dishes. Throughout the week Cafe Jungle will serve up Central and Southern American inspired dishes, street food and cocktails. www.urbanjungle.uk.com

LATITUDE FESTIVAL

PICTURE BY VICTOR FRANKOWSKI

July 21 to 29 From comedy to cuisine, politics to pop, Holt Festival brings you the best in music, theatre, fine art and the spoken word in a celebration of the arts, and this year marks 10 years of the festival. Throughout the week, during events at Auden Theatre, East Coast Bars will be serving drinks in the Foyer Bar; and there will be food and drink on the field near the entrance to Theatre in the Woods. www.holtfestival.org

O N

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

HOLT FESTIVAL

W H A T ' S


it’sss Braziliant!

Explore the Amazona in Cromer Amazona Zoo Rainforest logo

outdoor play

South American Animal Adventure

Adventure

Under 4’s go FREE Braziliant value: Admission still at 2014 prices!!

stay with us at cromercamping.com check website for opening times

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South American Animal Adventure

Hall Road, Cromer NR27 9JG Tel. 01263 510741 Facebook.com/AmazonaZoo

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WORLD WHISKY TOUR 2 HOUR TOUR

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OPEN

MONDAY TO SUNDAY 9AM-5.30PM

HARLING RD, ROUDHAM, NORFOLK NR16 2QW JUST 5 MINUTES FROM THE A11


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BREAKFAST AT HOLKHAM

DISCOVER HOW TO MAKE THE ULTIMATE BREKKIE AT THE NORTH NORFOLK FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL THIS SEPTEMBER SAYS SARAH HARDY The show runs from 10-4pm. Parking is £3 per car, per day. Dogs on leads are welcome. Entrance is free VISIT

www.northnorfolkfoodanddrink.com

WITH A HOST of well-known chefs showing off their skills, the Cookery Theatre at the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival is one of the star attractions at the two-day event. Presented by Mary Kemp, the stage sees festival chairman Chris Coubrough (The Crown Hotel, Wells), Fran Hartsthorne (The White Horse, Brancaster Staithe), Eric Snaith (Titchwell Manor), Richard Bainbridge (Benedicts, Norwich), Vanessa Scott (Strattons, Swaffham) and Michael Chamberlain (The Victoria Inn, Holkham) all cook up a selection of dishes, showcasing local produce. As part of this, Wells-based butcher Arthur Howell, Chris Coubrough and Kate Barmby, a former Great British Bake Off contestant, are cooking up a breakfast feast which should get us all drooling! The festival, which regularly attracts between 10,000 to 12,000 visitors, takes place on September 1 and 2 in the Walled Garden at Holkham Hall. It is in its ninth year and sees more than 50 local producers take part. Chris says: ‘The festival isn’t just a celebration of our rich culinary heritage and a chance to showcase outstanding field-to-fork produce to a wider audience but, most of all, a fantastic weekend to enjoy food and drink with friends and family in a stunning, iconic location. It’s a feast for all the senses! ‘It’s a fantastic event to take part in and grows year on year, demonstrating just how popular and, thanks to a wealth of growers, brewers, producers, farmers, chefs and bakers, diverse and thriving Norfolk’s food and drink scene is.’ Norfolk-based Kettle Foods remains the festival’s headline sponsor. Managing director Ashley Hicks says: ‘We really enjoy being part of this celebration of local produce.

I highly recommend a visit to the festival as it’s such a great opportunity to try some of the best food and drink that our region has to offer. Whilst you’re there, make sure you come to our ‘Create & Donate’ area and have a go at making your own limited edition potato crisps in aid of our charity partner, The Feed.’ Lucy Downing, of SALT, a boutique coastal holiday agency who are sponsoring the children’s activities, adds: ‘As passionate supporters of the thriving local food and drink scene here in North Norfolk and knowing it to be one of the reasons our discerning customers choose to holiday here, we’re thrilled to be a sponsor.’ • Feast Norfolk: As media partner, we are delighted to be part of this lovely festival and will be present on both days. Seek us out and enjoy our new September issue!

CAKE COMPEtItION

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THE ANNUAL CONTEST, sponsore d by Fakenham-based chocolate manufacturer Kinnerton, has two categories, one for adults on Satu rday and one for children on Sunday. The winners of each category rece ive a KitchenAid mixer, worth more than £400. All entries have to involve choc olate in some way, either as icing, deco ration or simply as the whole cake. They mus t be at the chairman’s tent by noon on each day. Judges include Feast Norfolk staff and we reproduce the winning recipes in an edition of the magazine.


Aylsham Show AylshamShow Show the the the

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www.theaylshamshow.co.uk www.theaylshamshow.co.uk www.theaylshamshow.co.uk

Thelocally locally grown grown day The locally day out! The dayout! out!


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WINNING WAYS

Charlotte Gurney of White House Farm, on the edge of Norwich, is celebrating a new award - and looking forward to the Aylsham Show

VISIT

WHITE HOUSE FARM, WROXHAM ROAD, NORWICH

Other categories saw three of our fellow businesses as finalists. Voted as the coolest, quirkiest and simply most unmissable in their retrospective categories were: Lois Reloved, our women’s fashion boutique, The Hair Boutique, and the Barn Beauty Rooms, your go-to beauticians, firmly putting us on the map as the destination for lunching ladies in and around Norwich! It's a great milestone to have reached as a thriving group of businesses celebrate just over 18 months working together, creating the new Norwich hub that it is fast becoming. I would never have believed we could make this sort of transformation in five years, but we've become a real family of businesses now and it's a lovely place to spend your day.

www.norwich-pyo.co.uk

DUBBED THE 'urban guide to the countryside', Muddy Stilettos, the popular lifestyle website, crowned White House Farm the Best Farmshop and Deli in Norfolk in their annual awards. To my amazement, they received more than 2000 votes in this category, as five farmshops in the county battled it out in a week of frantic keyboard tapping, as our wonderful customers showed their support. All publicity is welcomed, but it is particularly humbling when our own regulars take the time to show their approval. It was real pat on the back to our team of bakers, butchers and farm shop staff who make WHF the charming place it is!

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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DIARY DATES

August 27, Blickling Park - The Aylsham Show is a highly popular country show, with a great foodie tent, packed with local producers. We are selling our award winning sausages, apple juice and jams, plus Norfolk Raider cider from our orchards, and, for the first time, the Brett family, who run our Veg Shed, will be talking about their produce and what makes a fine Norfolk potato! • White House Farm hold monthly Farmers’ Markets. The next ones are July 21 and August 18. • White House Farm can be accessed via the new road from the Sprowston Park and Ride roundabout on the Wroxham Road. It opens six days a week, closing on Mondays. •


CHILDREN'S ACtIVItIES -

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NORFOLK’S FOODIE HERITAGE THEATRE DIRECTOR EVE STEBBING HOLDS A CHILDREN’S STORY TELLING AND COOKERY EVENT IN NORWICH THIS JULY. SHE TELLS US MORE VISIT

www.spinofftheatre.co.uk

Here is a smaller variation of the Swimmer, made with self raising flour to reduce your prep time:

Norfolk Spoon Dumplings

MAKES TEN

INGREDIENTS 1 of a 4oz of self raising flour; 1 egg; /8 salt of h pinc good pint of milk; a METHOD Whisk the egg until it is frothy, then . add the milk and whisk some more Combine with the flour to make an elastic dough. Little air pockets it should appear straight away, but poon teas a Take y. runn should not be and drop individual dollops of the mixture into your stew. Replace lid and cook for three minutes

ling, JULY 27 - Dumplings and Storytel Norwich, et, Stre r este Leic rn, The York Tave 2-4pm. This is a free event.

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FOR MANY YEARS I have made it my business to collect and perform the stories and dialect that make this region such a rich place. Many pub gardens have seen a show by Spin-Off, the theatre company I direct. When I paused to have children, in 2013, we had clocked up more than 400 performances and 22 plays over 16 years. Given the excellent menus at the pubs we toured to each autumn, food was always part of the theatrical experience our audience enjoyed. But as we re-launch in Norwich this July, it is finally taking centre stage. And it is a dumpling sitting in the spotlight. Dumpling, after all, is a dialect word. This region has a very special relationship with these steamed buns and it is this age-old love affair that Spin-Off hopes to rekindle. Story-telling and recipe swaps will play their part, with children well catered for with foodie tall tales. But we will be tingling taste-buds, too, with a variety of traditional and contemporary buns that are simply delicious. Inspiration for our food events, which combine a love of words with an affection for tasty delicacies, comes from the Antipodes. There, the Sydney-based annual Food and Words Festival focuses on food writers as much as it does on food. To whet the appetite for the event, here’s a little of the dumpling’s history. The famous Norfolk dumpling is known as the ‘Twenty Minute Swimmer’. A yeasted bun, the dough should be kneaded and risen a number of times, to make it light and springy. A disastrous dumpling will sink instead of rising to the top when placed in the pan these dodos are called Soggy Bottoms. They are not to be confused with Sinkers - a term used to refer to the suet variety for which Suffolk has received such praise.


PORKSTOCK -

W H A T ' S

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GETTING TO THE MEAT OF IT

Porkstock takes place at the Norfolk Showground in October, Pippa Lain-Smith meets three producers at the heart of the family-friendly foodie festival

VISIT

www.porkstock.co.uk

A

S THE POPULARITY of events such as Porkstock, an annual food and drink festival which celebrates pork, demonstrates, buying local is high on the priority list for many people; so we’re lucky to have some fantastic producers on our doorstep. Wayland Farms, Cranswick Country Foods and Fruit Pig specialise in very different areas of the meat industry, but they share a commitment to animal welfare, quality and environmental sustainability. Based in Breckland, Wayland Farms and Cranswick Country Foods work together from farm to fork, creating the highest quality pork products for consumers across Great Britain. ‘We’ve been breeding and nurturing pigs for decades; with farming knowledge passed down through generations,’ explains Charles Bowes, Operations Director for Wayland Farms. ‘Animal welfare is at the heart of the business and all our farms are RSPCA and Red Tractor assured.’ Barry Lock is Managing Director of Cranswick Country Foods, one of the festival’s main sponsors. ‘All of Wayland Farms’ pigs go to the Cranswick Country Foods facility in Watton,’ he says. ‘Even though we produce on a mass scale, we pay attention to the detail; focusing on traceability throughout our

supply chain.’ As a Group, Cranswick supplies most of the UK’s well-known supermarkets including Tesco, with most of their pork and sausages. ‘Together, Wayland Farms and Cranswick Country Foods employ more than 1300 people,’ continues Barry. ‘We’re committed to working with the local communities we’re part of, and love getting involved with events such as Porkstock which celebrate the best of local food and drink and its provenance.’ Matt Cockin founded the Fruit Pig Company (named after the fresh fruit and veg that Matt’s first pigs were fed) in 2008 and the butchery has become particularly well known for its rare fresh blood black pudding and specialist bacons, made from traditional breeds. Initially, Matt, and his business partner Grant, hadn’t appreciated just how rare fresh blood black pudding was. ‘Almost all the black pudding produced in the UK is made from imported dried blood powder,’ Matt explains. ‘Grant and I are now qualified slaughter men and although working in this environment is very challenging, the end-result is worth the effort.’ Matt makes no excuses for his bluntness when it comes to talking about the process of creating Fruit Pig black pudding. ‘We don’t try to avoid discussing how our puddings are made. We are proud of the care and effort we put in.’

SEE SEPTEMBER’S Feast Norfolk for more on this great day out - which includes an evening Knees Up with live music and a rum bar. Tickets for this event, from 7pm to 12.30am, are £20 and be warned - they do sell out!

FEAST NORFOLK is proud to again be the media partner of the Food Demo Stage at this year’s Porkstock. The free, family friendly food festival takes place on October 13 at the Norfolk Showground. Car parking is £ 2 per car and dogs, on leads, are welcome.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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NEW GIN

IVY UPDATE

We were looking forward to the launch of the new Boadicea Gin, just as we were going to press. Hand crafted in East Anglia (the land of the Iceni, the ancient British tribe led by Warrior Queen Boadicea), the gin is distilled from Norfolk barley. Fittingly, the soft launch took place at Caistor Hall Hotel, situated in the village of Caistor St Edmund, near Norwich, previously known as Venta Icenorum and founded during the AD 60s. Visit www.foundingdrinks.co.uk

It can’t be long until The Ivy Norwich Brasserie opens its doors on London Street - we’ve been looking forward to it since the start of the year! The restaurant will feature an all-day dining menu and will open seven days a week. Visit www.theivynorwich.com

ROSY OUTLOOK Rose Hanison of The Black Horse on Earlham Road, in Norwich, is never one to rest on her laurels. She’s just taken on The Wildman pub, and will be offering great music, beer, spirits and cocktails until late in the heart of Norwich Lanes! Visit www.theblackhorsenorwich.net or find The Wildman on Facebook

LUCKY LOBSTER

READY, STEADY, BAKE!

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A Norwich-based social enterprise, The Feed, is extending its academy, where it helps the vulnerable by providing catering training, and opening a new city centre café. Chief executive Matt Townsend explains: ‘We have secured premises on Prince of Wales Road in Norwich where we plan to run a much bigger training academy and also a café where we can sell coffees and sandwiches.’ It would allow the organisation to train up to 100 people at a time - more than doubling their current capacity. Matt continues: ‘We have a waiting list for those who want to try and turn their lives around. And we will move our headquarters there, too, so we can all operate together.’ In order to make all this happen, The Feed has created a new charity, The Feed Foundation, and launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise the £20,000 needed. It already has support from Kettle Foods, Aviva, the owners of Warwick Street Social in Norwich and the rotary club of Norwich St Edmund, along with profits from The Feed’s catering business. It has also been chosen as the Lord Mayor’s and Sheriff’s civic charity for the forthcoming year. www.thefeed.org.uk

.uk

THE FEED EXPANDS

it w Vis

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R OU N D - U P It’s peak season for food and drink news, as Emma Outten finds out in her round up

Joaquim Teles, a Portuguese pastry chef, is opening his first café and pastry shop, Teles Patisserie, at Yare Valley Oils at The Grange in Surlingham, near Norwich. Expect to find a great selection of his show stopping cakes and more. Keep on eye on his Facebook page for full details

Do make time to visit Erpingham House, a glamorous new plant-based restaurant in Tombland, Norwich. With an interior by Norwich-based designers, Berrys and Grey, it boasts a ground floor café, a first floor restaurant and a second floor bar. Head chef Dan Jobey has created a menu with attitude! Visit www.erpinghamhouse.com

LET'S TALK The Barn Bistro in Holt has had a lovely idea with a ‘Happy to Chat’ table now available. It means if you fancy sharing a table and having a natter, simply choose the one with the Happy to Chat sign. And tuck into the lovely cakes, too! Visit www.the-barn-bistro.co.uk

SPARKLING FORM Congratulations to John Hemmant from Chet Valley Vineyard, in Bergh Apton, as his first sparkling wine - Horatio 2015 Blanc de Blancs Brut - has won a 2018 Decanter World Wine Award. The family run vineyard produces artisan wines with state of the art equipment and specialises in English sparkling wine. Visit www.chetvineyard.co.uk

Visit www.gnawfolkchocolate.co.uk

ERPINGHAM HOUSE

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We like the sound of Brancaster Brewery’s newest craft ale, ‘Lucky Lobster’. A refreshing 4.2 per cent Pale Ale packed with ripe tropical fruit, big bold aromas with a crisp hoppy finish, it’s made from the famous local Norfolk Maris Otter malted barley along with Mistral Hops for aroma and bitterness.

GNAW ON THAT Norwich-based chocolate innovator, Gnaw has just launched a range of indulgent chocolate bars with a healthy twist. The small 35g bars are handcrafted in Norfolk with 35 per cent healthy ingredients, natural flavours and no added nasties. There are three bars in the range; Milk Chocolate with Peanuts, British Granola & Seeds, Milk Chocolate with Cranberries, Raisins, British Granola and Seeds and Dark Chocolate with Orange, British Granola & Seeds.


News & Gossip KITCHEN CAPERS (pic right) We’re looking forward to checking out the new Ber Street Kitchen in Norwich. Formerly The Tea Lounge, it is a new independent café/deli – breakfast and lunch will be served daily, with a selection of freshly prepared food always on display and ready to take away. The menus are created using locally sourced and seasonal produce. Visit www.theberstreetkitchen.co.uk

UNDER THE HAMMER A stunning cellar comprised of several hundred bottles of top-quality vintage wine will go under the hammer in July as part of Keys Fine Art Auctioneers three day Fine Sale. Topname Champagnes, clarets, Burgundies, Ports and sweet wines are among the fine collection, amassed by a Blickling couple over a number of years. The wine collection will be auctioned in Aylsham on July 26. Visit www.keysauctions.co.uk

BY GEORGE (pic left) Good to see that 18th century West Norfolk pub the George & Dragon at Newton by Castle Acre has reopened its doors. Wells Deli, in conjunction with proprietor and General Manager Tiffany Turner and Head Chef Tiago Rodrigues, have brought their wealth of hospitality experience to the old drinking and dining rooms at the pub known by locals as the ‘Newton George.’ The new interior offers the Pickwick Club Room, which seats up to 60 people inside and which opens onto a covered terrace, seating up to a further 150. Plus there’s a new 'Pig Shed Motel' next door, comprising 10 ground level drive in drive out ensuite double rooms, with two for disabled people. And car parking for both the pub and motel will include two electric car charging points. Visit www.newtongeorgepub.com & www.thepigshedmotel.co.uk

CATTLE CARDS

ICE CREAM COMPETITION If you like ice cream you simply must enter this year’s Lakenham Creamery competition to design its new flavour (the last competition generated the award winning Gooseberry and Elderflower!). The winner will receive 25 x 500ml tubs (one of each of the 25 flavours if they so wish) and will be invited to the factory to see the flavour in production. Visit www.lakenhamcreamery.co.uk

GARDEN PARTY PERFECT Award winning restaurant, boutique hotel, catering and event venue Brasted’s in Framingham Pigot proved to be quite the place for a summer garden party, at a recent networking event. It now boasts a new ‘living wall’ entrance and artificial grass in the outside courtyard which is overlooked by the function suite. Visit www.brasteds.co.uk www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

TRULY GREAT Well done to Truly Local in Stalham which sells items grown, produced or crafted within 40 miles. In March Debs and the team celebrated seven years of trading, and by August they anticipate that they will have turned over £850,000, the vast majority of which has gone back into the local economy. Visit www.trulylocalcic.co.uk

TERRIFIC TERRACE If you’ve driven to Norwich on the Loddon Road recently, you surely couldn’t have failed to notice the fabulous new rooftop bar at The Gull Inn, in Framingham Pigot. The 18th century coaching inn is under new management and has had a complete refurbishment inside and out – and now offers ‘niche dining’ (we’re intrigued) and a freehouse. Visit www.thegullinn.co.uk

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We love the designs coming out of IzziRainey, a small textile company based on a cattle farm in Foulsham, near Fakenham. All of Izzi's designs have been inspired by farm life, the Norfolk countryside and most importantly her Dad's beef cattle - which inspired the distinctive Highland Cow design. She has just launched her first collection of cards which have been inspired by her farm visits. Visit www.izzirainey.com


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Award-winning food www.morstonanchor.co.uk OPENING TIMES 9am til late everyday FOOD SERVED 9am–11am, 12pm–3pm, 6pm–9pm (8.30pm Sunday) THE ANCHOR INN, The Street, Morston, Norfolk NR25 7AA morstonanchor@gmail.com

5 7AA | morstonanchor@gmail.com

CALL US 01263 837359 or 07999 959760

TAKEAWAY CRABS & LOBSTER AVAILABLE FROM 10AM OPENING TIMES: SUNDAY-THURSDAY 10-5pm; FRIDAY-SATURDAY 10-8pm SERVING FOOD FROM 12pm with Surf and Turf on Friday and Saturday CROMER ROAD, WEST RUNTON, NORFOLK, NR27 9QA

www.rockybottoms.co.uk


Fine food, beautiful surroundings and an old fashioned day at the beach, look no further. OLD HUNSTANTON

TITCHWELL

NORFOLK COAST

Coastal location

Stunning views

Cottages by the sea

Seasonal food

Salt marshes

Pet-friendly

16 stylish rooms

Locally sourced all-day dining

Stunning locations

Relaxing family atmosphere

Beautiful decor

Idyllic getaways

www.thelodgehunstanton.co.uk

www.briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk

www.norfolkcoastholidaycottages.co.uk


ON THE BUSES

THE COASTAL BUS ROUTE IN NORTH AND WEST NORFOLK HAS BEEN GIVEN A NEW LEASE OF LIFE IN GOOD TIME FOR SUMMER THANKS TO TWO LOCAL OPERATORS STEPPING IN TO SAVE THE DAY. EMMA OUTTEN REPORTS VISIT

wwww.lynxbus.co.uk AND www.sanderscoaches.com The news that it was to be withdrawn led to a petition to save the service, signed by more than 11,000. Two local operators, Lynx Bus and Sanders Coaches, then stepped in to save the day. Lynx replaced the King’s Lynn - Hunstanston - Wellsnext-the-Sea section of the former Coasthopper route, with its Coastliner service 36. And Sanders Coaches replaced the Wells – Sheringham - Cromer section of the route, with its service number 4 – still under the Coasthopper branding.

WHEN STAGECOACH announced it would be withdrawing the much-loved Coasthopper route in North Norfolk in April, the prospect of getting out and about over the holiday season - walking along the coastal path and having lunch, followed by a bus journey back to your starting point – went out of the window. The Coasthopper began in 1997, and was originally operated by Norfolk Green, before being sold to Stagecoach in 2013.

BURNHAM OVERY STAITHE

HUNSTANTON CLIFFS

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02. HEACHAM HERE’S OUR SELECTION OF GREAT FOODIE DESTINATIONS TO TRY WHEN YOU USE THE COASTAL BUS SERVICE THIS SUMMER

O1. KING’S LYNN:

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KING’S LYNN

Goldings Deli and Bar Check out their Facebook page In the historic quarter of King’s Lynn, this little deli is a real find and you can enjoy a pint in the adjoining pub, too. The carrot cake is highly recommended and the staff are very jolly. It’s perfect for your al fresco dining needs or a post walk pig out! We love - the colourful salad bar

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Walsingham Farm Shop www.walsingham.co This deluxe farm shop, packed with all manner of goodies for your picnic, is based in a converted barn at Norfolk Lavender. The cheese selection is fabulous, and there is a good range of hampers which usually include one of their pies. Produce is always seasonal, mainly local and fresh as a daisy. Also at Little Walsingham. We love - their sausage rolls and pies!

03. OLD HUNSTANTON

The Lodge www.thelodgehunstanton.co.uk A handsome hotel, with rooms, and a very buzzy bar. It’s super dog friendly and just the place to refuel after a day on the beach - which is just across the road. If you need a pick-me-up, the gin selection is rather good! We love - the stone-baked pizzas


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way to explore the beautiful North Norfolk coast and many of the fine eateries on offer. Coastliner day tickets give you one day unlimited travel on all Lynx and Sanders bus services in the area, so why not sit back, relax and let us do the driving?’ Of course, the saved bus route is great news for drinkers who don’t want the worry of driving or parking. For example, there is a bus stop opposite The Jolly Sailors and another one outside The White Horse, both in Brancaster Staithe. Ian Stamp, Chairman and Pub Campaigns Co-ordinator of Norwich and Norfolk CAMRA, says of the service: ‘We started using the service about four or five years ago, when we realised we could get a Rover ticket at Norwich Station which included the train from Norwich, and as many journeys on the buses as you need, all day, for under a tenner!’

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DROVE ORCHARDS Eric’s Fish and Chips Restaurant www.ericsfishandchips.com This frankly rather upmarket chippy is a delight - and somewhere all members of the family love. There’s a wide range of fish available, plus a few surprise like Japanese style black pudding fritters. You can either eat in or takeaway. We love - cocktails. Fish, chips and cocktails. Who could want more?

Thornham Deli www.thornhamdeli.co.uk This is your one stop for a terrific deli, café, lifestyle shop and cool bedrooms! There is masses of outside seating and it is quite the place to see and be seen. Head chef Gemma’s cakes are to die for! We love - their breakfasts, especially their buttermilk pancakes with maple syrup

The Chequers Inn www.chequersinnthornham.com Another very dog friendly place, with super stylish interiors, including the bedrooms. Look out for their Norfolk tapas (salt and pepper squid) and new vegan menu. Great walks are available from the door. We love - the cedar wood pavilions which you can hire as your own private party spot

Titchwell Manor www.titchwellmanor.com Sophisticated dining is equalled by stylish interiors at Eric Snaith’s 31-bedroom hotel. The walled garden is a real find in the summer months and we like the sound of the newish Sunday brunch, served from 1-3pm. We love - the seafood is always fabulous here look out for Brancaster oysters

05. TITCHWELL

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MUNDESLEY

NORTH WALSHAM 20

MORE SUGGESTIONS OVERLEAF

WARNING: MAP NOT TO SCALE - CONSULT ORDNANCE SURVEY MAP!

Moreover, Sanders Coaches has connected it to the service number 5 at Cromer, which extends the service all the way to North Walsham, via Overstrand, Trimingham, Mundesley and Trunch. So how’s it all going so far? Managing Director Charles Sanders says: ‘Coasthopper is a very weather reliant service with passenger numbers sometimes doubling on a warm sunny day. It has been a difficult start with a very stubborn north wind keeping the east coast quite cool. However, when we have had a good day it has been well used. I am sure this is the same for many catering outlets as no one really wants to sit out on a cold day and people tend to either stay in or go to town in poor weather. However, with the height of the season yet to come we remain optimistic and will assess it properly in the autumn.’ Graham Smith, the Commercial Manager at Lynx, urges people to make the most of the service this summer: ‘With buses operating up to every 30 minutes, seven days a week, the brand new Coastliner bus service is a great, sustainable


t: 01485 210314

info@jollysailorsbrancaster.co.uk www.jollysailorsbrancaster.co.uk

Briarfields www.briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk A relaxing spot, with masses of room to simply chill out in. Local produce, especially fish, is a big feature of the menus here, and their afternoon teas verge on the decadent. There are bedrooms, too. We love - sitting on the terrace, looking out over the marshes with a large glass of rosé

06. BRANCASTER

The Ship www.shiphotelnorfolk.co.uk Now run by the same family who own the Maids Head Hotel in Norwich, The Ship is right in the centre of the village. Plans are afoot for a few changes so watch this space! We love - waiting to see what happens next!

07. BRANCASTER STAITHE

The Jolly Sailors www.jollysailorsbrancaster.co.uk This is hugely popular spot, with the bus stop right outside and perfect for families.There are great beers from their microbrewery, Brancaster Brewery, and there always seems to be something happening here - it’s a fun place! We love - their rum menu

E IT TH T A VIS TAI S RE G TO R 2 ES STE U N CA VE AN BR

IN

A taste of north Norfolk Living

reception@whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk t: 01485 210262

The White Horse www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk This is a rightly popular choice, with fab food served in stunning beautifully surroundings - the views over the tidal marshes and out to sea can bring a tear to the eye. Head chef Fran Hartshorne is simply a gem.The bar menu is available all day so head for the terrace and enjoy tapas and fizz. We love - the daily lobster barbecues in the summer

08. BURNHAM MARKET

The Hoste www.thehoste.com This iconic hotel, right on The Green, has a wonderful walled garden where you can relax after a spot of retail therapy in the town. All day dining is available, with an accent on local produce, and the wine list is very comprehensive. We love - The Nelson exhibition - be sure to seek it out!

09. BURNHAM OVERY STAITHE

The Hero www.theheroburnhamovery.co.uk With a bus stop right outside, and that glorious coastal path to enjoy, The Hero is a great stopping off point for walkers

30

or those of us who enjoy a glass of wine with our meals! The gin selection is rather fab, the food is gorgeous (don’t miss the tiramisu) and there are three contemporary bedrooms. We love - Gun Hill, their master suite, with views over the Staithe

10. WELLS

The Crown www.crownhotelnorfolk.co.uk Standing proud on The Buttlands, The Crown, run by the well known chef Chris Coubrough, is simply great fun. Unstuffy, with (unsurprisingly) great food, it’s a real home from home. There are now 20 bedrooms, some with copper baths, which are simply divine We love - the sun-soaked, south-facing terrace The Globe www.theglobeatwells.co.uk Overlooking The Buttlands, The Globe is a great meeting place, with a buzzy bar and popular restaurant - do try the house curries. The new look courtyard, complete with wood-fired pizza oven, is perfect for summer dining. We love sitting out the front, watching the world go by, with a cool beer


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11. WARHAM

The Three Horseshoes www.warhamhorseshoes.co.uk This family-run country pub has been open a year now and is packed with character. Classic dishes dominate the menu, with local produce such as Mrs Temple’s cheeses used, and local beers are very well kept. They make a real point of welcoming children, too. We love - the spacious walled garden

12. STIFFKEY

Stiffkey Stores www.stiffkeystores.com Pop into this lovely store for great coffee and cake, children’s toys, flowers, plants, home interiors, super stationery and an awful lot in between. They even run the Post Office! We love - the eclectic mix of wonderful things

F E A T U R E

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13. MORSTON

The Anchor Inn www.morstonanchor.co.uk Run by Harry Farrow and Rowan Glennie, this is a friendly pub, with an innovative menu which is dominated by local produce, especially, at this time of year, fish. The decor is great, there are plenty of gins and the real ales are very well kept. We love - the vibe - everyone is made to feel welcome

14. BLAKENEY

White Horse www.whitehorseblakeney.co.uk Blakeney Quay is oh so pretty and The White Horse is just up from the Quayside. Owned by Adnams, it has a modern feel with nine boutique style rooms (Room One has the view over the marshes). Dog friendly, it offers all that you’d expect from Adnams behind the bar and some great local produce on its unfussy menu. We love - the great selection of vegetarian and vegan options available

15. WIVETON

Wiveton Hall Café www.wivetonhall.co.uk

THE WELLS CRAB HOUSE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

38-40 Freeman street WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA CALL US ON 01328 710456 WWW.WELLSCRABHOUSE.CO.UK

"With buses operating up to every 30 minutes, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, the brand new Coastliner bus service is a great way to explore the BEAUtIFUL North Norfolk coast "

Wells Crabhouse www.wellscrabhouse.co.uk Husband and wife, Scott and Kelly, have worked hard to create the perfect little restaurant right on the quay. Fish is landed just yards away and it shows! We love - the seafood platters, with a little bit of everything

N E W S

Situated in a barn on a fruit farm, with masses of outside seating, the colourful café overlooks the marshes. It’s well known for its salads and uses produce from the farm and local suppliers. It is very family friendly and you can do a spot of pyo, too. We love - Desmond, the owner. He’s such a character!

16. WEYBOURNE

The Ship Inn www.theshipinnweybourne.com In the pretty village of Weybourne with its lovely old railway station, this is a great spot to enjoy a seafood platter or a simple pint of local ale. We love - the shellfish from Cley Smokehouse

17. WEST RUNTON

Rocky Bottoms www.rockybottoms.co.uk Right on the beach and situated in a former brick kiln, RB is a seafood lover’s paradise. Expect the freshest crab and lobster, straight from the boat, served with pretty salads. Dogs are welcome in some rooms, and outside. Also, check out those huge deckchairs! We love their crab salads

18. CROMER

No 1 Cromer www.no1cromer.com Overlooking the beach, this fish and chip takeaway is run by Galton Blackiston of Morston Hall and Michelin Star fame. You can eat in but not much beats sitting in the salty sea air and tucking in, with gusto. We love the cockle popcorn. Oh yes

19. MUNDESLEY

The Ship Inn www.mundesley-ship.co.uk The recently refurbished Ship Inn makes the most of its seafront location in quaint Mundesley, one of the county’s hidden gems. The menu is packed with seafood, too, and the big garden is a real draw in the warm weather. We love - that seafaring theme

20. NORTH WALSHAM

The Beechwood Hotel www.beechwood-hotel.co.uk An attractive country house hotel, the Art Deco bar is the place for afternoon tea or pre dinner cocktails. Emma and Hugh have created a lovely spot, right in the town centre, and the large, mature garden is real bit of Eden. We love those Agatha Christie links!


7D O AY P S E A N W EE K

From the Deli:

Farms Shop

From the Butchery:

Guild Street, Walsingham, NR22 6BU t: 01328 821877 Caley Mill, Lynn Road, Heacham PE31 7JE t: 01485 570002

it w s i v

ww.wa ls

m.co • gha in

Visit our website for more info

ham.co • g in

Local summer fruits, fresh vegetables and bread, Norfolk wines and beers, preserves and pickles

ww.wa ls

From the Shop Floor:

it w vis

Great choice for the BBQ, local meats, aged steaks

Everything for picnics and snacks, party buffets, fine local Norfolk cheeses and celebration cheese ‘cakes’


’s s u w ic g as r a o Y no E b ct n e s e ! a s ip f g c ha h er ba c C p r & e, ch u p s h i f ea i l F r ab o f

ENJOY the

sUMMER

Choose from...

cod

at...

build yo ur o w n s undae? W hy no t

EAT IN • TAKE AWAY ¯

Call

01485 525886

FAMILY FRIENDLY

GLUTEN FREE

LOCALLY SOURCED

FREE PARKING

WE SELL G VOUC IFT HERS

...a perfec press ie t

Opening Times

12PM¯9pm daily

New Outside Bar

serving ice cream AND cocktails coming soon

Drove Orchards, Thornham www.ericsfishandchips.com


Summer on The Green in Burnham Market

All day dining, sheltered garden, summer cocktails, Hoste of Music, Beauty Spa, luxury cinema and the ‘Remember Nelson’ exhibition

01328 738777 • reception@thehoste.com • www.thehoste.com

E

M D N CO S A EL W N

RE

G

D

O

IL

D

H

C

Hop off the bus & pop in Whether it is food, fashion or furnishings, Thornham Deli is your one-stop shop on the Norfolk Coast

A pub with real character

Simple, unfussy food made with the best local produce, local ales and fine wines. Renowned for its pies and puddings. Stylish but cosy rooms. Stunning large walled garden with outside bar.

THE THREE HORSESHOES, 69 The Street, Warham NR23 1NL www.warhamhorseshoes.co.uk Tel: 01328710547

Thornham Deli, High Street, Thornham, Norfolk PE36 6LX 01485 512 194 | www.thornhamdeli.co.uk


MAKE IT A DATE! 29th October - 9th November 2018 EACH PARTICIPATING RESTAURANT OFFERS A FIXED PRICE MENU OR

Restaurant Week menus will be offered Monday - Friday, excluding weekends. Look out for the full list of participating restaurants later this summer. Keep up to date by joining us on social media and sign up to our mailing list.

SU FR E D N O M VE I N D AY 6 RY N E R . LU 3 0 N I G N - 8 HT C .4 H 5 12 P -2 M PM

www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk

Beechwood Hotel & Restaurant 2 0 C R O M E R R OA D, N O R T H WA L S H A M , N O R F O L K N R 2 8 0 H D W W W. B E E C H W O O D - H O T E L . C O . U K

TEL: 01692 403231

BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY 27TH AUGUST

Join us from 1pm for an afternoon of entertainment

Murder Mystery & Afternoon Tea

We will be serving a delicious BEECHWOOD AFTERNOON TEA, separated in to two courses - savouries followed by sweets - the afternoon tea will be accompanied by an intriguing MURDER MYSTERY TALE... *WHY NOT INCLUDE AN OVERNIGHT STAY? Room rates, based on two people sharing, include: Full afternoon tea from 1pm, Murder mystery entertainment, evening meal, overnight stay and breakfast on Tuesday morning. FOUR POSTER ROOM £270 CLASSIC DOUBLE ROOM £245 SMALL DOUBLE ROOM £205

£40

PER PERSON*


S

EATING & SHOPPING!

O - EATING IN A SHOP? Mmm, does it sound right? Can there be much of an atmosphere? Won’t it always play second fiddle to the main business? Well, Jarrold’s has invested in its eateries - Benji’s on the first floor was reworked two or three years ago and Chapters, the coffee shop in the book department, is another new addition. Now the old Metro café, on the lower ground floor, has been reinvented as The Exchange. Its rebirth marks the latest development of the store’s foodie offerings, taking the number to five overall. Last year, The Deli was substantially expanded, with a new wine bar, and both have been hailed as great successes. To such an extent, in fact, that wine bar has doubled in size, with more seating now available.

SARAH HARDY HEADS TO THE EXCHANGE, THE LATEST FOODIE VENUE AT JARROLD’S DEPARTMENT STORE IN THE CITY The Exchange is a continuation of this, with the same cool vibe throughout, with much use of copper, a trendy tiled counter, lots of little bistro style table and chairs, plus a lovely large round table for bigger gatherings which looked great fun.

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The Exchange -

E A T I N G

O U T

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www.jarrold.co.uk

pizza. In a rare moment of not being too greedy, I opted for a smaller charcuterie one, crammed with cured meats, baby rocket, duck egg, smoked mozzarella and pesto, plus a mixed side salad. With its sourdough base, it was really delicious! I have also tried their baked macaroni cheese, with spinach and tomatoes, and my eye caught Bourbon whisky marinated chicken with salad - next time. Charlie went for a chicken and avocado sarnie on white bloomer bread and tucked into it with gusto. With master of wine Nick Adams on board, the store’s wines are ever improving (and expanding) and my glass of Italian Pinot Grigio rosé La Voluta was very refreshing - and it was hard but necessary to turn down a second! There’s a good children’s menu, with pizzas, fish and chips, and a pasta choice on offer, plus a dessert and a drink, all for £6. I think the chocolate and banana pizza would have been right up my children’s street, if they were still little and cute - as opposed to ‘challenging’ teenagers! Add in a separate breakfast menu, where a galette pizza, complete with meats, avocado and Mexican beans topped with a free range fried egg, sounds fun, and an afternoon tea menu which includes Jarrold’s iconic scones, and you are pretty much sorted! The Exchange is a very welcome addition to the city’s daytime dining scene. I’ve visited two or three times since it opened and thoroughly enjoyed all my visits. The service is lovely, it is a very good place to meet people and you can, of course, include a spot of retail therapy. The beauty hall does it for me everytime!

VISIT

Pride of place is a wood fired pizza oven which, rumour has it, was a devil to install, but does have that ‘wow’ factor - and the pizzas, with sourdough and gluten free base options, are pretty good, too! The menu is accessible and packed with firm favourites and there’s a nice healthy feel to much of it. Plenty of salads, soups and fresh pasta dishes dominate, with a wide choice of sandwiches available, too. You’d think it would be common sense to offer lighter meals in the day, but so many places seem to think we always want a huge plateful of nosh! Special mention must be made of the puds which are really rather fab - and I have tried a few of them. The waffles with berries and a white chocolate sauce speak for themselves while the little doughnuts, with lime curd, are a real favourite. But I met Norfolk foodie Charlie Hodson for a gossip and lunch - which is pretty much what The Exchange is perfect for. Big fat green olives and a selection of breads and oils fuelled us as we checked out the menu. I love soups, especially spicy Tom Yum, but couldn’t resist a


WHAt A TONIC!

The Gin trap Inn in West Norfolk

appeals to Sarah Hardy ’s sense of style as well as her love of ambitious food TUCKED SLIGHTLY inland from the ultra popular coastline, The Gin Trap Inn at Ringstead is rather a revelation. Traditional cosy coaching inn, it ain’t. It may look like that from the outside, with its white washed walls and agricultural artefacts on show, but there’s a gastro pub with an edge inside. Bold wall colours (Farrow and Ball, of course), glorious reclaimed wooden floors, and amazing artwork give a cool vibe to this very pretty place. There may be woodburners and plenty of those nooks and crannies, but the overall feeling is chic and well, rather exciting! Not unsurprisingly, the pub is taking full advantage of the current gin craze and well, with its name, it would be daft not to. We think there are about 120 gins on offer including all our Norfolk favourites. Bullards Gin, based in Norwich, also makes the pub its own label gin, which is Thai-inspired, with sweet mango and passionfruit so it seemed rude not to try one. Served with a straight up tonic, a slice of lemon and plenty of ice in a balloon glass, it was refreshing: fruity and just right for a summer’s day. Also look out for plenty of craft beers and a solid wine list.


VISIT

www.thegintrapinn.co.uk All this attitude is reflected in the menu, devised by head chef Stuart Wyllie, which has more than a nod to the Med and Middle East. It may well have familiar favourites such as fish and chips and ham, eggs and chips, but there are most certainly a few twists - how about pineapple salsa Rachael chose a with your eggs and chips?! child's sized Sundae There is also a real emphasis on vegan and - E A T I N G O U T of the Day which was vegetarian dishes and the menu is clearly packed with strawberry ice marked up with gluten free options, too. cream, rhubarb soaked cake, syrup, dried raspberries and I had a very enjoyable lunch, sitting in the main dining area polished it all off - the cake noted as particularly delicious. which overlooks the garden. I almost started with Morston There are eight boutique bedrooms available, including crab on sourdough, and also fancied the sweet potato, two suites, and all have striking and individual designs. These cardamom and coconut soup, but instead went for a spicy are in both the main building and the inn’s converted stables hummus with crunchy vegetables, a colourful dish packing a - plus there’s a very sweet two-bedroom self contained good punch of flavour. cottage in the former brew house, which would be my My dining chum and colleague Rachael chose the onion choice! bhaji Scotch egg and raved about the crisp onion batter. The sheltered garden, with a rather splendid ash tree and For mains, I had smoked haddock, chives and mozzarella play area, is just the spot for summer fun. fish cakes, with a lovely creamy parsley sauce, and I had a As you’d imagine, The Gin Trap Inn organises plenty of fabulous side salad, too - and a portion of hispi slaw, just to try, events and activities, and, on September 14 and 15, there is of course. Again, dishes burst with freshness, were crammed a gin festival where you can really let your hair down, enjoy with herbs and spices and were exciting to look at and tasted live music and different, seasonal gins. It sounds like a hell of just as good! a party. For mains Rachael opted for vegan tacos despite not being Do look out for manager, Sophie, who oozes good taste and vegan. Tempted by the sound of flavoursome veggies; roasted charm, and runs a very friendly establishment. cauliflower, avocado mayonnaise, pickled red onion, slaw, What I like about The Gin Trap Inn is that they are keen, a jalapenos, and those sweet potato fries, they didn’t disappoint. bit like us, to ‘do different’. Their menu is more ambitious, the The desserts continued to delight; tiramisu is always interiors are dramatic and they don’t seem the types to stand popular but I opted for Eton Mess, which was enhanced with still. a rhubarb gin for extra oomph, and was again a treat.

THE GIN TRAP

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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T

AKING THE FIRST STEPS in a career in the catering and hospitality sector may seem a little daunting. Will the right level of training and support be there, which area is best to focus on and what skills are needed to succeed in what can be a demanding, but rewarding, sector to work in? One way into the industry is via an apprenticeship scheme. City College Norwich, with its long track record in catering and hospitality training, offers an innovative range of apprenticeships and works closely with apprentices and employers to ensure that standards of training and learning remain consistently high. Jobs and apprenticeship delivery manager Caron Goreham explained that a range of apprenticeships are available from hospitality team member, hospitality supervisor, commis chef and chef de partie, starting from September 2018. ‘What we try to get across is that an apprenticeship is a job with training,’ she says. ‘Anybody over the age of 16 can be an apprentice but increasingly they are 19 plus, and we have just taken somebody on who is 37.’

T H E A P P R E N T I C E MARK NICHOLLS DISCOVERS HOW TO BECOME AN APPRENTICE IN THE HOSPITALITY SECTOR

"when they receive a job offer they can come along and meet us and enrol at city college as an apprentice"


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C I T Y

www.ccn.ac.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

VISIT

The course is all-year-round and the commis chef apprenticeship, for example, runs twice a year in October and late spring on day release. Effectively, the apprentice will secure a job with an employer and work four days in a kitchen and be at college one day a week. Information on how to become an apprentice is available online and City College Norwich also works closely with employers to support them and help if they are looking to take on an apprentice. Caron adds: ‘What normally happens is that an individual will be interviewed by an employer and when they receive a job offer they can come along and meet us and enrol at City College as an apprentice.’ During their hours spent at college - which may vary according to the type of apprenticeship - lectures will cover the theory of the role and the knowledge and skills required to enable an apprentice to then apply them in their workplace. About 20 per cent of an apprenticeship is off-the-job training, though that will not always be within a lecture room setting. ‘It can also be in their workplace, shadowing a senior member of staff or doing e-learning,’ says Caron. ‘When a hospitality apprentice comes to college, they have access to facilities, equipment and food products that they may not necessarily come across normally in their workplace.’ City College Norwich’s hotel and hospitality department has lecturers who have worked within the sector for many years, and a £500,000 kitchen, arguably the best-equipped in East Anglia. After her career in the hotel industry, Caron has been at the college for 14 years, initially as a lecturer before taking up her current role more recently. She emphasises that hospitality apprenticeship roles, while supported by the county’s leading chefs and restaurant owners, are not confined to fine dining.

C O L L E G E

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‘We have apprentices in prisons, pubs, care homes, schools and holiday resorts with people providing the skills they need as an apprentice,’ she adds. ‘We work very closely with employers in Norfolk right across the range and we find they are supportive and very much favour apprenticeships as they are always looking for skilled staff.’ At the end of the apprenticeship there is a multifaceted End Point Assessment which includes a test, culinary challenge and a professional discussion with an independent assessor to talk about an individual’s experiences of the job. Most apprenticeships last 12-18 months and from there, the apprentice gains a qualification and can progress within an organisation. Caron says: ‘The benefits of an apprenticeship are clear: an apprentice is earning, but more importantly they are learning while they are working.’

PROGRAMME MANAGER IN HOTEL HOSPITALITY, CATERING AND TOURISM, JOE MULHALL SAYS: ‘City College Norwich - Hotel School is second to none when it comes to outstanding facilities and outstanding teaching. Employers and apprentices are recognising the benefits from the valuable off the job train delivered at City College Norwich, to enable all the involved stakeholders to prosper. Don’t forget, City College Norwich is your college, offering a course for all ages, such as full time, apprenticeships and leisure. Do take the opportunity to look at our Catering and Hospitality courses online.’

FOR MORE INFORMATION, call 01603 773370, visit www.ccn.ac.uk/ employers/apprenticeships or email apprenticeships@ccn.ac.uk

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VISIT

www.eastgatelarder.co.uk

JAM

HOT Eastgate Larder, run by Jane Steward,

is the home of some great Norfolk preserves. Emma Outten tries her hand at making jam

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I DON’T KNOW what the ladies at my local Women’s Institute would make of it but, before I’d spent a day at Eastgate Larder Norfolk Preserves, I’d never, ever, made jam. Maybe I thought, somewhat misguidedly, that life’s too short to make jam, but that was before I’d met Eastgate Larder’s Jane Steward. Jane’s real passion is for reviving the medlar. But when she’s not busy reviving this long forgotten, old English fruit which was once Britain’s sweet treat, she makes rather lovely preserves, using only locally sourced produce, with as much as possible grown at home in Eastgate, near Cawston. Her preserves can be found at such places as Creake Abbey Farmers’ Market, and the Slate deli in Southwold. Since moving to Eastgate, Jane has become a committed grower of fruit, vegetables and flowers – all very fitting considering she recently discovered that her plot was a fruit farm around 100 years ago. In 2015, she was cured of a stage 1 bowel cancer, thanks to the Norfolk & Norwich Hospital’s screening programme, and digging and planting became vital to her therapy. As she says: ‘My passion for growing, harvesting and making is essential to who I am.’ My first foray into jam making was all thanks to my colleague, Rachael, winning a day at Eastgate Larder as a prize at last year’s Royal Norfolk Show, and raising money for Thornage Hall, near Holt, in the process (it was Jane’s charity of the year, with five per cent of her retail sales going towards the regeneration of the herb garden at the Hall which provides supported living accommodation). Donning aprons, and with jam thermometers at the ready, there was a bit of a Great British Bake Off feel to our day - who was going to get a good set first? We kicked off by making raspberry jam, and soon discovered that jam making is surprisingly simple – involving equal proportions of raspberries and granulated sugar, and some lemon juice (only because raspberries have very little pectin, so the addition of pectin-rich lemon juice helps achieve a set). There’s no slaving over a hot stove for hours here – raspberry jam is particularly quick and easy to make.


EAstGATE LARDER -

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that weight in sugar, compared to the volume of juice. Again we were aiming to get the mixture boiling at a temperature of 104°C, the setting point when the magic (or is it the science?) happens. I cannot explain how excited I was when my jelly finally started to set. The third and final recipe was for lemon curd. Jane’s recipe is a big nod to Nigel Slater, and is delicious on toast, as a cake or tart filling, or, my personal favourite, stirred into some Greek yoghurt. The recipe involves lots of lemons, sugar, unsalted butter, and eggs. It was a bit like making custard, and there was a real sense of achievement when all that light whisking paid off, and it started to thicken up. Not that we’re

competitive or anything, but I couldn’t help but feel envious that Rachael managed to fill up an extra jar with her lemon curd! After lunch, we were lucky enough to take home a box full of our very own preserves. I can see why Eastgate Larder is Jane’s therapy. A day spent stirring is akin to being in a psychological state of flow, a fully immersive experience where I’ve never been more pleased to see wrinkles forming.

EMMA OUTTEN AND JANE STEWARD

And there’s something satisfying about standing there, stirring away, then testing for that all-important set – when a teaspoonful of the jam on a cold plate will wrinkle when pushed with a fingertip. And just when I’d convinced myself that it was never, ever going to set, mine did - my first tears of pride moment. Next up was redcurrant jelly. No lemons were needed here, as redcurrants are very high in pectin, and it was another ridiculously simple recipe, just the redcurrants, water and granulated sugar. The most complicated thing was doing a bit of maths – depending on how much of the hot fruit has dripped through the jelly bag into a jug, we needed to measure out three-quarters of

F E A T U R E

RECIPES OVERLEAFS www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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EAstGATE LARDER -

REDCURRANT JELLY MAKES 3 MEDIUM JARS

INGREDIENTS 600g of redcurrants, fresh or frozen; 500ml of water; granulated sugar EQUIPMENT Large saucepan; spotlessly clean jelly bag and frame; heatproof jug; chilled saucer; sterilised jars (washed in hot soapy water, rinsed and dried in a warm oven for 10 minutes); spotlessly clean jar lids METHOD 1. De-string the redcurrants with a fork 2. Put the fruit into a wide stainless saucepan and add the water 3. Bring to boiling point and cook until the fruit is really soft (10 mins) 4. Carefully pour the hot fruit into the jelly bag and leave to drip through into a heatproof jug (don’t push it through or the jelly will be cloudy) 5. Measure out 3/4 weight in sugar to the volume of redcurrant juice. (eg 750g sugar to one litre of juice) 6. Bring the juice up to the boil in a large pan and add the sugar. Test for a set after 5 minutes at a temperature of 104°C 7. When you’ve got a set, pour the jelly into the sterilised jars, cover tightly and store in a cool dry place 8. Refrigerate after opening

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

R E C I P E S

LEMON CURD MAKES 4 MEDIUM JARS

INGREDIENTS 5 lemons; 250g of sugar; 125g of unsalted butter, diced; 4 eggs plus 1 egg yolk EQUIPMENT Large pan; large heatproof bowl; sterilized heatproof jug; small bowl; whisk; zester; ladle; warm, sterilized jars (washed in hot soapy water, rinsed and dried in a warm oven for 10 minutes); spotlessly clean jar lids METHOD 1. Finely grate the zest (yellow part only), juice the lemons and put both into a heatproof bowl. Add the sugar and butter 2. Put two inches of water into a large saucepan, bring to a simmer and sit the heatproof bowl over the pan. It is important that the bowl isn’t in contact with the water. Whisk until the butter is melted and sugar is dissolved (c. 5-10 mins) 3. Take off the heat 4. Crack the whole eggs and one yolk into a small bowl, whisk lightly 5. Pass the eggs through a nylon sieve into to the hot lemon mixture and put the pan back on to the heat. Whisk the mixture for about 10 minutes until it thickens. It will feel heavy and look like custard when it is ready 6. Spoon the curd into the warm jars. Tightly close the lids. Store in a cool dry place and refrigerate after opening

45

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RASPBERRY JAM MAKES 600g*

INGREDIENTS 500g of raspberries, fresh or frozen; 500g of granulated sugar, warmed; lemon juice EQUIPMENT Wide stainless steel saucepan; slotted spoon; jam thermometer; sterilised jars (washed in hot soapy water, rinsed and dried in a warm oven for 10 minutes); spotlessly clean jar lids METHOD 1. Sterilise the jars: wash in hot soapy water, rinse and dry them in a warm oven while you make the jam 2. Put the berries into a wide stainless saucepan 3. Mash them a little and cook for 3-4 minutes over a moderate heat until the juice begins to run 4. Add the warmed sugar, stir over a gentle heat until completely dissolved. Add juice of one lemon 5. Increase the heat and boil for a further 5 - 6 minutes, stirring frequently 6. Test for a set. A teaspoonful on a cold plate will wrinkle when pushed with a fingertip 7. Remove from the heat and skim carefully 8. Pour the jam immediately into your sterilised jars, cover tightly and store in a cool dry place 9. Refrigerate after opening

*2 large or 3 small jars


ON YOUR MARKS

MARK NICHOLLS HEADS TO NORWICH TO MEET ROB JACKSON…AND TALK M&S FOOD

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ARKS AND SPENCER has hit the headlines in recent times, with store closures and somewhat plunging profits. Yet Norwich’s flagship store remains one of the company’s most successful branches and the food hall is a popular choice for the area’s foodies. Keeping the shelves stocked and customers happy - as well as tempted with something a little different - is Rob Jackson’s job. He’s Food and Hospitality Commercial Manager for the Norwich Marks & Spencer store on Rampant Horse Street, a role which not only involves overseeing the food hall but also ensuring the two traditional in-store cafés run smoothly, as well as the new-look Market Place eaterie. VISI T

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It’s a big job. The food hall has 120 staff working across food and hospitality out of the total of 350 people working in store. But for Rob, it’s somewhat personal, too. Norfolk born and bred, he comes from Stalham, went to Stalham High School and Paston Sixth Form College in North Walsham before studying business management at Sheffield Hallam University. He started his career with the Norwich M&S store as a graduate trainee 16 years ago after having his passion for retail fired by working in a toy outlet for a year. And although he has worked elsewhere in the country in various roles for M&S - as well as in Lowestoft and opening the Longwater store in Norwich - he is relishing the current position, which he has held for 16 months. The size of the Norwich store means he is able to stock virtually the whole range of M&S foods but is always keen to hear customer feedback about their culinary preferences.


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‘Our grill range is really popular at the moment, along with our ‘best ever burger’,’ he says. ‘But we have also had a real push on our beef traceability campaign and that has gone down well as our customers do like to know where their meat comes from.’ Summer sandwiches and salads and flavoured chickens have been popular and he’s noted the lemon mayonnaise has been flying off the shelves. The food range, by its very nature, is constantly changing with the seasons and with September not far away the store will be looking towards more wholesome lines for winter. ‘Also, at Christmas, we have a real show-stopper dessert and all the team here are waiting to see what that is,’ says Rob. While as a national chain, M&S does not tend to buy-in local products for individual stores, Rob is content with the fact that a significant proportion of items such as chocolate, crisps, fruit, veg and salad lines are sourced in Norfolk and East Anglia. And Woodbastwick-based Woodforde's Brewery has produced a British Lager which is sold in branches of M&S nationwide. ‘Customers more and more want food from the area and we try to respond where we can,’ he adds. ‘The trend is for people to be more interested in where their food comes from and what it has got in it. We are increasingly being asked for gluten-free products and vegan lines with people having greater awareness of food. ‘But at the same time, many of the old favourites from when I joined 16 years ago are still as popular as ever such as our ready meals, our lasagne and pies.’ As for future plans, Rob explains that M&S is always looking to expand the range. ‘This summer we had a new barbecue range and summer groceries and would expect to see new ranges come through as the year goes on. Every year we bring out what I think are some of the best products out there.’ The Market Place café, with pizzas, salads and a rotisserie, is a new concept, which Rob says is going well, and the Norwich branch is one of only five stores trialling hot chicken for sale in the food hall. Married to Felicity for nine years, who he met in store in Norwich, they have two daughters Elsa (seven) and Thea (five) and live at Hainford, near Norwich, with three chickens, two guinea pigs and a cock-a-poo dog. ‘I love country life; gardening and growing my own produce and family days out and Norfolk is set up for that. In Norfolk you are also spoilt for choice when eating out but my wife is a fantastic cook and does a lot of cooking, though I do the barbecuing.’ Man-to-man, I ask: ‘gas or charcoal?’ Rob frowns at the phrase gas barbecue - we are kindred spirits over charcoal. He continues: ‘We love The Broads, the beaches and the girls like the Dinosaur Park at the moment, and they have both started cycling so we do that too.’ He acknowledges the changing trends in shopping in general, and the store is seeing it with food.

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‘There is more online shopping with food - wine and flowers are popular - but a lot of people are still shopping in store. ‘Because we are a retailer that brings out so many new products, people want to come into the store to see them. We also do tastings; that demonstrates a bit of theatre to the food hall and has resonated really well with customers. They also want to hear the story behind the product.’ In the M&S food hall in recent weeks, staff have been highlighting their own personal favourite lines, wearing a ‘Your M&S - My Favourite’ badge with their choice item of food on it. Rob went for the Triple Chocolate Crunch cereal but has been impressed and surprised by what other staff have been selecting. ‘It has been very popular with staff and is proving so with customers as well,’ he tells me. ‘I made a pledge to try every one of their items - that’s 120 staff and 120 choices!’ And he has discovered some products he hadn’t tried before, including Cheddar cheese with seaweed!

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"We are so lucky to be right on the coast for

Who are you and where do you work? My name is Emma Boubaker. I currently own an outside catering business called Bayfield Catering, and also am head chef at Cley Windmill on the beautiful North Norfolk coast.

fresh fish, crabs and lobsters "

How long have you been there? My business is now coming up to its fifth year and I've been working for eight years at the Windmill’s restaurant in Cley-next-the-Sea.

Where were you before? I was head chef for Chris Coubrough at The King’s Head in Letheringsett, near Holt. Where did you train? I trained at City College Norwich for three years. Who has inspired you? I've been really fortunate in working with some really great chefs. I first left college and trained

MY LIFE ON A PLATE

Emma Boubaker is one very busy woman, what with running her own outside catering business, being head chef at Cley Windmill and being surrounded by horses, dogs and sheep! VISIT

www.bayfieldcatering.co.uk under Galton Blackiston at Morston Hall which was amazing and taught me so much straight out of college. I also have lots to thank Sue Catt and Daniel Rees for, when they owned The White Horse in Blakeney - Sue taught me everything in the pub kitchens and we had the best times. Chef Ben Handley is amazing - I worked for his dad at the Morston Anchor - he is such a nice guy and really grafts hard! And obviously Chris Coubrough who taught me to work so hard for what I wanted, hence why I am now doing my business of outside catering (I learnt most of it from his amazing, dedicated head chef Nikki


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Merchant at Wells). I truly admired Chris's work and business ethic and he taught me that everything is possible. He was tough on me but it paid off and I thank him for that and miss my days with the Flying Kiwi team.

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What is your favourite ingredient? It has to be anything local, either from the sea or our local farmers. Everything I get is usually from within a 5-10 mile radius. We are so lucky to be right on the coast for fresh fish, crabs and lobsters, along with the best beef from Paul Graves in Briston. And I’m lucky enough to get lamb from my brother Jason's own flock of sheep. Got a favourite gadget? No gadgets – I’m really not into them or anything fussy or fancy - just a good knowledge of food and a pair of hands and mind to be creative. What is your signature dish at this time of year? I don't really have a signature dish but for now I would say local sea bass or lamb, Blakeney samphire when available, an abundance of shellfish, and strawberries from Desmond at Wiveton Hall Farm.

What would you be doing if you were not a chef? I used to have a smallholding a few years ago and I just love being with animals – they give me so much peace. So I’d probably do something like that or anything equestrian as I have a few horses.

What do you like doing when you're not cooking? I don't have a lot of spare time as I’m full time at the Windmill and also run the outside catering business on days off, which is great - I am lucky to do both. I have horses, dogs and sheep, so anything involving messing about with them; walking at Holkham with the dog and travelling with my husband.

What's your foodie prediction for the year ahead? I think people’s diets are going more towards healthier, adaptable life styles. There are more allergies and dietary requirements than I have ever known; now it becomes the norm to have vegetarian, vegan, gluten and dairy free dishes on our menus rather than it being a surprise, as it used to be. We try to accommodate and please everyone as much as we can, and I can only see it progressing as people’s diets and nutrition change.

Where do you like to eat out in the region? My favourite place is The Crown at Wells, or else I like to eat fish and chips whilst sitting on the quay. I also like Wiveton Café - their salads are always good.

RECIPE OVERLEAF

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PAN-FRIED NORFOLK LAMB RACK

SERVES TWO

with Roasted Sweet and Spicy Potato Purée, Local Beets, Buttered Spinach and Watercress Salad INGREDIENTS For the lamb 2 cloves of garlic; 2 sprigs of rosemary; 2tbsp of olive oil; 2 x 3 bone lamb racks For the potatoes 1 large or 2 small sweet potatoes; 40g of butter; 1 red chilli

For the roasted beetroot 2 large beetroots; Pomace oil/sesame oil; salt and pepper For the spinach 200g of spinach; 30g of butter; a pinch of nutmeg; salt and pepper; watercress, to dress the plate

METHOD For the marinade/lamb Finely chop the garlic before adding it to the bowl, along with the rosemary and oil. Give it a good mix round and then add the lamb racks, cover and leave to marinate 4-6 hours or overnight For the sweet potato purée I like to bake my sweet potatoes first preheat the oven to 180ºC. Scrub and pat dry the potatoes and rub in a little oil with a pinch of sea salt and black pepper. Roast on a baking tray for about 45 minutes or until soft. Allow the potatoes to cool a little and then peel off the skin, removing all of the skin. Place in a food processor with the chopped chilli and blitz with a tsp of butter For the beetroot Boil up the beetroots until they are cooked through or until your knife can go through them with ease, drain and allow to cool then

peel. Slice the beetroot into small cubes, cover with oil and season. Place them on a baking tray and roast through the oven for 10 mins at 190ºC For the lamb Preheat the oven to 200ºC. Pan-fry the lamb racks on the highest heat until golden in colour and make sure all sides are equally seared, turning when needed. Place the lamb in the oven for 10 minutes or longer if you like it well done. Bring out of the oven and rest for a good 5 minutes before slicing and serving For the spinach Melt the butter in a large frying pan, place the spinach in the pan over a medium heat for only a few minutes. Once wilted, grate in the nutmeg and add a little seasoning and serve straight away To serve Plate all your ingredients and garnish with fresh watercress and a drizzle of oil to dress the leaves


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Free from recipe writer Sara Matthews has a soup, a salad and a sweet treat for us this summer

RECIPES FOR ALL SARA MATTHEWS is a qualified trainer, food consultant, recipe developer and food writer

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Sara By Nature -

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Lavender & Chocolate Macarons This is a tricky recipe but worth the effort! INGREDIENTS 250ml of aquafaba - the liquid from the can of chickpeas; 1/8tsp of cream of tartar; a pinch of salt; 150g of ground almonds; 130g of icing sugar; 110g of golden caster sugar; 2tsp of lavender flowers, finely chopped

M A K ES 25-30

tartar - this helps stabilise the meringue. Keep whisking until it resembles whisked egg whites. You want it to form firm peaks. As you continue to whisk, gradually add the caster sugar. Keep whisking until it is thick, glossy and has stiff peaks. Add 1/3 of your almond and sugar mixture to your glossy meringue and gently fold in. Once incorporated, add another 1/3 then repeat with the remaining almond mix. This is a crucial stage that needs to be right or it can cause problems. The mixture must not be too thick, or your macarons may crack or be hollow, grainy and sometimes lumpy. If the mixture is too runny, they will not set, which means they will be chewy and sticky, and they may not rise. Gently fold in your lavender. Fill a piping bag with your mixture. Pipe the mixture into small blobs - they will spread a little and the nipple should disappear slowly. Once piped, bang your tray on the worksurface a few times. This removes the air bubbles. You now need to leave them to set. They will dry and go matt. This can take anything from 30 minutes to an hour depending on the humidity of your kitchen. As soon as they are set, place your macarons in the oven. You should be able to touch them without the mixture sticking to your fingers. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Do not open the door during baking. Once the time is up, turn off the oven and leave them there for a further 15 minutes with the door shut. Then open the door slightly and leave them in the oven to dry out for another 30 minutes. To make the filling, place all the ingredients and 1tbsp of the water into a food processor and blend on high until a very smooth paste has formed. You may need to add a tablespoon or two more of water to loosen up the mixture, so it is thin enough to pipe but thick enough to hold its form when piped. Sandwich two macaron biscuits together with the chocolate mixture. Serve with a well-earned cup of tea

For the filling 1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed; 1-2tsp of maple syrup depending on your sweet tooth; 3tbsp of raw cacao - you can use cocoa powder; 1tsp of fresh lavender, finely chopped; 1-4 tbsp of water METHOD First, you must reduce the aquafaba to a thicker consistency for the macaron to work properly. It also works better if it is aged, just like when making with eggs, many chefs use eggs that have been separated and left in the fridge for 24 hours. The principle is the same with the aquafaba. In a saucepan bring your aquafaba to a boil then turn down to simmer. Allow it to simmer away until it has reduced to 120g. I have a glass jug on some scales and pour it in and out to check a few times. Once you have reduced it to 120g, decant, allow it to cool, then refrigerate overnight. Pre-heat your oven to 120°C. Line a couple of baking sheets with parchment or a silicone macaron mat. In a large bowl, sieve the icing sugar and ground almonds, making sure there are no lumps. Set aside. In a stand mixer, whisk the aquafaba on high with a pinch of salt and your cream of

In this dish I use edamame bean noodles which are now readily available in many stores but you can use any fine gluten free pasta noodles or rice noodles INGREDIENTS 180g of edamame bean noodles; 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped; 3 medium white onions, finely chopped; 1 litre of vegetable stock; 1 large head of broccoli, stalk removed and broken into florets; juice and zest of 2 limes (save half the lime zest to garnish); 100g of fresh basil; 2tbsp of dried nutritional yeast; salt and pepper to taste; 1tbsp of pine nuts; a pinch of dried chilli flakes to serve

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METHOD Fill a medium saucepan with water, bring to the boil and cook your pasta according to the packet instructions. Drain, cover and set to one side. In a large saucepan, add a tbsp of your vegetable stock and, on a medium heat, sautĂŠ the onions and garlic. As the water disappears, add more, a tbsp at a time, so they cook without sticking to the pan. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften. Add the rest of the stock, bring to the boil, add

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the broccoli, then turn down the heat and simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the basil, lime juice and half the zest and nutritional yeast then stir to combine. Leave to stand for 2-3 minutes. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend until you have a smooth soup. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Portion out the noodles into 4 bowls and top with the soup. Garnish with pine nuts, the remaining zest and a sprinkling of dried chilli flakes. Serve immediately

[Serves 4

ANOTHER RECIPE OVERLEAF

Broccoli & Basil Pesto Soup with Noodles


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Sara By Nature -

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4-6

GREEK SALAD

SERVES

us bulo A fa , colourful dish for hig h s u mm er

INGREDIENTS Salad 1 large cucumber, chopped; 250g of tomatoes, chopped; 1 green pepper, chopped; 1 red onion, finely sliced; 200g of vegan feta; 80g of kalamata olives, sliced or halved Dressing 1tbsp of olive oil; 2tbsp of red wine vinegar; 1 garlic clove, crushed; 2tsp of dried oregano; a pinch of Himalayan salt or sea salt Feta 250g of firm/extra firm tofu; 60ml of freshly squeezed lemon juice; 125ml of water; 125ml of apple cider vinegar; 1tbsp of dried oregano; a pinch of salt (optional)

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METHOD To start you need to make the feta. It is an easy cheese to make and has a tangy fresh flavour. The longer you leave it, the more flavoursome it will get, so allow it to marinate for at least a day, preferably two, to get the maximum flavour. Press your tofu to get out as much of the liquid as possible. If you do not have a tofu press, place your tofu on a piece of kitchen roll

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on a tea towel. On top of your tofu place kitchen roll, a small chopping board and something with weight, like a book or a can of beans. Once the tofu has been pressed, cut it into cubes and place to one side. To make the marinade, mix the remaining ingredients in a bowl, add the cubed tofu, cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. This cheese lasts 3-4 days in the fridge. To finish the salad, chop the ingredients as stated and place in a bowl along with the tofu. To make the dressing, whisk all the ingredients together in a jug or jar. Pour over and toss the salad to coat. Serve as a side or a main


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VISIT

WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LEMONS

www.purpleplumcatering.co.uk

Our vegan writer Julia Martin just can’t get enough of preserved

lemonS

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JULIA Martin

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NEVER WANTING to stray too far from Arabia which has inspired and driven me in my travels and food tastes, I thought I would share with you my love of preserved lemons. They are not easy to buy, but they (like many other things: hello dukkah, harissa, chawanmushi, sumac) captivated me from afar. So I made my own. And now I can’t imagine my kitchen without them. If you are unfamiliar with them, a good place to start is popping them in dishes where you might usually use capers or chopped olives. Or any instance that would benefit from salt and citrus. Which is almost everything that I want to make or eat! A preserved lemon aioli? That sounds like a good idea. In a dressing? Yes please. Over roasted cauliflower with a spatter of homemade tahini and preserved lemon sauce? It came to the table straight out of the oven, glistening, golden brown and slathered with a preserved lemon sauce that had a hint of tahini - a perfect match for the cauliflower’s subtle, slightly sweet flavour. So much cauliflower on a plate makes a dramatic presentation and a change from the usual roasted florets. What seemed like a lot disappeared quite quickly - I can vouch for that. A topping for soup? Also a great idea. And they make an unexpected and wonderful garnish for cocktails and mocktails, a hybrid of the olive and the twist. And personally (as a lover of salt), I can eat them by themselves. But be warned, a little goes a long way. They take about two seconds to make, and are gorgeous last minute gifts you can probably throw together with things you have to hand. Just make sure you remind the recipient (if you make them last minute) to let them sit around for at least a month before diving in. After a month, I keep mine in the fridge, but, traditionally, they are kept in the larder where you can watch them change colour as the preserving takes a deeper and deeper flavour each month. I spend a lot of time just experimenting adding more, then less. And this is the kind of cooking I love as each time, something new will be created - no two attempts will be exactly the same. I have experimented with different spices but my go to combination tends to be cinnamon sticks, juniper berries, bay leaf, pink peppercorns, cloves, coriander and fennel seeds. You can play with the combinations or you can also make them with no spices at all, and that's just great, too.


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SALAD FEASTS

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These 65 simple and stress-free recipes turn the humble salad into an everyday feast, with handy substitutions available throughout and an emphasis on the power of contrast, crunch and texture. From a quick, 10-minute Radicchio, Stilton and Pear salad, to the slow cooked Anchovy Roast Peppers with Smoky Tomato Beans, each recipe provides alternative substitute ingredients that are designed to make your salad-making flexible and easy, no matter the season. It includes feasting menus to elevate your salads into occasion-worthy spreads, as well as a basic recipe formula to guide you.

Nadiya's new BBC2 TV series follows her meeting and taking inspiration from home cooks around the UK as well as cooking from her own kitchen. The 100 recipes include Piccalilli Macaroni Cheese, Sunday Lunch with a Difference, Baked Pear and Marzipan Crumble and Purple Velvet Cake. Nadiya shares the food she loves to cook and eat with her family and friends, offering fast, easy and delicious new recipes for every kind of occasion and day.

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CHEF 'S WORLD -

C O L U M N

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THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT - RIGHT?

ANDREW JONES

Andrew Jones of Farmyard in Norwich and The Dial House in Reepham is tickled by one publican’s robust TripAdvisor responses

VISIT

www.farmyardrestaurant.com AND www.thedialhouse.org.uk

MY WIFE HANNAH and I were giggling away to ourselves in bed last month. The person who runs the Earle Arms pub in Heydon was to blame for this. You’ve got to take your hat off to the owner of a venue who feels passionate, and brave enough, to say things like: ‘Believe me, the experience of meeting you was far worse for us and your ridiculous comments aren’t worth bothering about. You are obviously nuts,’ to a potentially returning customer. It’s almost worth going there to find any small fault just to send them a review and provoke some kind of brilliantly cutting response so that you get to print it out and frame it. They are beautifully witty and for anyone with an hour on their hands, I would strongly advise that you check out these wonderfully crafted responses! As a fellow restaurateur I sort of get their angst. A bad TripAdvisor entry keeps you up at night - like a passive aggressive, late night email from your boss or a ‘disappointed’ text from someone you love. You tell yourself that you can’t please everyone, it doesn’t matter - but, of course, it does. None of us went into this to provide ‘okay’ food and service. We don’t all want stars but we do want to shine. When we at Farmyard or The Dial House get a review that isn’t perfect we do try to take an honest look at what we might be doing wrong, but I can’t help but feel that TripAdvisor can also be used as a tool to prod at someone you don’t like much. It’s pretty unregulated and at times

that’s very unhelpful. Our ideal as business owners is for the customer to tell us face to face what they didn’t like so that we can fix it and make their evening better. That rarely happens these days. Trip Advisor is so much more cosy, freeing and confidential. I’ve been out for dinner before myself and skulked off, moaning in secret. When asked if it was all fine for us, we say: ‘Yes yes, lovely,’ to their faces wusses. So perhaps we should praise the brave ones who stand up and tell the truth, in whatever form they see fit. We’ve decided not to reply to reviews on TripAdvisor good or bad, and I’m relieved to say most are pretty good for us at Farmyard these days and as The Dial House is in its infancy in terms of the culinary journey we are about to embark on, reviews will reflect this. It doesn’t mean we don’t hear them, worry about them and action anything we hear more than once. And we do appreciate the feedback, good or bad. We certainly wouldn’t move forward without it. But over a glass of wine, I’d also challenge anyone not to be impressed by the courage and honesty of whoever takes the time and wit to write back to the pub goers of Heydon. You made our Sunday and we’ll be back soon! • You can also keep upto-date with Andrew via his monthly newsletter - Farmyard Confidential subscribe online

ULOUS

"YOUR RIDIC N 't WORtH ARE S t N E M M O C YOU ARE . T U O B A BOtHERINOUGSLY NUtS " OBVI

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INGREDIENTS 200g of free-range egg whites; 400g of caster sugar; 1tsp of rose water; pink food colouring (optional)

MAGIC UP MERINGUES LUCY BARTLETT RACES INTO SUMMER WITH HER GLORIOUS MERINGUES, TEAMED, OF COURSE, WITH OODLES OF STRAWBERRIES

ROSEWAtER MERINGUES ( M A K ES 1 0 L A RG E OR 24 M E DI U M M E RI NG U ES)

I LOVE MERINGUES and this recipe is my favourite; the stability of the mixture that you get from the hot sugar means you can make enormous pillowy meringues or teeny tiny meringues depending on what you need. Weighing the egg whites is well worth the effort – simply double the amount of sugar to the weight of egg whites

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METHOD 1. Set the oven to maximum. Spread the caster sugar evenly across a large roasting pan lined with baking parchment. Heat for 8 minutes or until the sugar is very hot - it should be starting to melt at the edges 2. While the sugar is heating, start whisking the egg whites on a high speed until they begin to froth 3. Using the baking parchment as a funnel, very carefully pour the hot sugar slowly on to the whisking whites. Once the sugar has been combined, add the rosewater and pink food colouring (if using) and whisk on a high speed for 8-10 minutes or until the meringue is cold. It should be very thick looking 4. Turn the oven down to 110°C 5. Line 1 or 2 baking trays with baking parchment 6. Use a spoon to scoop dollops of meringue onto the trays – they will almost double in size so give them plenty of room. I make these as either tea time size using a dessert spoon, or dessert size using a serving spoon 7. Cook for about 2 hours for large meringues and 90 minutes for medium meringues. Check they are done by lifting them from the tray and gently prodding to see if the underside is completely firm. Leave to cool 8. Serve with strawberries and lots of whipped cream


VISIT

www.archersbutchers.com

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SCOTT BUNN

JAMIE ARCHER


S H O P

BEST OF THE BUNCH Archer’s Butchers from Norwich has

been named Britain’s Best Butcher’s Shop - Sarah Hardy finds out why THOSE OF YOU who know Archer’s Butchers in Norwich will not be that surprised that they have scooped the top prize in a national competition. The shop, always busy and with a real community feel to it, covers all bases. From the takeaway outlet with its glorious hot pork baguettes (and more!) to the shop proper with its huge meat selection, ready meals and deli offerings, including, when in season, fresh asparagus, it is a bit of a Mecca for food lovers. It has just won the title of Britain’s Best Butcher’s Shop 2018 at the Meat Management Industry Awards. The awards recognise and reward standout people, products, organisations and companies in the UK meat industry; celebrating the best the sector has to offer: from sausages to machinery suppliers. The category is open to independent retail butchers, who can nominate themselves or be nominated by a Meat Management Magazine reader. Secret visits to shops then take place and finalists receive visits from expert judges before a final decision is made. Located on Plumstead Road, the business is owned by Jamie Archer, who is the grandson of John Archer who started it up on Norwich Market in 1929, and his wife, Lucy. ‘I couldn’t do it without Lucy,’ says Jamie. ‘She looks after all the book work.’ While there is a diverse range of products on offer, meat, says Jamie, is centre stage and he is passionate about provenance. His beef comes from William Almey, of Tavistock Farm in Antingham; all pork is

F R O N T

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"later this summer, we’ll be launching our new website, with around 200 products " from Tim Allen at South Creake; lamb is from Andrew Clarke of Bull Farm in Costessey and free-range chicken is from Martin’s Farm in Hindolveston. He explains: ‘Whilst we’ve diversified over the years and built a brand that I’m really proud of, the core of the business hasn’t changed; it’s built on relationships with farmers. We source each meat from one farm, meaning we can be 100 per cent confident of animal welfare, quality and sustainability.’ He is delighted with his award, which was presented at a rather posh ceremony in Birmingham, complete with a Champagne reception, saying: ‘Judges have a long check-list - they look at every element of the business including our external signage and branding, the skill level of our staff, the variety of products we offer, our customer service and, of course, the quality of our meat. It’s a very thorough process.’ The business employs 22 staff including his dad, Jim, and sister, Tracey, who works in the takeaway. ‘We have our butchery tables in the shop so people can see exactly what we do - and also request a particular cut,’ Jamie adds. Having the right facilities and technology is critical to Archer’s success and sustainability. Jamie says: ‘We’ve invested more than £60,000 in our on-site kitchen where, with our chef Tom Reeves, we create our range of ready-meals such as cottage pies and macaroni cheese. ‘And later this summer, we’ll be launching our new website, with around 200 products, where customers can order online with the choice of click and collect or home delivery. Whilst many of our customers have been coming into the shop for years, it’s vital that we find new ways to make the shopping experience as easy and engaging as possible.’ He also acknowledges that people’s eating habits can and do change and that the business has to keep up with them, saying: ‘I think people are more sophisticated - they travel more, see more cookery programmes on television and are keen to try new things - we have seen flat iron steaks become popular, for example.’

What caught Sarah ’s eye: Sausage rolls and Scotch eggs; Large selection of local cheeses; Extensive range of sausages - look out for tomato and fennel; Wayland Eggs; Fruit Pig black pudding; Minted lamb steaks; Pork and apple burgers; Own cured bacon

JAMIE is a key figure in Norfolk’s foodie circles. He is part of the organising committee of the Porkstock Food and Drink Festival which takes place at The Norfolk Showground on October 13. Archer’s also offers outside catering, including ever popular hog roasts.

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STOP PRESS: Archer's scooped both titles at this year's Battle of the Bangers at the Norwich Food and Drink Festival - winning both the public vote, and the judges' choice with their sausages

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C O L U M N

ASK ROGER *

ROGER HICKMAN'S

[Serves 4

CHICKEN LIVER PARFAIT

with chicken thighs, crispy chicken skin, bacon crumb, spring onion and leek purée

QUEStION & ANSWER ROGER HICKMAN, CHEF-PROPRIETOR OF NORWICH'S HICKMAN’S RESTAURANT, SHARES HIS TOP KITCHEN TIPS AND ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS ON ALL THINGS CULINARY

W

VISIT

hat is the best cut of steak? For me it has to be ribeye. This is cut from the centre ribs, called ribeye once it is removed from the bone. Because of the relatively light work it has to do in muscle terms, it has a very even marbling of fat, which renders quickly during cooking, distributing the flavour throughout the meat, and not resulting in the large pieces of unrendered fat you can get in other cuts. That fat is important to the flavour - that’s why I

ROGER HICKMAN

www.rogerhickmansrestaurant.com

think fillet steak is over-rated: it is very tender, but not very flavoursome. I always have my ribeye cooked medium-rare; if it is too rare, the layers of fat will still run through the meat. The other advantage of ribeye is that it is not the most expensive steak, so you can enjoy it as more than a rare treat. What is the difference between a pâté, a terrine and a parfait? A pâté is the simplest of these: coarsely or finely ground meat (which may include offal) with herbs and seasonings. A terrine on the other hand can be much more complex (indeed, pâté may be one constituent part of a terrine). Named after the dish in which it is cooked, a terrine may have all sorts of layers, including vegetables, larger lumps of meat (for example pigeon breasts or pieces of ham hock), boiled eggs and even seafood. You are much more likely to eat a terrine on its own, whereas pâté is usually accompanied by bread. A parfait is much lighter than either a pâté or a terrine; this is generally from using eggs in the recipe. A parfait will always be smooth and fluffy, often through whipping. It is a lovely, light summer alternative to pâté.

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INGREDIENTS 250g of chicken livers; 200g of unsalted butter; eggs, and a further 2 egg yolks; banana shallots, finely diced; 50ml of Cognac or Madeira; chicken thighs, boned and rolled (ask your butcher to do this for you); 2 tbsp of seasoned flour; 1 egg, beaten; breadcrumbs; 2 pieces of chicken skin, approx 15cm by 2cm; 6 rashers of smoked streaky bacon; 4 spring onions, green tops removed and finely chopped; 2 leeks, finely chopped; 2 sprigs of flat leaf parsley, finely chopped METHOD Put one of the chopped shallots in a pan with the Cognac or Madeira, and slowly reduce until all the liquid has evaporated. Melt the butter into the pan, and then cool to room temperature. Meanwhile, blitz the chicken livers in a food processor, then add the eggs and egg yolks. Whip the shallot/butter mixture into the livers, and season. Put the mixture into ramekins, and cook in the oven in a bain-marie at 160°C for 20 minutes, by which time the mixture should be set like a brulée. Remove from the oven and cool. Wrap the chicken thighs tightly in a double layer of foil, twisting the ends to form two ‘crackers’. Cook these in barely simmering water for about an hour (if you have a sous-vide, vac-pack the thighs and sous vide at 65°C for three to four hours). Allow the parcels to cool and jellify before unwrapping them, then slice into disks of approximately 1cm depth. Now you will need to pané the disks: dip them in the seasoned flour, then in the beaten egg, and finally in the breadcrumbs. Deep fry in rape seed oil at 170°C until golden. Put the bacon rashers in the oven at 180°C for 10-15 minutes, until crispy. Blitz while still hot, and then dry on a clean J cloth. Stretch the pieces of chicken skin out on some parchment paper, and cover with another sheet of paper. Place these between two oven trays so that they stay flat, and cook in the oven at 160°C for 12-15 minutes. Carefully peel away the top layer of parchment paper, remove each piece of skin and place it on a clean J cloth to absorb any excess fat. To make the purée, sweat the remaining shallot in oil and butter until it is transparent, but not coloured. Add the parsley, leeks and chopped spring onion tops, and wilt in the pan for a further two minutes. Add a little more butter if it looks too dry. Blitz in a food processor, and pass through a fine sieve. Finally, chargrill the spring onions. Sprinkle bacon crumb onto the plates, add two or three chicken thigh parcels, then two whips of parfait. Break the chicken skin into pieces and decorate the parfait. Add one spring onion onto each plate, and drizzle with the purée.

*If you have a question for Roger, send it to sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk


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D R I N K S

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GIN IS IN! GIN SPECIAL

NOT MUCH BEATS A G&T ON A HOT SUMMER’S DAY, SAYS SARAH HARDY, AS SHE LOOKS AT THE RISE AND RISE OF THIS AROMATIC SPIRIT

M

Y FIRST MEMORY of gin is back in the 1960s when my mother and her friends used to enjoy a ‘Gordon’s’, with masses of tonic, a thick wedge of lemon and stacks of ice. Much laughter usually followed! Few of us could have predicted its incredible resurgence in the last couple of years, with the number of gins being produced almost too much to keep up with. Just as with whisky, there are so many different variations, depending on the botanicals used, and it is simply a case of trial and error; in other words, having a good go and deciding what you like. Juniper berries are essential but you might find coriander, lavender, and more. Gin bars, gin cocktails and gin menus are now the norm as we have all become keen fans of the spirit, with the accompanying tonics becoming just as sophisticated - those Fever-Tree ones are rather yummy. You can now make your own gin, with several creators such as Adnams holding regular ‘have a go’ classes at their Westlegate store in Norwich, and you can watch the gin makers in action, with Bullards’ distillery at the Ten Bells pub in Norwich on show. The list of Norfolk-based gin makers continues to grow - we feature the new WhataHoot from West Norfolk in this issue - there’s a new one from Fakenham-based Black Shuck, and the makers of Wild Knight Vodka are just releasing their first gin, Boadicea Gin. Many local chefs love to use locally-produced gin in their recipes, too, maybe marinating salmon in it, and it does give a certain something to ice cream. Here at Feast Towers, we are looking forward a summer of tasting them all - purely in the name of research, of course!

“FEW OF US COULD HAVE PREDICTED ITS INCREDIBLE RESURGENCE IN THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS “

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PETER SMITH

BULLY FOR BULLARDS

Bullards Gin, the only gin company to distil

and bottle in Norwich, is launching a new gin, getting a new still and redesigning its bottles, discovers Sarah Hardy 70


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• LOOK OUT for Bullards Gins at leading events over the summer such as the Worstead Festival on July 28 and 29, and they also hold regular tasting events in stores such as Bakers and Larners in Holt and Jarrold’s in Norwich.

• BULLARDS has just signed a three-year deal to be Norwich City Football Club’s official gin partner, serving gin in Delia’s Restaurant and Bar, various kiosks at the ground and at corporate events at the stadium

“ALL THREE GINS, tHE ORIGINAL NORWICH DRY, StRAWBERRY AND BLACK PEPPER, AND tHE NEW OLD TOM, WILL HAVE THEIR OWN DIStINCtIVELY COLOURED BOttLES “

www.bullardsspirits.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

• REGULAR TOURS and tasting sessions are held at the Ten Bells, where five boutique bedrooms, with a gin theme, are planned for 2019. See online for full details

VISIT

IF LAST YEAR was a big one for Norwich-based distiller and brewer Bullards (they won best London Dry Gin in the World 2017 with their Norwich Dry Gin), this year looks like being even bigger. For a start, head distiller Peter Smith and assistant Rory Smith have been working on a new gin since January. An Old Tom, it is due to be released in the early autumn, with Peter explaining: ‘Old Toms were very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, and sit between Dutch Genever and London Dry, drier than the former and sweeter than the latter.’ Rory continues: ‘It is sweetened with Norfolk honey, is soft and fruity, with mango, and has the subtle spices of black pepper, pink pepper, cinnamon and vanilla. We would serve it with a slice of lemon and tonic.’ I was lucky enough to sample this gin and can report that it is lovely and smooth, and definitely something you would be happy to sip as the evenings draw in. This launch ties in with a bottle redesign, which pays homage to the company’s brewing heritage and is part of a new branding strategy, using The Spirit of Norwich as a key message. All three gins, the original Norwich Dry, Strawberry and Black Pepper, and the new Old Tom, will have their own distinctively coloured bottles which should look very smart on a bar shelf or as part of your drinks collection. But their precise design and look remain under wraps - for now. Again, I’ve had a cheeky preview and yes, they are clever! To help with the production of the new gin and strong demand for the existing ones, the company is investing in a new, much larger copper still. Coming from Germany, it will quadruple the amount of gin they can produce at the distillery at the Ten Bells in Norwich’s St Benedict’s Street. Peter explains: ‘We are expanding the distillery and installing a new viewing platform, so people can have a really good look at what we are doing. And we will be able to produce a lot more gin!’

ABOUT BULLARDS


Available from Norfolkgin.co.uk and from Arthur Howell Deli

JA RR OL DS • BA KE RS & LA RN ER S • ROYS • NO RF OL K DE LI • DR OV TH OR NH AM DE LI • SA E OR CH AR DS • RE NO TC HE LS • W HI TE HO W IN E US E FA RM • TH E GR EE N GR OC ER S • GO OD IES

Available from Norfolkgin.co.uk


S T

G I L E S

G I N

VISIT

ONE NIGHT IN BANGKOK

www.stgilesgin.com

INGREDIENTS 35ml of St Giles Gin; 10ml of Cocchi Americano; 25ml of lemongrass syrup; 20ml of lemon juice; 75ml of carbonated jasmine green tea; a dash of lemon bitters METHOD Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker (apart from bitters) with ice. Shake and strain into a hi-ball glass with ice. Top with the green tea and garnish with lemongrass and a lemon twist. Dash with lemon bitters for aroma. To make the lemongrass syrup combine 300g of sugar, 300ml of water and 2 sticks of sliced lemongrass in a saucepan. Bring to the boil and reduce to simmer for 10 minutes. Strain, bottle and refrigerate. For the carbonated jasmine green tea make some incredibly strong tea (2 tea bags with 75ml boiling water) allow to cool, dilute and carbonate with soda water

[Serves 1

SALTY SEA DOG INGREDIENTS 35ml of St Giles Divers’ Edition gin; 20ml of lemon juice; 10ml of Chartreuse green; 10ml of rosemary infused agave syrup; 12.5ml of egg white; 2.5ml of salt water (1 part sea salt, 1 part water) METHOD Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake once, discard the ice and shake again. This will help generate a foam from the egg white. Double strain into a coupe glass, garnish with a sprig of rosemary and burn for the aroma

GIN SPECIAL

GETTING IN THE SPIRIT

These two recipes were created for us by Alfi Shipp from Chambers Cocktail Company in Norwich and use both our original London Dry gin and our new Divers ’ Edition gin

ST GILES GIN, BASED JUST OUTSIDE NORWICH, OFFERS US TWO VERY DIFFERENT COCKTAILS WHICH USE BOTH THEIR GINS www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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SERVES ON E


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S H U C K

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NEW FAMILY MEMBER

FAKENHAM-BASED BLACK SHUCK INTRODUCES ITS LATEST ADDITION: PASSION GIN PATRICK AND SARAH SAUNDERS started their family run business in 2012 with their award winning Black Shuck Sloe Gin. Since then, the Black Shuck range has flourished and is now recognised all over Norfolk and beyond. The arrival of the legendary Black Shuck Gin in 2015 heralded a new era for gin lovers old and new. In August 2017 Black Shuck continued to lead the way with the launch of its limited edition Blush Gin, infused with rhubarb and strawberry. The latest arrival, Black Shuck Passion Gin, is the culmination of a two-year labour of love and creativity.

On numerous occasions, members of the ever-expanding Black Shuck tasting panel were summoned to HQ to taste test an extensive selection of trials. The recipe and methods changed many times before all were in agreement that Passion Gin was ready. It goes without saying that this sophisticated gin has been distilled with an abundance of patience, precision and, of course, passion. At 43% volume, it has both strength and complexity. It is distilled with 15 botanicals, including passion fruit, grapefruit, lime flower and elderflower.

BLACK SHUCK LONG SWEET NEGRONI

VISIT

The Negroni is a bittersweet cocktail which is said to date back to 1919. The story goes that it was in the Caffe Casoni in Florence that Count Camillo Negroni asked bartender Fosco Scarselli to add gin instead of soda water to his Americano. Fosco went on to use an orange garnish in place of the lemon garnish to highlight that is was a different drink.

w w w. blackshu ckltd.co. uk

INGREDIENTS 2 measures of Black Shuck Gin; 1 measure of Sweet Vermouth; 1/2 a measure of Campari; Fever-Tree Aromatic Tonic; ice; orange wedge; fresh strawberries

THE LEGEND OF BLACK SHUCK

According to English folklore, Black Shuck, a large ghostly spirit dog with malevolent flaming red eyes, has haunted the East Anglian countryside for hundreds of years. It has been suggested that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle took inspiration from Black Shuck when writing the classic thriller, Hound of the Baskervilles. In 1901 he returned from South Africa suffering from typhoid fever. Whilst recovering, he and his companion, Bertram Fletcher Robinson, took a golfing holiday in North Norfolk. They stayed at the Links Hotel and visited nearby Cromer Hall where they would undoubtedly have heard chilling tales of the fearsome Black Shuck


GIN SPECIAL -

C H A M B E R S

C O C K T A I L

C O M P A N Y

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PINKY BLINDER

This one is fruity and bold, balanced between sweet and sour to make an incredibly easy drinking cocktail METHOD Combine all the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with cubed ice, shake once, discard the ice and shake again (this helps activate the egg white and generates a foam). Pour into a martini or coupe glass and garnish with raspberry purée, mint and fresh raspberries. For the raspberry syrup, add equal parts of raspberries, sugar and water to a saucepan, bring to the boil then blend. Strain, bottle and refrigerate. To make the soured hibiscus, combine 50g of citric acid with 50ml of boiling water and 10g of hibiscus flowers. Stir and leave to infuse for 30 minutes. Finally, strain, bottle and refrigerate

NORWICH’S NEWEST COCKTAIL BAR MIXES TWO GREAT COCKTAILS WHICH ARE PERFECT FOR SUMMER SIPPING!

CHAMBERS COCKTAIL COMPANY, 12-14 Wensum Street, Norwich

[Serves 1

A CERTAIN ROMANCE This spritz style

drink is light, refreshing and floral - ideal for warm weather evenings

oc

kta

ilco

mpany

.co.uk

INGREDIENTS 20ml of Adnams Copper House gin; 20ml of St Germain Elderflower; 15ml of Lillet Rose vermouth; 15ml of rose and sage syrup; 15ml of fresh lemon juice; Prosecco

sc

RAISE YOUR GLASS

SERVES ON E

b

er

INGREDIENTS 35ml of Boxer Gin; 35ml of raspberry syrup; 20ml of Chambord; 20ml of lemon juice; 5ml of soured hibiscus; 1 egg white

VISIT

w

a .ch ww

m

METHOD Add all ingredients apart from Prosecco to a cocktail shaker with cubed ice, shake and strain into a wine glass over fresh ice. Top with Prosecco and garnish with a big sprig of sage, a twist of lemon and a few rose buds. For the rose and sage syrup, add 200g of sugar, 150ml of water, 50ml of rose water and 50g of fresh sage to a saucepan, bring to the boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar and simmer for 5 minutes. Strain, bottle and refrigerate

CHAMBERS COCKTAIL COMPANY opens daily from 3pm until late, offering bespoke cocktails, a great selection of craft beer both on draft and in cans, as well as a wide selection of spirits and wine. There is also an Early Bird Special between 5-7pm Monday to Thursday, with 20 percent off house spirits, wines and beers, as well as selected cocktails at £6 each


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W I N E

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GOING UNDERGROUND ANDY NEWMAN EXTOLS THE VIRTUE OF SUBTERRANEAN STORAGE FOR YOUR WINE

78


THREE WINES ANDY HAS ENJOYED tHIS MONtH: Franciacorta Extra Brut, Sullali your fingertips simply encourages you I WAS RECENTLY SHOWN round a new (Harper Wells, £22.49) to open more bottles. Who would have showhouse, and it brought home to me Franciacorta is Italy’s answer to Champagne, thought? just how far house-building has come in made from the same grapes, and in the However, despite the best efforts of recent years. This was no ‘identikit box’: traditional bottle-fermented method. This my family and friends (yes, OK, and there was real design flair here; it was one is a Blanc de Blancs, made from 100% me) to create empty spaces in my wine so energy-efficient that you wouldn’t Chardonnay. It has a very fine mousse, with racks, building up a cellar has been a notice the utility bills; and it even had a toasty yeast on the nose and a citrus/apple fascinating and rewarding experience. dining room, something which is sadly flavour on the palate. Not complex, but a The ability to buy wines while they are becoming an endangered species in good alternative to day-to-day Champagne. young and still relatively cheap, waiting modern homes. Valpolicella Ripasso Classico Superiore La for that perfect drinking window, and However, there is one reason why I Casetta, Domini Veneti (Majestic, £14.99 the knowledge that by doing this I am wouldn’t move to such a house. There when bought as part of a mixed case of six) giving myself access to bottles which are was one feature it didn’t have, and this is Some of the complexity of Amarone without fully mature and which would otherwise something that as a wine-lover, once you the hefty price tag and the massive alcohol be beyond my means, is very satisfying. have lived in a home with one, becomes – that is what makes Valpolicella Ripasso Of course, having a real cellar in your a must-have feature: a cellar. one of my favourite wines. With the pomace house helps. But if you don’t have an My own home was built in 1900, in of leftover skins from Amarone and Recioto underground space, don’t worry. There an era when refrigeration was still very wines added to the mix, it combines the are other solutions for creating that much something for the moneyed power and class of those wines with the perfect storage space. classes, so more homes in those days bright fruit of a classic Valpolicella. This one has a lovely balance of cherry, spice and The simplest way is to find a quiet were built with an underground space, pepper, and is a bargain at this price. cupboard in a north-facing spare where semi-perishable foodstuffs could bedroom, and turn off the radiator. This be stored in a cool, dark place which Shawsgate Pandora 2016 will work well for storage of wines for a would extend their shelf-life. (East of England Co-op, £7.99) year or two, but it’s not the ideal solution Having bought a house with a cellar, With the deluge of Bacchus and sparkling for those which require longer-term I took it as my duty to put it to good wines coming from English vineyards, it’s keeping. use. This was the excuse I needed (OK, easy to forget how well this country does If you are serious about keeping your I didn’t really need an excuse, but you easy-drinking, off-dry wines. This is an precious bottles in tip-top condition, know what I mean) to start to build up excellent example: made from Muller-Thurgau you will need to invest some serious a collection of wine which could sleep and Sylvaner grapes, it is full of ripe fruit, with grapefruit and melon to the fore. At just cash. A stand-alone wine cabinet is the undisturbed beneath the floor until it 10.5% abv, it’s the perfect patio wine. simplest answer, but it doesn’t come got to peak maturity. cheap. A 180-bottle capacity cabinet A few hundred bottles, readily from market leader Eurocave is going to cost you upwards accessible behind the cellar door, would mean I could always of £2000. find the exact bottle I needed to accompany dinner without That may sound a lot, but think of it this way: if you fill it having to venture outside the front door. with first-growths which are going to need 10 years or more You need to know that ageing wines require three things. to come to maturity, it’s actually only about £1 per bottle The first is dryness, so sealing the cellar walls and installing a per year. And that’s a great deal cheaper than the alternative, dehumidifier was a must. The second is a stable temperature, which is cellaring your wine in someone else’s warehouse, ideally around 11 degrees, but stability is the key thing with the concomitant risks of theft, insolvency and fraud. here – and that is why cellars are the ideal place to keep The other alternative is to create your own cellar, by wine, because they are largely immune from temperature digging downwards. The most efficient way of doing this variation. is the spiral cellar, a solid concrete cylinder sunk into the So, two boxes ticked. Unfortunately, the third thing you ground, with a trapdoor for easy access. need is patience, coupled with immense willpower, and Be warned, though, this solution does not come cheap: I’m afraid that has been the biggest challenge. Every time Spiral Cellars UK charge anything between £14,320 and I descend those stone steps into my subterranean treasure £68,750 for one of these, depending on what capacity you house, those wonderful sleeping bottles call out to me. are after, and how swish you want it to look. It turns out that having a huge ready supply of wine at

Home of award winning wine www.eastofengland.coop/store-finder

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DANIEL MATTHAMS

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GRIND YOUR OWN

Daniel Matthams of Green Farm Coffee tells us how to keep coffee as fresh as possible

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www.greenfarmcoffee.co.uk AS COFFEE BEANS are an organic, agricultural product they have a life-span. Whilst green, unroasted coffee beans can last a significant amount of time when stored in the correct conditions without declining in quality, roasted coffee is quite different. When coffee is roasted, the beans are full of CO2 due to reactions that occur during the roasting process. This CO2 helps to keep coffee fresh. However, CO2 quickly starts to leak from the coffee after roasting, exposing the volatile flavour compounds which leads to staling.

After roasting, coffee beans are often left to rest to allow some of the CO2 to escape, and the flavours within the bean to balance. The normal so called ‘degassing period’ is usually between three to seven days. ‘Degassing’ is particularly important if you are using the coffee to make espresso, as espressos made with coffee which is too fresh will have a very large crema, resulting in a different texture and flavoured coffee. After coffee is roasted it usually peaks in flavour between seven to 12 days. However, after two weeks you will start to notice a deterioration in aroma and flavour. This will be minimal initially but will accelerate as the coffee gets older. Once the coffee bean has been ground the staling process rapidly increases. This is due to a greater surface area of the coffee bean being exposed to the three main external elements that cause deterioration: • Sunlight/UV light • Moisture/Humidity • Oxygen Therefore I would always advise, if possible, to have your own grinder and try to grind your coffee fresh each time. Storing coffee in the right conditions can help slow down the staling process, maintaining more flavour and aroma for longer.

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Here are a few quick tips to help keep your coffee as fresh as possible: • First, always try to store coffee in an airtight bag or container. This will help to prevent the oxygen from causing the coffee to deteriorate. Furthermore, ensure the coffee is kept in a dark cool place, as light will rapidly increase the staling of coffee, especially sun and UV light. • I would not recommend putting coffee in the refrigerator due to possible cross contamination of aromas from other items, for example, you wouldn’t want an onion flavoured coffee! Refrigeration can also affect the moisture content within a bean which will impact upon flavour. • A final tip is to make sure you keep your coffee dry. Avoid storing coffee in humid or moist places as this will also increase the staling rate of the coffee. Whenever possible, keep your coffee stored in the full bean form and only grind when you need it. If you do buy ground coffee, try to purchase a resealable bag or one that has been flushed with nitrogen, as this will remove any oxygen from the bag. At Green Farm we sell a range of different coffee beans as well as resealable, and nitrogen packets of ground coffee, so be sure to check out our website for more information.


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picnic food without going over the top. It is all disposable so there is no rubbish to leave behind and no broken glass left either. Apart from use in picnics, these little bottles are ideal for gifts or, if you run a hotel/guest house, then put a couple in the room for guests as a welcome present. On a recent trip on the train from London to Norwich, I had a couple left in my overnight bag and so happily drank a bottle on the way home. The train company was not happy but the wine was far superior to what they have to offer! All the wine is made from local Portuguese grapes and are all very drinkable. They cost £14 per pack from Tastebuds Wines, and I am the only importer of this product. Just to finish I thought I would mention another style of Champagne I import from the House of Dumenil; The Blanc de Blancs. This is 100 per cent Chardonnay grape and contains 50 per cent of reserve wine and is kept in the cellars for three years. Small regular bubbles race up the flute, which leaves a smooth persistent mousse, and look for aromas of light citrus fruits with a little jasmine and honey. A taste of fruit with almonds and vanilla is enhanced by little toast flavours and there is a delicate acidity. It is quite perfect as a summer aperitif – a picnic perhaps? Tastebuds is the UK agent for Dumenil and at £32.80 a bottle, it is a bargain for a Premier Cru Champagne.

TRADITIONALLY our holiday season is when we can enjoy warm sunny days and generally, if we can, outdoor living! I am going to start by writing about the presentation and packaging of wine for outdoor drinking. And the food? The infamous picnic! Picnics can contain all types of food, depending on who is eating it and who is preparing it. Often, for speed, it is sandwiches wrapped in foil, containers of salads and the usual 'nibbles', all put into a chiller bag or box. However, if you are going to a concert or similar then the hamper may come into play. Whatever, it needs to be well prepared and transported with care. Wine is important on these occasions but glass can be dangerous and so, regrettably, we need to turn to plastic. Good quality plastic glasses are acceptable as I would not take my Premier Cru Bordeaux wine on a picnic, rather something a little more modest. On my trip to Portugal last year, one of the producers presented me with what they called ‘The Wine Break’. This is a little cardboard holder in which they had put two plastic glasses with two plastic, screw top bottles of wine. Red, white or rosé are available. The quantity in each bottle is 187ml, just a little over a glass of wine, and just perfect for outdoor drinking. Now, if you are driving, then you should not drink but everyone else can and it is just sufficient to accompany your

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ADD

SUNSHINE

OUR WINE EXPERT STEVE HEARNDEN IS HEADING OUTSIDE WITH HIS WINE SUGGESTIONS FOR THE SUMMER MONTHS

TASTEBUDS WINES, Norwich Road, Strumpshaw, opens by appointment. Visit www.tastebudswines.co.uk

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DIET REMAINS AT THE HEART OF HEALTH AND HAPPINESS. ABLE COMMUNITY CARE ALLOWS YOU TO KEEP YOUR PASSION FOR GREAT FOOD AND DRINK Having a live-in carer enables people to choose their food, what they would like to eat, how they would like it prepared and cooked, and this helps them maintain their independence and choice. Able Community Care provides live-in carers who will support their food choices, shopping to their wishes and preparing their food as they request. A live-in care service also enables people to venture outside of their home, to visit that café or restaurant or to enjoy a leisurely drink at their local. Live-in carers have the time to carry out a person’s wishes and Able Community Care has been providing these food and meal choices since 1980.

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IF AN OLDER PERSON is asked what they would like for dinner, many would ask for shepherd’s pie or, if it were a Sunday, then roast beef and Yorkshire puddings. If it is a piece of cake with an afternoon cup of tea, then a slice of Swiss Roll will be high on the wish list. Being cared for by relatives and friends will probably ensure that personal preferences are catered for, but when care is provided by employed care staff who have half an hour to prepare lunch or supper, then personal preferences will almost certainly be abandoned due to lack of time, and other care aspects taking priority. Meals will be compromises. A carer coming in to help an older person get up and dressed and who will return in the evening to reverse the process may leave a sandwich in cling film for lunch, a mug of soup to put in the microwave and a cold drink and biscuits nearby. Make do food, cereals, frozen meals in tin trays, microwaveable dishes in plastic trays, ham in just about everything - these are the staple options for many people who are being cared for. For those of us not needing care, would we be happy with such a diet? Food is one of the pleasures in life. Fresh food, ‘what I fancy to eat’ food, the pleasurable expectation of the food chosen to eat, the accompanying sides, the relishes and the sight of the prepared dish, all add to the experience. People who need care may have lost some of their mobility and thus the opportunity to spend a few hours away from their home in the same way as an able-bodied person can. These lost opportunities include going to lunch in a nearby restaurant, having a drink in a local pub or just enjoying a coffee and a slice of cake in a local café.

www.ablecommunitycare.com

FOR A BROCHURE, call Norwich-based Able Community Care on 01603 764567

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ELAINE REILLY

SMALL BUSINESS OWNER ELAINE REILLY OF MUSTARD COFFEE BAR IS ROLLING UP HER SLEEVES FOR A BUSY SUMMER SEASON

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teas to make some exciting iced teas. Despite no Norwich Lanes fair this year, we do still have our favourite event to look forward to: Norwich Pride on July 28. If you haven’t joined us in the city for it you really should as it brings the whole community together under the slogan #loveislove and promotes acceptance and tolerance, something we should all try and live by. The police force do a great job keeping the parade moving and always join in with the fun. Summer starts to draw to a close with the Norwich Duck Race, an event that is so much fun but epitomises the saying ‘Normal for Norfolk’. It’s a real family event and brings the August bank holiday to a (hopefully) sunny close! The summer also sees us welcoming lots of visitors to the city. As we are situated in the original Colman’s mustard shop, in one of the city’s oldest alleys, we do feel it’s important to pass on the area’s heritage to people and there are days when I feel more like ww a tourist guide than a coffee bar w. m us owner. I have also become an ta expert on everything from car parks to peregrines! Come and test me! • Mustard Coffee Bar, Bridewell Alley, Norwich, opens Tuesday to Saturday, 8am-5pm

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SUMMER IS HERE and, for any small business, it is all about seizing the moment, joining in and making the most of any and every opportunity. It can be a tricky time of year as people are on holiday, they are busy and there is so much going on, that you can get lost amongst it all. So, as the old saying goes, if you can beat ‘em, join ‘em! You might have spotted us at the Norwich Food and Drink Festival held the day after our 30th wedding anniversary so excuse the dark glasses - and we now looking forward to the arrival of our leveret as part of the Break Charity GoGoHares trail. The trail, which runs all summer, is great fun for people of all ages and gets everyone to walk all around our fine city and discover its many wonders. We are planning hare themed biscuits and cakes as we speak. This year sees the inaugural Norfolk Day on July 27. So far it doesn’t appear to be taking off as a concept in the city but we love an excuse to celebrate so are planning a Norfolk tea stall for the day, using some lovely Nelson and Norfolk


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OME: the very word evokes images of imperial majesty, religious supremacy, and grand architectural statements. Visitors to the Eternal City are faced with a sensory overload – and that includes on the gastronomic front. For more than two millennia, Italy’s capital has principally been about status and power. From the excesses of the original Roman Empire right through to the strutting arrogance of Mussolini, successive guardians of the city have attempted to show the world their grandeur, their influence and their pomposity.


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ROME

IF YOU WANT TO THE ETERNAL CITY OF ROME OFFERS TOURISTS NOT ONLY TWO MILLENNIA OF HISTORY TO RUMINATE ON, BUT ALSO ‘WORKING CLASS’ CUISINE BEYOND COMPARE, AS ANDY NEWMAN DISCOVERS


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“ICONIC MONUMENtS SUCH AS THE , tHE RUINS OF tHE ROMAN FORUM AND tHE TREVI FOUNTAIN ARE AN ASSAULt ON tHE SENSES.”

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This has left the city with an impressive presence, if not always an aesthetically pleasing one. Take, for example, the faintly ridiculous Vittoriano monument, built in the late 19th century to commemorate Italy’s first king, Victor Emmanuel. Swathes of medieval streets were swept away to build a huge, bombastic structure in white marble, which Romans themselves refer to somewhat irreverently as ‘the typewriter’. When it comes to ostentatious displays of power, though, nothing comes close to the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Under the current incumbency of the rather humble Pope Francis, it is easy to forget that for much of the last thousand years, the Vatican was as much the seat of immense political power as it was a religious headquarters. This is most evident in the great basilica of St Peter, which dominates the cityscape. Enormous, imposing and undeniably impressive, this is a church built first and foremost to demonstrate power over beauty. Notwithstanding Michelangelo’s great dome, you are left with a sense of awe rather than being moved by its aesthetic qualities. Perhaps controversially, the same could even be said for the Sistine Chapel, which can be visited as part of the Vatican Museums. Most famous for Michelangelo’s frescoes on the ceiling and on the altar wall – and they are stunning, true masterpieces - the modest dimensions of the chapel are overwhelmed by what was in fact an afterthought (Michelangelo was commissioned 27 years after the chapel was consecrated), and overshadow the more restrained and arguably more beautiful paintings on the remaining three walls by the Renaissance masters Pinturicchio, Botticelli, Signorelli and Perugino. Both St Peter’s and the Sistine Chapel are mustsees for their bombast and their rather over-the-top attention-seeking, but, if you scratch under the surface of Rome, you will find much beauty on an altogether more intimate scale. A good example is Santa Maria del Popolo, one of three churches on the vast Piazza del Popolo. Hidden behind an anonymous door is a jewel of a 16th century church, packed with Renaissance masterpieces. Among them are two Caravaggio paintings, The Conversion of St Paul and The Crucifixion of St Peter. These stunning pictures were deeply shocking when first painted, with the ever-controversial Caravaggio choosing to place the rather over-prominent backside of a horse facing the altarpiece painting by Carracci, as shocking a twofinger salute to established art as anything Damien Hirst might ever have dreamed of.


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customers had bought the four quarters of the animal). Perhaps only the strongest of stomachs will order pajata, the intestines of unweaned milk-fed calves complete with the partially digested mother’s milk, but it is worth putting aside any qualms and discovering just how much flavour there is in the parts of the animal that many discard. Even if offal isn’t your thing, simplicity remains the watchword when eating in Rome. Once you have tasted spaghetti alla carbonara made properly – al dente pasta tossed in crispy pig’s cheek, eggs, pepper and pecorino cheese – you will never again think that this is a dish which requires cream. Probably the best in the city can be found at Rosciolo, a bustling delicatessen cum restaurant a few paces away from the food market on Campo de’ Fiori. Ask for a table at the back of the shop or in the cosy downstairs room if you don’t want to be jostled by customers at the busy deli counter.

With so much great art, statement architecture on every corner, iconic monuments such as the Colosseum, the ruins of the Roman Forum (really poorly interpreted – visit with a guide or risk being disappointed) and the Trevi Fountain at every turn, Rome is an assault on the senses. And when it comes to eating and drinking, the city offers no sensory respite. This is not really a place for fine dining; there are Michelin-starred temples to international gastronomy, but if you want to really enjoy Roman cuisine, you should eat at a more prosaic level. Roman cuisine is rooted in tradition rather than in culinary fashion, and simplicity combined with good, if not expensive, ingredients is what marks the city’s tastes. Despite the architectural bombast, Rome is mainly a working class city, and this is reflected in its local dishes. A fair amount involve offal, the so-called ‘fifth quarter’ (because workers at the city’s meat markets would be paid in offal, left over after their more affluent

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SISTINE CHAPEL

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RISTORANTE ROSCIOLO, Via dei Giubbonari, www.salumeriaroscioli.com DA FRANCESCO, Piazza del Fico, www.dafrancesco.it MATRICIANELLA, Via del Leone, www.matricianella.it GLASS HOSTARIA, Vicolo de' Cinque, www.glass-restaurant.it IL NOLANO BOTTIGLIERA Campo de’ Fiori

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ROMAN FORUM

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Rosciolo is popular with Romans and tourists alike, and perhaps the biggest tip is to seek out places to eat which are frequented by locals – a strategy that works in practically any city, but particularly in Rome where food and drink is as much as religion as the mother church. For this reason I would eschew the ever-popular but increasingly touristy Da Francesco near Piazza Navona in favour of the rather more authentic Matricianella, just 10 minutes away. Here you will find traditional Roman food (including the finest saltimbocca I have tasted) in a cheerful and cosy setting. Almost all the voices I heard were speaking in Italian, and, as ever, a little effort to speak the language was rewarded with broad smiles and extra warmth in the welcome. For something rather more contemporary, it is worth crossing the river to the bustling Travestere district, once a working class area but now a trendy quarter full of bars, restaurants and boutiques. Here you will find Glass Hostaria, which is a world away from the classic trattoria. In a room full of glass, brick and steel, Michelin-starred chef Cristina Bowerman presents an innovative, modern cuisine, sometimes provocative, but always interesting and tasty. Put yourself in her capable hands and go for one of the tasting menus. Ultimately, though, food and drink is the one area of Rome where simplicity triumphs over pomposity, and whether it’s a simple espresso and a pastry for breakfast (taken standing at the bar, of course), a lunchtime artisan beer and a plate of charcuterie on the terrace of a bustling bar like Il Nolano, or a slightly chaotic but delicious dinner in a traditional Roman osteria, the city’s love of food will ensure that at mealtimes, the grand posturing of political or religious powerhouses take second place to simple gastronomic pleasures – and that is what the real Rome is all about.

WHERE TO EAt A AR I ST HO

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CHANCE TO

WIN

C O M P E T I T I O N

HEAD OUTSIDE

WIN AN ANNUAL PASS TO PENSTHORPE PLUS AN EXPLORER TOUR AND AFTERNOON TEA FOR FOUR IN THIS MONTH’S GREAT COMPETITION

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ENSTHORPE NATURAL PARK, near Fakenham, celebrates its 30th anniversary this July and is the perfect spot for some outdoor exploration. With woodlands to roam through, streams to paddle in, gardens to stroll around and wetland hides to watch nature from, Pensthorpe’s 700 acres of diverse habitats are the ideal spot for getting closer to wildlife. Hands-on nature activities are the order of the day, including nature trails, pond dipping and bird feeding, plus who can resist scaling some of the most adventurous play areas in the region? The Wetland Discovery Area, which launches on July 20, will be home to a new larger pond-dipping area and will feature the exotic new enclosure for Pensthorpe’s resident flock of 29 bright and beautiful flamingos! With six beautiful gardens nestled within the reserve, a stroll promises an array of colourful and creative planting. Watching barn owls swoop over the Wildflower Meadow or seeing the spectacular display of alpine grasses in Piet Oudolf’s Millennium Garden are special moments not to be missed. To toast Pensthorpe’s 30th anniversary, we have teamed up with the park to offer a special day out for one lucky family! Not only will the winner receive annual membership, guaranteeing 12 months of outdoor adventures and nature exploration, but on one chosen day you’ll enjoy a special trip aboard the off-road Pensthorpe Explorer, taking you to the furthest reaches of the reserve not accessible on foot! Spending time outdoors is hungry work, so you’ll then enjoy an afternoon tea for four in the pretty courtyard café, as nature and wildlife bustle around you.

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HOW TO ENTER

To be in with a chance to win this wonderful prize all you have to do is answer the following question:

How big is Pensthorpe in acres? 200 550 700 Send your answer, plus your name, address and a daytime telephone number, to competitions@ feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk. Please mark your entry, Pensthorpe. You can also enter by liking and sharing the competition on our Facebook page.

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www. penst horpe .com

Ts & Cs: Normal Feast Norfolk competition rules apply and the editor’s decision is final. The competition is open to people aged 18 and above. Annual membership is for four people from the same family and is valid for 12 months from the date of issue. The Pensthorpe Explorer trip is for four people. The Pensthorpe Explorer runs on selected dates (weather dependent) up until October 28 2018 and must be booked in advance. Afternoon tea, also for four people, must be taken on the same day as the Pensthorpe Explorer tour and booked no less than 24 hours in advance. No cash alternative will be offered. The closing date is August 31 2018, when a winner will be selected at random.


The Pigs

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www.thepigs.org.uk

IT’S ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING BEDROOMS IN NORFOLK AND SARAH HARDY IS ONE OF THE FIRST TO TRY IT. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE WALLOW, NEAR HOLT

VISIT

JUST WALLOWING


IMAGINE a hotel bedroom with your own hot tub deck, garden with log fire, steam room, sauna, bath for two, and dining area - plus a super king sized bed and great in-room entertainment. Well, The Wallow at The Pigs at Edgefield, just outside Holt, has all this and yes, it is impressive! What first strikes you is the sheer space on offer; it feels very much like your own luxury suite as you keep discovering new little areas and treats, like the jar of old fashioned sweeties! Then there’s the decor, created by Holt-based interior designer Annabel Grey, which just exudes style. It is all urban chic, with copper piping, concrete flooring, and recycled wood.

DON 't MISS

every • Have you tried The Pigs’ Pudding Club, held and Sunday, from noon to 3pm? It is £6 for adults as £3.95 for children, and you can fill your plate often as you like! nts. • Pigspa offers half day spa trips for non reside ent, At £65, the price includes lunch and a treatm plus exclusive use of the spa. room. • Spa rooms have their own sauna and steam ly. friend dog are • Several rooms

Whilst it is so on trend, you might think that comfort is sacrificed but there’s gorgeous Egyptian cotton bed linen, a comfy sofa, cuddly bath robes, fluffy towels and pretty fabrics. But what’s special about The Wallow, which opened to guests on June 1, is its private spa facilities. I was barely through the door before my cossie was on and I was in the hot tub. Set in its own little garden in the shade of mature oak trees, it’s just the place to relax, read magazines and generally dip out of life for a couple of hours. Then it’s time to start up both the sauna and steam room - both take about half an hour to reach their perfect temperatures and if I can work them, believe me, anyone can! With lovely body scrubs and butters provided (all made in Cromer from natural ingredients), you can create your own deluxe spa experience, hopping in and out of the enormous power shower, too.

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PRICES from £325 per night bed and breakfast.

PICTURES BY CHRIS TAYLOR

The Pigs also has its own spa, Pigspa with three treatment rooms, where you can book all manner of wonderful facials and massages, so you could add in one of these, too, for an extra special treat. You can dine in your room at The Wallow as there is a table and two chairs, but, after an afternoon of pure indulgence, we headed to the restaurant for supper and a bit of company. The bar boasts several real ales and I spotted a great selection of gins, including many of our local ones like St Giles. Himself had a pint of Moon Gazer from Norfolk Brewhouse but I went for a couple of glasses of Bishop’s Leap Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough in New Zealand which was good and sharp. Do try the homemade pork scratchings which have their own following! There are four different dining areas at The Pigs, plus a lovely outdoor terrace, and up to 200 people can be catered for if they are at full stretch! There’s a family room, the main dining room and Scandi Norfolk, an uber cool area, seating

up to 40, which is just for adults and opened last year. It is straight out of the pages of a glossy interiors magazine. We grabbed a table in the main dining room where the menu changes every two weeks. With an accent on local, seasonal produce, dishes range from ham, eggs and chips, to fish and chips, a pork burger, a house salad and an asparagus and spring onion tart. The steaks look great and there are a handful of daily specials, too. The Iffits, little Norfolk tapas dishes, are always popular and include a Kilner jar of potted pork, deep fried whitebait, and twice baked crab souffle.They make for a fun, sharing meal. But I opted for the day’s pie (steak and ale) with mash and a side order of Savoy cabbage. It was rich, thick and very moreish and I enjoyed soaking up all the gravy with the cabbage. Sir had a veggie option: spiced cauliflower and sweet potato and chickpea casserole, with coconut and coriander which he proclaimed as spicy and it predictably disappeared at the double. Neither of us could resist the puddings which included an apple and caramel crumble and a dark chocolate tort. I went for the whipped strawberry cream with pineapple, butter crumb and mint salsa, which was simply divine. My husband had a classic lemon tart with raspberry sorbet and mint meringue, which had a delicious sharp hit, provided by both the lemon and mint. A quick mention must go to the breakfasts, which include a 15-mile option, with all the goodies sourced locally, and my Norfolk rarebit set me up for the day, along with a couple of cups of strong tea. The Pigs dates back to the 17th century and was bought by Iain Wilson in 2006. The Norfolk-based entrepreneur has expanded it to include 20 bedrooms (there were three originally) and it is now a serious player on the county’s hospitality scene. As with all Iain’s properties - Byford’s in Holt, lovely apartments in Sheringham and the Ffolkes in Hillington in West Norfolk - there is a laid back feel. Staff are chatty and motivated, and nobody stands on ceremony too much. There is just one thing we missed - a soak in that huge bathtub. Be afraid husband, be afraid. We’ll be returning!


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ELLEN MARY is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

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Summer Fruits

Kitchen gardener Ellen Mary heads to the Med as she tells us all about aubergines and offers us a tasty summer recipe RECIPE WITH ELLEN MARY

AUBERGINE ‘MONEYMAKER’

Alexander the Great discovered the aubergine in Babylon and seeds were later brought to Greece by his army, although they are originally from India and Sri Lanka. Gastronomist Sergius Rosario Silvestri named the aubergine after the place he found it, Vergina in northern Greece - ‘au vergine’. Moneymaker is very tolerant of British temperatures, and will produce a high yield in a greenhouse or polytunnel.

How to grow SOW For germination, seeds need to be sown at 1821°C in seed compost and individual pots or modules. Sow in February in the greenhouse or leave it a little later, until the end of the month, if sowing on a windowsill. Keep the soil moist but not overwatered. CARE Pot on when the roots take up the smaller pot, usually in about May or early June. When potting up ensure you provide plant support and tie in the plants as they grow. When plants reach about 30cm remove the tip from the main stem and water regularly. Once the first fruit has set, feed the plant every two weeks with tomato food. HARVEST Make sure you harvest the fruits when they are still shiny, as that is the prime time. Just cut each fruit from the end of July or August when they are about 15cm long. The key is in the shine!

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AUBERGINES STUFFED WITH RED PEPPER, TOMATOES AND QUINOA

SERVES TW O

Aubergine dishes really can bring a Mediterranean feel to the table, so there’s nothing like a delicious aubergine recipe and a glass of red wine for that feeling of being on a Greek island in the summer heat INGREDIENTS 2 freshly picked aubergines; a punnet of plum tomatoes, diced; 80g of pre cooked quinoa; 3 shallots, finely chopped; 1 red pepper, diced; 1 clove of garlic, pressed; 35g of pine nuts; freshly picked basil, thyme and oregano, chopped; olive oil; salt and pepper to taste METHOD 1. Cut the aubergines in half and use the knife to slice lines on each of the aubergine flesh in the shape of a grid. Cut around the outside, leaving enough flesh around the skin and then remove the cubes 2. Roast the cubes, plum tomatoes and red pepper with some olive oil, salt and pepper for about 20 minutes in the oven on 180°C. Put the aubergine skins on the same baking tray with a drizzle of olive oil to soften 3. I like a quick cheat, so microwave the quinoa and put to the side 4. Fry the diced shallots, pressed garlic and pine nuts until soft and then add in the herbs on a gentle heat 5. Add the roasted aubergines and tomatoes mix to the pan with the quinoa and cook together 6. Add the quinoa and roasted vegetable mix into the aubergine skins and put back in the oven just for a few minutes. If you fancy it, grate some cheddar cheese on top or mix in some feta cheese


RACHEL BIRTWHISTLE

• KEEP UP tO DATE WItH RACHEL’S ALLOtMENt ON tWITTER @TREAtLIKEDIRt

STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER

Celebrating her second summer at the allotment, Rachel Birtwhistle discovers the joys of grow-your-own and the fruits of her labour 96


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EING BRITISH requires us to do some specific things extraordinarily well; royal weddings, Wimbledon and strawberries, to name but a few. All quintessentially English and all requiring a modicum of good taste. As my wedding invite got lost in the post and my tennis skills are at best average, strawberry production is where I am pinning all my hopes this British summer time! Strawberries and summer go hand in hand and homegrown ones are hard to beat. No cream, no ice cream, no accompaniments and definitely no sugar - just the strawberry on its own is my idea of heaven. Strawberries used to be available for just a brief period during the summer, but now they are a year-round export. But seriously, eating strawberries in November is like having a snowball fight in July – a waste of time. To really enjoy strawberries at their aromatic, juicy and flavourful best, it's worth holding out for the British season. If you want to eat them super-ripe, pick-your-own is the only way to go and in Norfolk we are spoilt for PYO places. Having an allotment is what PYO is all about, but you don’t need loads of space to grow strawberries; they thrive almost anywhere – in borders, containers or hanging baskets. A couple of key things to bear in mind is that strawberries need sun, shelter, and fertile, well-drained soil, and that really is as complicated as it gets. Who doesn’t love a strawberry? No one - including birds - so if you’re not inclined to share, make sure you net the plants when the fruits start to show. One little health warning: if you

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are growing strawberries in the ground, avoid areas which have previously been home to potatoes, chrysanthemum, or tomatoes, because they are susceptible to ‘verticillium wilt’ which is a fungal disease. Strawberries can be bought as potted plants or barerooted runners which is how I first stumbled upon the strawberries that festoon my plot this summer. ‘Would you like a few runners? I’ve got so many, I’ll bring some round next week’, said my lovely allotment friend in spring last year. In haste, and so as not to look too amateurish (!), I dutifully prepared a bean trench ready for my adopted plants. So when a box of roots with a few tatty leaves anonymously arrived I was a little perplexed. I assumed they had been left out for a few days and had half died so I relegated them to my compost heap. When I saw my allotment friend a few hours later she enquired about the runners - the strawberry runners. ‘Just pop them in with some compost,’ she advised. ‘Already have,’ I reliably informed her! To me, strawberries really nicely sum up the experience and spirit of allotmenteering. My donated strawberry plants which started off so pathetically as little runners have born runners of their own this spring, which I donated to a family a few allotments down from me. Strawberries are good currency at the allotment and I have promised a bowl of strawberries in exchange for Victoria plums later in the year with another plot holder. Strawberries: they truly are the gift that keeps on giving.


Proudly Norfolk -

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www.whatahoot.co.uk

How did the name come about? We came up with the name 'WhataHoot' as we love owls. We also wanted this business to be fun – a real lifestyle business – so by calling ourselves WhataHoot, it is a reminder that we are in this to ‘have a hoot’ and do something together as a family. The barn, with all its own connotations, and the fact that Flitcham has a bird reserve was just a perfect happenstance. When can we expect the new gin to be available and where? We will be at many farmers’ markets, craft fairs and festivals throughout the year. We have also been approached by a number of delis asking to stock our gin as well as various restaurants, so you may well find us in an establishment near you!

NEW GIN ON THE BLOCK

ETHAN CROWN, BECCA WALLS, NICKY & JASON CROWN

The Crown family from West Norfolk debuts its first gin, WhataHoot, which uses the county ’s lavender and samphire

Who are you and what do you do? WhataHoot is a Norfolk based, family owned distillery. We distil gin using a range of traditional, exotic and local botanicals to create a distinctive Norfolk dry gin.

We are so lucky that our barn has the most beautiful outlook and is surrounded by grazing cattle. So most days, it’s just us, with the farm animals and the local wildlife to keep us company!

Is it a family firm? 100 per cent. We are husband and wife Jason and Nicky Crown who, along with our eldest son Ethan, look after the day to day running whilst youngest son Oliver supports the business with his cocktail creations.

What is your background? We all bring something different to the table – Jason owned an IT company, Nicky worked with families, Ethan has an established social media business and Oliver is currently studying Entrepreneurship at university. However, it was always our plan to start a lifestyle business together and we realised there was real mileage in making a business out of our favourite drink – gin.

Where are you based? At Flitcham Barns in Flitcham, just outside King’s Lynn. The barn is part of the Sandringham Estate and we are surrounded by glorious countryside.

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Can you tell us a bit about it? Any secret ingredients? We use a range of botanicals, some of which are sourced from overseas, but we are also proud to use local ingredients such as samphire, lavender and even our water is from East Harling. The secret is purely in the quantities and blending. Any future plans? We plan to develop and bring out new flavours and we are already currently working on some exciting ideas for Christmas. We also want to develop 'WhatsyourHoot'! We know that everyone likes their gin a different way, so whilst we are happy to give ideas on how you could drink it, we passionately believe it is up to you how you enjoy WhataHoot gin – hence 'WhatsyourHoot'! We are keen to establish an online platform #whatsyourhoot, so we can share everyone’s different ideas. How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? We believe Norfolk Food and Drink and Proudly Norfolk Food and Drink embodies the community of the food and drink industry here in Norfolk which we look forward to being part of. This column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com


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Personal Contract Plan representative example for Q5 Sport 2.0 TDI quattro 190 PS S tronic based on 10,000 miles per annum+ Duration 47 monthly payments of Your deposit Audi deposit contribution

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Book a test drive Norwich Audi Meridian Way Norwich NR7 0TA 01603 709200 www.robinsonsaudi.co.uk Official fuel consumption figures for the Q5 range, in mpg (l/100km) from: Urban 32.8 (8.6) – 52.3 (5.4), Extra Urban 44.8 (6.3) – 58.9 (5.4), Combined 39.8 (7.1) – 56.5 (5.0), CO2 emissions 162 - 132g/km. Fuel consumption and CO2 figures are obtained under standardised EU test conditions

(Directive 93/116/ EEC). This allows a direct comparison between different manufacturer models but may not represent the actual fuel consumption achieved in ‘real world’ driving conditions. Optional wheels may affect emissions and fuel consumption figures. Image shown for illustration purposes only. More information is available on the Audi website at www. audi.co.uk and at www.dft.gov.uk/vca

Robinsons Autoservices Limited trading as Norwich Audi is a broker and not a lender and can introduce you to a limited number of lenders, who may pay us for introducing you to them. *At the end of the agreement there are three options: I) own the vehicle: pay the optional final payment; ii) return the vehicle: subject to fair wear and tear, charges may apply; or iii) replace: part exchange the vehicle. With Solutions Personal Contract Plan. 18s+. Subject to availability and status. Terms and conditions apply. Offer available when ordered between 2nd January 2018 and 2nd April 2018 and registered by 30th June 2018. +8p per mile excess mileage applies. Indemnities may be required. Offers are not available in conjunction with the scrappage scheme or any other offer and may be varied or withdrawn at any time. Accurate at time of publication [June 2018]. Freepost Audi Financial Services.


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Food Hall & Fine Wine Department

Sunday Summer Openings with Local Supplier Food Fairs*

10.00am - 4.00pm 29th July* - 5th August - 12th August* 19th August - 26th August* - 2nd September In conjunction with the Bakers & Larners NEW Sunday Summer openings there will be Food Fairs on select *Sundays. All areas of our Department Store will be open including our Home Furnishings & Furniture area. The Food Fairs will be in Bakers Court Car Park and will be showcasing some of Norfolk’s finest food producers.

A Legendary Evening of Gin & Cocktails

Thursday 12th July

Hosted by Patrick & Sarah Saunders Owners & Founders of BLACK SHUCK

Tickets £25.00 each Groups of 4 or more £22.50 per person includes all Gin and Cocktail samples & nibbles Further details and to book www.bakersandlarners.co.uk

7.00pm for 7.30pm in our Number Ten Restaurant

Award winning Food Hall & Fine Wine Department Newly Refurbished 8 -12 M A R K E T PL AC E , HOLT, NOR FOL K, N R 25 6 BW

01263 71224 4

*Join the Bakers & Larners Wine Club and receive 10% discount on all future purchases in our Wine & Spirits department.

T&C’s apply.

w w w.ba kersa nd la r ners.co.u k †Our team of experts are qualified to WSET Level 3 and 4

Feast Norfolk Magazine July/Aug 18 Issue 28  
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