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FEASTNORFOLKMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Editor's Letter

WELCOME TO OUR APRIL ISSUE which comes to you just as we celebrate Easter so I hope you find a moment or two to enjoy this special time with family and friends. Add in plenty of good food, and wine, and it is a lovely long weekend. Lamb is often the centrepiece to your foodie celebrations and we have a couple of recipe ideas for you to try, plus some breakfast suggestions, as Bank Holidays do give you just a bit more time to indulge yourself with a scrummy start to the day, whether you opt to eat in or out. If, like me, you quite like logistics, you’ll be interested to read about Accent Fresh who supply hotels, restaurants, schools and more around our region with fresh produce, especially fruit and veg. We struggled with our deliveries in the snow last month, so take our hats off to all those in the distribution business! This issue has no less than three staycation reviews which, I’m rather embarrassed to say, I did myself and thoroughly enjoyed them all. They are in different parts of our region and are very different places, so there really is something for whatever mood you are in! We also take a look at The Control Tower in Egmere, near Wells, which was built in the 1940s and is now a vegetarian B&B. The owners, Nigel and Claire, are real characters and have worked hard to create a quirky yet authentic spot that pays true homage to its past. We hear that the brekkies here are wonderful, too. A happy birthday to The Last Wine Bar and Restaurant which celebrates its 28th birthday this month, find out more about Norfolk Gin, one of the region’s first artisan spirits, and catch up with Greg Smith, who updates us on this year’s Royal Norfolk Show - it will soon be here! Finally, don’t miss our two great competitions this month. One is the chance to win a holiday cottage break with Norfolk Country Cottages and the second is for tickets to the East Anglian Game and Country Fair at the Euston Estate later this month. And congratulations to Paula from mid Norfolk who won our Imagine Spa competition, as featured in our February issue. Do keep in touch with us, we love to hear from you with your latest tea room finds, new local honeys, places to avoid - we enjoy it all! Happy reading.

SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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Mark Nicholls goes on a foodie trail in Puglia in the heel of Italy

ABOUT US 05 Editor’s Letter WHAT’S ON 14 We preview the best events and activities taking place in the region this month 16 The East Anglian Game & Country Fair takes place at the Euston Estate at the end of the month. Win tickets to this popular family event 20 Our news and gossip pages keep you up-todate with all the latest openings, appointments and more FEATURES 30 The White Horse at Blakeney is Adnams’ one and only managed pub in Norfolk. The new General Manager Matthew Palmer shows Emma Outten around 45 Step inside the new look Food Hall at Bakers and Larners in Holt - it’s a paradise for foodies! 74 Photographer Keiron Tovell visits The Control Tower B&B at Egmere, near Wells, in his latest photo essay story

COVER STORY

40 We wake up to the breakfast boom - how the first meal of the day is fast becoming the new going out

EATING OUT 22 Zoe Dunford tucks into gin (of course) and lamb at The Anchor Inn at Morston on the North Norfolk coast

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26 Emma Outten and Sarah Hardy help The Last Wine Bar and Restaurant in Norwich celebrate its 28th birthday this month INTERVIEWS 32 Emma Outten heads to the Norfolk Showground to meet Greg Smith, Chief Executive of the Royal Norfolk Agricultural Association REGULARS 08 Our spotlight falls on Accent Fresh, a fresh food supplier in West Norfolk who deliver to many of our leading chefs 34 The latest City College Norwich features globe trotting Chef Lecturer, Martin Smith 44 We’re going cheesy with our selection of gadgets and gizmos this month 46 The chef Q&A this month focuses on Ross Bott of The Swan Hotel in Southwold 56 Our feature on newly published cookbooks, produced by Jarrold’s, includes ones by Diana Henry and Tommy Banks 62 We meet Jonathan Redding of Norfolk Gin in our artisan producer feature 94 The Proudly Norfolk column features Nortons Dairy near Norwich who produce cheese, milk and yogurt


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RECIPES 12 Mark Dixon and Steven Trett use wild garlic in two very different dishes - a fish one and a lamb one 39 Lucy Bartlett wakes us up with two breakfast dishes 49 Ross Bott of The Swan Hotel in Southwold offers us his delicious fish and chips recipe 51 Our free from recipe writer Sara Matthews has four dishes for us this month - including a non dairy ice cream! 91 Ellen Mary serves us a fish, fennel and spring onion dish DRINK 61 Our wine expert Steve Hearnden finds the perfect partner for the classic pudding, Eton Mess 64 Andy Newman travels to Bordeaux to visit the world’s best wine museum 66 Woodforde’s Brewery in Woodbastwick, near Norwich, tells us about their green credentials COLUMNISTS 19 Charlotte Gurney, of White House Farm near Norwich, is getting ready for her annual Plant Fair next month 37 Roger Hickman of his eponymous restaurant in Norwich, answers more of your questions

90 54 Charlie Hodson introduces his great friend and spice maker, Rai Bukulu, of A De Piff 55 Julia Martin, of Purple Plum Catering, spices up vegan food for us 60 Chef patron Andrew Jones updates us about life at Farmyard in Norwich TRAVEL 68 Mark Nicholls goes on a foodie trail in Puglia in the heel of Italy 81 The Crown at Westleton, near the Suffolk Heritage Coast, offers a historic setting with funky modern additions! 84 The Lodge at Old Hunstanton is the perfect spot for some coastal R&R 88 Sarah Hardy tries out the new Norfolk Garden Rooms - and the hot tub - at The Kings Arms in Fleggburgh GROW YOUR OWN 90 Our kitchen gardener Ellen Mary tells us all about spring onions 92 Allotmenteer Rachel Birtwhistle discovers what the hungry gap is - and it’s not that period between elevenses and lunch! COMPETITION 80 Win a cottage break with Norfolk Country Cottages

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THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Scott Nicholson, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Diane Green Brand Manager | 07988 867483 diane@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

Keiron Tovell, Andy Newman, Julia Martin, Charlotte Gurney, Charlie Hodson, Mark Nicholls, Zoe Dunford, Andrew Jones, Roger Hickman, Sara Matthews, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Steve Hearnden

PUBLISHED BY

FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

PRINTED BY

MICROPRESS, Fountain Way, Reydon Business Park, Reydon, Suffolk, 1P18 6DH


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www.accentfresh.co.uk

A NORFOLK-BASED SUPPLIER ENSURES OUR CHEFS GET THE BEST INGREDIENTS TO CREATE THEIR OUTSTANDING DISHES. SARAH HARDY FINDS OUT MORE ABOUT ACCENT FRESH IN WEST NORFOLK

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OW IN ITS 21ST YEAR, Downham Market based Accent Fresh sends out deliveries of fresh produce six days a week to some of our best known hotels, pubs, cafes and restaurants. The business was founded by two couples, Steve and Karen Short, and Frank and Jan Bradshaw, who have since retired. The Shorts have been joined by Danny Griffiths as a codirector, and the company primarily supplies fresh, seasonal fruit and veg. It has steadily grown its range to include a greater selection of cheeses, bread, dairy and frozen produce and more.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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S P O T L I G H T

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Steve, who has an agricultural and fresh food background, thinks the company, which employs 80 people, is extremely well positioned to offer top quality produce. ‘We are surrounded by the country’s finest farming land and we work extremely hard to develop great relationships with our farmers and local producers,’ he says. ‘We respect each other, which is very important.’ As a basic rule, the company supplies 50 per cent local produce, 10 per cent national produce with the remainder imported - we do all like our avocados and pineapples, don’t we! ‘We do a heck of a lot of potatoes,’ continues Steve, before adding that foraged goods have become increasingly popular in recent years. ‘We have one main forager, based here in Norfolk, who supplies us small amounts of whatever is in season - wild garlic is very popular at the moment, with samphire in the summer months. We let the chefs know what we have, and sometimes they call us up and ask if we can get hold of a certain something!’

" We

DELIVER a lot of local CHEESES...

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" We want to

become a real FOOD HUB, especiall y for local, ART ISAN PRODUC ERS.

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He continues: ‘People’s tastes have become more sophisticated, mainly, I think, because of all the cookery programmes on television. We have seen so much choice become available for them - so many more exotic fruits are now mainstream, for example. ‘People enjoy seeing more unusual fruit and veg on menus and they also like to cook with them at home.’ Steve adds: ‘Fresh herbs are more popular, and micro flowers and herbs, too.’ The company has always been based in Downham Market, moving to larger, purpose-built premises on an industrial site near the river in 2001. And Steve says that they are seeking planning permission to increase the site by a further third. ‘We want to become a real food hub, especially for local, artisan producers. We deliver, for example, a lot of local cheeses, which are very popular, and have started to work with an artisan bakery in Heacham. And we also produce bespoke pre-prepared produce, too - all freshly made, of course.’ The company, says Steve, started out with just one van but now has 29 fully refrigerated delivery vehicles which travel across East Anglia, supplying schools, care homes, offices, hotels and restaurants. And yes, he laughs as he admits, ‘I do most definitely get my share of the recommended five-a-day fruit and veg!’

STEVE SHORT

OVERLEAF ARE A COUPLE OF RECIPES from two Norfolk chefs: Steven Trett, Head Chef at Branford’s, The Old Hall Hotel, Caister, and Mark Dixon, Chef Patron at the Kings Arms in Fleggbugh, near Acle, both of which are supplied by Accent Fresh. They show us how to use wild garlic, which has a strong smell and is very versatile. It is great in sauces and soups, and is a little more mellow than everyday garlic!

WHAT'S IN SE ASON IN APRIL

RECIPES OVERLEAF

IN SEASON IN APRIL ARE: Cauliflower, cabbage, celeriac, lettuce, new potatoes, pak choi, peas, peppers, potatoes, purple sprouting broccoli, radicchio, radish, spinach, spring greens, watercress, asparagus

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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Mark Dixon's

PAN ROASTED FILLET OF NORTH SEA COD,

Crispy Cromer Crab Cake, Butter Confit Leeks, Madras Roasted Cauliflower, Parmentier Potatoes and Wild Garlic Beurre Blanc

SERVES TW O

INGREDIENTS 2 x 6 oz cod fillets; 2 crab cakes; 20 parmentiers; 100g of confit leeks; 6 florets of cauliflower; 1tsp of Madras powder; 4 baby leeks; 50ml of wild garlic beurre blanc; 4tbsp of cauliflower purée For the cauliflower purée 1/2 a cauliflower; 1 knob of butter; 125ml of double cream For the Cromer crab cake 75g of mashed potato; 450g of dressed Cromer crab meat; 100g of panko breadcrumbs; 2 large eggs; 1 lime, juiced; plain flour; salt and pepper to taste For the confit leeks 1 large leek, finely sliced; 2 knobs of butter; 100ml of white wine; salt and pepper For the parmentier potatoes 1 large peeled potato For the wild garlic beurre blanc 25ml of white wine; 5ml of cream; 50g of butter; 1 tsp of white wine vinegar; 2 tbsp of wild garlic

METHOD For the cauliflower purée Boil the cauliflower for 10 minutes until tender. Then drain the cauliflower and place in the food processor with the butter, and cream. Once blitzed, season to taste and strain through a fine sieve for extra smoothness For the Cromer crab cake Combine the crab meat, potato, lime juice and seasoning into a bowl. Divide the mix into 30g portions and shape into even sized balls. Lightly coat with the flour, then beaten egg and finally breadcrumbs. Deep fry the balls until golden brown on the outside ensuring they are hot in the middle For the confit leeks In a pan place the leeks, butter, wine and season. On a simmer, slowly stir the leeks until just soft. Gently strain the excess liquid in a colander For the parmentier potatoes Depending on the size cut the potato into 3 x 2cm slices. Cut each slice into 3 and then again into 1cm cubes. Blanch the parmentiers

until soft, then refry on high temperature until golden For the wild garlic beurre blanc Heat the wine and cream in a saucepan until simmering. Add the butter and stir until melted and the sauce has thickened. Add the finely chopped wild garlic To assemble Pan fry the cauliflower with Madras curry powder and a knob of butter until golden brown. Place in the oven for 5 minutes to soften the cauliflower. Remove from the oven, place on the heat and put the cod in the pan, skin side down. Once golden, turn the cod with a fish slice, add the baby leeks and confit leeks to the pan and return to the oven until the cod is cooked. In the meantime, heat the cauliflower purée. Once the cod is cooked, place the cauliflower purée just off centre on the plate. Drag down the middle, place the cauliflower one end. Then place the confit of leeks on the plate, with the cod on top. Dot the parmentiers around the plate, crab cake next to the cod and the baby leeks on the cod. Slowly pour the wild garlic beurre blanc over the cod and around the plate


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R E C I P E S

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INGREDIENTS 800g of lamb cannon, trimmed For the wild garlic purée 50g of unsalted butter; 4 small shallots, sliced; 1 garlic clove, crushed; 300g of wild garlic; 30g of fresh chervil, chopped; double cream; a pinch of salt For the burnt apple purée 8 Granny Smith apples; 15g of caster sugar; a pinch of salt; 30ml of rapeseed oil For the bubble and squeak cakes 50g of cold, firm mashed potato; 40g of white cabbage; 2 spring onions; 20g of smoked ham; 40g of panko bread crumbs For the carrots 8 baby carrots For the redcurrant jus 1 tbsp of redcurrant jelly; 200ml of good quality red wine; 1 tsp of balsamic vinegar; 500ml of chicken stock or 1/2 stock cube; a knob of butter To garnish 20g of crushed pistachios

Steven Trett 's

CANNON OF LAMB,

Wild Garlic and Burnt Apple Purées, Crispy Bubble and Squeak, Redcurrant Jus METHOD For the wild garlic purée Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the shallots and garlic and cook gently without colouring them. Add the wild garlic and chervil and cook until the wild garlic is tender. Transfer to a blender. In a small pan bring the cream to the boil. Add this to the blender. Blend until smooth. Season with salt, to taste. Put into a plastic bottle and keep warm until serving

For the carrots Peel and cook for 5 minutes in lightly salted boiling water

For the burnt apple purée Roast the apples, sugar and salt in a very hot oven, 220°C for at least 1 hour. The apples should be completely soft. Blend with the rapeseed oil until it’s a smooth purée

For the lamb cannon Season the lamb cannon and place in a pan on a high heat. Add 5ml of vegetable oil and place the cannon in the pan. Cool until each side is coloured and then place in an oven, preheated to 170°C, for 6 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave to rest for two minutes before slicing and serving

For the redcurrant jus Place the red wine, redcurrant jelly and balsamic vinegar into a small saucepan and reduce until it starts to get sticky and dark. Add in the chicken stock and reduce by 3/4. Whisk in a knob of butter and then take off heat

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To garnish Garnish with 20g of crushed pistachios

[Serves four

[

For the bubble and squeak cakes Add the mash, cooked cabbage, shredded spring onions and diced ham in a bowl and season. Mix and form into small cubes. Pané and coat in the panko bread crumbs and deep fry at 180°C for 2 minutes and drain


PIZZA MASTERCLASS

The Two Magpies Bakery in Southwold is holding its next pizza masterclass on April 6. Learn how to make and shape a sourdough pizza dough, choose from a range of menu toppings then watch your creation being baked in the deck oven before relaxing in the cafe and enjoying your pizza with a glass of wine followed by a dessert. Visit www.twomagpiesbakery.co.uk

WITTON LANE

WRENTHAM LODGE

TEA AND GARDENS

The National Garden Scheme in Norfolk has three pretty gardens opening to the public this month: Wretham Lodge at East Wretham opens on April 1 and 2; 16 Witton Lane at Little Plumstead on April 8; and The Old House at Ranworth on April 22. All the gardens offer home-made teas. Visit www.ngs.org.uk

WHAT'S ON in

FARMERS' MARKETS

The next Farmers' Market at Sandringham Visitor Centre Restaurant takes place on April 22. Look out for local produce including meat, fish, shellfish, fruit and vegetables and homemade cakes, plus plenty more. Visit www.sandringhamestate.co.uk Creake Abbey hosts its next award winning Farmers’ Market on April 7. More than 50 stall holders come with fresh local produce including meat, fresh vegetables, fruit and flowers in season, cheeses, cakes, tarts, pies, fudge, artisan breads, pickles, rapeseed oil, vinegars, preserves, local ales, juices and plants plus much more. Visit www.creakeabbey.co.uk

April

BRUNCH CLUB

The next Strattons Bank Holiday Brunch Club takes place on April 2. Indulge in homemade pastries, granola pots, local juice and unlimited tea or coffee and choose a delicious hot dish from the menu, such as the Strattons brunch with bacon, sausage, slow roasted tomato, mushrooms and a choice of poached, scrambled or fried eggs. Visit www.strattonshotel.com

TALK AND TWO COURSES

The next Talk of Wells at The Globe Inn is with cinematographer Clive Tickner on April 16. Clive has been Director of Photography on many films, television series and documentaries, and the evening will involve a special menu of two courses and a glass of wine (with £5 donated to The Wells Maltings Trust). Visit www.theglobeatwells.co.uk

AFTERNOON TEA

The Imperial Hotel in Great Yarmouth is offering Afternoon Tea…Just for Grown Ups from April 7 to 29. There will be a choice of loose leaf teas to choose from, plus you can indulge in some special treats on the food menu including Salmon Vodka Gravadlax and Whisky Honey Glazed Ham finger sandwiches. Visit www.imperialhotel.co.uk

GREAT BRITISH DESSERTS

St George’s Theatre in Great Yarmouth is holding a Quiz and Great British Desserts Night on April 23. One round of the quiz is to be based on St George, and the ticket includes a selection of traditional British desserts. Visit www.stgeorgestheatre.com

TEA DANCE

The Drill House Tea Dance by SeaChange Arts in Great Yarmouth takes place on April 28. DJs from The Ragroof Players will be playing authentic music from the 20s to the 50s and bring their trademark instant dance classes. Tickets include a free cup of tea and a slice of cake. Visit www.seachangearts.org.uk

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VEGAN SUPPER

BUY LOCAL

Norwich's newest vegan supper club starts on April 28 and promises a lively mix of people, dishes and great music, at The Old Green Door - a new arts and events space right in the heart of the Golden Triangle. In the kitchen will be Nania Tait, a private chef and caterer (and the mother of a 12-year-old vegan), who firmly believes that 'going vegan' doesn’t mean 'going without'! Visit www.maniatart.co.uk

A Buy Local Norfolk event is taking place in the Atrium of The Forum in Norwich on April 9. Meet passionate local businesses and support the unique character and flavour of Norfolk, safe in the knowledge that the not-for-profit social enterprise includes businesses genuinely local to Norfolk. Visit www.buylocalnorfolk.org.uk

WINE TASTING (pic below)

Enjoy a Spring Wine Tasting at the Maids Head Hotel in Norwich on April 6. Try some of the new flavours on the new seasonal menu in the WinePress restaurant paired with fine wines to complement them. Tickets are £25. Visit www.maidsheadhotel.co.uk

GIN MASTERCLASS

Bakers and Larners of Holt is holding a Gin Masterclass Evening on April 12, in the Number Ten Restaurant. Craig Allison, Director of Bullards Gin, Norwich, will take guests on an exciting discovery through the history of gin, on a journey from its origins to the present day. The ticket price includes all gin tasting samples and a selection of nibbles. Visit www.bakersandlarners.co.uk

JAZZ SUNDAY LUNCH (pic below)

The next jazz Sunday lunch takes place in Brasserie Bleue at the White Lion Hotel in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, on April 15; enjoy a traditional Sunday lunch menu while listening to the gentle sounds of Keith Monk and his trio. Visit www.whitelion.co.uk

DIARY DATES Beyond Easter weekend at the start of this month, there is so much more to look forward to on the foodie front, says Emma Outten

OUTDOORS FESTIVAL

The eighth Broads Outdoors Festival takes place from April 28 to May 13. Foodie events during that time include an Italian Evening at How Hill House, on May 11, involving three courses and coffee; or sample a selection of gins from Adnams, Sipsmiths, Warner Edwards and more, at the Waveney Inn’s Gin Festival, on May 4. Visit www.visitthebroads.co.uk PICTURE BY JAMES BASS

IF YOU GO DOWN TO THE WOODS TODAY… If you’re seeking somewhere unique to stay with a touch of luxury and solitude, then Whoa-Stop offers both in abundance. This romantic shepherd’s hut, located deep in Thetford Forest, offers plenty of privacy with inside and outside bathing and cooking facilities. Situated on the outskirts of the forest canopy this little bijou retreat allows you to get back to nature with the opportunity to walk, cycle and ride your horse too with stabling and livery on site. A two-night stay at Whoa-Stop shepherd’s hut is £320 (flexible arrival dates available).

Visit www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk Call 01485 211022 Email enquiries@norfolkhideaways.co.uk


THE EAST ANGLIAN GAME & COUNTRY FAIR OFFERS A FANTASTIC DAY OUT FOR ALL THE FAMILY AND WILL ONCE AGAIN BE HELD AT THE EUSTON ESTATE, NEAR THETFORD, LATER THIS MONTH. AND YOU CAN BE IN WITH A CHANCE OF WINNING ONE OF FIVE FAMILY TICKETS!

GAME ON! VISIT

www.ukgamefair.co.uk


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East Anglian Game & Country Fair -

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There’s a fantastic line up of other free events to watch across the show, including the Sheep Dog & Duck show, Harvey’s Shires, Gundog displays, Traditional Craft demonstrations and Farrier and Blacksmith demonstrations. And don’t miss the 2018 Cutters and Climbers Competitions in the Forestry Arena where competitors will scale the highest poles ever seen at the East Anglian Game & Country Fair. Have a go at a range of country activities, such as clay shooting with John Bidwell’s High Lodge instructors, or enter the 40-bird re-entry shooting competition for men, women and juniors. There’s fly fishing and coarse fishing on the Black Bourne River, and anything from ferret racing and archery to paintballing and crossbows. Try the air rifle ADVANCE range, hold a bird of prey, enter discounted your dog into the pet dog admission e-tickets are available now show, join in with your dog online at www. at the K9 Aqua Sports pool or ukgamefair.co.uk or take a ride in a Land Rover on by calling the ticket the off road 4x4 course. hotline number There will be more than 01263 735 828. 350 shopping stands with a Adult £15, Children wide variety of products, from (5-16 years) £6 and fashion and footwear to gun Family (two adults makers, eco products, fishing and 2 children) £40, tackle and home designer (offer valid until midday on April 23) wares. The Dog and Duck and a small booking onsite pub will be serving a fee applies to phone great selection of local beers orders). Under 5s and drinks throughout the are free and car weekend, and will be hosting parking is free for all. live music both during the day and on the Saturday evening.

OME OF The Duke and Duchess of Grafton, the prestigious Euston Estate, near Thetford, has also been the new home to the East Anglian Game & Country Fair for the last couple years. This year the Game & Country Fair takes place on April 28 and 29, and, as ever, it will welcome world class events and attractions to the estate, which is located just off the A11. Main Arena displays confirmed for 2018 include the world famous JCB Dancing Diggers, The Mounted Games Association of Great Britain and The British Scurry and Trials Driving Championships.

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For the foodies among us, the Game Fair Country Kitchen has a great line up with a variety of cookery workshops and demonstrations taking place over the weekend from a selection of local chefs including Chris Coubrough, James Conway, Justin Kett, Michael Chamberlain, and Daniel Freear. The Game Fair Kitchen is housed in the centre of the Food Hall where you will find a wide variety of exhibitors from Norfolk and across the UK bringing unusual and mouth-watering food and drink to the show for visitors to sample, enjoy and purchase. There will also be new hosts for the VIP Members' Enclosure Restaurant & Bar: Feast Norfolk’s very own columnist and Executive Chef Charlie Hodson, plus Chef Andy Snowling and Woodforde’s Brewery.

VIP memberships, glamping and camping tickets also available at discounted rates if booked in advance.

Chance to WIN

COMPETITION

We have teamed up with the East Anglian Game & Country Fair to provide you with the chance to win one of five family tickets. To enter please visit www.ukgamefair.co.uk/feast and enter your answer along with your details in the boxes provided on this competition page online. Normal Feast Norfolk rules apply. The closing date is April 18 2018. To enter you will simply need to answer the following question:

Which two chefs will be hosting the VIP Members’ Enclosure catering?


L O C A L LY S O U R C E D F R E S H F O O D 3 COURSES COURSES £ 3 5 . 7 5 • FREE F R E E PARKING PA R K I N G £37.50

CARROW ROAD NORWICH

01603 218705 deliascanarycatering.co.uk/delias


White House Farm -

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GET PLANTING!

CHARLOTTE GURNEY OF WHITE HOUSE FARM NEAR NORWICH SETS THE SCENE FOR THEIR ANNUAL PLANT FAIR NEXT MONTH WHITE HOUSE FARM, WROXHAM ROAD, NORWICH

VISIT

www.norwich-pyo.co.uk IT ALMOST SEEMS we are waking from a wintry dream as our gardens peel themselves out of hibernation.You would not believe the farm was quite literally 'White' House Farm last month. We all endured our own trials and tribulations as we battled the 'Beast' that swept through the county. So, it is with good cheer that we look ahead to a milder spring and the long awaited White House Farm Plant Fair on May 12 which is back by popular demand. We're delighted to announce that we'll be joined once again by the Garden Party team from BBC Radio Norfolk when the enthusiastic Icelandic, Thordis Fridriksson will be back with her microphone and those colourful sartorial tastes! DIARY DATES - April 15: Indian Night (must be pre-booked and numbers are limited); April 21: Farmers’ Market; May 12: Plant Fair (9.30am-3.30pm) FREE PARKING

The BBC will be live from the Plant Fair interviewing stall holders, customers and any four legged friends that happen to be passing. Everyone is welcome to join the Q&A, as well as tap into the extensive horticultural knowledge of leading nurseries with their wide range of rare and interesting plants. It will be a unique event; with such a wealth of green fingered wisdom all in one place, as we talk about how to make the best of plants and colour in all our gardens, be they small or large, and how to keep the weeds at bay by using innovative ground cover plants. You can enjoy independent stalls with violas, plants for shade, herbaceous perennials, shrubs, climbers, herbs and edible plants as well as plants from the cutting garden to decorate the house. So come and have peek, and spruce up your garden ready for the barbecue season and some al fresco eating. Plus, we'll have sausage tasting in the butchery and the cafe will be buzzing with cakes and a variety of delicious goodies, thus making it the place to stop for lunch.


, WOODFORDE S& , JIMMY S TEAM UP (pic right) Three cheers to Woodforde’s for sponsoring the Wherryfields Main Stage at this year’s Jimmy’s Festival, in Suffolk, on July 21 and 22. Paul Young will headline on the Saturday and the Happy Mondays will top the bill on the Sunday. There will also be a Woodforde’s Kitchen, welcoming the likes of Butcher Farrell, Bosh!, Hardeep Singh Kohli, and DJ BBQ. Visit www.jimmysfestival.co.uk

SUMMER SEASON Sheringham Little Theatre has released its drama line-up for the summer season and offers the perfect excuse to drop in to The Hub, the theatre’s friendly coffee bar run by a wonderful army of volunteers. Offering a wide range of hot and cold drinks and tempting treats, The Hub is the ideal meeting place for locals and visitors alike. Visit www.sheringhamlittletheatre.com

FESTIVAL WITH A FOODIE TWIST We’re delighted to spot a foodie event in the Norfolk and Norwich Festival programme: Provisional Figures, a new piece of theatre inspired by the 10,000 Portuguese immigrants arriving in Great Yarmouth in the mid-2000s, will be accompanied by a celebration of Portuguese culture, food and drink! Visit www.nnfestival.org.uk

SWEET TWEET Norfolk-based Cocoa Delicious has received a business boost from retail entrepreneur Theo Paphitis. Owner Laura Cotton tweeted Theo about her business during ‘Small Business Sunday’ and was one of the six weekly winners to gain a retweet by Theo to his 500,000 Twitter followers. The weekly initiative, set up by Theo in 2010, now has more than 2000 #SBS winners and supports small businesses in the UK. Visit www.cocoadelicious.co.uk

N EWS

R OU N D - U P

We’ve been getting out and about to gather the latest food and drink stories for you, says Emma Outten Visit www.hutnextthesea.co.uk

HUT-NEXT-THE-SEA

Visit www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk

SCOLT HEAD SUPPER

CHAMPION BEER

Editor Sarah Hardy recently enjoyed a locally-sourced supper, A Taste of Norfolk, at The White Horse in Brancaster Staithe, with Ben Keeley from King's Lynnbased Barsby Produce as guest speaker. The fivecourse supper, created by White Horse head chef Fran Hartshorne, included delicious salt marsh lamb, oysters and cheese. It was £35 a head, or £49.50 if you included wines. More suppers are planned.

Congratulations to Lowestoftbased Green Jack Brewery’s Ripper, for being crowned Champion Winter Beer of Britain at the recent Great British Beer Festival Winter in Norwich. The 8.5 per cent barley wine was crowned champion at the festival, organised by CAMRA (the Campaign for Real Ale) in association with the Norwich & Norfolk Branch. Visit www.norwichcamra.org.uk and www.green-jack.com

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BUBBLES BY THE BEACH Feast Norfolk writer, Zoe Dunford, who runs Hut-Next-The-Sea, a shepherds hut on the edge of Wells next the Sea, has teamed up with Byfords to provide a hamper for guests renting The Den, a beach hut which you can book separately - and she assures us it includes lots of their lovely cake! Zoe will also be adding a bottle of Prosecco, and either fresh strawberries or dog treats.

ALL READY AT REDWELL Editor Sarah Hardy visited the newly reopened craft brewer, Redwell Brewery in Trowse, Norwich, where the tap house is up and running! It is a fab space so watch out for tastings, events and more - looks like a great place for a party to us. It opens 5-9pm on Fridays and Saturdays, with wood fired pizza from Brick. Visit www.redwellbrewing.com


COFFEE ROASTERS We’ve been hearing good things about Smokey Barn Coffee, based in King Street, Norwich, a local, family-run coffee roasting business and café. It roasts Arabica quality Fair Trade beans which it sells both to the public and to other local businesses – and usually has at least 15 different coffees from around the world. Visit www.smokeybarn.co.uk

4 AA SILVER STARS

SILVER STARS

RESTAURANT WEEK Norfolk’s largest dining event, Restaurant Week is back! This year's event takes place from October 29 to November 9. After four successful years in North Norfolk, Restaurant Week went countywide last year, with more than 60 restaurants to choose from. We’ll keep you posted about this year’s event. Visit www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk

Congratulations to Tuddenham Mill, the award-winning restaurant and boutique hotel near Bury St Edmunds, for being awarded 4 AA Silver stars! The restaurant has also retained the acclaimed 3 Rosettes for culinary excellence after a thorough AA inspection. Visit www.tuddenhammill.co.uk TUDDENHAM MILL

PICTURE BY CHRIS RIDLEY

Ne w s & Gossip

FIGBAR

FIGBAR & THE FOODBANK Well done to husband and wife team, Jaime and Stephanie Garbutt at Figbar, the dessertonly restaurant in Norwich, for teaming up with Norwich foodbank. Figbar is to donate £1 from every one sold of Chef Jaime’s signature plated dessert, Snickers, to the foodbank – which provides crisis food parcels to thousands of people across the greater Norwich area every year. Visit www.figbarnorwich.com

DRINK TO REMEMBER For those of you wondering where you can get hold of charity beer ‘Drink to Remember’ (around 15p per pint sold goes towards the former RAF North Creake memorial), it’s available in the nearby Black Lion Hotel, Carpenter’s Arms, Warham Horseshoes, Binham Chequers and The Lifeboat Inn Wells. And from this month it will also be bottled and for sale from The Real Ale Shop. Visit www.controltowerstays.com

NEW NAVY GIN Norwich-based St Giles Gin are celebrating their first anniversary this Easter by launching a naval strength gin! The 57 per cent proof ‘Diver’s Edition’ has been inspired by the fact that owner Simon Melton used to be a commercial diver. In keeping with the nautical theme, you’ll be able to taste sea kelp and Norfolk Samphire. Expect to find the 500ml bottle in Jarrold’s and Bakers and Larners. Visit www.stgilesgin.com

LAUNCH SUCCESS (pic below) So…Socius, the new restaurant with a New Yorkinspired twist, has opened its doors in Burnham Market, after much anticipation. Located just off North Street - adjacent to the new Foundry Place car park - Socius is the dream of young couple, Natalie Stuhler and Dan Lawrence, who are well known for their high end busy outside catering business, Socius Dining. Visit www.sociusnorfolk.co.uk

NEW DELI SPECIAL DINNERS We’re are liking the line-up of special themed evenings coming up this year at Bishop's Restaurant in Norwich. The April event might be fully booked, but in June there is a Champagne Dinner, which includes four courses and six Champagnes! Jerome from Norfolk-based Bijou Bottles will be sharing his knowledge about the fizz and how it compliments the food. Visit www.bishopsrestaurant.co.uk

IN WITH THE NEW We’re welcoming the opening of two new Norwich eateries: Pono Superfood Bar on St Giles Street - inspired by Hawaiian culture, and selling healthy, nutritious food; as well as Art Deco-style coffee shop and dessert lounge Mindoro in Westlegate. We’re getting spoilt for choice around here! Visit www.staypono.co.uk and www.mindorodesserts.co.uk

21

STOP press

Look out for NR2 Cafe and Deli on Trory Street in Norwich. It's a great new addition to the city's food and drink scene. Watch this space!

NEW VINTAGE Flint Vineyard, in Earsham, near Bungay has just released its new vintage, the Bacchus 2017, along with its first ever rosé and red Rosé 2017 and Pinot Noir Précoce 2017. The launch coincides with the start of the summer tour season (there will be two tours every Saturday at 10am and 2pm), and this year Flint has teamed up with Fen Farm Dairy, White Wood Dairy and Marsh Pig to offer cheese and charcuterie boards, alongside its awardwinning wine. Visit www.flintvineyard.com

WINNERS The East of England Co-op Producer of the Year Award 2018 was won by Fergus Howie of Wicks Manor Pork from Maldon in Essex. Tim Briscoe of Buxton Potatoes was the Norfolk winner and Havensfield Eggs was the Suffolk winner. Congratulations all round!


MAKING WAVES VISIT

SEVEN YEARS SINCE LAUNCHING, THE ANCHOR INN CONTINUES TO EXCITE FOODIES ON THE NORTH NORFOLK COAST, SAYS ZOE DUNFORD

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www.morstonanchor.co.uk


The Anchor -

E A T I N G

O U T

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y LUNC H comes withas a d n u uch " ....S T IVE twist, s an IMAGI NA TREACLE-marinated

Peer into the kitchen on a weekday morning and through a cloud of flour you might glimpse chef and co-owner Harry Farrow rolling out home-made pasta, or pastry chef Margi preparing damson sorbet - a favourite of manager Alex Woods. Binham Blue was one flavour that didn’t quite work but it won’t stop them innovating. I suggest pomegranate and samphire and Harry gamely promises to try, so I’ll report back! I dined on a Friday evening out of season but, as we head towards summer, it’s advisable to book to make sure of a table. I’ve learnt the hard way that Sunday lunch is particularly popular. Just a few months ago, a national newspaper listed it as one of the best 50 Sunday lunches in the UK. The roast beef is of particular note. Harry chooses the best sirloins on-the-bone from Wells butcher Arthur Howell, who hangs them for at least three weeks. On a Thursday, Harry takes it off the bone and marinates it in mustard powder and black treacle, vacuum packing it to seal in the flavour and to slightly cure the meat. It is then cooked in a water bath before being roasted. The result is tender and sweet. Underneath this and your Yorkshire pudding, you’ll find a gem of a purée - made with caramelised celeriac or parsley root. But I digress from my own meal! My dining companion and I were seated beside the roaring fire and within easy sight of the gin menu. I tried Monkey 47 served with juniper berries, lime and Fever Tree tonic. On return visits, I’m looking forward to Gin Mare or St Giles Gin, both inspired by the coast. My friend chose the New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc from the Marlborough region, a great accompaniment to seafood. She started with mushrooms on toast, which sounds unremarkable until you see the wild enoki and oyster

W

PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

ITH CHEEKS glowing from fresh coastal air, ears ringing from the cries of cavorting oystercatchers and eyes full of the beautiful marshes and quay, there is no better place to treat the remaining senses of taste and smell than the Anchor Inn, Morston. The emphasis here is on experimentation. Sunday lunch comes with an imaginative twist such as treacle-marinated beef, the Anchor Burger is served with bacon jam, while sorbet flavours are conjured in-house.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

BEEF"

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The Anchor -

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I was tempted away from seafood by a main dish of lamb (£16). As well as generous slices of perfectly pink roast lamb rump, it came with delicious dollops of braised lamb shoulder (much tastier than it looks), home-made pasta, rocket and pine nuts. The unexpected Anchor twist came in the form of a sharp goats’ curd that balanced the softer flavours and made the whole dish one to relish. My friend let me try her Brancaster mussels (£16.50), prepared with chorizo, Aspall Cyder, onions, garlic, cream and served with more of Ed’s bread. It was a welcome change to enjoy such strong flavours with a North Norfolk favourite. Other seafoods that make an appearance on the menu include lobster and smoked salmon from Simon Letzer in Brancaster, oysters from Richard Loose in the same village and crabs from Arthur Weston in Weybourne. The sorbet flavours we tried for dessert were raspberry, apple and white peach (£1.50 per scoop). Harry looks forward to new flavours made possible by the changing seasons. His quest to innovate also applies to finding ways to address environmental issues such as plastic packaging. He and fellow director Rowan Glennie won’t just be blown where the salty wind takes them, but will navigate their own path.

mushrooms topped with grilled honey goats’ cheese and served on locally-baked sourdough. The Anchor is justifiably proud of its bread, which they call simply Ed’s bread and Simon’s sourdough. I dived straight into seafood with Miso fish broth. Fungus-fermented soy beans don’t sound especially promising but I find the flavour of miso delicate and moreish - the essence of umami. It was served with mussels, cod cheeks, coriander and mushrooms, plus buckwheat noodles for a bit of depth. Both starters were £8.50. HARRY FARROW

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STILL A ST 1 CHOICE THE LAST IN NORWICH CELEBRATES 28 YEARS IN THE WINE BAR AND RESTAURANT BUSINESS THIS MONTH. PERFECT TIMING, THEREFORE, FOR EMMA OUTTEN TO REVISIT WITH HER EDITOR

T

HE LAST WINE BAR and Brasserie has long since been the first choice when it comes to celebrating a special occasion here in Norwich. For me, the Norwich institution in a former Victorian shoe factory has been the go-to place for birthdays with girlfriends, interviews over long, liquid lunches and the odd (surprisingly wellbehaved) hen party. And it holds a special place in my heart as it was the setting for one of my last suppers, before giving birth to my one and only - and boy did she kick as soon as I’d finished eating!

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The Last Wine Bar -

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This month The Last is 28 years old, which is no mean feat in this day and age. There are not many other restaurants that have been going that long in the city (in fact, I can only think of one). James Sawrey-Cookson and Ecky Limon are the directors of the show (although you’re more likely to find Ecky at the Blue Joanna Bar and Kitchen on Unthank Road these days). They’ve always tended to do their own thing, and manage to be on-trend without following the vagaries of foodie fashion.

VISIT

www.l astwin ebar.co .uk It has expanded over the years, and is rather labyrinthine, split as it is over two levels. The restaurant side has had a spring refresh, and now there’s much more of a sense of cohesion between the restaurant and bar, colour-scheme wise. On the far wall, the Country and Eastern cushions scattered across the mellow yellow banquette seating have softened things up somewhat and I particularly liked the wooden wine box ‘bricks’ on the feature wall. The bar remains pretty much unchanged and still has a great buzz about it on a Friday night – hey, the end of the working week is always worth celebrating. It’s a sophisticated sort of place, and yet is gently understated – there’s a friendly feel, with lots of regulars, and the manager, Emma, seems to know all of them! After an uplifting glass of Prosecco, editor Sarah and I were shown to our table. We liked the fact that there is a both a bar and restaurant menu, and that you can mix and match (although the bar menu is not available on a Saturday night).

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

27


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THE ANCHOR INN, The Street, Morston, Norfolk NR25 7AA | morstonanchor@gmail.com

THE ANCHOR INN, The Street, Morston, Norfolk NR25 7AA | morstonanchor@gmail.com


The Last Wine Bar -

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Now, the wine list was always going to be extensive (there’s maybe more than 100), not to mention ambitious and unusual, but our choice was a simple one: it had to be ‘A Great White’, a Vermentino from Languedoc (£19.95), specially selected by James and Ecky to celebrate their 25th anniversary just a few years back. We kick-started things with warm sourdough bread and butter, then chose starters from the bar menu – all were priced at £6.50. I went for the grilled halloumi cheese, with slow roasted tomato and cashew pesto – this was absolutely delicious and turned out to be my favourite course (a case of peaking too soon!). The plentiful pesto topped things off perfectly. Sarah had the char-grilled bacon, blue cheese, pear and walnut salad, which, she reported, was good and crispy – and she liked the fact it didn’t come dripping in a heavy sauce. For mains we chose from the restaurant menu: I had the barbequed celeriac, with borlotti beans, cavolo nero, hazelnuts, and Binham Blue (£15). The celeriac was surprisingly filling (it had something of the jacket potato about it in terms of size), and I loved the crispy, cheesy balls (I think I might’ve mentioned my cheese addiction, before...). Sarah went for the catch of the day, which was, on this particular day, sea bream. It was beautifully cooked, with great spices and flavours - the accompanying aubergine was very tasty and she liked the quirky mini poppadoms. We probably over ordered by also going for a side dish of mixed seasonal greens (£3.50) which saw plenty of kale and sprouting broccoli – but then you can never have enough greens.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Finally, we tackled desserts – Sarah had to have The Last’s iconic cheesecake which she reported as being as rich and satisfying as always. This version was with blood orange (£7.25) so had a tangy, zesty tone which went well with creamy richness of the cheesecake. Whereas I opted for the rhubarb, custard panna cotta, pistachio and rhubarb sorbet (£6.50), which was suitably seasonal and delicately refreshing. We signed off with some loose leaf, mint tea at the end of an enjoyable, relaxed evening. The Last has been going since 1990 and, quite frankly, has still got it. Put it this way, Sarah rebooked for a month’s time, on her way out!


The White Horse -

I N T E R V I E W

-

VISIT

www.whitehorseblakeney.co.uk

J

UST UP from Blakeney Quay, The White Horse has the Adnams stamp all over it, from the bright blue and pink cushions in the white and bright conservatory restaurant to the impressive range of Adnams drinks behind the bar. The White Horse used to be very much the ‘locals’ pub’ of Blakeney, in a prime spot on the High Street. These days there are fewer locals and a few more second homers living in the North Norfolk village, and the refurbished pub has become one of Adnams’ coastal collective of managed pubs and hotels and the only one in Norfolk. New General Manager Matthew Palmer has come by way of London and, prior to that, The Crown Hotel in Southwold, where he was Restaurant Manager. He says: ‘The chance to come back to Adnams was too good to miss. And there’s a lot of similarity between here and The Crown, in terms of dining style, service, rooms and décor.’ At The White Horse, there are nine boutique-style rooms, with a couple of the rooms enjoying views of the coastal marshes and sea beyond. A ground floor family suite also happens to be dog friendly.

A TASTE OF SUFFOLK *

THE WHITE HORSE IN BLAKENEY IS THE ONE AND ONLY ADNAMS MANAGED PUB IN NORFOLK. EMMA OUTTEN HEADS TO THE COAST TO MEET NEW GENERAL MANAGER MATTHEW PALMER


might be Adnams Brown Sauce or Broadside Chutney, for example, and desserts can be paired up with, say, Adnams Pachereno Dessert Wine or Pomme Pom Spirit. Matthew promises that a much-expanded wine list is coming soon. He is looking forward to approaching his first busy season at The White Horse, and is planning a series of events in The Gallery, such as food and wine pairing evenings – a case of watch this space!

It would be fair to say the popular pub attracts the wellies and binoculars brigade. ‘Walkers and bird-watchers are our bread and butter,’ says Matthew. Not surprising really, considering it’s so close to the coastal path to CleyNext-The-Sea. Then there are the seal trips, of course, and nearby attractions include world-famous Wiveton Café and Holt. The bar area is nice and cosy, and behind the conservatory restaurant is an attractive walled courtyard area. Matthew says: ‘We are incredibly dog friendly - it’s something people are surprised about. On a Saturday there’s probably more dogs than kids!’ He adds: ‘We’ve got a settled kitchen team here. Our Head Chef, Mark Anderson, is one of the best chefs I’ve worked with – he’s very creative and cares a lot. ‘We use fresh, local produce and everything is made from scratch. We are now transitioning into our spring menu but we also have daily specials. I would class it as very good pub food, and there’s a couple of restaurantstyle dishes on the menu, too.’ Not only that, there’s a sizeable vegetarian/vegan section, with Matthew commenting: ‘I am a vegetarian (and my partner is vegan) so what I wanted to do was have three to five options. It’s going really well and is something I’m very big on.’ As for the drink offering, it goes without saying that you can expect an extensive range of well-kept, awardwinning Adnams beers, wines and spirits – and they are often used in recipes to offer something a little different, such as Adnams Copperhouse Gin Cured Letzers Smoked Salmon, Ghost Ship Beer Battered Haddock, or Beef and Blackshore Stout Suet Pudding. Even the condiments

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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BLAKENEY HARBOUR

*in North Norfolk


VISIT

www.rnaa.org.uk

GREG SMITH

T

HE CHIEF EXECUTIVE of the Royal Norfolk Agricultural Association doesn’t really know where his love of all things agricultural comes from. ‘I’m a Norwich boy, north of the city, and had nothing to do with agriculture when I was young,’ says Greg Smith. ‘My brother and I both sang and got choral scholarships at Norwich School.’ However, he recalls: ‘I worked in the summer holidays on farms - pig farms mainly - and for our local butcher for at least one Christmas. I learnt three things in that job: how to dress a turkey; how to make sausages; and never to draw a knife towards you when you’re cutting meat.’ He adds: ‘I also kept chickens at home.’

Although he says he wasn’t particularly academic, Greg went on to study Agricultural and Food Marketing at Newcastle University. Afterwards, London beckoned – and a career in market research and consultancy, initially working for clients in the agricultural and food sectors in the UK and further afield. Although he adds: ‘In parallel with that I had a military itch that needed scratching - I became an army reservist. My military career took me to the top of the reservists.’ Greg was the MOD’s two-star (Major General) policy advisor for Reserves and Youth until 2013. By that time he had already returned to Norfolk, or near Aylsham, to be more precise. Describing himself as a ‘Norfolk boy who’s married a Norfolk girl’ (Greg married Rebecca in 1982), he adds, ‘we knew that one day we would move back to Norfolk because why wouldn’t you?’ Greg has been chief of the RNAA, which is based at the Norfolk Showground, since 2012. The charity and membership organisation aims to promote a better understanding of food, farming and the countryside. ‘I was approached and asked whether I would be interested in this role and thought ‘why not?’ After all, the role would involve ‘all sorts of things which appealed to my butterfly nature, including food and drink.’ Although the RNAA is best known for the Royal Norfolk Show – the biggest two-day event of its kind in the UK – it also runs a year-round events venue and programme of activity in support of its educational objectives and is keen on growing its own events portfolio. First up is the Spring Fling on April 10. ‘The Spring Fling is a fantastic Easter celebration,’ says Greg, ‘and we are continuing to evolve that.’ Then it’s the big one – the Royal Norfolk Show on June 27 and 28. Greg says: ‘We have worked really hard at ensuring that the show is absolutely at the top of its game in all respects.’ This year’s three key themes for the Show are Field to Fork, Wellbeing and Our Coast.

MORE THAN A

SHOWMAN GREG SMITH IS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF THE ROYAL NORFOLK AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION, THE ORGANISATION THAT BRINGS US SPRING FLING, THE ROYAL NORFOLK SHOW AND HARFEST EACH YEAR. HE EXPLAINS TO EMMA OUTTEN HOW THEY ALL SHOWCASE THE BEST OF THE COUNTY’S FOOD AND DRINK

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Greg Smith -

B I G

I N T E R V I E W

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" I’ve got SHEEP

at home that need SORTING OUT... I'm a bad SHE PHE RD!

So does Greg love his food? ‘My wife would say too much and too often! I’ll eat anything in the main. I think we’re blessed in this region with some really good food producers – and we grow food ourselves. I’ve got a wife whose father was a flour miller so she’s grown up in the food industry and is a great cook. And I’ve got a daughter who’s always keen to encourage us to experiment - we’ve played across the whole carnivore and non-carnivore continuum.’ Greg and Rebecca have also got two boys, and daughter-in-law Hannah Yeadon just so happens to be a cookery writer. As for drink, he’s ‘more of a G&T and too much red wine on a Friday’ imbiber, although he adds: ‘I’ve redeveloped my interest in craft beers since I’ve been here.’ Although the 62-year-old doesn’t exactly sound like the ‘pipe and slippers’ type, he does sound settled back here in Norfolk. Besides, as he says: ‘I’ve got sheep at home that need sorting out - my little Borerays.’ Although he jokes: ‘I’m a bad shepherd!’

Once again the RNAA will be supporting small businesses and local food and drink producers thanks to its continued collaboration with HSBC. ‘I think Norfolk producers have always had access to the Show’s Food and Drink Experience but we want to give people a fair chance.’ Work on the Show never stops: ‘We work on about an 18 month lead in on the Royal Norfolk Show so we’re already planning 2019.’ Then, come the autumn, it’s the turn of HarFest, a free one-day fayre to celebrate Norfolk’s harvest, but this time held off-site, at Norwich Cathedral. Greg says: ‘Picking up the seasonal theme we devised and then launched the HarFest concept – the first outing was in 2016 - and it is our way of taking food, farming and the countryside into the city.’ It sounds as though it was Greg’s idea: ‘I’ve a lifelong connection with Norwich Cathedral - it’s a special place to me.’ And he adds: ‘It provides another channel for Norfolk food and drink producers to take their products to market and to put them on show.’ Are there plans for a winter event, to complete the four seasons? It sounds as though Greg and the team are thinking of new things all the time and he acknowledges there’s a gap, but hints: ‘that’s another story!’

"

ROYAL NORFOLK SHOW

HARFEST

HARFEST

SPRING FLING

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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PROGRAMME MANAGER, IN HOTEL, HOSPITALITY, CATERING AND TOURISM, JOE MULHALL SAYS:

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C I T Y

C O L L E G E

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C

‘I’m really proud of teachers, such as Martin, at the Hotel School, and the wealth of experience that they bring back to the classroom, to inspire our students to use their skills and qualifications on leaving college as a tool to enable them to find employment worldwide, and to enjoy the benefits that travel can bring to them. Everyone eats, whether it’s on a yacht, aeroplane or train - that’s why I manage hospitality and tourism, because that sector is so closely linked.’

HEF LECTURER at City College Norwich, Martin Smith, is probably too modest to mention to his students that his first job overseas, as a private chef on a luxury yacht in the South of France, involved him rubbing shoulders with Denzel Washington. Or that a subsequent charter involved him playing football with Rod Stewart! Martin is the perfect example of a Hotel School tutor who has travelled the world thanks to the skills he learnt whilst studying at the college. The 47-year-old had originally studied City and Guilds 706/1 and 706/2 in professional cookery as well as 707/1 and 707/2 in front of house (the latter holding him in good stead when it came to dealing with famous clients). He recalls: ‘Thirty years ago this year I was in my first year as a student here. I’m a local lad and so afterwards, I worked a little bit in the industry, in some nice restaurants.’

THE WORLD IS YOUR

OYSTER

GRADUATE FROM THE HOTEL SCHOOL AT CITY COLLEGE NORWICH AND THE WORLD REALLY CAN BE YOUR OYSTER, AS EMMA OUTTEN DISCOVERED WHEN SHE HEARD THE TRAVEL TALES OF CHEF LECTURER MARTIN SMITH VISIT

www.ccn.ac.uk

34


" It became a

nice little earner, COOKING for BILLIONAIRES, no less." Then, when he was around 21, he took the plunge and went abroad. ‘A very good friend of mine went to Antibes in the south of France, and worked in a luxury villa, so I went, too, and walked up and down the quay looking for work, and lucked out when I got my first job.’ It became a nice little earner, cooking for billionaires, no less. He would do it for about six months of the year, travelling all the way around the Mediterranean, from Morocco to Turkey and all the islands in-between. Martin, who found himself working on yachts up to 60 metres long, explains the lifestyle: ‘You’re the only chef, with probably about 10 crew, and 14 to 16 guests, and you’ve got to look after them all to the best of your ability. You’re working a 16 to 18 hour day, and you don’t get a day off either as they’re on the boat for two to three weeks.’ But as he points out: ‘The money is very good and the lifestyle is amazing - when you do get time off, you can really enjoy yourself.’ His summer job led to winter work, too. Whilst back home working at The Wildebeest, one of the families he’d worked for tracked him down. As a result, Martin became a personal chef in Los Angeles for two winters. He ended up travelling all over America - his client had several houses and would also think nothing of

MARTIN SMITH

THE WILDEBEEST (PREVIOUS EMPLOYER OF MARTIN)

heading to Mexico for a weekend. ‘It was an amazing experience and I became part of the family, which was really nice.’ Martin adds: ‘I also worked in the Caribbean, travelling from Antigua all the way to Venezuela.’ He met his future wife whilst travelling abroad and they then went on to work in a ski resort in Alpe d’Huez, France. ‘One thing I would encourage students to do when they finish college is a chalet season as a lot of the people who work there are young and it is great fun.’ And, with recipes online nowadays, it’s a lot easier for a young chef to travel, as Martin explains: ‘You don’t even need to carry your books. I used to travel with a set of chef knives under my arm (you could back then) and a couple of cookbooks and a lot of written recipes.’ One of the cookbooks was his college textbook, Practical Cookery, which students still use today. ‘The techniques we’re teaching students will hold them in good stead – they are the classics.’ He came back to Norwich around 10 years ago and joined the college, teaching students from entry level all the way to level three. ‘That’s the beauty of the job – I’m really happy to be here because of the variety.’

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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ASK ROGER *

EACH MONTH ROGER HICKMAN, CHEFPROPRIETOR OF THE AWARD-WINNING ROGER HICKMAN’S RESTAURANT IN NORWICH, SHARES HIS TOP KITCHEN TIPS AND ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS ON ALL THINGS CULINARY

www.rogerhickmansrestaurant.com

ROGER HICKMAN

VISIT

Can you suggest a lemon curd recipe? I make my lemon curd in a Thermomix, an amazing machine which blends and cooks at the same time. But if your kitchen doesn’t boast this rather expensive piece of kit, you can achieve the same results using a bowl over a pan of simmering water. Simply whisk 125g of caster sugar, four egg yolks and the zest and juice of three lemons in a pan, then add 125g of melted unsalted butter. Put the bowl over a pan of barely simmering water, and whisk until it gets to a ribbon stage - this will take around 10-12 minutes, depending on how hot your water is. Cool the bowl over iced water, and there you have it - lemon curd. It really is that simple.

What is your favourite spring ingredient? I love wild garlic, because it is only available at the start of spring - so really signals the beginning of the better weather, and the season of fresh, new ingredients. Wild garlic is native to this country, and you can eat both the leaves and flowers. Although it has a pungent smell - catch wafts of it as you pass through the countryside at this time of year - its taste is much mellower than bulb garlic. You can use the leaves in risottos, soups and sauces, and the flowers give a lovely garlic kick to salads. It is also free, and easily foraged in hedgerows and woods, but you can buy it at this time of year in most farm shops, and on Norwich Market. My recipe this month takes garlic as its theme, incorporating wild and bulb, as well as that other great flavour of spring, lamb.

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[

[Serves 4

C O L U M N

ROGER HICKMAN'S

LAMB SWEETBREADS WITH TEXTURES OF GARLIC INGREDIENTS 500g of lamb sweetbreads; potato starch; butter; 2 whole heads of garlic, plus 4 cloves; milk; 16 wild garlic leaves METHOD Put the sweetbreads in a pan of cold water and bring to the boil. Drain and refresh in cold water. Once cool, trim the sinew from the sweetbreads. Roll them in potato starch and shallow fry them in butter for a minute on each side until they are golden. Drain on a clean J cloth. Take the two heads of garlic and separate and peel the cloves. Cover with milk and bring to the boil. Discard the milk and repeat twice more – this will remove the bitterness from the garlic. When your third lot of milk has boiled, turn the heat down and cook slowly until the garlic is soft. Then blitz the garlic and milk with a knob of butter and little salt (no pepper) in a food processor until you have a smooth purée. Take the four garlic cloves, peel them and slice very thinly with a mandolin. Deep fry in rapeseed oil at 140°C (it is important not to burn them) for about 30-40 seconds, until they are crispy and golden. Remove from the oil and drain on a clean J cloth. Wilt the wild garlic leaves in a small amount of butter and the same amount of water for about 30 seconds. The butter and water will form an emulsion which will coat the leaves. Serve the sweetbreads on a bed of the purée, with the garlic crisps and wild garlic leaves, and a potato or celeriac fondant or terrine

*If you have a question for Roger, send it to sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk


BRUNCH

From patisserie and pan perdu, to Norfolk mushrooms on country toast and scrambled Havensfield free range eggs with award-winning Royal Warrant John Ross smoked salmon, enjoy breakfast or brunch at Benji’s Restaurant. Find us in Norfolk’s favourite independent department store, floor 1

LONDON STREET, NORWICH 01603 660661 JARROLD.CO.UK

Café open: Mon-Fri 9am-4pm Sat 9am-4pm Sun 9am-3.30pm

Goodies’ famous All-Day Breakfast A South Norfolk taste sensation!

The freshest local, quality ingredients including Goodies own handmade sausages and cured bacon from our Food Hall. Served all day, every day.

Goodies Food Hall French’s Farm, Wood Lane, Pulham, Diss IP21 4XU T: 01379 676880 Plenty of parking and a lovely children’s play area

goodiesfoodhall.co.uk

Just off the A140 @goodiesfoodhall


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R E C I P E S

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INGREDIENTS 1tbsp of thick Greek yogurt; 1tbsp of apple juice; 25g of oat bran; 1tbsp of seeds - I like a mixture of pumpkin, linseed and sunflower seeds; 1tbsp of raspberries (I use fresh in season and frozen the rest of the year); 1tbsp of blueberries; honey to taste

01.

METHOD 1. Stir together the apple juice and yogurt and then simply layer the ingredients in a glass with a final layer of seeds and blueberries 2. You can eat it instantly and it will be delicious or it keeps well in the fridge for up to 2 days

WHAT’S FOR

BREAKFAST? LUCY BARTLETT HAS TWO OPTIONS FOR A HEALTHY START TO THE DAY 01.

RASPBERRY & BLUEBERRY Bircher Muesli SE RV ES 1

02.

Roasted PEPPER & GOATS' CHEESE Frittata SE RV ES 2

THESE ARE MY very favourite breakfast recipes. Both are very flexible. I play with the ingredients according to what I have in the garden/fridge/cupboard. Passion fruit and mango are a delicious alternative to the berries in the Muesli and courgette and mint make a pleasing frittata.

INGREDIENTS 4 roasted peppers (I use prepared ones in oil); 1tbsp of oil from the roasted pepper jar (or olive oil if you are roasting the peppers); 1 red onion; 4cm of goats’ cheese log; a handful of parsley, chopped; a handful of basil, chopped; 1tsp of Dijon mustard; 4 free range eggs; a pinch of salt and a grind of black pepper

02.

METHOD 1. Finely slice the onions and roasted peppers 2. Cut three thin slices from the goats’ cheese and then roughly chop the remainder 3. Chop the parsley and basil 4. Beat the eggs with a teaspoon of mustard, a pinch of salt and a couple of generous grinds of black pepper 5. Mix the parsley and basil in to the egg mixture 6. Heat an oven proof frying pan over a medium heat with 1tbsp of oil then add the sliced onions and soften for 2-3 minutes 7. Add the sliced peppers and roughly chopped goats’ cheese to the pan and stir until mixed through 8. Pour in the egg mixture, stirring gently for a few seconds to ensure that the onions and peppers are evenly coated 9. Place the goats’ cheese slices over the surface of the frittata and place under the grill for 7-8 minutes until the frittata is gently puffed up and the goats’ cheese is starting to colour 10. Leave to stand for 5 minutes and then turn out onto a plate, cut into wedges and serve warm

INGREDIENTS FOR COOKS is a family-run Suffolk-based business which supplies a wide variety of ingredients for both home and professional cooks. Visit www.ingredientsforcooks.co.uk


A

S THE OLD ADAGE GOES, we should all breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dine like a pauper, and it seems we are waking up to the idea of doing exactly that, with Brits apparently spending £7.3m on seeking breakfast outside of the home last year. It’s been identified as a real growth market, and the first meal of the day is set to take restaurants by storm in the UK this year.

THE BREAKFAST BOOM Check out the various foodie trends for this year and much mention is being made of the most important meal of the day: BREAKFAST. Emma Outten reports

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F E A T U R E

So is breakfast becoming the new lunch? We already have bottomless brunches on offer in our city centre bars, which neatly ties the two meals together, and can throw in unlimited alcohol for good measure. And it must speak volumes that there was even a breakfast Martini launched at Norwich Cocktail Week last year! The all-day breakfast has become particularly big news. We are welcoming the fact that some of our newest cafes are tapping in to the breakfast boom by serving the first meal of the day all day, every day, rather than just until, say, noon. That and the fact that some of our newest restaurants are catching the early birds and launching breakfast menus along with the usual lunch and dinner ones. And we know of at least one pub which turns into something of a coffee shop of a morning, with fully-trained baristas and breakfasts on offer. So what are we eating? A full English is always going to be top of the menu, but, more specifically, locally sourced breakfasts have become big news: expect free range pork sausage and cured bacon from Suffolk, kippers from Lowestoft, and locally pressed apple juice. Bread and croissants, tea and coffee, ham and eggs can all be locally sourced. Down in London, where these food trends tend to start, it says something that a new Turkish inspired fresh yoghurt bar, Mandira, has just launched The Breckland Brown Egg Menu, created using eggs from Highfield Farm in Norfolk. Porridge is particularly popular at the moment – and not just in Norwich, where we can boast our very own brand! It’s fast become a trend amongst foodies (just search #porridge on Instagram), which is probably one of the reasons why, north of the border, VisitScotland has created the Porridge Grand Tour: ideas for porridgethemed trips in Scotland where oat enthusiasts can indulge their love of porridge and even eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner!

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

And that fruit sensation, the avocado, which has also graced millions of Instagram feeds, is quickly becoming a breakfast staple. Internationally inspired dishes are par for the course. Breakfast burritos, tacos, chorizo hash, and huevos rancheros, are well and truly on Mexican-themed menus; American-style pancakes with bacon, and eggs benedict, are still proving popular; or how about Spanish omelette first thing in the morning? The list goes on. So what are you waiting for? Get up and get out there!

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Breakfast at The Black Horse

Served Saturdays & Sundays from 9.30am until 11.30am We cater for all needs, including vegan & gluten free options Booking advised

01603 630880

Email info@theblackhorsenorwich.com to find out more

www.theblackhorsenorwich.net

D LY HE EW IS N RB U EF

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THE SURREY KITCHEN & BAR

COME & SEE US FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER - OR JUST A DRINK!

Contemporary dining with a relaxed atmosphere 44-46 Surrey Street, Norwich, Norfolk NR1 3NY

01603 559135


las t

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A family run, fully licensed café in Burnham Deepdale on the beautiful North Norfolk coast

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

STOCKING LOCAL PRODUCE

Served all day!!

COME AND TRY something from our full breakfast menu served daily 8am until 11.45 or try our delicious home cooked classic breakfast served all day

US 8 LL 24 CA 2 678 9 016

THROWERS OF LUDHAM

Dalegate Market Main Road Burnham Deepdale Norfolk PE318FB

We can supply everything you need for your perfect picnic www.throwers.co.uk

www.deepdale-cafe.co.uk

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HIGH STREET, LUDHAM, NORFOLK, NR29 5QQ

LOWESTOFT

visit our two floor department store with dedicated areas catering to:

Kitchen & Cookshop • Carpets & flooring • curtains & blinds • beds, bedding & Towels • furniture • giftware • Tearooms find us at: 3-23 Suffolk ROAd NR32 1DZ call us today on: 01502 528599 @KerrysLowestoft

@KerrysLowestoft


01.

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02. 03.

SHOPPING:

CHEESE WE ALL NIBBLE AWAY ON CHEESE, DON’T WE? WHO CAN RESIST A SPOT OF BINHAM BLUE OR NORFOLK MARDLER? NOT US!

05.

06.

WHERE TO BUY 01. T&G Woodware Scimitar Collection cheese board with wire cutter £19.99, Roys of Wroxham, www.roys.co.uk 02. Nambe Harmony cheese board with knife, £75, Jarrold’s, Norwich, www.jarrold.co.uk 03. Gourmet set of four cheese plates, £19, Kerry’s Home Furnishing, Lowestoft, www.kerrysuk.com 04. Par Lane cheese dome, £55, Barefoot Living, Burnham Market, www.barefoot-living.co.uk 05. Cheese Rotage - £56.99, Bakers and Larners, Holt, www.bakersandlarners.co.uk 06. Croft copper fondue, £85, John Lewis, www.johnlewis.com

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S H O P

F R O N T

NOW OPEN!

EDITOR SARAH HARDY REPORTS ON THE OPENING OF THE NEW LOOK FOOD HALL AT BAKERS AND LARNERS IN HOLT

VISIT

www.bakersandlarners.co.uk

WITH EVERYTHING from loose leaf tea to organic chocolate, Norfolk whisky to Belgian waffles, the Food Hall at Bakers and Larners in Holt is a paradise for us foodies. It has just had a redesign throughout, with a new ceiling, floor, lighting and shelf fixtures installed, as well as an upgraded air conditioning system.The fine wine department, which is home to more than 1100 wine varieties, has been completely redesigned and now boasts one of the county's first Enomatic wine tasting machines. The automated system offers a selection of the retailer's finest vintages that are stored at the optimum temperature for the ideal tasting experience. There is also a new patisserie and bakery, where goods including sourdoughs, muffins and cheesecakes, are baked daily, and the range of own brand produce such as jams, chutneys and coffees, has increased. The extensive health food range of more than 800 products remains, with much for diabetics and those on a gluten-free diet. More than 100 people attended the opening, including local suppliers and producers such as Sarah and Patrick Saunders from Black Shuck Gin, which is based in Fakenham. And several producers, such as Archangel Gin from Walsingham, were offering tastings. The delicatessen, where in excess of 100 cheeses are on offer, was buzzing, and the butchery counter, run by H.V. Graves from Briston, groaned under the weight of their tempting selections. Managing director Michael Baker gave a short speech, thanking everyone for their support, and simply encouraged us to dive in and explore! www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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The S

n Hotel wa

Who are you and where do you work? My name is Ross Bott, I am the Executive Head Chef of the newly refurbished Swan Hotel in Southwold on the Suffolk Coast. I was born in Zimbabwe, and then relocated to England with my parents when I was six years old. ROSS BOTT

How long have you been there? I have been on hand at The Swan from September 2017 as part of a small team, helping recruit staff, creating new innovative dishes, and making sure everything was perfectly ready for our re-opening in October 2017. Where were you before? I spent time working closely with twice Michelin starred chef Atul Kochhar, opening Hawkyns, a restaurant located in Amersham, Buckinghamshire. This was an exciting endeavour, especially as this was Atul’s first English adventure.

MY LIFE ON A PLATE ROSS BOTT is the Executive Head Chef at the newly refurbished SWAN HOTEL in SOUTHWOLD. Here he talks about his love of foraged food and how, if he wasn’t a chef, he’d happily be an archaeologist

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What is your favourite ingredient? I am passionate about produce that is foraged; food that has rich, earthy flavours. If I had to pick a favourite foraged food, it would be wood sorrel.

www.theswansouthwold.co.uk

Who has inspired you? Growing up and watching some of the chefs on television such as Ainsley Harriott, Gary Rhodes and many others got me excited about cooking. My mother would cook at home and I regularly enjoyed cooking from a young age.

VISIT

Where did you train? I spent three years at Birmingham College of Food, Tourism and Creative Studies, training for my NVQ.

Got a favourite gadget? A Thermomix is a staple for any kitchen. Working in a restaurant where there is a lot to

prepare, this is a fantastic gadget that can lend itself to many different uses, including such things as blending, cooking, weighing, steaming, and so much more. What is your signature dish? My signature dish that I am very proud of is my deconstructed fish and chips. This has been a dish on our menu here at The Swan since we re-opened and continues to be a favourite. What do you like doing when you're not cooking? I enjoy visiting the gym and keeping fit in my spare time. Also, Southwold provides a beautiful background for a nice long run when the sun is out. Where do you like to eat out in the region? There are many fine restaurants in this area where I have dined before and continue to dine. However, after a long day at work, you can’t get better than The Little Fish and Chip Shop, just a few minutes’ walk from the hotel, to finish off the evening. What would you be doing if you were not a chef? Aside from my passion for cooking, I have always been fascinated with the field of archaeology and becoming an archaeologist. What's your foodie prediction for the year ahead? Healthy eating is something people are more conscious of these days, even when eating out. I believe there will be an increase in restaurants that will create new dishes that combine the occasion of eating out, with still being able to maintain a nutritionally balanced diet.

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RECIPE OVERLEAF


APRIL ECIA L RESTAURASP NT EVENTS

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TAKEAWAY CRABS & LOBSTER AVAILABLE FROM 10AM OPENING TIMES: SUN-THURS 10-5pm; FRI-SAT 10-8pm SERVING FOOD FROM 12 with Surf and Turf on Friday and Saturday CALL US: 01263 837359 OR 07999 959760 CROMER ROAD, WEST RUNTON, NORFOLK, NR27 9QA

www.rockybottoms.co.uk


The S

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R E C I P E

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FISH[ & CHIPS

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INGREDIENTS 480g of cod; 300g of split peas; 1/2 a pint of Adnams Ghost Ship beer; 200g of plain flour; sparkling water; 160g of unsalted butter; 2 pints of cream; 1 lemon; 1 gherkin; 2 banana shallots; sherry vinegar; rock salt, to season

METHOD 1. Soak the split peas overnight in 600g of water 2. Using ‘in season’ potatoes of your choice, peel and cut into chunky chips. Place in a pan of salted water, bring them up to boil and then turn off the heat and allow to sit for 10 minutes. Then drain the water and leave to cool. We’ll come back to these later 3. Fillet the cod and lightly season with rock salt for 30 minutes. Then wash the salt off and place it in the fridge to chill and dry off for an hour 4. Bring your split peas to the boil and overcook to create the pea mush (this can take longer than you expect) 5. Roll the cod into sausage-like shapes using Cling Film and tie both ends of the film 6. To make the batter, warm the beer gently in a pan. Add the flour to make a thick batter and add 3tbsp of sparkling water, then leave to sit at room temperature 7. Either heat a frying pan of oil to 180°C or reheat your fryer (if you have one) 8. Using a fork, drip the batter mix into the fryer/frying pan and move it forward and back, like a pendulum swing to create the ‘scraps’. Once they are golden brown, remove scraps from the fryer, drain on kitchen paper and leave to cool 9. Heat the cream in a pan and reduce by 50 per cent. Once reduced, remove from the heat and whisk in your butter slowly, piece by piece. Keep whisking to make a ‘beurre blanc’ 10. Using a hand blender, blitz the peas to a smooth paste, then add sherry vinegar and salt to taste. This is where things start to come together 11. Segment the lemon, dice the gherkin and shallots and add these to the beurre blanc. This does not need further heating 12. Simmer a pan of water and cook the cod for 16-20 minutes on a low heat 13. Now for your chips, you can either oven bake them for 25 minutes at 180°C, or fry for 14 minutes at 180°C 14. Start to build your dish by adding the split pea purée to the plate. 15. Remove the cod from the Cling Film using scissors and place next to your split pea purée 16. Now add your chips to the side and your scraps on top, and finish with our beurre blanc - this is our version of a ‘tartare’


LIGHT BITES

THIS MONTH FREE FROM RECIPE WRITER SARA MATTHEWS OFFERS US MEAT-FREE BUFFALO BITES AND DAIRY-FREE ICE CREAM SARA MATTHEWS is a qualified trainer, food consultant, recipe developer and food writer

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w. s a r a b y n at u r e . c o m


Sara By Nature

[

[Serves 4

CHOCOLATE AND CASHEW ICE CREAM

Yes, you can make amazing ice cream without dairy and this recipe is sure to satisfy your ice cream cravings INGREDIENTS 4tbsp of all-natural cashew butter (you can use other nut or seed butter if you prefer, this works very well with peanut butter); 50g of dairy free chocolate chips or shavings*; 1tsp of maple syrup (optional); 4 ripe bananas, peeled, halved and frozen METHOD Place the frozen bananas in a food processor and pulse until they resemble breadcrumbs, add the nut butter and maple syrup (if using) and blend on high, scraping down the sides, until creamy in texture - about 2-3 minutes. Then add the chocolate chips and pulse to combine and distribute evenly. Transfer to a freezer proof bowl and freeze for at least an hour to firm up before serving. Serve with a sprinkle of grated chocolate

F R E E

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*If you do not like or want chocolate you can substitute the chocolate for another flavour: sultanas work well as do goji berries

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CAULIFLOWER BUFFALO BITES

This recipe is a great substitution for buffalo wings, gluten free, dairy free and vegan. Enjoy dipped in the vegan ranch sauce for even more added flavour

For the Batter 300ml of plant milk (I used almond milk, but any plant milk would work); 150g of gram flour (also called besan and chickpea flour, it can be found in most supermarkets); 2tsp of garlic powder; 1tsp of onion powder; 1tsp of ground cumin; 1tsp of smoked paprika; a pinch of salt and pepper For the Sauce 1tbsp of vegan/dairy free butter/spread; 100ml of Frank’s RedHot sauce (you can use any buffalo hot sauce but Frank’s is not too hot, so guest friendly); 1/2tsp of garlic powder; 1tbsp of maple syrup

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METHOD Pre-heat the oven to 220°C /gas mark 7. Line a baking sheet with baking parchment. In a large bowl, whisk the milk, gram flour, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, paprika salt and pepper. Leave for at least 10 minutes for the batter to thicken. Dip your cauliflower florets one at a time into the batter and shake off the excess then place each one on the baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, turning over half way through. While the florets are in the oven, prepare the hot sauce. In a saucepan heat the butter, hot sauce, garlic powder and maple syrup until the butter melts, remove from the heat. Once the cauliflower is cooked, place each one in the hot sauce to coat completely and place back onto the baking sheet until all are coated, then put them back in the oven for a further 20-25 minutes, again turning half way through. Once cooked, serve with a cooling ranch sauce

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MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF

INGREDIENTS 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets

SERVES F OUR


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delivered to your BUSINESS including bespoke, hand-prepared vegetables

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Sara By Nature -

SERVES 6-8

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F R O M

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RAINBOW SLAW

Packed full of nutrients, this slaw is a colourful healthy addition to any table. Drizzle with ranch sauce or eat as it is INGREDIENTS 120g of red cabbage, finely shredded; 2 large carrots, peeled and cut with a julienne peeler (or coarsely grated if you do not have julienne peeler); 6 spring onions, chopped (green and white part); 50g of radishes, halved and finely sliced; 50g of stemmed kale, chopped (I used cavolo nero, but any kale will work); juice of 1 lemon; a large pinch of salt; 2-3tbsp seeds of your choice (I used a sunflower and pumpkin seed mix) METHOD In a large bowl place the kale, then drizzle over half the lemon juice and salt and massage the kale to soften slightly. Be careful not to over massage as you do not want it to break up. Add the remaining ingredients and the rest of the lemon juice and, with a large spoon or your hands, coat the ingredients with the lemon juice. Transfer to serving bowl. This salad can be kept in the fridge for up to 2 days

RANCH SAUCE

This ranch dressing is full of flavour and only takes five minutes to make. Great with Buffalo bites or drizzled over salad INGREDIENTS 1 packet of soft silken tofu, drained; 1tbsp of apple cider vinegar; 2tsp of garlic powder; 2tsp of onion powder; 1 heaped tbsp of fresh finely chopped parsley; 1 heaped tbsp of fresh finely chopped chives; salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste METHOD Place all ingredients into a food processor and blitz until smooth, creamy and combined, check seasoning and adjust to taste. Transfer mixture into a bowl and chill before serving. This dressing can be stored in the fridge for up to 3 days. Great as a dip but can also be used as a sandwich spread or alternative to mayo

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CHARLIE HODSON

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Our columnist CHARLIE HODSON tells us why he thinks food encourages greater understanding and tolerance

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THIS MONTH’S story begins at one of the monthly pop-up supper clubs I host at the Fur and Feather at Woodbastwick, near Acle.This particular evening had an African theme and the spice man himself, Rai Bukulu, founder of Norfolkbased spice blend firm, A De Piff, headed up the kitchen. As the evening came to an end, and we said our goodbyes, a lovely woman approached and asked if I would like to present an assembly at her school, which was a real first for me. Over the next week and several emails later, I decided to accept the invitation. My thoughts then went to: ‘What on earth am I going to talk about?’ So, I invited Rai to lead the assembly as he is someone who would not only add a little sparkle to an assembly stage, but would also inspire the children and show that, whatever life throws at you, you can succeed. Rai escaped Uganda, in East Africa, following the fall of Idi Amin and the subsequent intense civil unrest, as a child soldier in the 1980s. He endured guerilla warfare, the African bush and much hardship before settling in the place he now calls home - Norwich. Much of his early life remains unknown. He doesn’t know his birthday, for instance, but he decided to found his own spice mix company, A De Piff, which means add a pinch, in 2015. He grows many of his own herbs and chillis in his garden, and aims to recreate the flavours he remembers as a child. We decided to base our assembly on refugees, to highlight how much others can bring to an area, in our instance, Norfolk, either through food, manufacturing or any other profession. Learning to embrace and accept each other’s differences is how we become stronger. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing Rai for almost four years and use his mixes and rubs in much that I do. They add a very special something - real depth and flavour - and are all the more impressive when you know the story behind them and their maker. • Our next pop-up supper at The Fur and Feather takes place on April 30 with Joe Hurd from Saturday Morning Kitchen and The Munch Box, and also Norwich chef, Jon Gay RA

THE SPICE OF LIFE

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SPICE GIRL C O L U M N

MY LOVE OF VEGAN FOOD began with me being asked to cater for allergy-free/ vegetarian weddings, which in essence were vegan meals. Cooking and eating are, by their nature, sociable acts. Hence people who become restricted in their diets worry that they might also become restricted in their lives. Family meals or dinner with friends can become an act of isolation, with one meal for you and another for everyone else. Eating out can be equally fraught, its pleasure outweighed by the simple lack of anything on the menu that you can actually eat! I feel that the key to creating satisfying vegetarian/ vegan food is in the contrast. This is most evident in East Asian recipes, where the balance of hot versus cool, crisp versus soft, sweet versus sour, chilli heat versus refreshing herb, is all. This goes beyond East Asia though and, if you bear this in mind, it will add so much to your cooking, even if it is simply in making a perfectly balanced salad dressing or adding hot toasted nuts to a cool dish as a final flourish. Consider texture and temperature as much as taste in vegan cooking – it will elevate each dish you make. So will putting effort into the basics. When I started on my spice journey, I thought that spice was all about heat. But that's not the case. There are fragrant spices, robust spices and peppery spices. And they're used carefully and thoughtfully. Each has its own aroma and adds its own character to a dish. I have started to make my own spice mixes, with different blends used for different types of vegetables. The varieties are simply mind-boggling. When individual spices are combined with each other, they create another kind of magic. The three main ways to use spice in Indian food is to dry-roast and grind; fry in oil and then pound; or simply use them whole in what is called a tadka. Dry-roasted and fried spices can then be ground into wet or dry masalas (spice mixtures) and used according to the requirements of the dish. Dry-roasting is done for a number of reasons. Firstly, it removes excess moisture and makes the seeds and spices easier to grind. Secondly, it changes the flavour. As whole spices heat, they release volatile aromatics. These aromatics can then break down and recombine to form dozens of new compounds, adding complexity. Have a taste of a raw coriander seed and its roasted version and you'll notice a marked difference. The former is floral and lemony. The roasted one is intense, grassy and earthy. It's a completely different flavour you're getting out of one ingredient, in two ways. The best way is to toss whole spices in a dry skillet, stirring and tossing frequently over medium heat, until they begin to smell toasty and fragrant. Transfer them to a bowl and allow them to cool before incorporating into dishes or grinding in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated spice grinder.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

In her second column, JULIA MARTIN, of Purple Plum Catering, goes down the spice route to enhance her vegan cooking

VISIT

www.purpleplumcatering.co.uk

PICTURE BY RJA PHOTOGRAPHY

JULIA Martin

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ONE WORD

Wonders The titles of a couple of new cookbooks this month are super simple and to the point!

ROOTS

STAR BUY

by Tommy Banks

Jarrold price ÂŁ20 RRP ÂŁ25 Self-taught Michelin Star chef and twice winner of BBC2's Great British Menu, Tommy Banks shares his original cooking in this new book. Roots comprises dishes such as Blue Cheese with Spruce and Fir; Jerusalem Artichoke Fudge; Raw Deer; Beer and Woodland Gear and even a cocktail named Bedstraw Martinez (a Martini with foraged herb woodruff). Tommy's farming background steers both his menu and attitude about eating off the land. He sources local ingredients from the family farm and implements old fashioned techniques such as clamping, preserving and fermenting seasonal harvests. The three rather than four cooking seasons are based on the availability of locally grown produce close to his award-winning restaurant, The Black Swan in Oldstead, North Yorkshire. The 'Time of Abundance' is from May to August, followed by 'The Preserving Season' from October to December. 'The Hunger Gap' from January to May is the most challenging period, when ingredients preserved and stored from the previous year are used, along with some foraged new growth.


Cookbooks

THE HAPPY WORLD OF DRI DRI GELATO

by Adriano Petrillo £9.99

GOAT

HOW TO EAT A PEACH: MENUS, STORIES AND PLACES

by James Whetlor £20

by Diana Henry £25 James Whetlor, founder of the Cabrito Goat Company supplying goat meat sourced from British dairy farms to restaurants, butchers and catering suppliers, explores how food and farming culture developed in the west without the help of this staple of global agriculture. With 100 dishes created by the author as well as guest recipes from world-renowned chefs, including Yotam Ottolenghi, Gill Meller, Neil Rankin and Jeremy Lee, they show how an underused ingredient can be delicious cooked fast and lean, or slow cooked in curries, stews, braises and roasts, from kebabs to stir-fries to sausages. Fifty per cent of the royalties from sales of this book will be donated to Farm Africa.

When Diana Henry was 16 she started a menu notebook (an exercise book covered in wrapping paper) to write up meals she wanted to cook. She kept and used the book for years. Deciding on what to cook and which dishes to put together is still one of the favourite aspects of cooking for her because, rather than combining dishes solely for practical reasons, they can work as a succession of flavours, to evoke different places, conjure memories and create different moods. Diana shares some of her favourite dishes in menus that go through the year and to different parts of the world.

Don 't miss

DI AR Y DA TE S

April 19, 3.30pm

ENJOY AFTERNOON TEA with lead ing Norfolk novelist Rose Tremain as she launches her new memoir, Rosie, Scenes From A Vanished Life. Held in Benji’s Res taurant on Jarrold’s first floor, two different types of tickets are available. See online for more.

May 22

89 JARROLD SPRING LITERARY LUN CH, Top of the Terrace restaurant, Norwich City Footbal l Club

For those who have a rarely used ice cream maker at home, this is the book to put it through its paces to create the tastiest Italian-style gelato, sorbet and granita. According to the author, a good gelato should be rich in flavour but you shouldn't feel full, even after you've eaten a pint of it, as it is made with milk rather than cream - so is much lighter and significantly lower in fat. There are simple recipes for vanilla, coffee, bitter chocolate, cookies and cream and tiramisu, as well as ideas for gelato-based drinks, including Italian classics such as Rossini (strawberry sorbet with Prosecco) and Sgroppino (lemon gelato blended with vodka or Prosecco).

THE WELLNESS REBEL by Pixie Turner

Jarrold price £15 RRP £20 Pixie Turner is a food blogger, biochemist and nutritionist. The Wellness Rebel is a dedicated guide to sorting nutrition fact from fiction using evidence based science and delicious recipes. Each chapter is themed around a common healthy food misconception such as 'Alkaline', 'Raw' and 'Superfoods'. Pixie shares her tips, tricks and tastiest recipes, including her popular Pixie Plates, for a healthy diet, free from detoxes and restrictions.


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SPRING LAMB

WITH EASTER WEEKEND AT THE VERY BEGINNING OF APRIL, H.V. GRAVES OF BRISTON OFFERS US A SUITABLY TIMELY SHOULDER OF LAMB RECIPE

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SLOW ROASTED [Serves 6-8 SHOULDER OF LAMB

INGREDIENTS 1 whole shoulder of local Briston lamb on or off the bone (not rolled); garlic bulb; fresh sprigs of rosemary; dried rosemary; 4 tbsp of rapeseed/olive oil; salt and crushed black pepper; 1 onion, cut into quarters; 4 carrots, cut into large chunks; 2 medium parsnips, cut into large chunks; 1 swede, cut into large chunks

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NO MEAT symbolises Easter more than lamb, and, served up with some spring greens and roast potatoes, it’s the ultimate traditional Sunday lunch for this time of year. From rack of lamb to roast lamb leg, it can be served up in all sorts of ways. However, H.V. Graves, based in Briston, near Holt, offers us a slow roasted shoulder of lamb recipe to feast on with friends and family.

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For the Gravy 3tbsp of plain flour; 1tbsp of redcurrant jelly; 1l of lamb or chicken stock METHOD 1. Using half of your garlic bulb, slice the cloves and place into a bowl with 1-2 tablespoons of oil. Add a tablespoon of dried rosemary and mix together to make your marinade. Coat the lamb with this, skin scored into diamonds to absorb the flavour, and set aside to marinate, ideally overnight for the flavours to infuse into the meat 2. Preheat oven to 150°C/300°F/Gas Mark 2 3. Remove the lamb from the bowl and add the vegetables to any remaining oil left in it (add more if necessary) and coat evenly. Season with salt and pepper 4. Place the vegetables and the remaining garlic cloves (unpeeled) into a roasting tin and sit the lamb, skin side up, on top. Add a few sprigs of fresh rosemary, cover with foil and place into the preheated oven for 2 and half to 3 hours. If you like crispy skin, remove foil for the last half hour 5. Remove from oven, place meat and veg into a serving dish, and leave to rest 6. Using the roasting tin with your meat juices, add the stock and redcurrant jelly, heat over a medium/high heat. Place the flour in a jug or bowl, add a small amount of water and mix together until a smooth consistency. Slowly add the liquid flour mix to your simmering stock, stirring constantly until you reach the thickness you require. Keep the stock simmering the whole time to cook out the flour

Serve with spring greens and roasted potatoes!

Family Butcher for over Seventy Years Home-reared beef from our own farm, home-cured and smoked bacon, gammon and ham. We make our own sausages in a variety of flavours. We also provide a delivery service to ALL areas, nationwide

24 Gladstone Place, Briston NR24 2LE www.hvgraves.co.uk


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PADDOCKS BUTCHERY & DELI STORES Church Farm, Norwich Road, Hethersett NR9 3AS 01603 812437 Paddock Farm Shop, Norwich Road, Mulbarton NR14 8JT 01508 578259

11 MARKET PLACE, AYLSHAM 01263 732280

Spring lamb, pork, beef or a delicious roast chicken? Come and chat to our butchers for brilliant Easter roast ideas

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Tel 01603 434253


Chef's World -

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AHEAD OF THE CURVE ANDREW JONES

Andrew Jones, chef patron of Farmyard, is never one to stand still. He tells us about his latest plans

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Gone are the days when a token wild mushroom risotto on the menu will tick the ‘veggie box’. So, the challenge I have set the guys in the kitchen is to get creative with veg. We now always have at least two vegetarian/vegan main courses on the menu that are not only imaginative but above all delicious and we have gluten and dairy free menus available at all times. We will also be hosting a quarterly ‘Farmyard: free from all’ night, the first of which is on April 25, where we will be cooking an entirely meat free menu with dairy and gluten free choices too. We have some big guns in our corner where producing great tasting veg is concerned. We have an incredibly dedicated grower, Hannah Claxton at Eves Hill Veg Co, near Reepham, who brings us some of the freshest and most flavourful veggies I’ve ever seen. We also have our charcoal oven Bertha in the kitchen that delivers incredible flavour to everything she touches. We have had a lot of fun over the last year smoking, grilling, charring and occasionally totally burning pretty much anything that has come our way from Eves Hill. Don’t worry, not all of these experiments make it on to the menu but those that do represent the most fundamental beliefs of our concept. Great produce, grown with love, cooked with fire and served with care. It may not be meat but it is definitely Farmyard! • You can also keep up-to-date with Andrew via his monthly newsletter - subscribe online

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NE OF THE THINGS I really enjoy as a chef is that there is always something new to learn, a new skill to master or a new ingredient to get to grips with. As a newbie restaurateur this is most definitely true. A key function of any restaurant is to communicate your concept to your potential guests as clearly as possible, and if there is a market for what you’re offering you will get bums on seats. Of course, every other restaurant is doing the same thing so you have to have a clear identity. In the hubbub of competition, any eatery that doesn’t clearly define itself will struggle to stand out. Dancing to your own tune is great. However, not being aware of your guests wants or wider changes in society will ultimately mean a restaurant gets left behind as tastes change. We pride ourselves on the quality, sustainability and ethical production of the meat and fish we use at Farmyard. However, Norwich has one of the largest and fastest growing populations of people opting for a plant-based diet in the UK. There are also many more people with specific dietary requirements, intolerances and allergies, due to better understanding of the role diet plays in overall health. There are some great restaurants that cater specifically for vegetarians and vegans, but there seems to be a deficit of good plantbased offerings in more mainstream restaurants. Well, at Farmyard we have listened and we say a big ‘NO’ to boring veggie options.


THIS MONTH I am holding my third food and wine pairing evening at Barnham Broom, a hotel just outside Norwich. I can let you into a secret and reveal that the dessert is Eton Mess, a pudding which really heralds the start of much better weather - we hope! A perfect wine to go with this sweet treat is Busuioaca de Bohotin 2014. As you can tell it is not French, but is part of The Romanian Wine Company portfolio. I imported just a few cases of this rosé wine as it is so unusual and I was uncertain as to the reception it would receive.

It has aromas of soft summer fruits with a hint of light spice. The softness caresses the tongue and, as the aftertaste is of medium length, the sweetness then takes over. It is not at all cloying, rather simply perfect with a dessert of this lightness and mixture of textures. It is so new I have not put it on the website so email me if it appeals. It’s a fabulous experience at just £9.50 a bottle. I suppose the best contrast to this sweet rosé would be a good solid red wine: another of my Portuguese finds, PQW Reserva Doc from the Dao region of Portugal. A deep red colour, this wine is made from 100 per cent Touriga Nacional

grape. It is fairly strong in alcohol at 13.5 per cent and the aromas of fruit, herbs and spices make for a confusing blend, which in turn makes tasting it even more exciting! Once in the mouth, the tongue, of course, does all the work. There’s a very small amount of residual sugar on the tip of the tongue, which soon turns into a mixture of marinated summer fruits. This is a full bodied wine and needs a full flavoured dish to accompany it. Beef always springs to mind and indeed it should for this wine – just a plain grilled steak, preferably fillet, would be an ideal accompaniment. This wine is £15 per bottle.

WINE AND DINE, April 7, Barnham Broom. Enjoy a four-course dinner created by head chef James Conway and wines by Steve Hearnden. £54 a head. Expect plenty of information - and fun!

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OUR WINE EXPERT STEVE HEARNDEN TELLS US WHAT TO DRINK WITH STEAK AND A CERTAIN VERY POPULAR PUD THIS MONTH

PERFECT PARTNERS TASTEBUDS WINES, Norwich Road, Strumpshaw, opens by appointment.


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tasteless, odourless alcohol base and seven ITH ITS botanicals, including juniper berries, coriander DISTINCTIVE and cardamom. About the only rules for gin stone jars, manufacture are that it must be flavoured with Norfolk Gin is a juniper berries and be at least 37.5 per cent proof. popular choice Norfolk Gin is 39 per cent. at many of the He works from home, using both a purpose region’s leading restaurants, hotels and bars. And built studio for production, and a rather lovely you’ll spot it for sale in our farm shops, delis, customised shepherd’s hut, Matilda, in his wine shops and more. grounds, where you’ll finding him labelling his It is now in its third year, with Norwich-based bottles - each one has its own batch and bottle gin maker Jonathan Redding explaining how number - and doing all that essential paperwork. it all started around his kitchen table - just like HOW TO DRINK Jonathan, who is originally from most great ideas! ‘I had no experience in gin NORFOLK GIN Gloucestershire, pays great attention to detail making but we researched it for a good two Jonathan drinks the stone jars (handmade and hand-decorated) years, and really worked on our recipe,’ he says. his with orange are produced by Stoke-on-Trent-based Wade After more than 20 years in the British Army, and a sprig of Ceramics to an original design by Kerry where he rose to the rank of Major, and a spell thyme plus a Wielkopolka of Polska Designs. And he has in Civvy Street where he worked for, amongst standard Fever commissioned Norwich artist Simon Pritchard others, The Big C and the Benjamin Foundation, Tree tonic. For to create a series of dramatic canvases which Jonathan and his wife, Alison, set upon the those who don’t capture the spirit of gin as well as advertising it idea of creating their own gin, imagining they like tonic water, to gin lovers. would sell about 20 bottles to family and friends! try elderflower Do look out for Jonathan making deliveries He says: ‘We didn’t need a lot of investment, presse with a in and around Norwich as he’ll be in Ginnevere, equipment or space and I fancied running my slice of lemon. his little electric motor which is not only own business. And I knew from the very start He also likes great fun but means he’s doing his bit for the that I wanted to use stone bottles and to call it Fentimans Rose environment, too. And he offers a ‘loyalty’ Norfolk Gin - Norfolk has been my home since Lemonade, scheme whereby pubs and restaurants he 2004 after living all over the world.’ garnished with delivers to can get a free bottle if they return 12 The first 15 bottles were produced in June a slice of orange of their used bottles to be refilled. 2015, with a handful going to Harper Wells, and frozen Jonathan’s local wine merchant who had an raspberries. Eaton branch. And, predictably, people were delighted with the tipple, he was asked WHERE TO BUY: restock that very same day, and it was The Deli at Jarrold’s; Bakers and Larners, onwards and upwards for Norfolk Gin. Holt; Reno Wines in Wymondham; The Now 10,000 bottles are produced Norfolk Deli, Hunstanton; Satchells in a year, with stockists in London and Burnham Market. Wales, too. But Jonathan stays true to his artisan roots, not selling online or to SEE ONLINE supermarkets. for full details The gin’s recipe is, of course, top secret but it is handcrafted, in small batches, using a colourless,

THE TRAiL BLAZER

NORFOLK GIN was the first produced in the county. SARAH HARDY meets the founder, JONATHAN REDDING to hear his story www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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WORLD'S BEST

ANDY NEWMAN TRAVELS TO BORDEAUX TO VISIT THE WORLD’S BEST WINE MUSEUM - A CROWN THE CITY HAS SNATCHED FROM LONDON

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PICTURES COURTESY OF WWW.LACITEDUVIN.COM

www.laciteduvin.com/en

DESPITE THE RECENT revival in English wine, and the occasional world-beating award won by vineyards such as Norfolk’s own Winbirri, our place in the world wine-producing ranks will only ever be as a bit-part player. Unless the worst environmental doommongers are proven correct, we will simply never have the climate for it. But it’s precisely because we don’t have a significant wine-producing industry of our own that Britain has always been a major centre of connoisseurs. Wine-producing countries and regions always have difficulty looking beyond their own local products; whereas places like the UK are much more open to trying the new, embracing wines from other areas - in short, we demonstrate a particularly un-British openmindedness when it comes to wine.

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Because of this, we have always enjoyed a wider selection of wine on our shelves than pretty much anywhere else in the world. It was as recent as 1988 that the first Master of Wine qualification was achieved by a non-UK citizen, and even today, 208 of the current 369 Masters of Wine are British. For 16 years, the importance of London as the epicentre of the world’s wine market was reflected in the fact that the capital boasted the most innovative and best wine museum: Vinopolis. Now, I am a sucker for a wine museum, and if there is one available, I will visit it. More time than not, I end up disappointed, mainly because establishments based in wine-producing regions almost always take a parochial approach to the subject, more or less ignoring any wine not made within the local postcode.


of the world’s wine-making regions, the story of how By contrast, when it opened in 1999, Vinopolis, close human beings discovered the intricacies of making to London Bridge, took a world view. It also introduced wine, and, of course, how we have enjoyed it through what was at the time groundbreaking technology, the ages. bringing the world of wine to life for everybody, The museum uses the latest technology to guide the whatever their prior level of knowledge. visitor, armed with a smartphoneSadly, Vinopolis closed for good in like electronic guide, starting 2015, and the crown for the world’s THREE WINES ANDY HAS with a dizzying helicopter tour best wine museum was snapped up ENJOYED THIS MONTH: of the planet’s greatest vineyards, the following year with the opening La Fleur Solitaire Côtes du Rhône moving through many fascinating of the futuristic and impressive La Blanc, 2016 (slurp.co.uk, £11.95) video introductions to the world’s Cité du Vin in Bordeaux. Once again White Côtes du Rhône wines are gaining great wines from the winemakers we are seeing a resurgent, confident a deserved reputation, and this mix of themselves, and employing theatrical France stealing the glory. traditional southern grapes (Grenache grandeur to show how wine is There are two potential problems Blanc, Viognier, Roussanne, Marsanne), enjoyed in its many guises. with putting a major wine museum which sees a portion of the wine vinified The exhibition cleverly excites in Bordeaux. The first is that the city’s in oak, delivers a fresh, delicate nose your senses - like wine - without you innate conservatism could render of apples and hedgerow flowers, and realising it. For example, while you the whole thing worthy but dull; the a mouth-filling, citrus/apricot palate. learn about the importance of barrels second is that the overwhelming Excellent value. in the maturation of wine, you slowly power and influence of the region’s Pieropan Soave Classico, 2013 become aware that you are smelling winemakers could result in it being (Harper Wells, £14.99) oak; a buffet table allows you to simply a celebration and promotion Forget the watery, bland Soave you experience the ‘sensory experience’ of Bordeaux, to the detriment of the too often encounter in cheap Italian of wine, offering combinations of rest of the wine world. restaurants; proper Soave should deliver aromas and textures to surprise you. One glimpse of the museum, intense and long-lived flavours. One of It is all slightly overwhelming, so located on the riverside near the the top two Soave producers (the other the final climb to the observation historic centre of the wine trade, being Anselmi), Pieropan’s ‘basic’ Soave tower to enjoy the (included) tasting and you know it is going to be is anything but. The maker’s (correct) is a welcome opportunity to try and fascinating. A swirling, curvaceous decision to bottle with a screw cap has seen the wine demoted from ‘Soave take it all in. structure of aluminium and glass, it Classico’ status, which is a nonsense. brings to mind the equally out-there Guggenheim in Bilbao, and this sets Yering Station the Elms Shiraz, Yarra the scene for the imaginative and Valley, 2014 (Majestic, £9.99 as part engaging exhibition it houses. of a mixed six bottle case) Set across 10 levels, La Cité du Vin Everything you expect an Aussie Shiraz is not about trumpeting Bordeaux, to be: big, spicy, plummy and warming. but instead seeks to promote wine This is forward, but certainly not oneculture as a whole. At its heart are dimensional, with notes of coffee and 19 themed spaces across more than black pepper on the palate. A steal at this price. 30,000 sq ft providing an overview

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FORTUNE UNDER OUR FEET WOODFORDE’S BREWERY TELLS US ABOUT THEIR GREEN CREDENTIALS, ESPECIALLY THEIR WATER SUPPLY

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Woodforde's -

www.woodfordes.co.uk

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TAKE A STROLL through the picturesque village of Woodbastwick, home of Woodforde’s brewery, and you could be forgiven for being totally unaware of the rich resource beneath you. Two hundred feet below the surface - under the topsoil, brown sand, grey clay and shale - lie deposits of chalk and flint which bathe in natural mineral water which fell as rain over 10,000 years ago. The Woodbastwick Estate has licences to abstract almost 165 million litres of this pure resource each year, a volume which would cost you a cool quarter of a million pounds if it came out of your tap. Indeed, such is the quality of this water that a feasibility study was carried out in 2004 which looked into the possibility of bottling the product at source, but Woodforde’s brewery staff, looking for a new home after outgrowing their original site, had a better idea: why not drill two boreholes into this sealed aquifer and use the water to continue production of their range of award winning beers at a fraction of the cost of tap water, and completely devoid of chlorine? But the brewers did not get everything their own way. This water comes from ancient glacial deposits and, as well as containing many rich minerals (highly desirable when brewing beer), is also high in manganese and iron, both of which are implicated as catalysts of haze formation - until the advent of ‘craft’, not a positive attribute in beer. To resolve this problem, the abstracted water passes through green sand filters which remove the unwanted ions before reaching their tanks. Indeed, Woodforde’s take the quality of their water so seriously that it is the first thing they taste each day in their sample room, hot and cold, just to make sure! The water at Woodbastwick is classified as moderately hard and not ideal for brewing all styles of beer and so they add naturally occurring salts, namely calcium chloride and calcium sulphate, to suit the recipe, a process known as ‘Burtonisation’, as they are trying at times to mimic the waters of Burton on Trent, famous for its pale ales. Increasing the sulphate content of the water will give the resultant beer a crisp, dry finish as demonstrated in Wherry and Nelson’s Revenge, whilst beer brewed with an

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elevated chloride content will be perceived as sweeter, like Nog. Adding salts in this way has an effect on the final level of acidity in the finished beer which helps to maintain its quality for Woodforde’s customers. You can imagine the advantage of having a private supply of water in this regard, from a consistency point of view, rather than being at the mercy of a water company who may source the water from the most convenient location. Another positive advantage of tapping into a groundwater source is that the water comes into the brewery at a stable temperature which helps when it is being used for cooling purposes. Like all responsible companies, Woodforde’s are proud of their ‘green’ credentials and try to minimise their effect on the environment. It is of some concern to them, therefore, that for every barrel of beer that leaves the site they will have abstracted about four and a half barrels from the ground. This high usage results from the level of specialised cleaning that they carry out, evaporation during their boiling processes and water left in spent grain, all areas that they are constantly monitoring and attempting to minimise. Woodforde’s aquifer extends many miles under the North Sea and will last several lifetimes, but they are determined to use such a valuable resource sparingly so that Norfolk residents can continue to enjoy their beers.


SALUTi!

CASTEL DEL MONTE

MARK NICHOLLS DISCOVERS THE CULINARY CONTOURS OF PUGLIA, IN THE HEEL OF ITALY

TALK OF FOOD is never far away in Puglia. A land famed for its bread, cheese, wine, fresh fruit, vegetables, and olive oil, this wonderful landscape forms the heel of Italy’s boot and for centuries has been one of the country’s more important food producing regions. It is dotted with small producers and agriturismo - farmsteads where visitors can discuss the cuisine with those who produce it, before eating fresh food at farmhouse tables. I had joined a group with travel company Explore, which specialises in small group adventure, activity and cultural holidays, on a walking and foodie tour of Puglia - with the sumptuous produce we sampled countered by a few miles walking each day through the rural terrain of an area of Italy that is growing in popularity, yet remains relatively unspoilt. My visit to Puglia had started in Cisternino, with its whitewashed houses and piazzas and particularly famous butcher shops, which serve the local barbecued delicacy known as bombette - meat parcels filled with mince, ham and cheese. It’s a great tradition: you buy your meat at the butchers, have it cooked in a restaurant and eat with salad, potatoes, prosciutto and local wine at a canopied table in one of the shaded alleyways. There is, however, one product that truly defines Puglia. Accounting for more than 40 per cent of Italian olive oil production, the landscape hosts millions of trees producing the staple of the Mediterranean diet. Many are farmed by smallholders who take their olives to be processed at local olive oil mills such as ‘Il Frantolio’ which produces oil using both a traditional and a modern press.

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During the October-January harvest, farmers wait patiently for their oil to be produced, anxiously ensuring that the oil they get is from their olives. ‘Farmers always recognise their own olives and their own oil because of the taste, as each grove is different and has its own defining flavour,’ explains Angelita Amati from the mill, which also has a museum and offers tasting sessions. ‘The olive oil mill is what Puglia is very much about - the passion, the taste and the welcome.’ In the traditional method, the olives are pressed by large stone wheels, with 100 kilos of olives delivering 12-14 kilos of extra virgin olive oil within four hours.

EXPLORE offers an eightday Taste of Puglia trip from £1,295 per person including flights, transfers and some meals. The trip includes the pasta making, olive oil and wine tastings, and visits to the bakery and cheese farm, as well as walks of between 1-3 hours on five of the days. For more information call 01252 884723 or visit www.explore.co.uk CISTERNINO


However, a mechanised production line produces oil within 45 minutes and also has the capability to create flavoured oils such as orange or lemon and many more. Among Puglia’s agriturismo centres is Agriturismo Nuovo Muretto, where Anna Casulli enjoys showing visitors how to make mozzarella, trecce and nodini. It is an opportunity to taste the freshly-made organic cheeses and enjoy a lunch that includes courgette flowers in batter, mountain-style hard cheese, peppers laden with bread, egg and cheese, tomato focaccia and home-brewed wine followed by homemade pasta and tomato sauce. Anna uses curd from the previous day’s milk which is chopped into smaller segments and worked

STAY at Tenuta Monacelle, Selva Di Fasano, Puglia from 13 September 2018 for 7 nights on a bed & breakfast basis – from £738 per person including flights from London Gatwick.

with very hot water and kneaded like dough. It is stretched into lengths and shaped before being dropped into cold water to halt the souring process. The source of all the produce for the lunch - and cheeses - is close by: the cows, which provide the milk, laze in the field opposite the farm, while the

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ALTAMURA BREAD

70 ROCKY BEACH IN PUGLIA


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Altamura, we also learned how to make pasta by hand – capunti, orecchiette and spaghettoni – at the Tre Archi Restaurant. What was so enjoyable about the Explore foodie and walking tour of the region was that there was always a new local delight to taste and fresh opportunities to learn about the provenance of the food. Yet Puglia has much more to offer besides. The rolling landscape is spectacular, with white-washed towns, unique trulli-style round houses and ancient Massimi (fortified farmhouses) dotted amid thousands of acres of olive trees, while a rugged coastline is never far away. The appeal is clear. However, no visit to Puglia is complete without a pause in Alberobello in the wine-producing area of the Itria Valley. It is famous for its

iconic trulli buildings, traditional dry stone huts with a conical roof, which are arguably the most photographed feature of the region. As well as working off a calorie or two from the food we ate, the walks also allowed us the opportunity to enjoy this magnificent rural landscape, and our final walk in Puglia was particularly memorable. It saw us head toward the mysterious Castel del Monte, a citadel and UNESCO World Heritage Site built by Frederick II in the 1240s, and a structure which provided the inspiration for the novel The Name of the Rose. Today, from its position on top of a 500m mound, it is highly visible from a distance and acted as a landmark as we hiked through cherry orchards and across rock-strewn fields where tumble down trulli were the only remnants of shelter. Here, the conical roofed houses are semi-derelict and abandoned, unlike the pristine, white-washed examples in Alberobello, and stand in contrast to the castle’s stunning solidity and symmetry, with eight sides and eight, eight-sided towers. We paused to explore and admire the mesmerising structure before walking on and doing what is second nature in Puglia - stopping off for an agriturismo lunch of wonderful cheese, wine, bread, pasta and olives. Simply delicious.

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gardens and orchard - where the fruit and produce are grown - fan out around the homestead. Not far away is Altamura, a town famed for its bread making. One morning we crowded into the di Gesu bakery on a side street to watch the process of bakers loading the creamy-coloured dough of the famed Altamura loaves into a wood-fired oven, spreading some 320 of them around evenly to absorb the heat. When the bakery first opened, like many, it was a community facility where local women brought dough to be baked into bread for the family. Today, while not acting as a community oven, the di Gesu bakery continues to bake bread in a town that has given its name to the famous hard crust loaves – the only town in Italy with a DOP (protected designation of origin) recognised bread. Alongside visiting the bakery in

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NORFOLK CALLING www.controltowerstays.com

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TANDING SENTRY, The Control Tower at North Creake Airfield was built in 1943 as part of a secret bomber base. Crews of Stirling and Halifax aircraft, from 100 Group of RAF Bomber Command, were sent out on counter missions to confuse the Luftwaffe as to the real whereabouts of the Allied thrust. They further disrupted Nazi electronic and radio communications by using airborne radio transmitters called Mandrel to jam early-warning radar signals and also by dropping aluminium strips, known as chaff, to give false radar readings. The current owners, the somewhat flamboyant husband and wife, Nigel Morter and Claire Nugent, have soaked up all this history since they bought the rundown building in 2011. They have restored it with fabulous attention to detail, paying homage to its Modernist roots.


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PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

THIS MONTH PHOTOGRAPHER KEIRON TOVELL VISITS A BEAUTIFULLY RESTORED WORLD WAR TWO CONTROL TOWER IN NORTH NORFOLK, NOW A VEGETARIAN B&B


PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL


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It opened as a bijou B&B in 2013 and now offers three bedrooms, all packed with Art Deco treasures and quirky finds. Look out for a dramatic pink bathroom, enamel fireplaces and robust wardrobes and dressing tables. The style is retro meets contemporary - and it works!

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The highlight is, perhaps, a trip to the roof where, if you close your eyes a little, you’ll almost hear the faint buzz of a returning bomber, heading home after serving King and Country. And finally, breakfasts, as you can see, are quite something, and all sourced locally, with eggs from nearby Great Snoring, apple juice from Wells and much else from Walsingham Farm Shop. The Station Commander would most certainly approve!

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C O M P E T I T I O N

COTTAGE ESCAPE VISIT

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WE’RE DELIGHTED to team up with our friends at Norfolk Country Cottages to offer you a chance to win a fabulous cottage escape in stunning Norfolk worth £300. Established in 1992, and now the county’s leading and most awarded holiday cottage agency (they’ve just received a rare Gold Trusted Service Award from Feefo!), Norfolk Country Cottages has a hand-picked and fully-graded portfolio of more than 500 holiday retreats throughout Norfolk. Win and you can choose from a grand barn conversion in rolling countryside to a cosy coastal cottage, or waterside abode in the Norfolk Broads, to a chic, city-centre home. All from this truly local and family-owned and run company based in Holt. • To stand a chance of winning, simply enter online at www.norfolkcottages.co.uk/feastcomp

Terms and Conditions: 1. Competition closes at midnight on May 31 2018 2. No purchase necessary 3. The prize is a holiday to the value of £300, subject to availability. The winner can choose to spend above this, but will have to pay the additional amount 4. Holiday must be booked and taken before the end of 2018 5. No cash alternative. Prize is nontransferable 6. The competition winners will be notified by telephone or email at the beginning of June 2018 7. Competition is only open to people aged 18 or over and UK residents (full T&C's online)

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Crowning Glory VISIT

www.westletoncrown.co.uk

DUNWICH BEACH

SARAH HARDY ENJOYS LIFE AT A TRADITIONAL COACHING INN IN SUFFOLK

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RSPB MINSMERE

Westleton Crown


The menus, under the direction of head chef James Finch, make the most of the area’s rich larder - fish is straight off the boat in Lowestoft, Blythburgh free range pork is just down the road and the surrounding farmland supplies fresh veg and, as we move into spring, lush fruits. We started our evening in the bar, with a glass of fizz for me and a pint of Woodforde’s Wherry for him. It is a jolly place, with a good mixture of villagers and those on holiday - many of us were looking at maps, swapping stories and planning our next day’s excursions. We moved through to the garden room to eat and ordered a bottle of Pinot Grigio/Riesling Alisios 2015 from Brazil (£27) which promised to be zingy and aromatic - and it was much enjoyed! My starter, a beetroot and goats’ cheese risotto, got the taste buds going: the goats’ cheese was rich and gooey and cut through the beetroot to produce an interesting and enjoyable dish. Himself went for a warming soup - roasted tomato - as the weather was challenging when we visited. It was thick and creamy, with masses of herby homemade bread, too. I moved on to that classic - Adnams’ Ghost Ship beer battered fish and chips with all the trimmings, including some very yummy mushy peas. It was just right for a chilly evening. Himself, as ever, went for the fish option: this time it was hake with leeks, kale, crushed potatoes and a tasty saffron and mussel bisque. The roasted fillet was good and meaty, softened with the bisque, and ultra-healthy kale is seemingly everywhere these days! There was also a slow-cooked shoulder of lamb dish that caught my eye and a 28-day hung sirloin steak that sounded delicious - plus a couple of interesting vegetarian options, including a roasted courgette, sun-blushed tomato and pesto tagliatelle.

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HE WESTLETON CROWN, near Southwold, has been on my radar for some time. It has had a great reputation for years, for both its food and the accommodation, so my husband and I finally booked ourselves a much-needed night away. As it dates back to the 12th century, it oozes character from every pore, with masses of ancient beams, pamment tiled floors and open fires. But there is also a fabulous contemporary garden room extension, with floor to ceiling windows which, as the weather improves, creates that indoor/outdoor feel. The bar is perhaps the hub of the place, with its woodburner, long bar and rustic tables and chairs where you can enjoy a local real ale or tuck into, what the kitchen calls, ‘hearty yet sophisticated’ dishes! But there’s also a separate lounge and a further dining room,The Parlour, so you are spoilt for choice as to where you make your base, and it will depend on whether you have any four-legged friends with you or not!

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Westleton Crown We did rather save the best until last, with me simply demolishing a berry-based trifle with all the vital accessories, and him, again, as ever, having the chocolate option, this time in the form of a chocolatey crème brûlée with shortbread. I’m not aware that I have a sweet tooth but, goodness, these puds were divine. Then it was time for lashings of mint tea in the sitting room, and a quick trot around the village before retiring to our rather lovely room. There are 34 bedrooms in all. The majority are in the main building, with others scattered around the old stables. They are named after the local birdlife, and ours, Grebe, was a junior suite with a fabulous roll top bath, walk in shower and balcony which looked out over the surrounding fields. There is a relaxed feel to all the bedrooms, with countrystyle furniture, bathrooms by Fired Earth and plenty of lovely The White Company bath goodies to enjoy. Breakfast is another success story, with grilled kippers, smoked salmon, and smoked haddock all on offer, alongside your favourite bacon, eggs, sausages and so on. And yes, don’t worry, there are plenty of lighter options, including bowls of Greek yogurt and fresh fruit which I went for. The Crown, opposite the village church, is perfectly positioned on the Suffolk Heritage Coast, with Dunwich, Walberswick and the RSPB reserve at Minsmere all close by. And Southwold, of course, is perfect for a spot of retail therapy. You can walk to a sister establishment, The Ship at Dunwich, which is a very pleasant two to three mile walk. And The Ship, with its seafaring history, again oozes character and has a very good menu to enjoy, too.

relaxed fee l to all th e BEDROOMS, with countrystyle furniture...

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GREBE, JUNIOR SUITE

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COASTAL R&R

SARAH HARDY AND HER TEENAGE DAUGHTER - PLUS THE DOG - ENJOY SOME QUALITY TIME AT THE LODGE IN OLD HUNSTANTON

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HERE IS SOMETHING rather special about Old Hunstanton. It doesn’t shout about itself too much but rather just gets on with being rather gorgeous. There’s a proper sense of community here, with a little shop, a great beach cafe, a couple of hotels, a Michelin-starred restaurant and The Lodge, where we were based. The Lodge, which dates back to the 16th century and has been a hotel for more than 100 years, has plenty of stories to tell. It was a haunt of smugglers and was used by troops in the First World War but is now, thankfully, a very comfortable and welcoming place. There are 16 bedrooms, most in the main building and four, the dog friendly ones, in the courtyard. Ours, the Coal Bunker, was more than comfy and I have to say that my first stop - after a day out in the fresh air with the blessed dog - was the large Jacuzzi bath! Pouring in plenty of the very nice Natural Soap Company cedar and lemon bubble bath and sipping a cup of tea, I was one happy bunny! You can expect crisp white bed linen, lots of storage space, a big telly, and plenty of original features such as beams. All the rooms are individually decorated, with their own little added extras - the Snug, for example, has a woodburner, and I also loved the coastal views from The Loft, a second floor suite in the main building.

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VISIT

www.thelodgehunstanton.co.uk

After an hour or two of ‘me time’, we were dressed and ready for action in the bar where dogs are allowed, too. We bagged a spot next to the woodburner, ordered a Black Shuck gin for me and lemonade for her and instructed the dog to snooze. The bar is a very sociable place, with plenty of laughter and general chatter filling the air. There’s a huge TV screen for important sporting occasions and I can see that being real fun! Having the dog with us meant that we ate in the bar rather than the dining room so, once settled in our booth, we tackled the menu which offers a real cross section of dishes, from stone baked pizzas to juicy burgers and fish and chips, to more fine dining options such as Tuscan roast chicken and rump of English lamb. The kitchens here are bossed by

husband and wife, Nicholas and Loraine Parker, and they should be proud of what they offer. Dishes are carefully thought out and well presented, with plenty of local produce used, too. I went for a sea bass dish, served with a pearl barley and vegetable risotto, which was really delicious. There was a splash or two of seafood sauce, which added yet more layers, and I had a side order of seasonal greens, too. My daughter tucked into a margarita pizza, with a side order of skinny fries, and was beaten by its size. We had shared a selection of breads, dips and oils to start, as well as a chickpea and aubergine baba ganoush (fabulous with pomegranate seeds, rocket and more), so it’s little wonder she struggled. We didn’t therefore, manage desserts which I regret, as the selection included a twist on one of my favourites, key lime pie. The Lodge offers key lime cheesecake so I’m coming back for it - watch out! Breakfast the next morning was another very pleasing affair, with plenty of choice available as well as all your usual favourites such as cereals, juices, and fresh fruit. My daughter was again defeated by two enormous pancakes, smothered in maple syrup, and I enjoyed my scrambled eggs and smoked salmon.

OLD HUNSTANTON BEACH AND CLIFFS

The Lodge


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The Lodge Then, after a little rest and read of the newspaper in that rather pleasant bar, it was time to walk. The Lodge is perfectly positioned for exploring. For a start, you can head straight out of the front door, cross the road and about two minutes later you are at the beach. It is as lovely as all our beaches - and dogs are welcome. Hurrah. You can walk west towards those striped cliffs at Hunstanton and arrive there after about half an hour. Or head in the opposite direction to Holme and on to Thornham, and get the Coasthopper bus back. We also took the hound for a run in Sandringham Woods where there are a couple of easy waymarked trails and plenty of facilities, but, otherwise, there is so much to do, from the theatre in King's Lynn to a round of golf at the local course, which is again in walking distance. Bird watching is, of course, another popular activity. The Lodge is a sister hotel to Briarfields in nearby Titchwell and you can see the similarities - both are very comfy, unpretentious places, with great food and friendly service.

There’s always plenty happening at both The Lodge and Briarfields, whether it is live music on a Friday night at The Lodge or an author appearing at Briarfields. Keep on eye on their websites for more.

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Norfolk Garden Rooms

E ALL LOVE a night or two away from home but close to home. The reason, of course, is that you can leave your desk at 5pm and be, as in this case, in the hot tub by 6pm! And ready for fizz and supper at 7.30pm. It really doesn’t get much better. My husband and I were trying out the new Norfolk Garden Rooms, built by my old mate and great chef, Mark Dixon at his pub, The Kings Arms at Fleggburgh, near Acle. There are three rooms, Bee, Fox and Owl, situated in the grounds of the pub, with the lovely St Margaret’s Church as your neighbour. Cedar-clad, they boast underfloor heating, big French windows and one, Fox, is dog friendly. Mark, who has run the pub since 2014, has planted roses, lavenders and more, and each room has its own deck where you can soak up the sunshine and enjoy a drink or two once we get that much needed warmer weather. Each is individually decorated, with little touches like feathery Farrow and Ball wallpaper in our Owl room, huge

mirrors, and big tellies. They are romantic boltholes, with king-sized beds, ensuite bathrooms with fluffy bathrobes, and best of all is that they share a very generously sized hot tub. You can book yourselves an exclusive hour or so and let your worries and cares just bubble away. We thoroughly enjoyed our session; there is something decadent about outdoor Jacuzzis, and the prospect of Mark’s cooking added to our general jovial air. So, after a quick wash and brush up, we grabbed seats next to the fire in the bar to enjoy a pint of Timothy Taylor beer for him and a Ophir gin and tonic for me. The bar is very laid back, full of locals catching up with the news of the day, with many bringing their four-legged friends, too.

BOUTIQUE BOLTHOLE

SARAH HARDY IS ONE OF THE FIRST TO STAY IN THE NEW NORFOLK GARDEN ROOMS ON THE EDGE OF THE BROADS


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www.thekingsarmsfleggburgh.co.uk www.norfolkgardenrooms.co.uk

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The adjoining restaurant is smarter, with white linen tablecloths, and fresh flowers and you can see Mark and his team work their magic in the kitchen. Mark is an effortless chef; he glides around, sprinkling a little bit of this and a little bit of that, tasting, tasting again and giving himself the odd little knowing smile. I love watching him in action. There are two menus on offer so there’s plenty of choice, from the well priced bar menu with fish and chips, burgers and lasagne, to the more formal restaurant menu, with more elaborate dishes such as rump of Suffolk spring lamb, and belly and fillet of Dingley Dell pork. There are extensive vegetarian and vegan options, too. Mark has plenty of tried and trusted local suppliers and benefits from his own mini family farm, in nearby Ormesby, where he gets the majority of his vegetables. ‘The only problem is that I sometimes have to go and dig them up myself!’ he laughs. We had a tremendous meal and there’s not enough space here to do it justice. I went ‘retro’ with the pub’s signature prawn cocktail, all juicy prawns, lemony sauce and creamy avocado. Then I tucked into a sirloin steak, cooked just as I like it with masses of chips, onion rings, mushrooms and tomatoes. The peppercorn sauce was sheer over indulgence, and that’s before I mention my pud, Peach Melba, 2018-style, with perfectly poached and brûléed peaches, delicate meringue and vanilla ice cream.

VISIT

FILBY BROAD

Himself slurped a bowl of steaming mussels, with onions, cream, white wine and chives, mopping up the sauce with slices of soft ciabatta. He then chose sea bream, this time cooked with a lime leaf and tomato ragout, wilted spinach, lentils, saffron potatoes and more. Both dishes triumphed, with a lightness of touch praised, and great flavour combinations. His pudding option was dreamy salted caramel and peanut butter parfait - with a chocolate brownie on the side. I think it is their best seller - and no wonder! Breakfast continues the fuss free feel; it is served in the bar and you can simply order just about anything you fancy, with a couple of options such as smoked kippers from Lowestoft and Omelette Arnold Bennett tempting many. Fleggburgh is, Mark is keen to emphasise, perfectly placed for exploring all that Norfolk has to offer. ‘You can pretty much see The Broads from here so you can hire a boat for the day or go on a trip, I can be on the beach in 20 minutes, and Norwich is about 20 minutes, so there’s whatever you fancy, really,’ he says. ‘People love to go and look at the seals, visit the wildlife park at Thrigby, play golf, go to Yarmouth races - and then they can come back here and relax.’ And, after an action-packed day and a great supper in the offing, and a session in that hot tub, you can easily see the attraction!


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SPRING ONION

Since it is officially spring, it is fitting that spring onions, sown last autumn, will be ready to harvest now. They are rich in vitamins, including vitamin A, B, C, and K, along with a whole host of minerals. They are great for our cardiovascular health and even decrease cholesterol, along with many other health benefits. Simply, a great crop to grow in any kitchen garden.


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Our kitchen gardener ELLEN MARY celebrates the perfectly seasonal SPRING ONION this month and serves up a FISH DISH to complement it SPRING ONION ‘WHITE LISBON’ Spring onions are also known as scallions, Welsh onions, green onions, salad onions and Japanese bunching onions! All names are derived in some way from a country and relevant to how and when the onions are harvested. The spring onions we now eat are mainly from Allium fistulosum, which is thought to have originated in China. Centuries ago, they were grown for their ease of growth and harvest, flavour and propagation. The flavour of home grown spring onions is fantastic and you don't need much space either. Try ‘White Lisbon’, as they are great for beginners and experts alike.

How to grow

SOW Sow your seeds directly where they are to grow and make sure the soil has been worked into a fine tilth about a week before you plan to sow. Sow seeds thinly, about 1.5cm deep, and keep the soil moist but not overwatered. If you are sowing outside, you might want to think about some protection from birds. CARE Keep the seeds weed free as they won’t like competition. They won’t need thinning out because they will be harvested about 6 to 8 weeks from sowing. Generally pest and disease free, you should be harvesting a healthy crop, if they are grown directly outside, in a greenhouse or in pots and containers. HARVEST Gently pull them up when they are about a pencil thickness for the best flavour. If you are not ready to harvest they can be left in the ground and the bulbs may continue to swell. However, if left too long they can bolt. So always best to harvest at about 8 weeks and enjoy them fresh.

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[

ELLEN MARY is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

Spring Vegetables

[Serves 2

RECIPE WITH ELLEN MARY

FISH, FENNEL AND SPRING ONION DISH

Fresh, zesty and just delicious, this dish can be served with noodles or rice and is a lovely blast of healthy spring time food.

INGREDIENTS 2 pieces of fish of your choice, although seabream is perfect; 1 fennel, roughly chopped; 4 shallots, peeled and quartered; 1 garlic clove, finely chopped or pressed; 6cm of sliced ginger; butter; 2 fresh spring onions, finely chopped lengthways; fresh chilli, to taste; lemon, quartered; 1/2 a bunch of chopped coriander; a dash of soy sauce METHOD 1. Preheat your oven to 180ºC (slightly less if fan assisted) 2. Place two pieces of foil on a baking tray and lay one piece of fish in each piece of foil 3. Split the fennel, shallots, garlic and ginger between the two fish and add a little butter. Wrap 4. Bake for about 30 minutes until the fish and vegetables are softly cooked 5. Open the foil and turn up the oven to about 220ºC for 10 minutes until slightly crispy 6. Remove from the oven and dish up with rice or noodles 7. Sprinkle freshly chopped chillis (if you want to) 8. Add a dash of soy sauce and then lay the spring onions over the top of the fish and finish off with a garnish of coriander and lemon quarters 9. Enjoy with a sparkling white wine


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RACHEL BIRTWHISTLE

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...THERE WAS AN ALLOTMENT APRIL IS MY FAVOURITE MONTH of the year. My selfdiagnosed ‘seasonal affective disorder’ (the one highly plausible excuse for being grumpy from January until March) is receding. The allotment is springing to life and my mind is fully fixed on ‘growing my own’. I’ve got trays of flourishing seedlings at home; my seed beds are nicely prepared, and my potatoes are ‘chitted’ to give them a good head start. You would think with all this in mind that my fellow allotmenteers would be skipping to their plots in the spring sunshine, too. Not so. The wiser group of seasoned growers are filled with talk of the ‘hungry gap’. From the look on their faces I assume this is not the period of time between 10.45am and lunch time but think better than to ask. I’m still not fully au fait with allotment terminology, despite this being my second year at the plot. I decide education is the key and head to the library still wearing wellies, armed with a small boy and four overdue children’s books. If you are a keen gardener or grower and have not yet unearthed the gardening section at The Norfolk & Norwich Millennium Library (in The Forum), I urge you to go old school and discover these books. On a wet spring day, it’s second only to actually being outside digging and planting. Aside from my little boy insisting we already have a gardening book at home, ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’, and the librarian looking perplexed when I try and take the ‘grownups’ books out on my son’s library card – all in all, our quest for knowledge is successful.

It transpires that the ‘hungry gap’ is the growers’ name for the period in spring when there is little or no fresh produce available from the allotment. Traditionally, late winter through to early summer was a time of scarcity, when the last of the overwintering and stored vegetables had been eaten and the first of the new year’s produce was still growing. My winter crops, such as leeks, cabbages and root veg, have all finished, but the new season’s harvests are still a long way off. Some allotment stalwarts have memories of the first spring vegetables being something highly celebrated, an event we have lost touch of with our global year-round imports of ‘fresh’ produce. All attempts at lessening the ‘hungry gap’ are utterly dependent on the weather. As the first week of spring was consumed by snow, it’s tricky to know whether to sow or not as the start of the growing season was less than mild. I decide the best bet is to keep an eye on the seedlings I have growing in pots and to ensure they don’t become ‘pot bound’ while we wait for the warmer weather. The plants I have been indoor sowing will need to be ‘hardened off’ and a sunny April day is the best introduction to spring - it’s really important to remember to bring the plants indoors at night as, like me, they can still be surprised by the drop-in temperature. To some, the ‘hungry gap’ may seem like a bit of a quaint concept in today’s day and age but, for growers and producers, plugging the gap with year-round seasonal produce is one way of ensuring that we, like Jack and his beanstalk, can both eat and live happily ever after. • Find out more about Rachel’s allotment on twitter @treatlikedirt


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WILL ALDERTON AND TERESA NORTON

cream and Norfolk butter as well as fresh natural pouring yoghurt and the Nortons Soft Cheeses available as the original, with chilli, with apricot and with Norfolk Lavender. Any future plans? Our continued aim is to expand the number of outlets which we supply in the region and diversify to keep up with the changing farming environment.

FROM THE DAIRY THIS MONTH WE MEET THE NORTON FAMILY WHO PRODUCE MILK, CHEESE, YOGURT AND MORE FROM THEIR FARM NEAR NORWICH VISIT

www.nortonsdair y.co.uk

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ho are you and what do you do? We are Nortons Dairy, a familyrun traditional mixed dairy farm. We are involved in every stage of milk production from cow to cup; we breed, raise and care for our herd of Brown Swiss cows and process their top-quality milk in our on-site dairy. Our cows are able to choose when they want to be milked as we use a voluntary milking system; the girls bring themselves in from the fields and barns at any time, 24/7, and are milked by our robot, Merlin. We are passionate about providing the highest welfare for our animals and believe this is why our produce is some of the best around.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Where are you based? Our farm is located in Frettenham, about five miles north of Norwich in the beautiful Norfolk countryside. How big is the farm and the dairy herd? In total the farm is 360 acres with about two thirds of this acreage put to arable crop production, including feed and bedding for our cows as well as food crops like sugar beet and malting barley, and a third being used for grazing. We have a relatively small milking herd of 60 cows with an additional 35 followers made up of calves, heifers and pregnant cows. What do you produce? We produce bottled skimmed, semi and whole milk, double and single

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Can we visit? Yes of course! We offer pre-booked educational tours which are very popular with school, family, WI and scout groups. These are all tailor-made to suit the needs of the individual groups and can include product tastings – just get in touch via email if you wish to book. Farm education is something we are passionate about and so the more people we can show what we do, the better! Where can we buy your products? We stock a variety of local shops, cafes, delis, farm shops and restaurants – a list that’s growing all the time! A full-list is available on our website but includes White House Farm, Norwich; Farm to Fork, Horstead; Truly Local, Stalham; Budgens of Holt and Aylsham and The Tacons at Rollesby. Is there a best seller? Our best seller has to be our Nortons Soft Cheese with Lavender – and for good reason – not only did it win gold at the British Cheese Awards 2017, it was also awarded Best Flavour Added Cheese too. It definitely comes highly recommended from us! How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? Being part of an established local network of food producers helps us to keep in contact with our partners in the industry and promote and support our local produce. This column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com


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A TASTE OF THE NEW FOOD HALL Award winning Food Hall & Fine Wine Department Newly Refurbished Over a period of nine months, our award winning Food Hall & Fine Wine departments have undergone one of the most extensive refurbishments in their long and established history. • Brand New Bakery & Patisserie • Cook Frozen Foods, the region’s largest selection • North Norfolk’s first Enomatic Wine Dispenser • Bakers & Larners Own Brand Range • Local Producers & Suppliers • Luxury Hampers

Easter Opening - Good Friday - 8.30am - 5.00pm Easter Monday 9.30am - 4.00pm, Closed Easter Sunday

Bakers & Larners of Holt

8 -12 M A R K E T PL AC E , HOLT, NOR FOL K, N R 25 6 BW

01263 71224 4

*Join the Bakers & Larners Wine Club and receive 10% discount on all future purchases in our Wine & Spirits department.

w w w.ba kersa nd la r ners.co.u k

T&C’s apply. Our team of experts are qualified to WSET Level 3 and 4

Feast Norfolk Magazine April 18 Issue 25  
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