Page 1

Inspired by people and horses

$2.50 | Volume 35 · Issue 3 | March 2012 | www.horsesall.com

Marci Edey

Niki Flundra

A true woman of the West / 5

Act of the year / 6

New thinking on dewormers / 19

Sam Kelts On the road again / 10

PLUS:  The Mercantile What’s new in western furniture / 25 

Kamloops Cowboy Festival 16 years and still going strong / 13

Taking the yuck out of muck Managing your surface water / 18

COVER ART: Morning Light by Alicia Quist / See page 3

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Presents

2012 NRCHA WORLD SHOW RESULTS NRCHA World’s Greatest Horseman Champions Ron Emmons and Olena Oak, owned by Mel Smith & Nichole Scott! They stole the show with a blazing 228 cow work from the first draw and finished with a 885.5 composite (herd 216/rein 219.5/steer stop 222). Shawn Hays and Smart Chic Aloha took the Reserve Championship with a 875.5 composite. (Top 5 from each category listed) 2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/3/2012 Open Two Rein Finals COMPOSITE Place 1

Money $5,100.00

Horse Rider Half Time Report Rich; Roy

2

$4,080.00

Sheza Roo

3

$3,060.00

4

$2,040.00

5

$1,530.00

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/3/2012 Limited Open Bridle Finals COMPOSITE

Rein 217.5

Cow 222.0

Total on 2 439.5

218.0

219.0

437.0

Meet Rippen Anderson; Lyn Hershman; Dick 219.5 Diamonds Spendin Peptos Ralston; Aaron Strong; Rheta D. 216.0 Money Miss Dual Spook Grimshaw; Jason Roberts; Larry 215.0

217.0

Telford; Jake A.

Owner Hastings; Barbara Holy Cow Perf. Horses LLC

Place

Money

Horse

Dam

Owner

Cow

Total on 2

1

$3,622.50

Who Could Be Smarter

Blue Docs Badger

Biddix; Barbara J 214.0

220.0

434.0

2

$2,898.00

Half Time Report Hustlin Tips

Hastings; Barbara

217.0

217.0

434.0

436.5

3

$2,173.50

Royalty Return

Gray Badgers Return

Burnett Ranches 213.5 LLC

215.0

428.5

220.0

436.0

4

$1,449.00

A Nu Rey Of Hope

Miss Rey Dry

O'Rear;JulieAnne

206.0

219.0

425.0

217.0

432.0

5

$1,086.75

Playguns Courage

Badge Of Courage

Circle Y Ranch

213.5

211.0

424.5

Cow

Total on 2

Place

Money

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/4/2012 Open Bridle Finals COMPOSITE

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/2/2012 Non Pro Two Rein Finals COMPOSITE Place

Money

Horse

Rider

Horse

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

1

$1,770.00

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez Betty Lou Valdez Robert Or 218.0 Betty Lou

216.0

434.0

1

$8,106.25

Shiney Sushi

Rose Carol

221.0

215.0

436.0

2

$1,475.00

Smokums Dixie

Greathouse Russell

Greathouse Russell

216.0

213.0

429.0

2

$6,485.00

Heza Diamond Spark

Garver Michael

215.5

218.0

433.5

3

$1,180.00

Lil Smarty Pep

Dilday Tanna

Dilday Russell/ Tanna

214.0

207.0

421.0

3

$4,863.75

Shinerbock Nic

Thieszen Todd & Shariel 211.5

221.0

432.5

4

$885.00

Alberts Bro Rusti Smith Pamela

Smith Karl

211.5

204.0

415.5

4

$3,891.00

Spendin Peptos Money Strong Rheta D.

218.0

212.0

430.0

5

$3,242.50

Dancing Rooster

213.5

215.0

428.5

5

$590.00

Cobys Soula

Chown Robert

217.0

197.0

414.0

Chown Riley

Owner

Rein

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 Novice Non Pro Bridle Finals COMPOSITE

Rick Steed & Gary Biggertstaff

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 5K Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE

Place

Money

Horse

Rider

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

Place

Money

Horse

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

1

$3,300.00

Millionheir Boon

Proctor Lyle

Proctor Debbie

216.0

214.0

430.0

1

$2,693.75

TR Miss Graygun Self;Birgit

Self;Birgit

217.5

222.0

439.5

2

$2,640.00

Just Rein Or Shine

Gardiner Garth

Gardiner Garth & 213.0 Amanda

216.0

429.0

2

$2,155.00

Arc Tassa Me Please

Reed;Karen

Reed;Karen

216.0

216.0

432.0

3-4

$1,650.00

Pepinics Fancy

Miller Jackie

Miller Jackie

215.0

213.0

428.0

3

$1,616.25

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez;Kelly

Valdez;Robert Or 211.0 Betty Lou

219.0

430.0

3-4

$1,650.00

Vintage Tejonshine

Edson Carolyn

Edson Carolyn

213.0

215.0

428.0

4

$1,293.00

Lena On Que

Reilly;Garrell

Reilly;Garrell

214.0

214.0

428.0

5

$990.00

Short And Royal

Chown Riley

Chown Quarter Horses

208.0

216.0

424.0

5

$1,077.50

Nu Cash Queen

Lafitte;Gregg

Lafitte;Gregg

209.5

216.0

425.5

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/4/2012 OPEN HACKAMORE FINALS COMPOSITE

Rider

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 Intermediate NonPro Bridle Finals COMPOSITE

Place

Money

Horse

Rider

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

Place

Money

Horse

Rider

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

1

$8,527.25

Tuckers Smart Cat

Anderson Lyn

Archer David & Barbara

216.5

224.0

440.5

1

$3,318.00

Genuine Brown Gal

Schaal Suzon

Schaal Suzon

215.5

216.0

431.5

2-3

$6,117.38

Reymanator

Davis Zane

Semanik John

218.5

220.0

438.5

2

$2,607.00

Pepinics Fancy

Miller Jackie

Miller Jackie

213.0

214.0

427.0

2-3

$6,117.38

Smart Remedy Olena

Meador Jeremy

Meador Jeremy

220.5

218.0

438.5

3

$2,014.50

Sanjo Shine

Edwards Diane

Edwards Diane

208.5

218.0

426.5

4

$4,078.25

Shiney N Sporty

McLaughlin Jay

Salt Fork Cattle Co.

219.5

218.0

437.5

4

$1,422.00

Tejons Dry Deuce

Kiracofe Laura

Kiracofe Laura

215.0

211.0

426.0

5

$3,336.75

CNN Crystal Boon

Noyce Kyle

Mattson Steve

214.5

210.0

424.5

5

$1,066.50

Baddabing Baddaboon

Pursel Meg Rosell

Pursel Meg Rosell

209.5

213.0

422.5

Place

Money

Horse

Rider

Owner

Cow

Total on 2

1

$2,318.75

Smart Tic Tack

Valdez Kelly

Valdez Robert Or 216.5 Betty Lou

222.0

438.5

Place 1

Money $3,915.00

Horse Nics Long Pants

Rider Franz Karey

Owner Franz Karey

Rein 217.5

Cow 215.0

Total on 2 432.5

2

$1,855.00

TR Miss Graygun Self Birgit

Self Birgit

213.0

219.0

432.0

2

$3,262.50

The Fresno Fox

Wilhite Tish

Wilhite Tish

218.5

205.0

423.5

3

$1,391.25

Margarita Por Favor

Russell Erin

Russell James M 209.5 & Ellen

219.0

428.5

3

$2,610.00

Soulanova

Keller John

Keller John

212.0

209.0

421.0

4

$1,113.00

Meradas Money Bar

Stratton Tiffany

Stratton Tiffany

214.5

211.0

425.5

4

$1,957.50

Daphne Doo Right

Edson Carolyn

Edson Carolyn

215.5

194.0

409.5

5

$927.50

Chic N Miss

Mcbride Allyson

Mcbride J E &/or 209.0 Allyson

216.0

425.0

5

$1,305.00

Lenas Chexy Badger

Hagen Toni

Heath Dan

207.5

197.0

404.5

Place

Money

Horse

1

$2,693.75

2

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 2/4/2012 Non Pro Hackamore Finals COMPOSITE

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE Rein

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 5K Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE Rider

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 5K Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

Place

Money

Horse

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

TR Miss Graygun Self Birgit

Self Birgit

217.5

222.0

439.5

1

$2,693.75

TR Miss Graygun Self Birgit

Self Birgit

217.5

222.0

439.5

$2,155.00

Arc Tassa Me Please

Reed Karen

Reed Karen

216.0

216.0

432.0

2

$2,155.00

Arc Tassa Me Please

Reed Karen

Reed Karen

216.0

216.0

432.0

3

$1,616.25

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez Kelly

Valdez Robert Or 211.0 Betty Lou

219.0

430.0

3

$1,616.25

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez Kelly

Valdez Robert Or 211.0 Betty Lou

219.0

430.0

4

$1,293.00

Lena On Que

Reilly Garrell

Reilly Garrell

214.0

214.0

428.0

4

$1,293.00

Lena On Que

Reilly Garrell

Reilly Garrell

214.0

214.0

428.0

5

$1,077.50

Nu Cash Queen

Lafitte Gregg

Lafitte Gregg

209.5

216.0

425.5

5

$1,077.50

Nu Cash Queen

Lafitte Gregg

Lafitte Gregg

209.5

216.0

425.5

Place

Money

Horse

1

$2,693.75

2

Rider

Rider

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 5K Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE

2012 NRCHA World Show (San Angelo, TX) — 1/28/2012 5K Non Pro Limited Finals COMPOSITE Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

Place

Money

Horse

Owner

Rein

Cow

Total on 2

TR Miss Graygun Self Birgit

Self Birgit

217.5

222.0

439.5

1

$2,693.75

TR Miss Graygun Self Birgit

Self Birgit

217.5

222.0

439.5

$2,155.00

Arc Tassa Me Please

Reed Karen

Reed Karen

216.0

216.0

432.0

2

$2,155.00

Arc Tassa Me Please

Reed Karen

Reed Karen

216.0

216.0

432.0

3

$1,616.25

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez Kelly

Valdez Robert Or 211.0 Betty Lou

219.0

430.0

3

$1,616.25

Mh Bold Intentions

Valdez Kelly

Valdez Robert Or 211.0 Betty Lou

219.0

430.0

4

$1,293.00

Lena On Que

Reilly Garrell

Reilly Garrell

214.0

214.0

428.0

4

$1,293.00

Lena On Que

Reilly Garrell

Reilly Garrell

214.0

214.0

428.0

5

$1,077.50

Nu Cash Queen

Lafitte Gregg

Lafitte Gregg

209.5

216.0

425.5

5

$1,077.50

Nu Cash Queen

Lafitte Gregg

Lafitte Gregg

209.5

216.0

425.5

Watch 2

Rein

Rider

for more show results www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


CONTENTS

Volume 35 • Number 3 • March 2012

www.horsesall.com 5

Editor: Craig Couillard craig.couillard@fbcpublishing.com (403) 200-1019

6

8

10

Field Editor Crystal McPeak crystal@fbcpublishing.com (403) 360-3210 Field Editor Natalie Sorkilmo natalie.sorkilmo@fbcpublishing.com (403) 608-2238

The west was won with a smile

Niki Flundra: CPRA Act of the Year

Sales Account Manager Crystal McPeak crystal@fbcpublishing.com (866) 385-3669 (toll free)

12

Glen Stewart: starting the young horse

Sam Kelts: On the road again

13

14

18

Sales Account Manager Natalie Sorkilmo natalie.sorkilmo@fbcpublishing.com (403) 608-2238 Special Projects – Glacier Ag Media Tom Mumby glacieragproducts@shaw.ca (780) 459-5464 Publisher: Bob Willcox bob@fbcpublishing.com

Former cop now protecting wild horses

Kamloops Cowboy Festival

19

This month’s contributors: Cynthia Bablitz, April Clay, Doris Daley, Laura Ball, Aimee Benoit, Natalie Sorkilmo, Wendy Dudley, Dianne Finstad, Heather Grovet, Robyn Moore, Amie Peck, Jody Seeley, Glenn Stewart, Dr. Carol Shwetz and Carol Upton. Published Monthly by: Farm Business Communications 1666 Dublin Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1

24

Lantern Lighting

Associations.......................... 30 Calendar of Events ............... 32 Cowboy Poetry..................... 15 Eye on the Industry ............. 20 Get a Grip ............................ 8 Going Down the Trail .......... 13 Hands on Horsekeeping....... 18 Horse and Home .................. 19

Published Monthly by Farm Business Communications ISSN 0225-4913

Full, complete and sole copyright in any advertisement or editorial content bought or produced by HORSES ALL is vested in and belongs to HORSES ALL. No copyright material may be reproduced in any form with out the prior written consent of HORSES ALL. Horses All does not accept unsolicited manuscripts. Those received will not be returned.

Going in style with western furniture

Seat of Distinction  The Regency chair from Silver Stetson Gallery at Okotoks, AB, is both elegant and comfortable. Attention has been given to every detail of this chair. The wood is beautifully carved, and the hand tooled and hand stitched leathers are soft and supple. Choose from a large selection of wood and leather. www.silverstetsongallery.ca

Heather Beierbach captures ranch life through a different lens

DEPARTMENTS

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.

Notice of Copyright

Rustic Style Dining Rustic Ranch of Airdrie, AB, proudly carries the Sedona extension table made of distressed oak solids and veneers. The tables have two 12” extension leaves, and measures 42”X95”X30”H when fully opened. The table is shown with slat back side chairs that can be purchased with seats covered in either fabric or microfiber leather-look cushions. www.rusticranch.ca

 This cowboy chandelier from Keddie’s Tack and Western Wear of Grande Prairie, AB, can add ambiance to any country home. Measuring 21” in diameter, the dark brown light features horse shoes, Western spurs with silver detailing and three oldfashioned lanterns. www.Keddies.com

Arno Leblic: a friend to all horses

29

carries a wide variety of Western beds, including this unique canopy bed made of solid aspen. The bed is seven feet high and eight feet long, and can be purchased in either queen or king sizes. The matching chest has half-log fronts and a sliding top to hide special items. Its Sea Breeze Star bedding is available in twin, queen and king. Visit www.rusticranch.ca

Storage Solution

New Thinking on the Use of Dewormers

PRESENTED BY

 Wow! Rustic Ranch located near Airdrie, AB,

 Looking for a country solution to your storage problems? Then consider this rustic Western armoire from Frontier Western Shop at Claresholm, AB. The armoire can hold your entertainment centre or be used for storage, and is made from reclaimed wood. www.westernshop.com

Make cheques payable to Horses All.

None of the material, written or artistic, may be reprinted or used in any way without the specific permission of the editor. The opinions and statements expressed in the articles and advertisements found in Horses All are not necessarily those of the staff or owners. Therefore, HORSES ALL will not be responsible for those opinions or statements included in the articles or advertisements. However, the staff and owners of HORSES ALL would appreciate written notice of false advertising. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any advertising. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published, no responsibility will be assumed for advertising received by telephone and in no case will liability be assumed for greater than the cost of the advertising when errors or omissions have occurred. HORSES ALL may not be held responsible for the loss or damage of any photographs, drawings, logos, manuscripts, etc., that are sent or brought to the office.

25

Western Four-Poster

Choose the finish and pattern for this hand carved wood desk and matching office chair. Intricate hand tooled and hand stitched leather work can be ordered in colours and styles to suit your taste. Top quality hardware ensures that drawers glide smoothly. Proudly made in North America. Silver Stetson Gallery in Okotoks, AB, offers custom-made wood and upholstered Western furniture. www.silverstetsongallery.ca.

Subscription Rates (includes GST) 1-800-665-0502 One Year: $28.67 Three years: $63.59 One Year Overseas & US: $62.00

US Postmasters HORSES ALL (ISSN 0745-7294) is published monthly for $62.00 per year by Farm Business Communications. c/o U.S. Agent, Transborder Mail, 4708 Caldwell Road E, Edgewood, WA, 98372-9221. Periodicals Postage Paid at Puyallup, WA, and additional mailing offices. U.S. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (cover only) to Horses All c/o Transborder Mail PO Box 6016, Federal Way, WA. 98063-6016, U.S.A.

Taking the yuck out of muck Going in Style

the Ultimate Office Pair

Advertising Deadline Second Monday of the month prior to publication date.

Canadian Postmasters Return undeliverable Canadian addresses (covers only)to Circulation Dept., P.O. Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3K7. Return undeliverable US & foreign addresses (covers only) to Circulation Dept., P.O. Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3K7.

Canadian show jumper Taylor Bland

Horse Health ........................ 7 Horse Heroes ........................ 27 Homeward Bound ................ 24 I Did it My Way ................... 12 In it to Win it....................... 14 Inspirations .......................... 29 Looking Back........................ 15 My Tunes .............................. 23

Our Way of Life.................... 6 Reflections ............................ 21 Riding out of your Mind ..... 26 The Mercantile ..................... 25 Two-Bit Cowboy .................. 4 Time to Chill ........................ 23 Women of the West ............. 5

MORNING LIGHT Behind the cover Front cover artist profile By Cindy Bablitz

A

licia Quist’s skilled talent as a portrait artist working in pastel really shines in this month’s cover feature, Morning Light. “Sometimes, when I feel inspired but don’t have the exact image I’m looking for, I’ll browse an artist’s reference site I’m part of, and this time, this beautiful Gypsy Vanner paint stallion really caught my eye,” says Alicia. Specializing as a portrait artist, Alicia’s artistry typically portrays treasured memories for grieving families mourning a beloved pet. Her representational style evokes almost a three dimensional elegance, capturing the essence of the horses and other companion animals she paints, often in the simple glint or slant of the eyes. “I try to look deeper than just the picture... I like to pick up the colours that most people wouldn’t see in the photograph,” Alicia says.

MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

More than that, Alicia strives to capture the personality of her portrait subjects. For all of her commissioned work, she studies a variety of photographs, looking for different angles and lighting variations and interviews her clients, gleaning a detailed biography of her subjects before beginning the project. “I’m looking to capture a personality,” explains Alicia, adding, “It really is the most important aspect that goes into my work, and I think it sets me apart from other artists. “A painted portrait is a lot more personal than a photograph. People tell me — and it’s what I strive for — that my portraits somehow manage to capture the soul of their treasured animals. I pour my own heart into these portraits.” In Morning Light, Alicia uses the photographic bokeh technique, where the subject itself is the only part of the picture in focus, while the background detail fades to

a blurred colour mosaic. In this way, she is able to use a pastel layering of greens and blues to offset the warm reds and golds of the stallion. “A lot of people often mistake my work for oil paintings,” she says, explaining the smooth hand she manages in her pastel work. Morning light is a 16” x 20” pastel on velour, unframed, and is offered for sale at $400. Alicia also works with local animal rescue organizations, Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society, (AARCS) and Heaven Can Wait. Thirty per cent of all commissions generated through links from AARCS and Heaven Can Wait is donated back to the rescue organizations. To view more of Alicia’s work, to inquire about a commission of your own, or to purchase Morning Light, surf to either www. backroadshighriver.com or www.aliciasartwork.webs.com. 

3


World renowned equine clinician to be featured at the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show

Two-bits from a two-bit cowboy Craig Couillard - Editor

W

elcome to my monthly column as the new Editor of Horses All magazine. I’m of the vintage to know that two-bits usually refers to twenty-five cents. But two-bits can also mean “worth next to nothing!!” I’m a self-professed two-bit cowboy. Growing up a town kid and the third of four boys in Bow Island, Alberta, my Dad had a couple of saddle horses that he kept in the area. But the introduction of motorbikes, muscle cars, girls, and a little liquid courage spelled the end of the horses in the early ’70s. The tug of horses and western music sprouted again, and I bought my first mare (TJ) as a green two-year-old in 1984. I look back now and I’m lucky I didn’t break my fool neck — green horse, green rider — just me and TJ bouncing around the ditches, fields, and coulees north of town. But thankfully she is a good and faithful mount, and never left me on the ground. I still have her... 28 years later. I’ve never earned a pay cheque working from my horse. I’ve spent many hours volunteering on community pastures near my hometown of Bow Island, Alberta but I’m no lease rider. I’ve started my own colt and trained horses that came to me with 30 days on them. I’ve worked with horses that I now trust my wife and adult children on but I’m no trainer. I’ve travelled many, many days in the spectacular Rocky Mountains on horseback, experienced stirrup-deep prairie grass on the 9W6 Centennial Ride across CFB Suffield, thought I saw Sitting Bull as I rode into historic Fort Walsh in southeast Alberta, and chased the ghosts of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid on The Outlaw Trail down in Wyoming.

But I’m no guide and I’m no outfitter. I’ve team penned and sorted a bit but never won a buckle. I’ve thrown a loop but wasn’t much good at it (and I figured I needed my thumb and fingers for my real career). So I know enough to know that I really don’t know much. But what I do know about horses, I love. There is something spiritual, something deeply emotional that connects us with our horses. Some get it, some don’t. I can’t quite put my finger on it but it’s my intention to try and capture that connection in the stories we write about. Niki Flundra has that emotional connection to her horses. Glenn Stewart has it. The Kamloops Cowboy Festival and The Mane Event represent the best of it. Taylor Bland got it an early age. Laura Ball feels the connection every day on her ranch. Marcie Edey got it. Arno Leblic got it. We’ve recently lost these two inspiring people. They both had that connection. Hopefully Horses All will inspire and encourage you by the stories we write. Maybe we will help you better understand what stirs inside every time you brush your horse, or throw a leg over the saddle. Or hear a great western song… or are moved by a photograph or painting. To achieve this, we’ve introduced several new features in this issue, and more are on the horizon. There are so many great stories about people and their horses... we just need to work hard to find them. Send me a note at craig.couil lard@fbcpublishing.com or phone me at 403-200-1019. I would love to hear from you. That’s two-bits from a twobit cowboy living on our TwoBit Ranch near Millar ville, Alberta. 

Doug Mills to demonstrate “Train Thru Trust” program

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orthlands and Martin Deerline are thrilled to present accomplished horseman Doug Mills to the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show taking place from March 29 - 31 at the Edmonton EXPO Centre. Mills brings a wealth of knowledge and skill accrued over a lifetime of horsemanship. Mills was born and raised on a working cattle ranch in Price, Utah. This lifestyle gave him the opportunity to observe horses and their instincts in their natural environment — a key element in Mills’s ability to read and communicate with horses. After more than a decade of teaching horses and riders in workshops and one on one sessions in Canada, United States and Europe, Mills has numerous futurity wins, international and national championships. Mills also has gold medals in reining, working cow horse, rodeo, western pleasure, western riding, trail, showmanship, hunter under saddle, jumping, pleasure driving and dressage. His unique ability as a speaker allows him to present an exciting, educational, and inspiring program to audiences. With a calm and easy approach, Mills teaches practical

horsemanship skills that everyone can take home and put to immediate use using his interactions with the horse to emphasize the most fundamental lesson; allowing the horse to make choices.

National College Finals Rodeo presented by Martin Deerline are available at any Ticketmaster location, ticketmaster.ca, or by calling 1-855-780-3000. S e r v i n g t h e We s t e r n Canadian agricultural com-

Mills teaches practical horsemanship skills that everyone can take home and put to immediate use.

For more information on the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show, please visit f a r m a n d r a n c h s h o w. c o m . Advance tickets for the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show and the Canadian

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3rd competitor set for Mane Event Trainer’s Challenge Kerry Kuhn joins Martin Black and Mike Kevil

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ormer high school rodeo contestant Kerry Kuhn will be participating as the 3rd competitor in the Mane Event Trainers Challenge, April 27 - 29, 2012 in Red Deer. “This may be the toughest Trainers Challenge yet,” Mane Event management has announced, “as Kerry will be competing against two well known veteran cowboys, who are also world class horse trainers and clinicians — Martin Black and Mike Kevil, with horses supplied by the Ace of Club Quarter Horses. However, Kerry’s experience in numerous colt starting competitions should ensure high level competition throughout the weekend.” Kerry started his first 2 year old colt at the age of 12 with help from his grandfather, Dale Lukens, and spent many days working horses and gathering cattle with him.

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Kerry then went on to compete in team, calf and steer roping in high school, and then spent several years starting young thoroughbreds for the racetrack. Since the mid 90’s, Kerry has held horsemanship demonstrations and clinics at events such as Equine Affaire, Equifest of Kansas, the American Royal and the Missouri Equine Expo.

“This may be the toughest Trainers Challenge yet.”

Kerry has been a national ambassador for Purina Mills’ Equine Team for many years and given numerous Horse Owner Workshop (HOW) demonstrations around the country.

Kerry’s ability with both a horse and an audience have led him to be a guest clinician at the Tennessee Walking Horse Celebration, a featured clinician at the inaugural Arizona Horse Fair and Expo, and a judge for Craig Cameron’s Extreme Cowboy Race World Finals. He also hosted the RFDTV show “Best of America by Horseback” for several years. Kerry has won numerous colt starting competitions in the last few years. His victories include Equine Experience (CA), the American Royal (MO) and most recently Equifest (KS). Kerry was recently featured in the Western Horseman magazine as well as the online Western Horseman “Ask Our Expert” series. For more details on all clinicians appearing at the Mane Event visit www. maneeventexpo.com or call (250) 578-7518. 

Kerry Kuhn

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Women of the west Personal profile

The west was won with a smile Marci Edey (1939 – 2012) inspired the many lives she touched

By Natalie Sorkilmo

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hen one sits and reflects upon the western  way  of life they are likely to dream up images of galloping horses, mountains, and cowboys wrestling steers. Yet, if asked about the softer side of this vast country, a special woman may likely come to mind. Marci Edey embraced the western lifestyle on the ranch she shared with her husband Don. With a typical year dropping six to 12 foals into her capable hands to halter break, feed, and care for, it is easy to see her dedication reflected in the animals she raised. Those who knew Marci are quick to mention her preparedness to show, and although she openly admitted that lots of her competitors had more natural horsemanship ability, it was evident that no one worked harder at mastering the many equine disciplines she chose to excel at. As a true horse woman, she spent countless hours in the pursuit of the perfect ride, looking to others to find inspiration for herself. Horse women such as Marion Stav, Pat Ross, Shawna Sapergia, and Elyse Thomson contributed to her horse show accomplishments in her Western and English pleasure, reining, and cow horse pursuits. Marci showed attention to detail in the show ring and on the ranch with the care and welfare of her stock and family. In the show ring she loved the wins but she loved the camaraderie of everyone that shared the hitching ring, more often saying “I just have to be there!”

photo by natalie jackman

“A lovely woman, living a full life, loving her horses, married to a good man.”

Her success as a rider, mother, and friend are only etching in the leather; thus, it’s only appropriate for her best friend and husband Don to take it from here: What is the appropriate measuring stick of one’s lifetime accomplishments? Words like integrity, worthiness, humility, respect, and goodness come to mind as important measurables. There are many other words and phrases to describe

those that we have known that we hold in high regard. With Marci’s passing the notes, cards, posts and telephone conversations have one common thread and that is inspiration. The dominant phrase is, “Marci was an inspiration to me!” Now, here is the oddness of that phrase to me who has had a 48 year love affair going on every day of this ole cowboy’s life. Firstly, she had no idea that she was an inspiration to anybody. Secondly,

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she didn’t live everyday with a goal to inspire. She was not an educator, coach, public speaker, politician, motivator or any of the other handles reserved for those whose life is spent inspiring. So my take on it from all of the tributes that have come to this family in the last month is that she simply lived the ranch life she loved so much with her stock, dogs, family and friends doing what she loved to do. And all along the trail many noticed and wanted to be like her. Sounds simple... is simple. She didn’t go out there in the ring to inspire young women — she went out there to kick their butts! But her preparedness, attention to detail, and tenacity were infectious in a good way! Some special moments for Marci

included showing her part bred Arabian reiner in Scottsdale, winning her first reining buckle in the ARCHA yearend awards program, winning the Montana Reined Cow Horse Futurity in her class and, of course, showing at the World NRCHA show in Texas at age 70 as the Canadian Regional Champion. She loved to see the many horses that she raised trained and ridden by the great trainers she worked with at so many cow horse and reining championships: Brad Pederson, Gord Hester, John Swales, Cody McArthus and Jesse Thomson. I’m sure they all showed the good ones to their best for Marci’s smile! Lee McLean lives on a ranch south of ours and I so appreciated her post on Marci and I think it hits the nail on the noggin. “Marci will be missed in the horse world, that’s for sure. She was around for a long time and always had a twinkle in her eye, was beautifully turned out complete with a smile. When I was a surly teenager, my mother used to point Marci out in the ring, saying “see THAT lovely lady! She’s got a smile on her face, Lee, and she doesn’t look like someone’s pulling her toe nails out!” Mom was right. Marci was right. Life is too short and uncertain to walk around with a frown. I hope Marci knows what an inspiration she has been! A lovely woman, living a full life, loving her horses, married to a good man. It’s all we can hope for, right? Here’s to the good memories.” As with others, Marci’s trail is marked with ups and downs; however, her ability to appreciate each moment as it happened will certainly have her comrades pushing thoughts of mountains and cowboys to the back of their minds as they stop to picture the smile that won the west.   t

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Our way of life

Niki Flundra: CPRA Act of the Year From trick riding to liberty horsemanship, Flundra showcases her talents

Making a living with horses By Dianne Finstad

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he  bond  between human and horse can be a thing of beauty, especially if it’s being demonstrated by one of rodeo’s top entertainers. Niki Flundra has taken her horsemanship skills to new heights in the last year, and is bringing a unique equine experience  to  audiences across North America. Flundra began her career in rodeo as a trick rider more than a decade ago. She grew up in the entertainment world, with her father Jim Cammaert  of  Strathmore, both a rodeo rider and a fireworks expert, providing pyrotechnics for events large and small. She learned his trade, but her own early love of horses led to her own version of daring, with movie stunt work, and a flashy trick riding repertoire that included the suicide drag, and a flag carrying hippodrome stand, complete with a live sparkler. It was an act that took her to the biggest shows on the circuit. But  in  2010,  she  introduced a new specialty act to the rodeo world, showcasing her two black beauties, and a form of horsemanship known as “liberty.” “About three years ago, I was thinking of ways to branch out from trick riding,” related the 31-year-old. “I’d seen liberty work in the movie industry, and had always been amazed by it.” Not surprisingly, the liberty approach involves a lot of freedom. “Liberty horses are free from a bridle or saddle. They work off body language cues, and whips, which are used as an extension of our arms, for cueing,” Flundra explained. She began studying, reading books, and watching videos. When Flundra took part in the Spirit of the Horse Festival in Perth, Australia, with her trick riding, she got the chance to see liberty training in action. Each of the performers from the different equine disciplines had ten days to get an untrained horse ready to perform for a huge show. Flundra learned from the liberty trainer there, and again, when he came to the U.S. But a big part of developing a new act was finding horses that fit, and she has that in Sunny and Zyada. “The biggest thing with liberty training is learning each horse’s personality, to build on their strengths. Sunny is a really high energy, feisty horse, and so I make him a more exciting part of the show. He runs in, and does the raring up. He can do the other stuff, but that’s not his

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strength. He prefers action all the time. Z prefers to go into the arena and lay down,” she chuckled, describing the contrasting personalities of her equine partners. Flundra,   who  was  still Cammaert at the time, first tested the waters with her liberty horses at the Daines Ranch  Pro  Rodeo  near Innisfail. The crowds were thrilled to see her riding freely, bareback and with no reins, around the arena, and to have the horses both rear up and lay down on command. The response convinced the cowgirl she was on the right track. It was an exciting time in Niki’s life, because she also married Canadian champion saddle bronc rider Dustin Flundra, moved to Pincher Creek, and became a mom-tobe. She was still able to perform her act at the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Edmonton that fall, despite being five months pregnant. On March 19th last year, Ridge David James Flundra, made his entrance, to the delight of his proud new parents. While that changed everything for the rodeo family, it didn’t alter their dreams. Niki put on her first show seven weeks later. It was a busy summer, with Flundra’s liberty horses part of the 2011 Calgary Stampede’s nightly grandstand show, Volte. Flundra was able to lay her horse calmly down

on stage in the midst of the myriad of lights, fireworks, dancing and music. “We also came up on the elevator from underneath the stage. It was definitely challenging. The first time, the horses were sure wondering what I was asking them to do. But they were little troopers, and trusted. I asked a lot of them and they handled it well.” At the same time, Flundra was also doing stunt double and horse work on the

got the call to bring her horses down to be part of the opening ceremonies at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. There she rode Zyada bridle-less one night, and did trick riding on Canada Night. “Everything is so fast down there  during  the  openings. They  just  want  something quick and high energy, and the best you’ve got.” Flundra will never tire of the thrill of being part of pro rodeo’s ‘Super Bowl’ event.

“Liberty horses are free from a bridle or saddle. They work off body language cues, and whips, which are used as an extension of our arms, for cueing.” — niki flundra

hit  CBC  series  Heartland, filmed west of Calgary. There were some crazy days, with Heartland work, baby time, and  the  nightly  Stampede show. “We got ‘er handled. We’re fortunate Ridge is such a good baby, and lucky to have so much help from family!” Flundra  finished  2011 with a flourish, being named Specialty Dress Act of the Year for Canadian pro rodeo for the second straight year. For the sixth time, she also

“It’s instant goosebumps when you ride into the alley at the Thomas and Mack arena. There’s lots of lights, and it’s so loud, and there’s a lot of nervous energy. There’s nothing else like it.” “It was the first year for my liberty horses there. It was something I hoped I could accomplish, to take something new to them. My bridle-less ride went over very well. I hope I can show them more of what I can do in the future.”

Having her horses respond to cue, whether in the middle of the arena, or just off camera doing a movie shoot, is a skill in demand. Heartland producers wrote the act into the script storyline, and series star Amber Marshall got to learn some liberty training moves herself. Flundra’s horses have also been part of the CMT series Pet Heroes, helping reenact some real life horse rescue stories. And this spring, Flundra and her horses will be doing some more movie work. “Once you have the basic training, you can build from there on what you want them to do.” Even though it took a lot of horse skills to do her trick riding, Flundra believes she’s been able to reach a new level of horse knowledge through her liberty work. “It’s a whole new way of doing things, and communicating with horses. My experience has grown by leaps and bound, but I’ve still got tons to learn. The bond of trust between Flundra and her horses is clear to all who watch her perform. “That’s what we’re trying to get across. It’s a look at all the things that are possible to accomplish in the relationship between horse and human, when you play freely with them. I felt it right from the start. This is just a wider spectrum of all the things I learned as a little girl.”   t

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Horse health Expert advice By Carol Shwetz

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imely equine dentistry is an influential tool in maintaining  a  horse’s dental health. However, it is not the only tool, nor is its practice any more important than several others that shape the wear of a horse’s teeth. Since a horse’s teeth are evergrowing, practices that occur every day in their lives incrementally continually to shape and reshape their teeth. Diet and horsemanship are both important factors in determining dentition, and so can be used as tools to positively affect dental health. Corrections in these practices shall then indirectly reduce the need for equine dentistry. Horses spend up to 30 per cent of their day chewing, so what they eat and how they are chewing strongly affects the shape of their teeth. Horses use their incisor (front-most) teeth to clip and nip grasses/shrubbery and they use the teeth in the back to grind the feed into smaller particles. Since a horse’s upper arcade of teeth are set 30 per cent wider than their lower arcade, they must grind their food using a side-toside movement rather than chewing up and down as humans do. This allows them to make complete contact between their top and bottom teeth and the grinding action naturally wears down or “self-floats” the teeth. Healthy chewing movement results when horses are fed longstem forages or graze on pasture. When horses are fed grains or pelleted and processed feeds, the benefits of the healthy nipping and chewing motions are reduced as the horse begins to chew in an up and down fashion. As this chewing process is incomplete, raised edges appear along the outside margins of the upper set of molars and the insides of the lower set. These unground edges can become so large as to prevent the horse from freely rockering his lower jaw. This results in a self-propagating problem as the teeth become locked between opposing sharp ridges. It is mainly these ridges that are addressed through equine dentistry.

Keeping your horse away from the dentist Feed should allow horses to chew both up and down and side to side. ness, which is why horses avoiding discomfort in the mouth often experience back pain. As the horse attempts to evade the pain, it raises its head. This causes the back to drop and tighten, building a cycle

of tension and pain so that whenever the horse is ridden or sometimes even when it just has a bit in its mouth, the ill-carriage and tension returns. Horses worked under such

conditions will eventually develop abnormal dentition since illcarriage of the head and tension within the jaw affect how the teeth meet and wear against one another. Mindful dentistry can unlock patterns of resistance in the mouth and in the body, but if riding technique remains unchanged, the pattern of ill-wear in the horse’s mouth will merely return. Conversely, change in the type of horsemanship to a more sensitive means will encourage healthy development of wear patterns within the dental arcade. It is of great value to recognize the importance of favourably

introducing a bit to the young horse. Demands placed on young horses often exceed their readiness to accept the bit, as often at this time they are already tender due to the eruption of their adult teeth. Between the ages of two and five years old, 24 cheek teeth will erupt, with up to 16 teeth erupting simultaneously. Bit placement in a young horse’s mouth prior to its “readiness” can begin an associated painful response, and so instigate detrimental patterns of wear in a horse’s dentition, which will result in the need for ongoing intervention by equine dentistry.   t

Healthy chewing movement results when horses are fed long-stem forages or graze on pasture. Good dental health is important for all species.

Use of the bit The intimate relationship of a horse’s teeth to behaviour, performance and its health need be of serious interest to any horseman. Horses are incredibly sensitive beings, and the presence of a bit in the horse’s mouth is no small thing. Barely perceptual cues offered through the bit can not only direct a horse’s movement, but can also shape the horse’s manner of movement. The horse will search for meaning in the bit, but in order for this to happen the presence of the bit itself must in no way bother the horse. The horse’s reaction to any discomfort from the bit, whether it comes from pain within the mouth itself or through the insensitive hands of a rider, will be to brace his tongue against the bit, raise its head, and clench his jaw as his anxiety escalates. This  tension  reverberates throughout  the  horse’s  entire body causing resistance and stiffMARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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Get a grip Ask the trainers

Glen Stewart: starting the young horse Creating a braver, more confident horse right from the start

By Glen Stewart

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he first time I started a young horse I was 13 years old, and then I started doing quite a few when I turned 17. For years I started horses for people and I didn’t get paid much, which was good, because I wasn’t getting much accomplished. Of course, I was doing the best I knew at the time… I just didn’t know that what I knew wasn’t much. My main goal was to be able to ride the horse without getting bucked off. I had no plan or course of action, and I never thought of it as trying to develop the horse. I didn’t even know that how the horse turned out had more to do with me than the horse. I thought that if things didn’t go well it was just that particular horse. I never thought about preparation and that everything I did with them was interconnected. Well, I have come to find out there is a lot more to it than meets the eye. I have a plan now with every horse, steps that I follow, and I now know that if two different people could start the same horse there could be drastically different results. The overall objective I have is to develop confidence, respect and understanding. In the beginning, generally speaking, the main objective I put the most time into is confidence building. If the horse for some reason is disrespectful, then that will have to be addressed first or while your building the confidence. For the purpose of this article we will focus on ways to begin the process of creating a braver, more confident horse, earning their trust and accepting the human. The reason I like to start here is because a scared, untrusting horse has a very hard time learning. They are too busy worrying about their survival to think about whatever it is you are asking them to do. I need to mention as well, that horses need to what I call “learn to learn” from us. They have been learning from the herd, their mother, the environment they live in, but don’t yet know that we have something to share or offer that is of value to them. If we can present things in a manner that makes sense to the horse, you will see them realize that you are there for their benefit. When they realize that you are communicating with them, their confidence grows immediately and they start looking to you for answers or solutions. There are very few tools needed to get started. I prefer a soft rope halter, 12 foot lead, horsemen’s stick and string, flag, and an 8x8 or 10x10 plastic tarp. I also often use an Australian Stock Whip and 45’ Lariat, but neither piece of equipment is a must, and both take a bit of practice to use. I find that these few items used correctly prepare horses for much more than most realize. The halter and lead is for having a line of communication to your horse. It’s to help the horse understand what it is you are trying to tell him, making it easier for the horse to find the answer. It can help cause the right thing to be easy and the wrong thing to be difficult. You also use this as an opportunity to start teaching them to follow a feel. The halter is not for making the horse stand still. You can use the halter to make it difficult to move but not to make them stand. Be sure to spend an equal amount of time or more on the right side of the horse. That is the side that usually gets

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the least help and it causes the horse to get very out of balance. They might be comfortable with things on the left but not on the right. Don’t forget about the right, get them and keep them balanced. Doing a good job of building a horse’s confidence means that the horse has made the decision to stand still and relax because he has become braver and more confident and doesn’t feel the need to run or flee. I’m not in a big hurry to start moving their feet, which is respect-getting, until I have achieved some rapport and confidence. Waving a stick and string, a flag, using a tarp or stock whip is pressure to a horse if they are scared of them. The goal is to get them over the perceived danger of the tools and have them understand that you are trying to teach them to think, rather than react. Being smooth and having a rhythm to what we are doing is much easier for the horse to accept than jerky one-time type movements. Just last week I helped a fellow with his horse and he said he used to do some of this but stopped because it made one of his horses more scared and attack the flag. I’ve seen this happen before with the stick and string and tarps as well. So what was going on, did they all get a bad tarp or a faulty flag, maybe the horse was just different? Maybe it only works sometimes? With the right approach I have never seen it not work, and work very well. You must make it easy for the horse to do the right thing, which is to think, and show some signs of trying to relax. Look for small changes and reward the change. Too much pressure such as being directline in your thinking and approach, poor timing, and not recognizing or rewarding a try will make your horse worse rather than better. I will use the flag as an example. Our flags come with a stick and the flag is about one square foot in size. The directline approach would be to get one and start waving it around to see what the horse does. A better approach would be to tie the flag around the stick until it was very small and then offer it to see if the horse would smell the little ball of tied up flag. From there, start to rub whatever part of the horse it will allow to be rubbed. Take the flag away when you see a try or a bit of acceptance and then bring the flag back and proceed getting to more and more of the horse. Once you can rub the whole horse and take the flag away and come back with it and the horse is accepting of that, then untie one knot and start again. Follow that procedure until the flag is completely open and you can wave it wildly anywhere around the horse and the horse is comfortable with the sound and movement. I like to be able to stand anywhere, in front, at the side, behind and wave the flag with the horse accepting all the commotion calmly. Be sure not to wave your tools at the horse, you are not trying to move them, just help them get over the perceived danger. Most horses would be scared of something like this until they are shown that there isn’t anything to be scared of. More than getting your horse to accept a flag waving around, your real goal is to teach them to think rather than react. I try and use this approach and thought pattern with all the tools and in all situations. Your timing of the release is what will teach them to think or to become more reactive. Too much pressure, poor timing or over exposure to anything can create more problems and cause a horse to

become defensive, braced and even go on the offensive and go after the handler. With the tarp I would want the horse to comfortably accept me waving it, putting it on them and having them carry it as well as have them walk over it. With the stick and string be able to wrap it around their legs, spank the ground, swing it over their backs and be able to do it from every zone (all areas) as well. Before using the string I would rub the horse everywhere with the stick while hanging onto the string. Most horses can be fairly comfortable with the stick and string, flag, tarp and stock whip faster than it took me to type this article. The fellow I helped had a very unconfident horse and within an hour the flag, whip, stick and string were being accepted very well. The horses head was down, eyes half shut and soft, leg cocked and standing still. As well as confidence throughout this process the horses is also learning respect and understanding. When you make the wrong thing difficult, such as tipping his nose in and making it difficult to run or wander off, and easy and comfortable to stand, by leaving the lead line hanging loose they start to see the pattern. You cause your horse to think which actually makes them smarter. A horse handled in this manner learns to think their way through situations rather crash their way through. Every time we switch sides and walk away and then approach the horse, he gets a rub. They gain confidence and acceptance of the human. Besides being able to rub the horse everywhere with your equipment, you should also be able to rub every hair on the horse with your hands. It is not complete until you can see the horse has mentally accepted and enjoys all of it. The horse can be physically standing still but that doesn’t mean they have accepted it mentally or they are enjoying it. Getting good at this can save your horse from years of carrying around needless worry and fear. This is something that any horse, of any age should be able to handle and understand. It eliminates countless hours of training and frustration for the rider and the horse. Have fun with it. For anyone wanting to see a horse learning to learn and building their confidence which is a big step in starting the young horse, we have put together a short video clip of some of the processes from our Colt Starting DVDs up on our website at www.thehorseranch.com look at “Articles” under “Happenings.” Enjoy the video clip, and good luck. For more in-depth perspective on the concepts contained in this article, you can view a special video-clip enhanced version at http://www.thehorseranch. com/articles/. Glenn Stewart travels extensively conducting clinics, demonstrations, and colt starting sessions, and also offers Camps and a three month Horsemanship Course at his home The Horse Ranch, as well as the Horsemanship Learning Adventure Series; two completely different experiences, High & Wild in the Northern BC Rockies, and Working Equitation with Lusitanos in Brazil. He rides 30-60 client horses per year, including young horses, restarts, challenging horses, and foundation training. Glenn is a former Champion of the Cowboy Up Challenge at the Calgary Stampede and has been chosen as one of the Canadian representatives in the 2012 Road to the Horse, the World Championship of Colt Starting in Murfreesboro, TN. More information by calling 1 877 728 8987 or visiting www. thehorseranch.com.   t

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photos by dixie stewart

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www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Spring trailer maintenance Don’t get stranded on the side of the road By Heather Grovet

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ave you heard the expression “a bad day at the horse show beats a good day at work?” A few years ago I discovered this saying wasn’t completely true when my horse trailer developed a flat tire on the way to an early morning show. There was nothing fun about perching at the edge of the road with a tire iron in my hand. Regular trailer maintenance can solve some of these problems, so here are a few tips to make your next equine event more fun than a day at work.

Check your tires. You should examine your tires each time you drive down the road, but have an especially critical look when doing your spring trailer maintenance. Ensure each tire, including the spare, has optimal air pressure, and look for cracks, worn treads or uneven wear. Replace or repair problem tires promptly.

Have your brakes and bearings serviced. Some horsemen have the skills to check their own brakes and bearings, otherwise have a qualified mechanic or tire shop do the job for you.

Test your break-away switch. Byron Hussey of Cam Clark Trailers reminds horseman that all trailers must have an emergency braking system which activates if the truck and trailer become accidently disconnected. To

test this brake, connect your truck and trailer. Then pull the pin on the breakaway coupler and attempt to drive forward. If the system is working, your trailer’s brakes should refuse to turn. If the wheels turn, have the unit serviced immediately.

Test all your lights. Next check your trailer’s signal, brake and running lights. Sometimes problems with lights can be as minor as corrosion in the plug, and fixable with a squirt of WD 40. Also, test the horse compartment and dressing room’s interior lights, plus your exterior loading light. Years ago I was the last rider to leave our arena late one night, only to discover my interior lights weren’t working. My horse absolutely refused to step inside the trailer in the pitch black. Do yourself a favour, and avoid this dilemma.

Clean the horse compartment’s floor.

photo by alan dale trailers

Wash the exterior.

Allan Fertig of Allan Dale Trailers recommends customers remove their trailer mats at least once or twice a year to clean the floor and check for damage. “Urine is very caustic,” Fertig says. “All types of floors must be checked; wood can rot, iron rusts and aluminum corrodes. If you have difficulty moving the bulky mats, purchase a pair of mat grippers, they make a huge difference. Pull out those mats, wash the floor and allow to totally dry before returning the mats.”

Horse trailers are composed of steel, aluminum or fibreglass. All three types of exteriors require regular washing with warm, soapy water, especially if they have contacted road salt or sand. Aluminum trailers can also be washed periodically with a mild acid solution, available for purchase at most dealerships.

Carefully check the details. Check the condition of your jack, and grease it if it has a nipple. Next, examine and oil all doors, hinges, win-

dows, dividers and locks. If your trailer has a ramp, check its strength, and ensure it will raise and lower easily. Also, if there is any damage to stall padding, have it repaired before it becomes larger. Ensure your saddle racks, bridle hooks and other accessories are still in good condition and replace as necessary. Spring trailer maintenance is essential, but if you don’t have the necessary time, strength or tools be aware that most trailer dealerships will gladly do the job for you.   t

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In it to win It Competitor profile

Sam Kelts: On the road again Serious head injury puts bronc rider on shelf for 6 months

By Dianne Finstad

S

am Kelts has a date and an event circled on his calendar. March 11th. RodeoHouston. He can hardly wait. The talented saddle bronc rider from Millarville was on pace for one of the most successful seasons of his ten-year pro career in 2011. But then in Fort Madison, Iowa in September, came an unforgettable finish to a regular ride. Except Kelts can’t remember what happened. “It wasn’t a bad wreck,” Kelts explained. “I fell off, like a guy does time and time again. But I just hit wrong.” “I did actually get some pictures of the ride before the wreck. It looked pretty good at that point.” But seconds later, things were not good at all. Kelts made awkward contact with the ground hard, and was out cold. Justin  Pro  Rodeo  Sports Medicine experts were there to examine him quickly, along with his travelling partner Luke Butterfield. “Luke said I was out for four or five minutes. But then I was fairly coherent and answering all their questions. I guess they thought about letting me go, but then sent me to get checked out.” During the ambulance ride to the hospital came the first of several seizures, indicating a dangerous injury. Kelts was then airlifted to the University of Iowa hospital, where he was put into an induced coma. While the issue of concussions in pro sports is a hot topic these days, Kelts’ says his situation was a different matter. “They called it ‘shearing,’ where the nerve endings break

photo by mike copeman

apart. I had that in several spots, and that caused the seizures.” Once medication controlled the seizures, Kelts was brought back to consciousness, and could begin healing. “I was lucky. I didn’t have a whole lot of symptoms. I had

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months  before  Kelts  could return to active rodeo competition. He had a battery of brain tests three months after the injury, and has another followup to come. But the cowboy was given the all clear to ride, and March 8th is the six month mark. He was able to get his preference for the later round of action at RodeoHouston, and so will get back in his saddle March 11th. “I might get on a practice horse and cheat it by a day or two, but that shouldn’t matter too much,” admitted Kelts. Unlike a knee injury or a broken bone, there really hasn’t been any therapy for Kelts to do in the meantime. “I’ve definitely played it pretty safe, and kept myself out of situations where I could hit my head. I’ve rode some saddle horses, but only ones that were broke and quiet, no colts.” Kelts has had his share of injury recovery breaks from rodeo, including three shoulder surgeries. So he knows the importance of time for healing fully. But that doesn’t make it easy. “I was pretty hot when I got hurt, so hopefully this will be just a short break. With this injury, after a couple of weeks, I felt fine. There was no cast, and I wasn’t hobbling around on crutches. So it’s been a frustrating wait for me,” admitted the six-time Canadian Finals Rodeo qualifier, who had to miss competing in Edmonton in November, and also a shot at the NFR, while on in the 3injury list.

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Kelts did manage to fill his time with a few adventures, including a good dose of hunting, and a trip to Mexico for fellow bronc rider Dustin Thompson’s wedding. But then it was just a matter of time until the March opportunity in Texas. RodeoHouston is the largest indoor rodeo in the world, paying out more than two million dollars in prize money. It’s tough to make a return from an injury layoff at such a big stakes event. But it would be even tougher if Kelts had to sit it out. And besides, he points out, he’s had plenty of practice at comebacks. “ T h e r e ’s   a   l o t   o f   u n c e r tainty whenever you make that first ride back. But I’ve done it quite a few times. I’m definitely ready to go again. I was pretty much ready to go when they let me out of the hospital… but that would’ve been a poor decision at the time.” “But I had confidence, and was drawing good and riding good before I got hurt. Ideally, I’d like to pick up right where I left off, and keep that up!” smiled Kelts.   t

Colors www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012

6 7


Matching your truck to your trailer Do you really know how much your truck will safely pull? By Heather Grovet

O

ne of the most unusual things I’ve ever witnessed at a horse event was a family arriving with their smallish SUV pulling a long utility trailer. The SUV was obviously overloaded, and the trailer had no windows. When they opened the trailer’s door, out walked Buddy, a 16.2 hh Thoroughbred gelding. Buddy’s family was new to the equine world, and while they loved the horse, they had no idea how unsafe and uncomfortable his trip must have been in the nose-low, windowless box. Maybe you and I aren’t hauling horses with a tiny vehicle, but most of us do find the topic of matching the right truck to the right trailer a bit difficult. Here are five things to keep in mind when considering a good match. 1) Dan Ellsworth of Westwind Chevrolet Buick is in the rare position of selling both vehicles and horse trailers, so he is able to look at the big picture of matching the pair. Ellsworth explains all towing vehicles have a maximum tow capacity — the amount of weight they can safely pull down the road. Obviously a gasoline SUV and a diesel one-ton are going to have vastly different maximum towing capabilities. To learn

how your vehicle is rated Ellsworth suggests you contact your dealer or search the manufacturer’s  website  for the GCVWR (gross combined vehicle weight rating). “Or go to howstuffworks.com and enter ‘GMC (or Ford) towing capacity,’” Ellsworth suggests. “Here you can learn in layman’s terms the exact amount your vehicle is capable of pulling.” 2) Next, determine how much your empty trailer weighs. A sticker near the trailer’s door normally shows this weight before options. Then add the weight of your contents. Consider everything — your horse’s weight, your personal supplies, hay, water, tack and all other items. If possible, use the scale at your local gravel yard, garbage dump or grain elevator to get the actual weight of your trailer and contents. This total number is your combined gross vehicle weight (CGVW) and it must not exceed your tow vehicle’s gross combined vehicle weight rating. (GCVWR). When shopping, err on the side of caution. “I shudder when I see some dealers post signs on their trailers stating ‘half-ton safe,’” Jim Cobbe from Bar T5 Agra says. “How can anyone guess my combined gross vehicle weight? I might haul two small

horses therefore adding only an extra 2,000 lbs., or I might haul two large horses, feed, water, heavy tack, and end up with another 4000 lbs. This extra weight will make a huge difference in a crosswind, or if I try to pass another vehicle.” 3) Don’t forget your truck’s payload — the amount of weight you can put in the truck box. “How low does your half ton ride when pulling an 18’ bumper pull?” Ellsworth asks. “It would probably ride better with a gooseneck of the same size because a gooseneck’s weight is more evenly balanced on all four tires. This is easier on the truck and safer because you need adequate weight on your steering tires.” Ellsworth notes a longer trailer produces a heavier pin weight. 4) Ensure your truck has an approved  trailer  package, which  includes  upgrades such as an auxiliary transmission cooler, heavier rear suspension, receiver hitch, and wiring for brakes and lights. Many trucks come from the manufacturer with these towing packages, or you can have them added later. 5) Lastly, always determine your trailer tires are not P (passenger) tires, but instead LT tires, which can handle the extra air pressure required for a heavy load.   t

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wanted a Mercedes, now’s the time! New for 2011, the Free Spirit has been built on a Mercedes Benz Sprinter 3500 dual rear wheel chassis, Unlike many other Class B Vans in the industry, the Free Spirit offers a self-contained bathroom, We’ve taken full advantage of the Free Spirit’s 75 interior height, allowing ample space for you to move around, while at the same time providing you with generous storage in the stylishly designed curved cabinetry. features include - 188 HP @ 3,800 RPM, 325 lbft @ 1,400 RPM, Hitch - Trailer Hitch Receiver - 500/5000 lb, Captain Chairs - Ultraleather c/w Storage Pocket , Radio - In-Dash AM/FM/CD/DVD Player/GPS Navigation/ Bluetooth/Rear View Camera, Satellite Radio Prewire - including Antenna, Chestnut Cherry Finished Curved Interior Cabinetry w/ Positive Locking Upper Cabinets. Plus many more great features. $101,881.00 + Taxes

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Look at this completely custom super C Motorhome. As western Canada’s only Dynamax dealer we would like to present the all new 2012 34’ Dynaquest. With the powerful 350 Hp Cummins this coach will tow 20,000 LBS, having two slides gives the open feel of home. Some more features include Girard power awning, ceramic tile, Dyna power package giving you a bigger gen set and a bigger inverter, BOSE surround sound . On the roof there is Two 15K BTU A/C units also the in motion dome satellite with GPS. Don’t miss out on your chance to own a beauty like this. See your motorized specialists at the High River Autoplex & RV. $290,600.00 + taxes

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I did it my way Personal profile By Cindy Bablitz “

Y

ou see a lot of crappy  things... dealing with people in crisis and the situations they get themselves into,”  says  Bob  Henderson, president of the wild horses of Alberta society and retired police officer. “You can’t take that stuff home to your family, so you contain a lot of it inside. There were a lot of times I would have to go out and spend time with my horses before I could face my family at the end of a day. Horses calm the soul.” Bob served 27 years as a police officer with the Calgary Police Service and in 2001 joined forces with a team of other volunteers to protect a population that had no voice — wild horses who were being captured and slaughtered for meat in “a blatant disregard for the animals’ right to live and roam free as their birthright.” The Wild Horses of Alberta Society (WHOAS) has worked fervently for eleven years to spare the wild horses of this province from what they believe is inhumane, unsafe or undignified treatment at the hands of any person, organization, government or business aimed at depriving these wild creatures of their right to live and roam on land their species ancestors have known for thousands of years. “The government will say they’re not native, but science will tell you, all horses originated in North America,” says Bob. Bob explains that though there has long been a belief that horses were extinct from

Former cop now protecting wild horses Bob Henderson makes it his life mission to advocate on their behalf the continent from about 8,000 to 2,000 years ago, new archaeological evidence is suggesting there’s a good chance they never disappeared at all. Although official information from  government  differs, WHOAS estimates the wild horse population in Alberta to be about 500-550; Sustainable Resource Development publishes numbers twice that high. Bob explains, “We have had a couple of sit down meeting with the SRD and other officials. In 2005 they showed us a map indicating all the horses that they had counted in their aerial census. That number was 221 head. In 2008 they stated the number was over 700 head... and now they are claiming there are over 1,000 head of wild horses roaming the foothills. This giant leap in numbers is genetically not possible.” “In 2010-11 over 80 wild horses were captured, with a large majority going to meat buyers. Now, in 2011-12, the number is quickly approaching over 100 head taken,” laments Bob. Protecting wild horses from extinction, again, or for the first time, is the aim of the WHOAS... and a deeply felt passion for Bob personally. “Pregnant mares, studs ... whole harems of horses are being taken out of the wild horse population to be taken to Fort Macleod to be slaughtered. They’re not hurting anything out there in their wild habitat. I can show you the valleys where domesticated cattle have grazed all summer: there are no grasses left, and no wildlife left in the area. I can also take you to where wild horses have lived and grazed

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year upon year — there’re still grasses, and still lots of wildlife, including predators, visibly present.” WHOAS says there’s no need to remove wild horses from their habitats... and the population is low enough, it can’t handle the “genocide.” Speaking for the animals who can’t speak for themselves is a purpose Bob has set his remaining years to, and one he won’t abandon. He grew up riding horses on the prairies of Saskatchewan, and sighted his first wild horse in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in 1972. “I remember that first time a wild horse stud came crashing through the trees toward me, snorting and blowing. He amazed me. He was such a beautiful creature. He put an awe in my heart,” says Bob. “Now many years later, I’ve seen it many times: a wild horse stallion rushing out in front of

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photo courtesy of bob henderson

Bob Henderson reflects on his encounters with wild horses in westcentral Alberta.

his herd, snorting and blowing until his herd has dispersed... he would give his own life to protect them.” There’s a sense of urgency juxtaposed with a quiet resignation in Bob’s voice as he speaks about his advocacy for the wild horses of Alberta. He speaks of being demoralized by governmental apathy toward the wild horses... a species he feels ought to elicit pride in the soul of this province... and frustrated when official policy puts healthy populations at risk.

be a voice for these horses that don’t have one of their own. If I pass on fighting my butt off for these horses, I’ll be a happy camper.” For more information on the Wild Horses of Alberta Society, and to donate funds in support of wild horse conservation, sanctuary, management, education and community building, surf to www. northernhorse.com/wildhorses, e-mail president Bob Henderson at bob1603@telusplanet.net or phone 403 556 6167.   t

“I’ve seen it many times: a wild horse stallion rushing out in front of his herd, snorting and blowing until his herd has dispersed... he would give his own life to protect them.”

“I, and my group, and the people of Alberta, really have to stand up to some of these attitudes that we’re running into in certain departments of the government,” Bob implores. “My life wasn’t perfect. The way I lived my life wasn’t perfect. But I figure this cause is my opportunity to give back to creatures that helped me cope with what I had to. I feel it’s my job, my responsibility, to

E d i t o r ’s   N o t e :   We   w e r e so intrigued listening to Bob Henderson’s story and advocacy work for the wild horses of Alberta, we decided to run a two part feature over March and April. If you are a stakeholder invested in the management of wild horses and would like to contribute your voice to next month’s article, e-mail your contact information to craig. couillard@fbcpublishing.com.

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Kamloops Cowboy Festival

Going down the trail

16 years and still showcasing some of the best cowboy music, art, and poetry

Places and events of interest By Cindy Bablitz

R

eputed as the biggest and best event of its kind in Canada, the Kamloops  Cowboy Festival, March 8-11, this year celebrates its 16th anniversary. It’s grown from humble beginnings where some 400 people gathered for cowboy poetry, stories, songs and music to a four day, two venue event attracting some 8,000 visitors, vendors, visual and performing artists from all over North America. “We’re not a country music festival, but a cowboy music festival — and it’s an important distinction to make,” says Mark McMillan, president of the BC Cowboy Heritage Society (BCCHS) and chairman of the Kamloops Cowboy Festival. “Basically, country music is typically love songs: cowboy music is about riding and driving horses, moving cattle, the land and working and playing on the landscape. Sure, the odd cowboy falls in love and comes out with a love song,” Mark grins, “But traditional cowboy music is about a cowboy way of life.”

“Traditional cowboy music is about a cowboy way of life.” — Mark mcmillan

photo bymark mcmillan

Entertainers on stage vary in age from 10 years old to 80. There is something for everybody.

Mark says we don’t hear a lot of cowboy music, or poetry, or stories, because mainstream doesn’t provide a place for the genre. That’s where the inspiration of the Kamloops Cowboy Festival was born, and the growing popularity of the festival, among participants and audiences, says there’s no doubt there is some place for cowboy art. Actually, the festival is about more than providing a once-yearly forum for cowboy art, as the BCCHS operates the BC Cowboy Hall of Fame year-round, and also provides three $500 student scholar-

ships annually in support of promoting and preserving the cowboy heritage. The Kamloops Cowboy Festival is operated entirely by volunteers, (last year, 120, not including the board of directors) with literally not a single paid staff in the mix with all proceeds supporting the student scholarships and the BC Cowboy Hall of Fame. With weekend passes starting at just $65, the festival hosts some 30-40 entertainers from all over North America, including performers and artists from Texas, California, Montana and Utah... though

R E COG NI ZE D P R OG R AMS

the mandate of the festival remains to feature the bigger percentage of contributors from Canada. “The biggest numbers of Canadian cowboy performers we find come from Alberta... and the biggest percentage of the audience is from Alberta too,” says Mark. The Rising Star Showcase during the festival features entrants — literally of all ages — competing for a top prize of $1,000 in each of musicians and spoken word categories. Last year, nine year old Jayden Stafford from Fort St. John, BC, won the cowboy poetry competition and 16 year old Kristyn Harris of McKinney, Texas won the musician’s competition. Both will be performing on the main stage at this year’s festival. Still, Mark explains, “We never consider any of our entertainers a headline act: we treat all of our entertain-

ers exactly the same, whether they’re Joe Blow from Pincher Creek or Joe Blow from Texas, they’re all considered equal on stage.” In a jam packed weekend, the Kamloops Cowboy Festival also features the juried Art of the West Show and Sale, (featuring entrants in four categories — flat art, sculpture, photography and saddle making) the Western Art and Gear Show, (a trade show featuring some 50 exhibitors all showcasing handcrafted cowboycentric, products) and about ten  workshops,  (covering hands-on instruction in the cowboy way in song writing, guitar picking, cowboy poetry writing and even, how to pick the best cowboy hat for you). For more detailed information on the Kamloops Cowboy Festival, surf to the BC Cowboy Heritage Society site at www. bcchs.com/festival, or phone 888-763-2221.   t

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Hoof and Paw Body Workers Ltd. Home of Equinology and Caninology Canada 13


In it to win It Competitor profile

Canadian show jumper Taylor Bland After winning internationally at an early age, can the Olympics be far off for this athlete

By Amie Peck

T

he first time her grandp a r e n t s   t o o k   Ta y l o r Bland to a show jumping  competition  at Spruce Meadows, she knew she had found her true passion in life. She was eight years old at the time, no stranger to riding horses, but had grown up in a western saddle and around cattle on her family’s ranch in Strathmore, Alta. Horses are in her blood — her grandfather rode in the RCMP Musical Ride and raised and trained Morgan horses for driving and farm work, while her father was a professional saddle bronc rider. Bland had loved horses from the first moment she set eyes on them, but after the experience at Spruce Meadows, she had found her competitive avenue. “Something about the sport made my heart soar and I knew instantly it was what I wanted to do,” Bland explains. Bland was enrolled in jumping lessons with a local trainer and quickly worked her way up the levels on a feisty little bay Thoroughbred mare named Mississippi. “She loved to run and jump, and together we gave every parent around the ring half a heart attack,” Bland fondly remembers. “She taught me a lot about bravery, and to give everything you’ve got into what you want.” That lesson proved to be invaluable  as  Bland  was entered into the prestigious FEI Children’s International Competition in 2006. This annual event was created “to promote and encourage talented young riders by giving them the opportunity

Taylor Bland, of Strathmore, AB, aboard the eight year old mare Isis, competes in the 1.40m division during the 2010 Spruce Meadows Summer Series.

to experience international competition,” according to Equine Canada. The competition is open to riders between the ages of twelve and fourteen, over a course set to 1.20 m, to compete at qualifiers across Canada and the world. The top two riders from each country are invited to the finals, which in 2006

were held at Spruce Meadows. Bland, then just thirteen years old, was competing on a 15.1h palomino Anglo-Arab gelding named Tango — lovingly called “the little yellow pony that could.” Together they claimed the title for Canada, making Bland the first Canadian to ever win the championships.

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“With Tango — because he was naturally faster than the bigger horses — it was about judging the quickest track from fence to fence and balancing for the jump, creating power through momentum. He was my Hickstead,” Bland explains. Tango was a true partner for Bland, and taught her many skills through their time together. “With learning comes errors, but Tango would always

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Together they claimed the title for Canada, making Bland the first Canadian to ever win the Championships.

find a way to get us both to the other side (of the jump) in one piece,” Bland explains. “In doing that he really gave me the confidence to keep trying, even after a mistake, until our partnership became so natural there was really no true ‘thought’ in our rounds — only reactions through memory.” That competition proved to be a critical moment in Blands’ show jumping career. “Riding had always been a love and passion of mine, but the FEI Children’s was the turning point in my dreams — suddenly I was dreaming of World

Cups, the Pan American Games and the Olympics. I was thinking to myself, ‘You know what, I can do that.’” Bland was training with legendary Canadian show jumper Jill Henselwood at the time of her win, and called to announce the big news. “She asked if I cried when they played the national  anthem,”  Bland remembers, “but I was grinning from ear to ear and already planning for the next championship. When I’m standing on the Olympic podium and I hear ‘O Canada’ being played, then I might cry. I’m saving my tears for then.” Bland has since been competing on a number of different horses, including a fiery black mare named Isis that she showed to the 1.40 m level in 2011. Currently, she is focusing on a young project mare named Rosalie that she hopes to bring up through the ranks. “Recently I have been working with Sid Cook, who is a remarkable western trainer and colt-starter. Everything I have learnt  from  Jill  Henselwood about training the competition horse is matched by Sid Cook’s teachings about training the young horse. I hope one day to combine their styles to train the Olympic horse.” Although the future holds great  competitive  goals  and dreams, Bland still continues to enjoy just riding around the farm and being with her horses. “The number one factor that I think draws every rider into any aspect of horse riding is the breathtaking moments of communication and connection with such an amazing animal.”    t

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Kitchen Cupboards

Cowboy Poetry

A line from Will Shakespeare has rightly won fame, Prose from the saddle When Juliet asked Romeo “What’s in a name?” A rose is still sweet if you call it a cabbage But remember, the Bard had the Gift of the Gabbage. For flowers are one thing and horses another, A name is reflective of something or other. Champ was a winner! Trigger had zip! You’ve all known a Smoky or Copper or Skip.

In the hills of Alberta where the fescue grows tall There’s a horse that’s remembered–his name says it all. He came with a handle that dazzled your ears But his nickname’s the one that has stuck through the years. A cowboy...a road trip...he was ready and rough, A leather-shod rooster out strutting his stuff. Some scratch in his pockets, a red silk bandana He was loaded for bear in Shelby, Montana. He tore up the dance floor, he howled at the moon He’d been good for business at Big Red’s Saloon. But when the jing left his jingle and the shine slipped his chrome It was time to head north, back to wife, work and home. Oh friends, if he’d just left the bar when he should! If he’d only got gone while the gettin’ was good. If that horse trader hadn’t a ‘bought the last round He might have escaped with his finances sound.

1912 Calgary Stampede: A cowboy’s ride to fame

Looking back Images from yesteryear

O

Tom Three Persons faces the black terror

n September 7, 1912, Tom Three Persons and an outlaw horse named “Cyclone” became legends — immortalized in the rodeo world by just a few wild and dusty minutes in the infield. It was the final day of the first ever Calgary Stampede, and the Kainai cowboy drew one of the most notorious bucking horses then known. Cyclone, a gelding from Oklahoma nicknamed “the Black Terror,” had bucked 129 of the world’s top riders in the previous seven years and was considered unrideable. Stampede founder and manager Guy Weadick had assembled a stellar line-up of cowboys and cowgirls from across North America, promising them “the buckingest bucking horses that ever bucked a buck.” Four men had advanced to the finals in the saddle bronc riding competition, and when Tom Three Persons drew Cyclone, everyone expected that one of his American rivals would take home the $1,000 prize, saddle, and gold belt buckle.

Cyclone twisted, pitched and reared until it appeared he would go over backward, but he was unable to throw his rider. The dust finally settled — there was no eight-second rule in 1912, so the ride finished when the horse stopped bucking — and Tom Three Persons was still in the saddle. The crowds went wild, all except for Del and Bertha Blancett, owners of the bucking horse who had just lost his title as one of the fiercest undefeated broncs around. One hundred years later, Tom Three Persons is still celebrated as the only Canadian to win a world championship at the 1912 Stampede. As the Calgary Stampede celebrates its Centennial anniversary, this year promises to be just as full of exciting moments, and rodeo fans will be looking out for the next bronc rider and bucking horse to take their place as Stampede legends. For ticket information, go to www.calgarystampede. com.  — Aimee Benoit, Calgary Stampede Archivist

But the deal was a winner; the horse–a first-prizer. He was already wise and with Bud he was wiser. His wife had saved big time to redo the kitchen, He’d spend that on the horse and then brace for her...feedback. When he pulled in the yard she was already steamed. “Look what I bought you, my darling,” he beamed. Oh the battle was fierce, pots and pans flung about With magnificent cussing to finish the rout. Now folks, let me tell you, that horse proved his worth. For 26 years, pulled his weight on this earth. His name: Doc Bar Leo King Peppy Pride But he was called Kitchen Cupboards till the day that he died. By Doris Daley, based on a story told by Leo Maynard at the Bar U Campfire about a cowboy from the nearby EP Ranch who acquired a dandy horse on a road trip. Doris Daley has been named best female cowboy poet in North America by the Academy of Western Artists and the Western Music Association. www.dorisdaley.com

PHOTO BY CALGARY STAMPEDE

Good Night I’m Gone — Cyclone bucking off an unidentified rider

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BRITISH COLUMBIA: March 31-April 1 Glenn Stewart Natural Horsemanship Workshop, Hope BC Please Contact Laurie Thompson at 604-869-1411 or email thompsonlaurie@telus.net April 13 - April 14 Stage 3/4 Natural Horsemanship Clinic - Smithers BC Please contact Anika at 250-846-5494 or email gattiker@telus.net SASKATCHEWAN: April 19 - April 21 Stage 1 Natural Horsemanship Clinic - Saskatoon SK April 22 - Extreme Horsemanship Canada Competition - Saskatoon, SK April 23 - April 25 Colt Starting & Horse Development - Saskatoon, SK May 7 - May 9 - Natural Horsemanship Workshop - Saskatoon, SK Please contact Wendy Eliason at 306-492-4995 or email w.eliason@xplornet.com MANITOBA: April 28 - April 29 Stage 1 Natural Horsemanship Clinic - Stonewall, MB April 30 - May 1 Stage 2/3 Natural Horsemanship Clinic - Stonewall, MB May 2 - May 4 Stage 4/5 Natural Horsemanship Clinic - Stonewall, MB Please contact Penny at 204-467-8789 or email pfidler@rainyday.ca ALBERTA: May 19 - May 21 Natural Horsemanship Stage 1 Clinic Leduc, AB Please contact Ed Wedman at 780-916-0788 or email wedmans@xplornet.com September 5-7 Natural Horsemanship Stage 1 Clinic Water Valley, AB September 8 & 9 Extreme Horsemanship Canada Clinic & Competition Please contact Candice Tkachuk at 403-804-0334 or email candy@equivico.ca

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www.thehorseranch.com MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

15


Suzon Schaal and Genuine Brown Gal Win NRCHA Intermediate Championship Jackie Miller wins the Intermediate Reserve Championship

I

t  began  as  the  California Reined  Cow  Horse Association, but as the thrill of reined cow horse competition spread, the budding organization had to make a change. Years ago, the CRCHA amended its name, becoming the National Reined Cow Horse Association. Since then, cow horse competition has spread across the United States, Canada, Europe, and South America. On Friday, February 3, that international flair was evidenced as two Canadians took the top spots in the Intermediate Non Pro Bridle of the NRCHA World Championship Show presented by John Deere. For the third year in a row, Suzon Schaal will return as a World Champion to the Wild Rose Country of Alberta, Canada. “It feels pretty good. I’m having a hard time believing that it’s actually happened,” Schaal said of winning her third world title in three years. Schaal was riding Genuine Brown Gal, who she’s ridden for every championship. “She’s been very good to me.” Schaal and Genuine Brown Gal, by Listo Pollito Lena and out of Genuine Emerald, marked a 215.5 in the rein work and 216 in the cow work. “The rein work felt good, even though our first stop could have been a little better,” she said. “The cow work could have been a little tighter and quicker, but it was enough for today and I’m really happy.” Schaal, an equine veterinarian, said her friends, family, and coworkers were a large part of her success. “I couldn’t do it without them. They help me so much,” she said. “I also thank my trainer John Swales. I wouldn’t be here without him. He’s been a huge supporter and keeps me calm.” Schaals took home $3,318, a Bob’s Custom Saddle, and assorted other prizes.

competed  in  2011  at  the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity, and were tied for the lead of the Amateur division going into the cow work. Unfortunately, a bad fence work took them out of contention. “ We   d e f i n i t e l y   h a d   a screwup. I watched a lot of people while I was there and got some videos of different people — like Boyd Rice — and when I came home I worked to change his style and do an overhaul on him. It worked,” he said. Murphy’s parents, Eugene and Maria Murphy, own Pepto Pepermint, and were on-hand to cheer him on. “I thank my parents for all their support. I’m lucky that they help me do this and I get to go to the big shows,” he said. “I also thank Boyd Rice, Robbie Boyce, John Swales, Brad Peterson, the people I came with, and everyone else who has helped me.” Check out page 2 of this month’s Horses All for full results.   t

photos by primo morales

Jackie  Miller  won  the Intermediate Non Pro Bridle Reserve World Championship on her horse, Pepinics Fancy, with a 427. Pepinics Fancy is by Pepinics Master and out of Docs Fancy Dudette. Miller, of Okotoks, Alberta, won $2,607, a Gist Silversmiths buckle, and other prizes. The  NRCHA  World

Fast Moon Chic

Championship Show presented by John Deere is held as part of the NRCHA Celebration of Champions,  held  January 28-February  5  at  the  First Community Credit Union Spur Arena in San Angelo, Texas. The Celebration of Champions also features the Circle Y Ranch Derby and the World’s Greatest Horseman competition.    t

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16

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he big news at the National Reined Cow Horse  Association Circle  Y  Ranch Derby Non Pro divisions was an  un-assuming  18-yearold  Canadian  named  John Murphy. He and his family traveled more than 40 hours from his home in Wetaskiwin, Alberta, to the West Texas town of San Angelo to claim the Non Pro, Intermediate Non Pro, Novice Non Pro, and Amateur Championships! “He  was  a  good  boy,” Murphy modestly said of his horse, Pepto Pepermint, after the awards ceremony. Murphy won $5,652 from the Championships plus $3,094 from the go-rounds, including the high Amateur cow work score. “He was pretty much the best he’s ever been. He was solid and he worked like he does at home.” Murphy  and  Pepto Pepermint, by Surely A Pepto and out of Haidas Pepermint,

Sandy Ridge Stallion Station

Also Standing:

John Murphy sweeps championships

photo by primo morales

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www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Raffle winner Spanier claims coveted Centennial Saddle

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renda Spanier has just given new meaning to the term “free ride.” Spanier, of Cochrane, Alta., is the lucky winner of a 2012 Calgary  Stampede  Centennial Saddle, after her name was recently drawn from hundreds of entries in a raffle organized by the Stampede’s Western Performance Horse Committee. And even though this beautiful, purpose-built specimen is the real deal — and her Palomino horse Ranger, who stands 16-and-a-halfhands high, would love to try it on for size — Spanier says she’ll treasure it as more of a showcase piece. “I’m so thrilled. It’s a bit surreal to win a saddle like this,” says Spanier. “If I do use it, it’ll be on my special horse Ranger. But for me, it’s always something that’s going to be a collector’s item. “One of the things I am going to do is put it on display down here at the store (Cochrane’s Home Quarter Mercantile and Pie Shoppe, a Western store and restaurant, where she works). That way, so many other people will get to see it and appreciate it.” Spanier’s windfall is the latest development in a special celebration of the Stampede’s 2012 Centennial that has already been nearly a year in the making. Back in the spring of 2011, the Stampede’s Western Performance Horse Committee commissioned the production of up to 100 identical Vic Bennett Custom All-Round Saddles, to be handcrafted exclusively for the Stampede’s upcoming Centennial festivities in July. Bennett, one of the premier saddle makers in North America, has been working feverishly with a two-man crew in his Sherwood Park, Alta., shop to meet demand for these “gift-of-the-century” saddles, which are still available for sale to the general public. “It’s beautiful. The craftsmanship is extraordinary. I’ve worked in tack stores before, and I’m very familiar with Vic Bennett saddles — their reputation, the quality of their work,” says Spanier. “I’m just thrilled.” Bennett’s Stampede Centennial creations, which will never be reproduced, boast meticulous craftsmanship and painstaking detail, with the Calgary Stampede brand even lasered on the stirrup. These limited-edition saddles — which are currently more than 60 per cent sold — will include their own number and certificate of authenticity, and will be signed by both Bennett and Michael Casey, the Stampede’s President and Chairman of the Board. Casey himself drew Spanier’s name from the ballot box for one of these coveted Vic Bennett saddles on Wednesday, Jan. 11. “To purchase a saddle made by Vic Bennett is a great opportunity in itself, because he’s such a fine craftsman. And if people take advantage, they’ll have not only a great saddle they can use, but something that is really a piece of art, to celebrate the Stampede’s Centennial,” says Casey. “It’s hard to think of something better, in terms of a keepsake. The

whole of tenor of Guy Weadick (back in 1912) was to have a Wild West show with the best cowboys and the best stock,” he adds. “To be able to commemorate that with a saddle from an artist like Vic is, I think, just a wonderful opportunity.” CNNGo.com,  CNN’s  travel website, recently hailed the limited-edition Stampede Centennial Saddle as one of the world’s Top 10 travel souvenirs of 2012. “No, we don’t ride horses. Half our staff are challenged by the beasts at petting zoos. That doesn’t mean we don’t know true cowboy art when we see it,” reads the CNNGo.com entry on the Centennial Saddle. “Fortunately, you don’t have to… get thrown off a horse to buy this beautiful piece.” There’s still time for members

MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

photo by calgary stampede

Michael Casey, Calgary Stampede’s President and Chairman of the Board, draws the winning entry.

of the public to latch on to that Stampede legacy by purchasing one of Bennett’s creations, and securing their own priceless piece of Western artwork. To find out more about the Calgary Stampede’s Centennial

Saddle program, please e-mail saddle@calgarystampede.com or visit www.calgarystampede.com/saddle2012 The Western Performance Horse Committee plans to use proceeds from the Centennial Saddle pro-

gram to reward winners of the Team Cattle Penning Competition, the Cutting Horse Competition, and  the  Working  Cow  Horse Classic at the 2012 Stampede with Centennial champion saddles.   t

17


Hands-on horsekeeping Horse care advice

By Wendy Dudley

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uck equals yuck! For you and your horse. When the spring thaw and monsoon rains turn paddocks and pens into mire, Tovie Van Nes no longer worries about whether her horses are up to their hocks in goop. “Our solution was to haul in 70 tonnes of gravel and spread it very thickly in our shelters and loafing areas.” Anything to keep the feet dry is worth the battle against poor footing and potential bacterial and fungal infections such as thrush, rain scalds, or abscesses, said Van Nes who teaches horse health and behaviour through her Just Horsing Around program offered at her stable near DeWinton, Alta. When choosing the size of gravel, crushed rock no larger than 3/4 inch is best, with a layer of at least three inches. “Pea gravel is absolutely perfect for all horses to walk on, no matter what the condition of their feet and does wonders to help develop healthy bare feet,” said Van Nes. “The larger gravel can make horses with thrush, thin soles, and laminitis ouchie, so if using larger stones, I would introduce it in small patches around a gate, or a patch near the waterer or shelter to help develop tough soles gradually. If one plans to gravel large areas, consideration should be made for paths through it or around it so that horses can avoid it if they are sensitive for any reason.” Choose stones that are not so small they will get embedded in the laminae, but also don’t select a size that is so large the horses are tipping over on it, added farrier Steve Bennett of Blackie, Alta. He advises that hooves be regularly checked for any wedged stones, whether the horse is barefoot or shod. Gravel also can help pop out mud and debris compacted in the hooves, said Bennett who’s

Taking the yuck out of muck Spring is coming and so is the water – are you ready to handle your surface water? worked in the backcountry. “If you’ve been riding through the bush, and then cross creeks, the gravel bars can help pull out the mud.” Soft hooves from standing in water or mud are vulnerable to a number of health issues. “The hoof will be more prone to bruising, which can easily turn into an abscess, and if the horse is shod, the mud can pull the shoes off. Soft feet will spread, going over the sides of the shoes, which then loosens the shoe,” Bennett said. Compacted mud and manure that is not cleaned out can also lead to thrush, a bacterial infection of the frog. Some horse owners turn to sand to help absorb excess moisture, but it has poor compaction and can easily disappear, becoming costly to replace. “And if it is fine, it can work its way up the hoof wall and cause sand cracks,” Bennett noted. Sand should never be used in feeding areas since it can cause sand colic if ingested. Landscaping also can help prevent water from pooling. Pastures and paddocks should be sloped between four to seven degrees, said Adam Vanderwoude, a landscape architectural technologist with Bragg Creek-based Scope Projects Inc. A thicker depth of topsoil, as well as shrubs, should be placed around the loafing areas to help filter and absorb runoff. Subsurface work, such as laying down geosynthetic filter fabric, covered by the footing surface, can fix those areas that are heavy, muddy clay. The fabric keeps the soil from working its way up to the footing material. Interlocking grid systems can help reduce erosion in areas of high traffic, such as riding arenas. Once laid, the pockets can be filled with surface material, from gravel to soil and seed. The grid aids drainage and keeps the surface intact, Vanderwoude said. Offering a place for horses to stand out of the mud is another way to keep their hooves high and dry.

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PHOTO BY WENDY DUDLEY

It is important that horses be provided with high ground areas during wet seasons. Standing in water or mud can lead to bacterial and fungal problems.

PHOTO BY WENDY DUDLEY

Placing heavy mats around high traffic areas can help keep horses out of the mud. They also are handy to use when grooming or having farrier work done and the animal needs to be on a dry surface.

“It’s amazing how the horses will choose to stand on platforms. They don’t like standing in the mud,” Bennett said, recalling how an outfitter he once worked for built the platforms where the horses were fed. Building large composting mounds where horses can stand above soggy ground works well too. If possible, it is best to keep horses off wet pastures, as they can quickly churn up the sod into mire. Rotate them onto higher ground until the wetter fields have dried out. To keep water from entering paddocks, make sure buildings have rain gutters and downspouts that direct water away from confinement areas. As for those extra mushy areas around gateways, water troughs, or barn entrances, heavy rubber mats (make sure they are heavy enough not to blow away in the wind) provide dry footing. If you do not have a well-lit barn, the mats come in handy for outdoor work such as grooming or hoof care— a much-appreciated welcome mat for both you and your horse. 

PHOTO BY WENDY DUDLEY

Horse instructor Tovie Van Nes suggests gravel as a way to improve drainage in paddocks. It can also help toughen horses’ hooves, reducing chances of thrush and abscesses that can occur if horses are forced to stand in water and on muddy ground.

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Horse and home Small acreage living

By Amie Peck

D

eworming is a critical  component  of  a good health program for any horse as these products are designed to paralyze and eliminate common parasites from the digestive system of the horse. Horses are exposed to parasites while grazing and ingesting larvae which mature into adults in the large intestine and proceed to lie eggs. These eggs are then shed by the horse into their manure where they hatch into larvae and spread in the environment. Without  proper  management, this cycle continues to wreck havoc on the horse and a large worm infestation could potentially be fatal. Common signs of a parasite problem include a dull coat, weight loss, colic and loose manure. Before you grab that tube of dewormer — you must first know your enemy. According to  Trisha  Dowling,  professor of  Veterinary  Pharmacology at the Veterinary College in Saskatchewan, there are various types of parasites that affect young and adult horses differently. Small strongyles are the most important worms to target for adult horses. Other common parasites include large strongyles, bots, pinworms and tapeworms. Ascarids (roundworms) are found in mature horses, but are largely an issue for young horses up to two years of age and should be treated accordingly. In order to determine what parasites are affecting your horse, arrange for your veterinarian to conduct a fecal egg count. This test will show the levels of eggs in the horses manure as well as the type of parasite — an important step in determining your deworming medicine and schedule, according to Burwash Equine Services of Springbank, Alta. “The increased cost of fecal examinations by your veterinarian is offset by the savings on dewormer,” explains Dr. Dowling, as you can purchase less dewormer by strategically targeting the parasites and selecting the most effective drug based on the type of infestation. The various products on the market are targeted to treat different types of parasites: •  I v e r m e c t i n   ( E q v a l a n , Bimectin,  Panomec)  is  a broad  spectrum  dewormer that treats large and small strongyles, pinworms, bots and roundworms. •  M oxidectin  (Quest)  treats all  the  same  parasites  as Ivermectin,  but  will  kill encysted strongyles (which can burst from the gut lining and cause inflammation or colic) and lasts up to four weeks longer in the horses system. It is not recommended for use in foals, miniature horses, or any horse less than 400 kg. Both ivermectin and moxidectin are the only dewormers that are effective against bots. •  Pyrantel pamoate (Strongid C, Exodus) is especially effective for tapeworms. •  F e n b e n d a z o l e   ( S a f e g u a r d , Panacur)  treats  large  and small  strongyles,  pinworms  and roundworms but not bots.

New Thinking on the Use of Dewormers If not used effectively, your money could be flushing down the proverbial toilet Deworming Recommendation* Month of the Year

Product

January

Moxidectin (Quest)

April / May

Fecal Test and Ivermectin (Eqvalan, Bimectin, Panomec)

July / August

Ivermectin

October / November

Moxidectin

*Courtesy of Burwash Equine. To be used for information purposes only – consult your veterinarian for the best deworming schedule and products for each situation.

•  Praziquantal is often added to an Ivermectin or Moxidectin dewormer to treat tapeworms (Quest Plus with moxidectin, Eqvalan Gold with ivermectin).  These  dewormers  are shown to kill up to 76 strains of  parasites  and  claim  to have the broadest coverage of any dewormer. There are several management practises that will also help to prevent the spread of

parasites.  Dr.  Kate  Robinson, of Saskatchewan, suggests that having the appropriate number of horses for the size of pasture or turnout, as well as rotating pastures and removing manure will help to decrease parasite infestations. “All adult horses on a farm should be on the same deworming  program,”  suggests  Dr. Dowling, in order to be as effective as possible.   t

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12-02-21 9:14 AM


Regional stable meetings in March

Eye on the industry News from Alberta’a equine community

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anyone interested in attending. Stony Plain — March 10 at 3:00 pm at the Stony Plain & Parkland Pioneer  Museum  Teahouse; Athabasca — March 11 at 2:00 pm at the Athabasca Agriplex; Calgary — March 12 time and location TBD. For more information, please email Heather at heather@albertastables.ca. Standardbred Canada hosted the 2011 O’Brien Awards on January 28th to honour and recognize the horses and people who have made the greatest contribution to Canadian harness racing over the past season. Among the winners is Keith Clark of Okotoks Alberta, who

hree Regional Stables Meetings  are  scheduled  for  this  spring. These  complimentary meetings are regional based and intended for stable owners, managers, operators, staff and anyone interested in boarding horses at their property or equine friendly facilities as defined by the Alberta Stables Initiative. The meetings are intended to educate about the future of the stable industry in Alberta, stable business practices, herd & barn management, disease control & emergency planning and exploring resources for multi horse operations. Meetings are FREE and open to

w o n   t h e   O ’ B r i e n   Aw a r d   o f Horsemanship. Clark was the leading trainer at three racetracks last year — Alberta Downs in Lacombe, Alta., Northlands Park in Edmonton, Alta. and Fraser Downs in Surrey, BC. His driving talents are equally as impressive as he was also the leading driver at Alberta Downs and Northlands in 2011. Read the full press release from  Standardbred  Canada’s website.   t Robyn Moore is Manager of the Horse Industry Association of Alberta which will be presenting the Horse Owners and Breeders Conference, Jan. 11-13, 2013 in Red Deer, Alta.

photo by heather grovet

Select the perfect horse trailer By Heather Grovet

S

hopping for a horse trailer is like buying a new horse; part fun and part terror. Just how does an equestrian decide which trailer to purchase? To make the job easier, start by asking yourself these questions.

How many horses will you haul? A larger trailer is more expensive to purchase and haul, it requires more room to turn around, and most importantly, it requires a bigger towing vehicle. On the other hand, a spare trailer stall can be a bonus if you want to travel with friends, or have extra space for feed.

How wide and tall should your trailer be?

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“Trailers range from 6’8” to 8’ wide, and often the cheapest trailers are too narrow,” Byron Hussey of Cam Clark Trailers says. “An average sized Quarter Horse needs a trailer that is at least 7’ wide.” Hussey notes 8’ wide trailers are advantageous if you have living quarters or a large equine, but that extra width can be tough to see around when driving, and a tight fit on narrow roads. The majority of slant load trailers are 7’ tall; if you have a Warmblood you may want to consider straight load trailers, which normally are 7’6”.

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“In almost every case I recommend  goosenecks,” Jim Cobbe of Bar T5 Agra explains. “They are more stable to pull, have less bounce, and can turn sharper.” On the negative side, goosenecks tend to be more expensive, and the truck bed cannot be used for a camper or to carry feed.

Steel or Aluminum? Aluminum  has  many advantages; a longer life span, increased resale value, lighter weight and no rust. On the other hand, steel trailers are less expensive, easier to weld and repair, and stronger than aluminum. New steel trailers

are often made of galvanneal and have improved paint jobs similar to the quality seen on cars, so rust is less of an issue than in the past. Jodi Tebb of Airdrie Trailers suggests the perfect compromise is a steel frame/aluminum skin trailer. “These trailers can have the advantages of aluminum at a more reasonable price,” she says.

Ramp or Step Up? Ramps  make  loading easier for elderly or small horses,  and  can  make unloading on icy conditions safer. Unfortunately, ramps can become slippery with manure, and can be difficult to close if dirty. Allan Fertig from Allan Dale Trailers notes their   ser vice   department can add or remove ramps from their Featherlite trailers depending on their client’s needs.  “Likewise,  we  have hay racks and stud walls in stock, so those can also be quickly added.”

Living quarters or not? Living quarters are convenient if you frequently haul to shows or trail rides, but they can cost as much as a house, and add extra length and weight to your trailer. Some people throw a mattress in their gooseneck and camp there; others make their own simple weekend packages by installing countertops and a portable potty.

Which brand to buy? A popular brand trailer will ensure a higher resale value, but if your trailer is rarely used, you might manage with something safe but simpler. Do you actually need dividers, rear tack, or drop down windows? If you’re willing to live without these options you can save money, and still have a useful trailer. Whatever your brand, buy from a reputable dealer with a service department.

What do you do with your old trailer? Most  dealers  will  take your older trailer on trade if it’s safe, but often you’d earn more selling it yourself through Kijiji or other local websites.   t

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Boost performance in your truck By Heather Grovet

I

have  a  confession  to make. I’m completely un-mechanical. Horses interest me, vehicles don’t. But since I haul my horses to shows and trail rides I do have an interest on finding ways to increase my truck’s power, and improve its fuel economy. I was able to gain some information on these topics by using the internet and talking to trusted dealers and mechanics. And believe me, if I can become informed on these topics, so can you! Dan Ellsworth, manager of Westwind  Chevrolet  Buick, offers some tips on improving mileage. “Often people will pay thousands of dollars wanting an instant fix,” Ellsworth notes. “Yet  they  forget  the  basics. Studies show fuel economy can decrease up to 10 per cent if your tires are underinflated, so check them regularly. Likewise, have

Reflections Faith-based personal stories

I

start to see the excitement grow in the eyes of my three young children as I bundle them up in their farm coveralls and mismatched mittens to work alongside their Daddy. They literally push their way out the door. Their pure delight reminds me how much a gift and privilege it is for my children to be raised on a working cattle ranch. With calving season upon us, I feel overwhelmed by the true miracle that surrounds my family every day — the miracle of new life. Through the long calving season we see many, many calves born. But watching my children experience this

your franchised dealer change your air filter and oil frequently, following your owner’s manual recommendations. These little things will help your $60,000 investment last longer, and will maximize your truck’s power and fuel economy.” Westwind Chev does not offer any after-market changes as they are concerned these can shorten the truck’s lifespan. “Engines are designed by the manufacturers to run as effectively as possible within the current fuel emission specifications,” Ellsworth says. “Most after-market changes cause the engine to run harder and create more heat. We’re concerned this can damage your engine, and also void your warranty.” On the other hand, some dealers and mechanics recommend after-market equipment as a way to improve mileage and performance. Ed Fortney of Hi-Tech Auto notes there are four main types

new life reminds me to focus on the simplicity and wonder of it all. It’s incredible to witness my children’s sheer joy at spotting that slimy newborn laying in the straw. What a miracle that, immediately after giving birth, the cow begins to devoutly lick her entire baby clean. The calf starts shaking its head and moving around. And within an hour, this little calf will be running around, bucking, tail to the sky, belly full of milk. My kids, new calves, the miracle of birth, new life — these truly are the greatest gifts, and just some of the gifts that God has given me.   t

photo by heather grovet

of after-market equipment. “No. 1, to improve mileage and performance you need to increase your air intake. That can be done by changing to high-flow air filter systems, which can cost $75 to $500 installed. Secondly, you then need to move that extra air out, so you can modify your exhaust flow. Exhaust changes generally cost $500 to $2,000.” “Third, you can do programming or add chips to improve your motor’s power and performance,” Fortney continues. “I’ve found gas motors can get a 15 to 20 per cent horsepower increase with chips or programming, and diesels can get as much as 50 per cent increase! You can expect to pay $400 to $2,000 for chips. And lastly, you can put addictives into your fuel and drive lines; these will lessen friction and decrease heat. If you put addictives into all your systems including rear differential, front differential, transfer case, transmission, engine and power

steering it can cost $700 to $800 for the initial treatment. I’ve found these addictives can increase mileage by as much as 10 to 15 per cent.” Fortney recommends you talk to your warranty supplier before installing any after-

are then all covered by the truck’s warranty. “And some companies are even allowing clients to test drive their programmers/chips for a month before committing to their purchase,” he says. “If you input your vehicle’s year, model and make into

“Often people will pay thousands of dollars wanting an instant fix, yet they forget the basics.” — Dan ellsworth

market equipment. “Tell them specifically what make, model and year of truck you have, and what you’d like to do. Ask them if it will affect your warranty.” Fortney notes some dealers are now offering in-house upgrades on new vehicles, tweaking the exhaust and air intake plus adding performance chips. These

the internet you’ll find a wealth of free information on ways to increase power and fuel economy,” Forney says. As a final reference Fortney recommends North American Diesel Performance’s website www.nadp.ca, which offers a huge resource of information on upgrading trucks.    t

Laura Ball ranches in the Square Butte area southwest of Calgary with her husband, Luke, and their three children, Samuel (5), Bethany (3), and Leah (2).

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The slant on your next trailer purchase By Heather Grovet

M

y horses are very intelligent,  but since  they  can’t t a l k ,   t h e y   c a n ’t tell me whether they’d prefer a slant or straight load trailer! Your horses probably aren’t big conversationalists  either,  so you’ll have to make these decisions yourself. Here are a few considerations when selecting your next trailer’s style.

What size of horse do you haul? “If you’re hauling an average sized horse, then a slant can work well,” Byron Hussey of Cam Clark Trailers says. “But if you have a large horse a straight load is probably the best choice. Straight loads are normally 7’6” tall where most slant loads are only 7’ high. Also look at the trailer’s width. Slant loads vary from 6’8” to 8’ wide, which obviously impacts the stall’s length. A 15.2 hh Quarter Horse should have a trailer that’s at least 7’ wide.”

How long will your horses routinely travel? When traveling in a slant load, horses must brace sideways during starts and stops. This can cause one-sided stiffness and pain if they must travel long distances. Hussey believes horses traveling twenty continuous hours will manage better in a straight load trailer. “A horse confined for long periods of time needs to be able to move his head up and down,” Hussey says. “If they’re tied in a slant load trailer, or if a manger’s directly in front of them, their neck movement is limited.”

What style of trailer does your horse prefer? If possible, try to haul your horse in a trailer similar to the type you’re considering before making a big purchase. “Recently we had clients who ordered a brand new trailer with all the bells and whistles,” Hussey says. “It was a great trailer, but the first time they loaded their horse, he

photo by bart5 agra

freaked out. The family eventually sold that trailer and ordered a stock/combo, where the horse rode calmly. Those problems could have been avoided if they had taken the horse for a test ride before buying anything.”

What are the rider’s needs? “Slant load trailer are very popular with weekend riders,” Jodi Tebb of Airdrie Trailers observes. “They have a rear tack room, so the dressing room can be dedicated to the rider’s equipment, or even for sleeping. Plus a slant load’s dressing

If possible, try to haul your horse in a trailer similar to the type you’re considering before making a big purchase.

room is typically bigger than a straight load’s dressing room. And I’ll often recommend buyers with two horses purchase a three-horse slant, because then the front stall can be used to carry feed or bulky equipment. Plus the resale value on a threehorse slant can’t be beat.”

What length of trailer can you and your truck handle? “An angle load trailer can carry a maximum number of horses in a shorter space,” Allan Fertig of Allan Dale Trailers explains. “The early slant load trailers might have had lim-

ited stall room, but now they fit the average horse well. If you want to haul three or four horses, a slant load will allow you to do so without excessive length. This makes it easier for the driver to turn and park in tight areas.” I have a three-horse slant load trailer and love it. My best friend has a two-horse straight load, and she loves it, too. Both types have their advantages and disadvantages, so take the time to make the best choice for you, and especially for your horse. He’ll thank you for it.   t

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pruce  Meadows  is extremely  proud  to announce  that   for a second year in a row, the North American Riders  Group  (NARG)  has recognized Spruce Meadows as No. 1 in the sport of show jumping in North America for 2011. NARG  consists  of  the sports’ top riders, trainers, coaches,  owners  and business interests representing Canada, Mexico and the United States. A number of criteria are considered in assessing all of the tournaments,  including  footing in the rings, prize money, stabling, attendance, course designs,  technical  aspects and media coverage.

Representing  Spruce Meadows  for  the  awards in Wellington, Florida was Kelly Koss, Manager, Horse Program.  Spruce Meadow’s President, Linda SouthernHeathcott,  stated  “We  are honoured  to  receive  the award as it recognizes the dedication of the whole Spruce Meadows Team of sponsors, volunteers and employees to the sport of Show Jumping. We are looking forward to a fantastic season of sport

at Spruce Meadows in this Olympic year.” NARG noted that of the top 50 North American tournaments considered, there is no other venue that supports high performance sport in North America to the same degree as Spruce Meadows. Spruce Meadows’ tournaments not only focus on providing a high standard to all but through the generous support of sponsors also provides the athletes from around the globe the ability to obtain valuable world ranking points for the Rolex World Ranking computer list. For a complete 2012 tournament schedule, visit www. sprucemeadows.com.   t

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Time to chill

(new release from Chris LeBlanc)

Music reviews

Book and movie reviews

By Jody Seeley

G

rowing up in New Brunswick, Chris LeBlanc was surrounded by music. His father was a musician in several popular groups including The Reevers. LeBlanc fondly remembers all the times they played together and, moving out west, the music continued. During a performance at the Calgary Stampede in 2003, LeBlanc’s father passed away on-stage during a performance. As you can imagine, this ordeal stopped LeBlanc’s music career in it’s tracks. But a talented young man who was bitten by the music bug couldn’t shake the desire to pursue music. In 2007 he moved to Nashville. All alone, he said “I just went for it.” He attended the George Jones University and the result was album No. 1 called Too Much Nothin’. In February 2012, the second release from Chris LeBlanc came out called Two

Hearts and Four Wheels, a project LeBlanc feels has a more personal focus. Returning to Nashville to work with Canadian country music wizard Steve Fox helped give birth to this new soulful album. During his time in Nashville, LeBlanc also tied the knot with his new wife Steph. When asked about the inspiration behind this album, LeBlanc says most of it came from “just talking about stuff.” For example, the title-track Two Hearts and Four Wheels was inspired by when LeBlanc and Fox were 16 year-old guys who only cared about cars and girls... and they captured that in the song. The song Little Brick Bungalow came from chit-chat about the economy. And he does credit being in a really happy place with life, love and a new marriage as part of the inspiration for this album. Were there any other influences that LeBlanc drew from? He says Keith Urban. LeBlanc

Results from the 1st Annual Association of Country Music in Alberta Awards in 2011

Male Artist of the Year Shane Chisholm (Claresholm) Female Artist of the Year Tenille (Grand Prairie)

admires not only Urban’s musical talent, but also how he wears his emotions on his sleeve. LeBlanc says “most guys won’t go there.... with feelings and sharing them. Keith has a way of saying what the girls want to hear and I want to be like that too.” LeBlanc was recently nominated for Male Artist of the Year for the 1st Association of Country Music in Alberta Awards. He said it was “very exciting” and was “thrilled for Alberta to have this event.” He hopes, like many of us, that the Awards will continue to flourish. At the end of our conversation LeBlanc said he felt his Dad would be proud of where he is going and only wishes he was still here to play with him. You can find a list of upcoming tour dates for this Calgary, Alberta artist on his website www.chrisleblanc.ca or find him on Facebook. Group of the Year The Travelling Mabels (Longview/Calgary) Fan’s Choice Myrol (Edmonton)

The best of

The BAcK

PaGe

Baxter Black from Western Horseman

For more than 15 years, many Western Horseman readers have begun their journeys through each issue by, strangely enough, starting at the back. That’s because, during those years, the back page has been occupied by the humorous ramblings of America’s best-selling comedic veterinarian, Baxter Black. This book is a collection of those observations, accompanied by the original illustrations that appeared in the magazine. This look back at 15 years of the best of Baxter is sure to bring smiles to the faces of cowboy philosophers everywhere.

The Back Page The Best of Baxter Black From Western Horseman by Baxter Black Hard Cover, 2009, $21.95 ISBN: 978-0-911647-85-3 Available on Amazon Illustration by Kevin Cordtz Photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller Printed in U.S.A.

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side from day-to-day work with the horses, there may not be more fun for the average cowboy or cowgirl than to settle down in front of the fire with a copy of The Back Page. This hilarious collection of columns from 15 years of Baxter Black, America’s best-selling comedic veterinarian, will have you laughing long into the night. These stories and poems capture the essence of cowboy life while also seeing the funny side. They range from Definition of a Cowboy to The Equine Ego and Cowboy’s Advice to the Lovelorn. One of the funniest is Reality Shows on the Farm, where Black gives us his version of agricultural-survival shows like Horse People versus Mule People and Hereford Breeders versus Angus Breeders. Readers will pick their own favourites as they flip through the pages, which also contain the original illustrations that appeared with the columns as they were written. Black’s amusing, down-to-earth style will resonate with anyone whose

6/23/09 3:21:09 PM

The first few years of my veterinary profession was a crash course in Horses vs. People. How to win them over, what makes them tick, and what it will take for a 1,200pound, three year old stallion with rollers in his nostrils and fear in his eyes, to allow me to pass a hose through his nose and down to his stomach without getting killed. ~ Baxter Black

days include horses, cattle and human nature. He has the ability to spin a funny tale around cowboy topics; yet, the philosopher is never far from the surface. In his own words: “Working with animals keeps us humble. Each horse guarantees each person at least one chance.” The reader who takes a chance on Baxter Black will not be disappointed. Cowboy poet Baxter Black is a former large animal veterinarian who practiced for 13 years in the mountain west. He has since made a living by telling cowboy stories in his Western Horseman column, radio programs, RFD TV, and on stage at banquets, county fairs and poetry gatherings across the country.

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Homeward bound Celebrating lives lived By Wendy Dudley

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henever one o f A n d r e a Anderson’s horses ran a fever or had a cough, she knew she could count on Arno Leblic to get it back on track. Over several years, Arno, a licensed practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, treated her stable of reining Quarter horses for everything from breeding issues to infections. “Sometimes he would work along with the vets. They were always open and interested in what he did. They worked well together.” Arno never tried to convince a client that his herb formulas worked, added Anderson, who lives east of Strathmore, Alta. “He didn’t have to. The herbs and the results did the convincing.” Anderson’s story is echoed by equine enthusiasts in all disciplines, from horse breeders to dressage riders to show jumpers. When Arno passed away from a heart attack last October, he left horse owners mourning the loss of his gentle manner and vast knowledge. “He showed there was another way,” said Julie Parsonage, a certified equine osteopath who studied under Arno and worked with him on various cases in her equine business, Horses in Harmony. Arno’s approach was to treat the body, mind, and spirit. In traditional Chinese medicine, all organs — the heart, lungs, spleen, liver and kidneys — are connected so the body must be treated as a whole for optimum healing, Parsonage said. “His knowledge was endless. He was a great healer. He had strong intuition, and he was able to teach his clients what true healing is,” she said. “If you began as a nonbeliever, you certainly believed after a session with him.” Blessed with a joyful sense of

Arno Leblic: a friend to all horses (1956-2011) Practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine has big influence on alternative horse therapy humour, love of life, charisma, and compassion for horses, he changed the lives of many equines and their owners, said Anderson. Several times vets were in doubt whether her horse would survive, but Arno’s herbs pulled it through. “He really stood out. He gave so much to the horse world, but he felt that was his path. He was here to help horses and people.” L e b l i c ’s c o m p a n y, H o r s e Sense Herbs (HSH), based out of Okotoks, Alta., had thousands of customers throughout North America and overseas seeking his advice and formulas. The herbs, plants and vegetables — all known for their regenerative properties — are high-quality and humangrade. Imported from China, they are blended in a governmentapproved lab in Vancouver. The herbs are used to treat issues with lameness, muscle soreness, colic, stamina, infertility, allergies, and parasites. “They have been used on animals and people for almost 5,000 years,” said Parsonage. “That’s a lot longer than conventional Western medicine.” Leblic was drawn to spirituality as a young boy, practising yoga as a way to relax and meditate. “He was very open to other ways of healing, and he wanted people to know they had choices,” said his widow Birgitte. “And he had so much respect for horses. It was a natural click.” Horses known to bite or kick seemed to sense Arno’s calming energy, Parsonage said. Added Anderson: “He believed there was a way to communicate with a horse. When he worked on them, he was totally zoned into the horse. They would be so calm. They felt good around him.” Birgitte intends to keep the business going, continuing to build a clientele that has tripled since

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEBLIC FAMILY

Arno Leblic is being remembered as a spiritual man who successfully treated many performance horses with his blend of quality Chinese herbs. He was a licensed practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine.

its inception in 1994. Michelle Phillips, a registered acupuncturist and doctor of traditional Chinese medicine who began working with Arno last year, will take over treatment. Born in Paris, France, Arno came to Canada in 1976. Interested in holistic medicine, he studied traditional Chinese medicine for four years at the Vancouver branch of the European University of Chinese Medicine, based in Switzerland. Upon graduation, he established Horse Sense Herbs Ltd. “We were pioneers. This was 17 to 18 years ago, and people thought ‘Chinese medicine for horses? Are you kidding?’” recalls Birgitte. In 1998, Leblic and his family moved to Okotoks, south of

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“His knowledge was endless. He was a great healer.” — JULIE PARSONAGE Calgary. With approximately 35 per cent of Canada’s horses in Alberta — it boasts the most horses of any province — it made sense to be headquartered here. He travelled to horse shows across the country, from Spruce Meadows in Calgary and the Canadian Supreme show in Edmonton to Toronto’s Royal Winter Fair Horse show. I n i t i a l l y, customers approached HSH as a last resort, but as they began to see results, their trust in the remedies grew, Birgitte said. A number of Grand Prix jumpers, such as Karen Cudmore, originally from B.C. and now living in Nebraska, routinely use the herbs. “The Chinese herbal formulas gave the extra focus and energy that the horses needed to be performing at this level,” said Cudmore in a product testimonial. “All my competing horses are on HSH formulas.”

Sharon Cooke of Blackie, Alta., used the herbs to successfully treat fertility issues in her miniature donkeys and breeding Angus bulls. “I feel so fortunate to have known Arno,” she said. “He was a very empathetic person. He made us more aware of our animals’ bodies, and our own bodies. He was very spiritual, and I respected him for what he believed.” Parsonage will always remember the jovial Frenchman for his kind soul and sense of fun. “He taught me to believe in myself. He would always say ‘Let there be joy within.’” He opened new doors in the horse world, said Birgitte. He truly believed it was his destiny to help horses and people through his diagnostic skills and knowledge. “He was so happy and grateful to be able to share what he knew,” she said. “This was his dream.” 

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The Horse Sense Herbs logo incorporated the Yin and Yang symbols which represent the body in perfect balance. Arno Leblic practised traditional Chinese medicine which is based on treating the inner and outer body, or the yin and the yang. It embraces the mind, body and spirit.

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Going in Style

the

Western Four-Poster

Ultimate Office Pair

Wow! Rustic Ranch located near Airdrie, Alta., carries a wide variety of Western beds, including this unique canopy bed made of solid aspen. The bed is seven feet high and eight feet long, and can be purchased in either queen or king sizes. The matching chest has half-log fronts and a sliding top to hide special items. Its Sea Breeze Star bedding is available in twin, queen and king. Visit www.rusticranch.ca 

Choose the finish and pattern for this hand carved wood desk and matching office chair. Intricate hand tooled and hand stitched leather work can be ordered in colours and styles to suit your taste. Top quality hardware ensures that drawers glide smoothly. Proudly made in North America. Silver Stetson Gallery in Okotoks, Alta., offers custom-made wood and upholstered Western furniture. www.silverstetsongallery.ca.

Rustic Style Dining Rustic Ranch of Airdrie, Alta., proudly carries the Sedona extension table made of distressed oak solids and veneers. The tables have two 12” extension leaves, and measures 42”x95”x30”H when fully opened. The table is shown with slat back side chairs that can be purchased with seats covered in either fabric or microfiber leather-look cushions. www.rusticranch.ca

Storage Solution  Looking for a country solution to your storage problems? Then consider this rustic Western armoire from Frontier Western Shop at Claresholm, Alta. The armoire can hold your entertainment centre or be used for storage, and is made from reclaimed wood. www.westernshop.com

Lantern Lighting This cowboy chandelier from Keddie’s Tack and Western Wear of Grande Prairie, Alta., can add ambiance to any country home. Measuring 21” in diameter, the dark brown light features horse shoes, Western spurs with silver detailing and three old-fashioned lanterns. www.Keddies.com 

Equine Canada Unveils Inaugural Horse of the Year Award

P RE SE NTE D BY

Seat of Distinction  The Regency chair from Silver Stetson Gallery at Okotoks, Alta., is both elegant and comfortable. Attention has been given to every detail of this chair. The wood is beautifully carved, and the hand tooled and hand stitched leathers are soft and supple. Choose from a large selection of wood and leather. www.silverstetsongallery.ca

Royal Manitoba

Hickstead Honoured as First Recipient

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very special presentation was held at the 2012 Equine Canada Annual Awards Gala — the unveiling of the Equine Canada Horse of the Year award. Equine artist Mary Sand was commissioned to create a bronze sculpture in the likeness of Hickstead in recognition of his significant contribution to equestrian sport in Canada. As part of Hickstead’s legacy, this trophy will serve to recognize Canadian horses who have made an outstanding achievement in sport, and as such Equine Canada is honoured to present the inaugural Horse of the Year award to Hickstead. John Taylor, the chair of Jump Canada, accepted the award on behalf of Eric Lamaze and Ashland Stables Inc. In addition to the unveiling, CBC Sports provided a very moving video tribute of Hickstead with a voiceover by Scott Russell, CBC sports broadcaster. “It was an honour to introduce the inaugural Equine Canada Horses of the Year award, and a great pleasure to accept the award on behalf of Hickstead,” said the chair of Jump Canada, John Taylor. “Hickstead has become an icon in the PHOTO BY ROBERT YOUNG equestrian world. He was our hero and we are thrilled to be able to honour him and his own- E q u i n e C a n a d a ers with this award. The beautiful bronze will be unveiled the new a reminder for years to come of how lucky we Horse of the Year Award, with the were to have known this great horse.” Riding Hickstead, Lamaze won individual first recipient being Hickstead. gold and team silver medals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, individual bronze at the 2010 World Equestrian Games and team silver and individual bronze at the 2007 Pan American Games. Together, they won several major grand prix show jumping titles including Calgary (2007 and 2011), Geneva (2008), Aachen (2010), La Baule (2011) and Rome (2011). Tragically, Hickstead passed away on November 6, 2011. Henceforth, the award will be called the Equine Canada Horse of the Year, the Hickstead Trophy. Now considered one of Equine Canada’s most prestigious awards, it will honour Hickstead’s legacy and serve to set the standard to which all future recipients should strive.  MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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March 26th to March 31st, 2012 Keystone Centre, Brandon, Manitoba

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Riding out of my mind Equestrian sport psychology

When thinking hurts Over-thinking can actually hurt your performance...sometimes you need to just let go

By April Clay, Psychologist

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hinking  things through is  a  valuable  asset when you are learning. Remember when you first learned your diagonals? Your instructor had to break down the steps for you, including glancing at your horse’s shoulder. How about a new more complicated skill you are in the process of learning now? This might be a half-pass, roll back or mastering more advanced body position control. Whatever the skill, you have likely simplified the activity into chunks of bite-sized learning. Sure, it takes longer when you try it, and it’s a little awkward. But, slowly you can gain familiarity with those steps until you can put it into a complete whole. Essentially, when you’re in training, thinking and analyzing serves you well. You need to scrutinize the steps, and dissect where you might have gone wrong until you develop proficiency. It’s the left side of your brain that helps you out with all this examination. It is sometimes referred to as the “analyzer.” But a lot of thinking is actually not so great for your performance. While it’s the leftbrain that assists us in analysis, it’s the right side that puts everything together. This is why the right side is sometimes called the “integrator.” Have you ever noticed how your very best rides had that “flow” quality? That’s because you had let go and allow things to happen. Performance has an awful lot to do with trust. You have to trust yourself, trust in your

photo by thinkstock.com

training and just let it happen. The right brain helps you to do this, allowing your instincts and muscle memory to do what you know how to do. As a rider, a performer, you want to become proficient in turning your thinking on and off. Try this simple exercise: the next time you make an error in training, experiment with two different approaches. Try stopping and dissecting your ride. Take it apart piece by piece and walk yourself through the correction. Talk

away to yourself; even exaggerate your self-talk to the extreme. Alternate this with trying to just picture your correction in your mind and then without any further thought, do it. When you compare and contrast these two different approaches you will likely see the power of the right brain. It can put it all together for you, without all the distracting inner dialogue, which has this nasty habit of interfering, slowing you down or even freezing your intended action.

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Getting out of the thinking trap: When your thinking does start to hurt, there are a number of strategies you can implement to free you from the confines of paralysis by analysis. What they all have in common is the activation of your right hemisphere. You might even say this is what “riding in your right mind” looks like. •  Direct your focus to physical sensations: Put your focus on the feel of your horse, or the motion of your body. The more you place your mind on what your senses have to tell you, the less it will be on all that chatter in your head. Your mind will want to trick you, tell you it needs to listen, that is has vital information to keep you safe. Don’t buy into this. You need to be in there here and now with your horse, and there is no quicker route there than through your senses. •  Generate an image: What kind of a ride are you trying to achieve? Maybe it’s a “soft” dressage ride. In this case, you could think about marshmallows, feather pillows or fluffy clouds. If you want to ride more aggressively, try conjuring up a picture of a charging rhino, proud lion or even Clint Eastwood! What if you need to be brave? How about a well-armored knight riding into battle? The lion from the Wizard of Oz? •  Play a sound-bite: If there was a soundtrack that would best fit the ride or kind of mood you would like to encourage in yourself, what would it be? Back in my riding days, one of my favorites was the theme from the movie Caddyshack. Because it was kind of cocky, it helped me lighten up and loosen up before hitting the ring. Hear whatever you like in your head, techno, hard rock

even your own made up tunes. No one will ever know what’s going on in your head, but they’ll see the smile on your face and the confidence in your ride. •  Develop a cue phrase: Remember Muhammad Ali’s famous line, “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” This helped him get in the mood to fight, to be the best. What could be your line? Now, this is not to be confused with a lot of left-brain talk. It’s just a simple phrase that packs big emotional punch. Some examples from other riders include “go hard or go home,” and “reins to the right” (right brain that is) •  Creating new habits: At home in training, it is common to stop when we make

As a rider, a performer, you want to become proficient in turning your thinking on and off.

mistakes. Then of course we analyze what went wrong and try to correct it. It gets to be a habit. But in a performance situation you need a different kind of habit to form. That is the habit of quickly assessing a situation and choosing a course of action. Yes, it means you have to commit and that you may make the wrong decision sometimes. In the long run though, you will speed up your learning and your horse will thank you for being a more decisive communicator.   t

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Horse heroes Profiles of exceptional horses

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n 1981, Merv and Claudia Giles left their property Circle J Ranch in Cochrane, Alberta, for a trip to New York. They returned to Alberta with some unexpected cargo — miniature horses. The horses were the first miniatures they owned, but by 1988, Merv had them broke to drive in a four horse hitch. The hitch attracted the attention of UFA, who approached Merv and asked him to do parades. From 1988 until 2008 the Circle J Miniature Horse Hitch traveled each summer to parades and events as the UFA Mini Horse Hitch. Every year they travelled twelve to fifteen thousand kilometers and attended 260 events from La Crete in the North to Coutts in the South and from Dawson Creek, British Columbia to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, hooking up for around 400 appearances. The four horse hitch grew to six and then to eight. Kendra Gale, Merv and Claudia’s granddaughter, comments, “Driving an eight horse hitch is a challenge, more difficult even than six.” Regardless of the size of the hitch, the horses were always black geldings and the vast majority of the geldings were bred in Alberta. The eight horse team that did the parades the longest were all bred in Alberta. Some have since passed away or been retired, but they are all remembered by everyone at Circle J Ranch and the many people that watched them in the parades all across western Canada.

Mini horse hitch travelled 12 to 15 thousand kilometers a year Sheep Meadow Gretz 1984-2008 Bond Turbo x Bond Chee Chee Bred by: Roy & Mary McBride, Halkirk, Alberta. Kendra says Gretz was truly a “Great One.” He was a halter, showmanship, obstacle and single pleasure driving champ, he came to live with us in 1989 and was a leader in the hitch up until his death in 2008. He loved applause, and pranced his way through every parade.”

Sheep Meadow Bunky 1988 Bond Exchequer x Sheep Meadow Bunny Bred by: Roy & Mary McBride, Halkirk, Alberta. Bunky and Gretz were the lead team and Kendra says, “they were second to none. Bunky believes he is the most important horse and is quick to let you know if things aren’t just how he likes them. He is enjoying his retirement, though he does help out with training young horses from time to time.”

PitRPats Paco 1997 NFCs Night Wind x Wild Rose Rosa Bred by: Owen & Winifred Baker, Calgary, Alberta. “Paco was a breeding stallion,” Kendra comments, “siring 10 foals for us before he was gelded and joined the hitch.”

I’m Too Slick For You 1998 D As Sable x Easy Livins Chianti Bred by: Tracy & Chantel Praud, Calgary, Alberta.

CNCFR to host future rodeo stars

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ebruary 11 to March 18 college rodeo contestants will buck, rope and ride their way through the Canadian Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (CIRA) circuit before top contenders take their final test at the school of hard knocks at the Canadian National College Finals Rodeo (CNCFR) March 29-31 at Northlands in Edmonton (presented by Martin Deerline). For three wild nights, participants from post-secondary schools across Western Canada will wrangle their way through the six major rodeo events — tie down roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bareback riding, barrel racing and bull riding in addition, to team roping, goat tying, breakaway roping, and pole bending. These driven athletes must compete during school semesters while maintaining good academic standing at post secondary schools across Canada. By supporting CNCFR, you’re supporting the Canadian Intercollegiate Rodeo Associationa student run organization for students wishing to compete in rodeo as an extracurricular activity. Come see future Canadian rodeo champions in the making! The CNCFR runs in conjunc-

photo by ourtesy of giles family

Merv Giles at Circle J Ranch in Cochrane in 2005.

Kendra says, “Slick was a Reserve Canadian National Country Pleasure Driving Horse before he joined the hitch. Paco & Slick are a well matched team that have driven together for many years now.”

Little L Acres Clunkers Pending 1999 Little L Acres Relics Clunker x Christensens Daisy Bred by: Dawn Labine, Millet, Alberta. Kendra says, “Pending was shown as a stallion in halter, driving, and, his favorite, jumping, before he was gelded and started his second career as a hitch horse.”

Sheep Meadow Nova

Circle J Elvez

1990-2007 Bond Turbo x Bond Nutmeg Bred by: Roy & Mary McBride, Halkirk, Alberta. About Nova, Kendra says, “he wasn’t as black as the others, but he was so good at his job that he was a member of the hitch for 10 years and was sorely missed after he died of colic in 2007.”

1994 North Stars Valdez Y Basan x Fleetwood Madonna Bred by: Merv Giles, Cochrane, Alberta.

Chinooks Knight Rider 1992 Sheep Meadow Tut x Chinooks Flicka Bred by: Bill & Eileen Monteith, Calgary, Alberta. “Knight Rider took a while to get used to the excitement of parades,” Kendra says, “but he settled in to become a steady wheeler.”

THE TRADITION

CONTINUES

Kendra comments that Elvez was “the only the second homebred gelding in the hitch. Elvez also had a very successful show career.”   t If you have or know of a horse that is Alberta-bred, tell us why, send us a photo and each month we’ll feature a horse that stands out from the herd. Robyn Moore is the Manager of Horse Industry Association of Alberta, email rmoore@ albertahorseindustry.ca

55 STAVELY PRO RODEO

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tion with the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show and each CNCFR ticket includes a complimentary Northlands Farm and Ranch Show entry. Get your tickets today and support tomorrow’s career leaders in all industries, especially agriculture. For more information on The Northlands Farm & Ranch Show and the Canadian National College Finals Rodeo please visit farmandranchshow.com. Advance tickets for The Northlands Farm & Ranch Show and the Canadian National College Finals Rodeo are available at any Ticketmaster location, ticketmaster.ca, or by calling 1-855780-3000.    t

MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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The Mane Event is the largest of its kind in Canada

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hether your discipline is Barrel Racing, Western Pleasure or you would like to train your horse to bow or lay down, the upcoming Mane Event, Equine Education and Trade Fair has something for you. Back for its 6th year at Westerner Park in Red Deer April 27 - 29, 2012 the Mane Event is pleased to welcome horse trainers and clinicians from near and far. Well known Canadian trainers Jonathan Field, Jackie Johnson and Robyn Hood are being joined by six-time Canadian Olympic competitor, Cindy Ishoy, who will be presenting Dressage clinics throughout the 3-days of the expo. A first-time presenter at the Mane Event is Australian horse trainer Dan James who will be presenting demonstrations Saturday and Sunday as well as participating in the Saturday Night Equine Experience. A new component to this year’s event is the addition of Extreme Trail clinicians JoLinn and Mitch Hoover who will be

presenting clinics on mastering the challenges of Extreme Trail on Friday and Saturday and then judging the Extreme Trail competition on Sunday. The Mane Event is looking for some hardy horse and rider combinations to compete in this first ever competition at the expo. Stay tuned for further details on this competition.

Six-time Canadian Olympic competitor, Cindy Ishoy, will be presenting Dressage clinics.

Rounding out this year’s lineup of clinicians is: World champion Barrel Racer and trainer, Chad Crider; multiple world and national champion Western Pleasure competitor and trainer Robin Gollehon; NRCHA Judge and multiple champion Sandy Collier, who will be presenting clinics on Reining; the unstoppable, Michael Richardson, left Extreme Trail clinicians Mitch and JoLinn Hoover will be instructing how to master the challenges of this growing sport. a paraplegic after a vehicle acciWi t h o v e r 2 2 0 v e n d o r s information on equine activi- ping for you and your favourite dent in 1986, Michael will be presenting horsemanship clin- already booked as exhibitors, ties such as the Ranch Horse mount. For more information on the ics; Elizabeth Graves will be the indoor trade fair is again Versatility Association and the presenting gaited horse clinics going to offer a multitude of Canadian Cowboy Challenge, expo, including hours, ticket and welcomes any gaited breed equine products and services. and presentations on equine information, a complete listing horse and handler to partici- With clothing, hats, tack, feed, nutrition, parasite control, sad- of presenters exhibitors as well pate; and Hunter/Jumper rider, supplements, carriages and har- dle fitting, biosecurity and how as details on the very popular trainer, judge and clinician Scott nesses to name a few of the ven- to photograph your horse, this Trainers Challenge please visit Hofstetter will be presenting dor products being offered, along is the place to come for equine www.maneeventexpo.com or  with breed information and education, and of course shop- call (250) 578-7518. jumping andAQHA equitation clinics.Stallion 1994 Grulla

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By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of Poco Bueno) and out of a mare by Pocos Gray Comet (Grandson of Poco Bueno) Homozygous Dun - ALL his foals WILL be red dun, dun or grulla, regardless of the dam’s color!

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Equestrian of the Year t the 2012 Equine Canada Annual Awards Gala on Friday, February 3, in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Jessica Phoenix was named the 2011 Equestrian of the Year. Hot on the heels of a fantastic 2010 season, Phoenix, of Cannington, Ont., continued to prove in 2011 that she’s got what it takes to be the best. Born in Uxbridge, Ont., horses have always been a part of Phoenix’s life. At 13 years of age she won the Ontario Horse Trials Training Championship, and every year from then on she PHOTO BY ROBERT YOUNG continued to win a Championship. Jessica Phoenix Phoenix was named to Canadian Eventing receives the 2011 Talent Squad until she was long listed in 2006. Equestrian of the Riding Exploring, Phoenix was a member of Year Award from the Canadian Eventing Team at the 2007 Pan E q u i n e C a n a d a American Games in Brazil. At the 2010 World President, Michael Equestrian Games, Phoenix and Exponential were Gallagher. members of the Canadian eventing squad that claimed team silver. In 2011, Phoenix’s star continued to rise as she and Pavarotti, owned by Don J. Good, won individual gold and team silver at the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico, where they finished on their dressage score of 43.90, and led the three-phase competition from start to finish. Her win was only the second individual gold medal in eventing for Canada at the Pan American Games. Phoenix is the complete athlete — athletic, focused, and always ready to learn and give back to her sport. “It was an honour to receive the Equine Canada Equestrian of the Year award” said Phoenix. “I feel it is a reflection of the team of people that have helped me to this point — from our coaching to our entire support staff, vet, farrier, owners, sponsors, teammates and families. It would not have been possible without all of these people. We are all looking forward to 2012.”  www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


thinkstock.com

Heather Beierbach captures ranch life through a different lens

Inspirations

Her calendars are sought after by country and city folks alike

Artist profile By Cindy Bablitz

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aking pictures of their ranching life was as natural as living the ranching  life  for Heather S. Beierbach. “I found things so beautiful... and wishing I could hold certain moments locked in more than just my own memory of them,” says Heather. “I started carrying a camera with me all the time in the 70s.” She was so humble with her “ranchography,” she used to print her pictures... and then throw away the negatives. “That’s not something you do as a photographer, but then, I wasn’t thinking of myself as a photographer,” she smiles. No matter. Heather’s ranch calendars featuring her simple but telling portraits of ranching life on the plains of southwestern Saskatchewan have become an annual staple of art and storytelling since 1998, and, it turns out, a focal point on which to concentrate through the most challenging and tragic event of her life. Her husband Roger was the biggest fan of Heather’s photography, and proudly showed off her albums of pictures to visiting family and friends and friends of friends. Thanks to Roger’s delight, her illustrative images gained the notice of a local agricul-

tural supplier, who came to use a selection of her pictures in some of their marketing literature. This recognition started a ball rolling, and within a short while, with Roger’s patient but determined support, the first ever Slippery Moon Ranchography calendar was in production. This is when tragedy struck. “Roger and the colt he was starting were killed instantly on August 1, 1998, struck by lightning. He was riding with his arms crossed, letting the colt carry the spade bit in its

day planners and journals and note cards. It remains a humble venture; yet, one senses, out of the grief of startling heartbreak, Heather has created a legacy to outlast them both. Still, what began as an amusing lark, a hobby project, suddenly became a heartfelt memorial for a grieving widow. Silver Moon Ranchography’s publications  have  become something of a testimony of cattle ranching done well. “The public are increasingly more misled and misinformed by inaccurate media about ani-

ing out on miles and miles and miles of treeless rolling prairie, not seeing anyone or anything, it grabs hold of your heart. It’s quite gripping. You can’t help but feel a certain awe.”

It’s not too late to enjoy your own copy of The Slippery Moon 2012 Ranch Calendar. Call 306 299 4512, fax 306 299 4513 or e-mail slipperymoon@sasktel. net to order.   t

Ima Bootscootin Lena 2004 ApHC Registered Stallion Canadian Supreme Nominated LTE $15,860

2007 Canadian Supreme Open & Ltd Open Snaffle Bit Futurity Champion 2007 World Appaloosa Jr Working Cow Horse Champion

“You can’t help but feel a certain awe.”

2009 Canadian Supreme Open Hackamore Reserve Champion

Fletch is very consistent performer. He never placed worse than 4th mouth. They were hit and instantly tipped over. His arms were still crossed when he was found. He died doing what he loved to do.” Heather’s grief was overwhelming  and  consuming. But it was remembering her beloved husband’s enchantment with her photography of the ranching life they shared and loved together that got her through the pain of her loss into the production of what has become so far a 14 year journey. S l i p p e r y   M o o n Ranchography now produces stunningly expressive calendars,

mals farmed for human consumption, and they no longer have rural roots to support their own discernment of truth from fiction. I’m aiming to provide an honest and positive message... I think we owe that to the animal,” Heather explains. “It’s a bit of a mission of mine. I try to tell the truth about ranching without romanticizing it... even though, I do think our ranching life here south of the Cypress Hills is a bit romantic. When you’re sitting on the back of a horse, on top of a treeless hill, look-

Offspring of Show Age – 1 Next crop of Show age due to hit show pen in 2013

Sheza Genuine Lena 2007 ApHC Mare His only show age offspring is also a consistent performer with LTE $13,762 2010 CS Open Snaffle Bit Futurity Champion 2010 OTTW Open Snaffle Bit Futurity Reserve Champion 2011 CS Open Hackamore Reserve Champion Dual Pep Boot Scootin Dually Jae Bar Maisie Ima Bootscootin Lena Ima Doc O’Lena Ima Jo’s Doll Quanahs Leo Girl

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email: n.giberson@xplornet.com • www.gibersonperformancehorses.com MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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Association News Youth club president sets sights on national director’s position SASKATCHEWAN PAINT HORSE CLUB www.saskpainthorseclub.com

By Nicole Gauthier

W SPHC president, Nicole Gauthier, presents Audra Cooper, PAC High Point winner, with her award.

elcome to another exciting year for the S P H C . T h e c l u b ’s AGM was held on January 21, 2012 and thank you to everyone who came out for discussions and to vote. We would like to welcome Bruce and Lora Martin as well as Melissa

Minor and Henry Gauthier to our board of directors for 2012. Our executive stays the same this year: Nicole Gauthier, president; Tammy Cooper, vice-president; a n d We n d y D a v i s , s e c r e t a r y / treasurer. Directors staying on board for another term include Stephanie McMillan and Lorraine Beaudette. Please feel free to contact any one of these directors for information regarding the club and upcoming events. Congratulations to Audra Cooper, PAC High Point award winner for 2011. Congratulations to the many Saskatchewan exhibitors that made the APHA Top 10 lists. It is so great to see local names among the other Paint

exhibitors in the world. What a fantastic accomplishment. It with great regret that we have to cancel the fall Harvest of Colours show for 2012. Do not despair as this board is working very hard to plan some new and exciting events this year. Please check our website and Facebook page regularly for updates and news. The Saskatchewan Junior Paint Horse Club members have been busy over the past few weeks. The club’s AGM was held on January 21 in conjunction with the SPHC meeting. At the meeting the 2012 executive and board of directors were elected. Congratulations to all those holding office for the year.

All youth are encouraged to use their online ballot to elect their national director. Club president Taylor Gardner is running for this position. Congratulations to Dianna Nordal, Brittaney Campbell, Tyson Gauthier and Taylor Gardner who were all recognized at the APHC AGM with awards for their outstanding performances in 2011. SPHC’s spring Lloydminster show is scheduled for May 19-20, 2012. Forms and rosters will be available soon on the website. We will be holding the special twoyear-old lungeline class, Amateur Walk-Trot classes, Western Pleasure All Ages Jackpot and much more.  See you all in May.

Vaulting membership keeps growing in Alberta ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN VAULTING ASSOCIATION www.vaultcanada.org/AEVA

By Marijke van der Sluijs

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he Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association hosted its AGM and awards banquet at the Sundre Art Centre on January 15, 2012. Despite the drop in temperature and winter wanting to interfere with our plans the event was very well attended. The food was fabulous and the evening was well organized!

Several AEVA directors spoke during the evening and presented awards to our vaulters. Coaches from each of the clubs also presented awards and shared wonderful stories about their members and parents. There was also a power point presentation by Jeanine van der Sluijs, highlighting some of the international competitions that Alberta vaulters attended last year. Each club was invited to provide entertainment and, once again, vaulters and coaches did not fail. Some great routines were performed and our vaulters showed us they have what it takes whether they are on the back of a moving horse, on stage, with blacklights or in a bag! AEVA membership keeps growing and growing. The Rockyview Vaulters from Cardston is the newest club to join the ranks, bringing the

number of active clubs in Alberta to five. The AEVA is very happy to provide new clubs with information. Please visit our website at www. vaultcanada.org/AEVA for more information about the sport of equestrian vaulting.

RESULTS OF THE AWARDS FOR 2011 ARE: • Alberta Women’s Champion: Darine Pavan, Sun Wilow, Olds • Alberta Women’s Reserve Champion: Robyn Sinclair, Meadow Creek • Alberta Men’s Champion: Haigen Pavan, Sun Wilow, Olds • Zone 2 Champion: Brooke Boyd, Meadow Creek • Zone 2 Reserve Champion: Kendra Lavoie, Razzle Dazzle

• Zone 4 Champion: Joelle Gagne, Spruce Valley • Zone 4 Reserve Champion: Kendra Gagne, Spruce Valley • Zone 7 Champion: Shaelyn Fahselt, Razzle Dazzle

HIGH POINT AWARDS FOR THE YEAR OF 2011 ARE: • • • • • • • • •

Division Division Division Division Division Division Division Division Division

B Canter Women: Darine Pavan B Canter Men: Haigen Pavan C Canter: Brooke Boyd D Canter: Kendra Lavoie C Trot: Heather Latimer D Trot: Lindsay Worrall B Walk: Mackenzie Hooson C Walk: Rachel Land D Walk: Avery Malone 

A “Knight” of celebration for APHC’s award winners ALBERTA PAINT HORSE CLUB www.northernhorse.com/aphc

By Connie Webb

S

o, no complaints about our winter so far. On January 28 APHC held its AGM, banquet and awards night at the Black Knight Inn in Red Deer, Alta. Last year was a great year for the club. An active discussion at the AGM regarding sponsorship resulted in some excellent ideas being brought forward. Members were reminded that they are responsible for doing their part in fundraising so the club can continue to have added money futurities/stake classes and quality show/year end awards. After the meeting we were treated to a spectacular buffet and an evening of great entertainment and awards hosted by our very own Glenn Hyde who did a marvelous job. Thanks to our secretary, Lynn Hoosier, who co-ordinated the banquet; Ruth Hyde and Jan Gavelin, our silent auction experts; and to Caylee Webb for her assistance in presenting the awards. A special thanks to Janene Moch, one of the youth directors, who created a fantastic video, “Tribute to the Youth,” highlighting each of our youth competitors and an amusing look back at the infamous carrot race held at our Fall Ponoka show. Congratulations to all the 2011 High Point winners. A complete list, including Reserves and Top 5 can be found on our website: • High Point Halter Horse sponsored by APHC: ZI Supreme N Ideal, Lynsay Atchison • High Point Halter Stallion sponsored by Horse Creek Farms: Seriously A Grandslam, Betty Ann Vivian • High Point Halter Gelding sponsored by Riverside Meadows: ZI Supreme N Ideal, Lynsay Atchison • High Point Halter Mare sponsored by Masterfeeds: ZI Sierra Supreme, Mark Atchison

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APCH’s 2011 High Point Novice Amateur, Stephanie McMillian, accompanied by her parents, Glen and Colleen. • Yearling In Hand Trail sponsored by Sheridan Konrad: PP Dark N Desirable, Cathy Schryvers • High Point Longe Line sponsored by Connie and Caylee Webb: Zippin By With Charm, Chris Larson • 2 Year Old Western Pleasure sponsored by Greg Gavelin: PP Chips Tommy Boy, Jenn Olsen • High Point Jr. Western Pleasure sponsored by ConocoPhillips: A Private Invitation, Connie Webb • High Point Jr. Trail sponsored by Rupert Family: Ostentatious Me, Randi McCook • High Point Jr. Hunter Under Saddle sponsored by Masterfeeds: Livin Big, Caylee Webb

• High Point Overall Jr. Horse sponsored by APHC: Ostentatious Me, Randi McCook • High Point Sr. Western Pleasure sponsored by Merle Ann Howard: PP Sonny Go Lucky Te, Taylor Knight • High Point Sr. Trail Horse sponsored by Lorena and Verle Pahl: SAQ Twist Zip Leo, Stephanie McMillan A big, big thank you to all our sponsors who make it possible for the APHC to acknowledge these worthy winners. Baby time is arriving quickly so send me the details and a picture of your newest four-legged addition. Good luck to all and may your foaling  season be full of colour.

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Sponsors and advertisers a big part of Penners’ success CHINOOK TEAM PENNING ASSOCIATION www.chinookpenning.com

By Lillian Dalton

M

embers of the CTPA would like to express their great appreciation to our many sponsors and advertisers whose generosity makes Chinook Penning “simply the best!” Chinook Penning members have a variety of arenas and clinicians at their service and KJEN Ranches located near Carstairs is one example. On January 8, Kurt and Jen Robson hosted a sorting, offering #10, #7 and #4 classes and fresh cattle! Needless to say, after the holiday break everyone

was eager to get back in the saddle and into competition mode. The teams with the most number of cattle sorted in the fastest time were:

#10 CLASS Jen Robson / Les Marsh Kelly Disney / Dusty Wigemyr Kurt Robson / Dusty Wigemyr

#7 CLASS

Jack Richardson / Jody Riedel Kelly Disney / Tammy Evans Cam Evans / Jen Robson

#4 CLASS Jody Riedel / Beau Riedel Charlene Bayes / Christine Sowiak Tammy Evans / Shea Ohlmann The results of the Cam Clark Ford & Trailers Co-Sanctioned (CTPA & CATPA) two-day show February 25-26 at Olds will be available in the next issue and/ or online at www.chinookpenning. com. 

Friesian association gears up for 15th anniversary ALBERTA FRIESIAN HORSE ASSOCIATION www.afha.ca

By Linda Johnston

W

ith winter upon us, things slow down at AFHA. We had a great year in 2011 and expect an even better one in 2012. Our membership has grown significantly over the past few years, bringing fresh new ideas and renewed enthusiasm for our events and activities. We plan to start spring 2012 with a Fun Day on April 28 at Gull Lake Farm, hosted by our president team, Wim and Nita Floryn. The last Fun Day was a huge success and we look forward to getting back together with friends and Friesians, to enjoy games, fantastic food and camaraderie. Due to the huge success of our club trail rides/drives, we will hold three more this year. We’ll announce dates and locations very soon. We are hoping to arrange one of the ride/drive gatherings to include a camp-out with two days of fun on the trails. There is noth-

ing like gathering around the campfire after a good days ride! We also plan to hold one or two clinics this year. Club member Gerard Paagman, a highly skilled driver, has agreed to host a driving clinic. Negotiations with the Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club are underway in hopes of working together to host a clinic. There is also a lot of interest in having a dressage clinic. The Friesian horse will again wow the crowds during the Calgary Stampede. Along with a strong presence in the Stampede Parade, the AFHA will have an informational booth and hold demonstrations during the worldfamous event. The Friesian entries in the parade have won numerous prizes over the years, and the demos have always drawn large numbers of fans. Many of us are already thinking about the Keuring in September, which will be coupled with our Alberta Friesian Horse Association’s 15th anniversary. We are in the midst of bashing around ideas of how to make this anniversary something truly special. There have been many miles travelled, many dreams realized, many wonderful times spent together over the years, never forgetting the wonderful animal that brought us together and kept us together; the magnificent Friesian  horse.

PHOTO COURTESY THE MUILWIJK FAMILY

TRAC member reaches 12,000 miles TRAIL RIDING ALBERTA CONFERENCE

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www.trailriding.ab.ca

he Trail Riding Alberta Conference AGM and awards banquet signalled the end of another great year. Members came together to share winter stories, celebrate 2011 and plan for the season ahead. It’s always a bit of a shock to see everyone dressed up and barely recognizable when you are so used to seeing them in their horse gear!Congratulations to the following riders and horses:

2011 RIDER MILEAGE AWARDS 250 miles: Leah Brunner, Tracy Desiatnyk, Ruth Perkins, Shauna Perkins Piasta

1,000 mile belt buckle: Charlene Price, Lorrence Aplin, Rick Maidmen 1,250 miles: Chris Morrison 1,500 miles: Kristi McCaugherty 2,000 mile belt buckle: Laurie Janz, Brent Seufert 12,000 mile special designed belt buckle: Larry Handziuk (Larry completed these miles on only three horses. Great job, Larry on taking care of your equine partners!)

HORSE MILEAGE AWARDS 500 miles: JV Harlem (Cheyenne Bevan) 1,000 miles: ESP Classical Moment (Laurie Janz), Samsons Fire (Leanna Marchant) 4,500 miles: PeJay (Larry Handziuk)

TOP 5 ALBERTA HIGH POINT HORSES (AND THEIR RIDERS) Novice: Annie, Rick Maidman; Lupita, Cindy MacDiarmid; JD,

Fabienne Morton; Ruby, Vicki Deezar; and Prairie Drifter, Kristy McCaugherty. Intermediate: Angel of Harlem, Ruth Perkins; Kira Ann, Lorrence Aplin; Pratt’s Rainy Eagle, Tara McFadden; AA Artemis, Shauna Perkins Piasta; Jasmin, Kandace Krause; and Tuffy, Chris Morrison. Open: Samsons Fire, Leanna Marchant; PeJay, Larry Handziuk; Lady Halima, Jane Depner; Gypsy, Phil Henry; Drifter, Darren Desiatnyk; and JV Harlem, Cheyenne Bevan. Alberta Grand Champion / Provincial High Point Champion: Samsons Fire ridden by Leanna Marchant Please check our website for up to date information on confirmed dates for our rides at www. trailriding.ca. See you on the trails! 

Scholarship recipients celebrate excellence in their chosen discipline ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION www.albertaequestrian.com

By Sonia Dantu

T

he AEF’s $500 annual English Rider Scholarship is granted to the rider who has achieved the highest average score of the level 8 test in the English Rider Development Program. The AEF congratulates Gwendolyn Mann for her excellence and dedication to completing the rider development program and her commitment to the horse industry. Mann recently graduated from the Equine Science program at Olds College with a major in English Horsemanship. Along with her mare Elli, she completed the Rider 8 Level. After graduating, she attended another year of school at Hartpury College in England and received a BSc in Equine Management. In recognition of Charlene Baker’s work and dedication to the Equine Canada Western Rider and Equine Canada Western Coaching programs in Alberta, the AEF provides a $500 scholarship awarded annually to the western rider who has achieved the highest average score of the level 4 test in the Western Rider Development Program. Stacey Buium is originally from Regina, SK, but has lived in Alberta for most of her life. Riding since the age of six, Stacey started out trail riding in the mountains with her dad. Since then she has taken part in team penning and western pleasure competitions. Stacey also enjoys polo cross and has just started reining. When she was 17, she started teaching at Laughing Horse Ranch summer camps and currently teaches adult beginner and intermediate lessons. Her horse’s name is Gentleman’s gossip, better known as “Jose.” Stacey is a registered animal health technologist based in Okotoks and enjoys working with cattle and horses along with small animals.

AEF’s 2011 English Rider Scholarship recipient, Gwendolyn Mann and her mare, Elli.

RIDE AND DRIVE PROGRAM EXPANDS With 48 AEF members and growing, achieving 1,000 hours riding or driving their horses, the AEF has extended the program to include more milestones. The AEF has created new categories for those individuals who really spend a lot of time with their horses! Staring this year, the Ride and Drive program is offering a new milestone of 2,000 hours. From 1,000 hours, new levels of 1,300 and 1,600 hours will be rewarded prizes with the highest level of achievement being 2,000. Those who have already achieved the 1,000 hour level are welcome to continue their venture with the Ride and Drive program from the 1,000 mark to reach these levels. Those new to the program and those who have not yet completed it can now

look forward to new great prizes and a higher goal to achieve (as well as much more time with your equine partner!). For complete program details visit: https://www.albertaequestrian. com/Recreation-Ride-Drive. For any questions regarding the program, please contact the coaching administrator at coaching@albertaequestrian. com or (403) 253-4411 x3.

JOIN THE AEF You’re invited to attend the AEF AGM, March 17, 2012 in Red Deer, AB. Check out the details on the website. The AEF’s mandate is to assist in creating a positive environment for the enjoyment of equines. Our mission, through leadership and a proactive approach, is to promote, facilitate, and coordinate equestrian-related activities in Alberta. 

Kees Muilwijk with Tjitske and Anneke, at The Mane Event in Red Deer, Alta.

MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

31


Calendar of Events Send your announcements by email to ltkdbell@yahoo.ca and we’ll include your event or announcement free!

17-18 Valleyview, AB Non-Invasive Chiropractics #1. For details, email: horses@laodasway.com

The Month Ahead:

18-24 Edmonton, AB

Can’t make it to Road to the Horse this year?

Equanimity Edge Equine Massage Therapy Course. Instructor: Sidonia McIntyre. For details, call: 1-888-EQUINE2 or visit: www.equinerehab.ca

Just sign up for the web cast at HorseCity.com for only $29.95 and enjoy all the competition and clinics LIVE!

24-25 Pritchard, BC Brad Giesbrecht Reining Clinic. For details, call: 250-577-3637

Be sure and click on the red “test your video player here” to make sure your system will work as NO REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED

24-27 Valleyview, AB Equine Kinetics. For details, email: horses@laodas-way.com 25-28 Edmonton, AB

Clinics & Seminars MARCH 3-4 Medicine Hat, AB Confidence Building Clinic at Waldners Arena. All levels of riders and horses welcome. Cost $250. For details, call: 403-9372188 3-4 Reining Clinic with Terry-Lee Sapergia. $120+GST. Maximum 12 people with 3 people/group. For details, contact Karen: 780967-5630 or email: perry6@xplornet.com 16-18 Ft St John, BC Clay Webster Clinic. For details, call: 403-861-2609 or email: cwperformancehorses@hotmail.com

PEPINICS MASTER

16-18 Wheel Building Clinic at Alberta Carriage Supply. Learn to build and repair wood spoke wheels for carriage & wagons. Instructors Dale Befus & Terry Bailey. $250/ person, maximum of 10 people. Lunch provided. For details, contact Alberta Carriage Supply: 403-934-9537

Equanimity Edge Vertebral Realignment Course. Instructor: Sidonia McIntyre. For details, call: 1-888-EQUINE2 or visit: www. equinerehab.ca 29-April 1 Dawson Creek, BC Dena Kirkpatrick Barrel Racing Clinic at Lakota Center Arena. For details, contact Katrina Favell: 780-228-3392 or email: katrinafavell@hotmail.com

17-18 Ponoka, AB

30-April 5 Ladysmith, BC

Reining Clinic with Wayne Latimer & Amanda Antifaev. 2 days - $300. Box stalls $35/night. Spectators $25/day. For details, contact Terry Olineck: tolineck@ hotmail.com or call Jones Boys Saddlery & Western Wear: 403347-7202

Equine Massage Therapy Course. Instructor: Sidonia McIntyre. For details, call: 1-888-EQUINE2 or visit: www.equinerehab.ca

17-18 Edson, AB Mel Hyland Horsemanship Clinic. For details, contact Christine Alward: 780-712-7974

PERFORMANCE

PHOTO CREDIT: CHERYL SMYTHE PHOTOGRAPHY AND DESIGN

Shows & Competitions

MARCH

MARCH

4 Ponoka, AB

3-4 Edmonton, AB

Alberta Donkey & Mule Annual General Meeting at the Ponoka Drop In Center. Everyone welcome, please bring something for the Potluck Supper. For details, visit: www.albertadonkeyandmule.com

Amberlea Meadows Indoor Hunter II. For details, contact Gerald Drews: Gerald@amberleameadows.com or visit: www.amberleameadows.com

9-11 Murfreesboro, TN 2012 Road to the Horse Competition. Team Canada represented by Jonathan Field & Glenn Stewart. For details, call: 325-7365000 or visit: www.roadtothehorse.com 10 Claresholm, AB Small Spurs Rodeo. For details, contact Dusti Whiteside: 403819-6614 or Travis Whiteside: 403-815-0395 or email: smallspursrodeo@yahoo.ca 16-18 Camrose, AB Camrose Spring Classic Pro Rodeo. For details, visit: www.cre. ab.ca

SALES

Natural Horsemanship with Glenn Stewart, Stage 1 Clinic at the Twisted Terrain Horse Park. For details, call: 604-869-1411, email: thompsonlaurie@telus. net or visit: www.thehorseranch. com

CIRCLE BAR GRAY GUN

BY PEDIGREE THE PROOF IS IN THE PROGENY

3-4 Calgary, AB Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Winter Training Serie – Hunter II. For details, visit: www.rmshowjumping.com 10-11 Edmonton, AB Amberlea Meadows Dressage Schooling Show I. For details, contact Gerald Drews: Gerald@ amberleameadows.com or visit: www.amberleameadows.com 10-11 Calgary, AB Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Carrots and Cocktails Series II. For details, visit: www.rmshowjumping.com 15-18 Calgary, AB Spruce Meadows Winter Farewell. For details, contact Joanne Nimitz: joanne.nimitz@sprucemeadows.com or visit: www. sprucemeadows.com 22-25 Calgary, AB

31-April 1 Hope, BC

POWERED

Pepinics Master’s performing offspring have earned $550,000 in cutting, working cowhorse, reining, and barrel racing (Equi-Stat).

EQUINE EVENTS

MARCH 24 Brooks, AB Badlands Spring Select Horse Sale at the Silver Sage Community Corral. For details, contact Darren Hubka: 403-363-2723 or email: badlandshorsesale@ hotmail.com 31 Edmonton, AB Northlands Performance Horse Sale in conjunction with the Northlands Farm & Ranch Show. For details, contact David Fiddler: 877-471-7472 or email: farmandranchshow@ northlands.com

Spruce Meadows Spring Welcome. For details, contact Joanne Nimitz: joanne.nimitz@sprucemeadows.com or visit: www. sprucemeadows.com 24-25 Calgary, AB Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Winter Training Series – Hunter III. For details, visit: www.rmshowjumping.com 31-April 1 Edmonton, AB Amberlea Meadows Indoor Jumper Tournament III. For details, contact Gerald Drews: Gerald@ amberleameadows.com or visit: www.amberleameadows.com 31-April 1 Calgary, AB Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Winter Training Series – Jumper III. For details, visit: www.rmshowjumping.com

Circle Bar Gray Gun is sired by Playgun who is the Equi-Stat #9 Leading Cutting Sire and an NRCHA Leading Sire, siring the earners of over $6,900,000.

Western Performance MARCH 8-10 Reining Alberta Peach Branch Show at Evergreen Park. For details, visit: www.reiningalberta.net 10-11 Melfort, SK

Ed & Connie Masson Cadogan, Alberta • Phone: (780) 857-2254 Email: ranchboss@myterraranch.com

www.myterraranch.com 32

Melfort Cutting Horse Show at Ken Morgan Arena. For details, contact Colleen West: 306-6992323 or email: dc.west@sasktel. net

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


Classifieds To place an ad call toll free 1.866.385.3669 | email: crystal@fbcpublishing.com Advertising rAtes & informAtion Regular Classified •   Minimum charge — $8.25 per week for first 25 words or less and an  additional 33 cents per word for every word over 25. GST is extra. $1.50 billing charge is added to billed ads only. •  Terms: Payment due upon receipt of invoice. •   10% discount for prepaid ads. If phoning in your ad you must pay with  VISA or MasterCard to qualify for discount. •   Prepayment Bonus: Prepay for 3 weeks and get a bonus of 2 weeks; 

sADDles

Display Classified •   Advertising copy deviating in any way from the regular classified style  will be considered display and charged at the display rate of $30.10  per column inch ($2.15 per agate line).

tRAileRs

INDEX Tributes/Memoriums Announcements Antiques for Sale Antiques Wanted Arenas Clothing: Western & Specialty Wear Collectibles Driving Equine Services Equine Breeders

sPeCiAlty WeAR

Equine Clinics Equine Consignment Equine Massage Horse Boarding Horse Hauling/Transport Horse Trader Horse Trailers Stallions at Stud Tack/Saddles Trainer Services English Trainers Western Trainers Various Equine Services Marketplace

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Horse Auctions Sales Horses American Saddlebred Appaloosa Arabian Belgian Canadian Clydsedale Draft Donkeys Haflinger Miniature Morgan Mules

ANNOUNCEMENTS

EQUINE CLINICS

Welsh Various Horses For Sale Horses Wanted Real Estate Acreages/Hobby Farms Community Calendar Community Calendar – BC Community Calendar – AB Community Calendar – SK Community Calendar – MB Careers Help Wanted Employment Wanted

EQUINE CLINICS

Burwash

EQUINE SERVICES LTD.

.

“Exclusively Equine” Full Service Veterinary Clinic

CLOTHING WESTERN & SPECIALTY WEAR

COlleCtibles

Tennessee Walker Thoroughbred Warmblood

Come & experience pioneer life for yourself. Activities include cattle drives, branding days, seasonal round-ups and regular checks on cattle & horses. Enjoy an evening of camaraderie by the fire-pit or hike the hills and see nature at its best.

Wayne & Judy Lucas • Box 1206 Claresholm, AB Canada T0L 0T0 Ph. 403.625.2295 • Toll Free North America. 1.877.477.2624 Email. lucasia@platinum.ca • Website. lucasiaranch.com

Advertising Deadline – NOON on the Wednesday following 10th day of the month for publication.

Norweign Ford Paint Palomino Percheron Peruvian Pinto Ponies Quarter Horse Shetland Sport Horses Standardbred

Historic Working Cattle & Horse Ranch Established in 1881

The Lucas family enjoy meeting and introducing guests the world over to their western lifestyle. Head back in time and join ranch cowboys as they herd cattle through the picturesque Porcupine Hills of southwestern Alberta.

All classified ads are non-commissionable.

bReeDeRs

Lucasia Ranch Vacations...Living the spirit of the West & Sharing our Western Heritage

CLOTHING WESTERN & SPECIALTY WEAR

•   Minimum charge $30.10 per week. •   Illustrations and logos are allowed with full border. •   Advertising rates are flat with no discount for frequency of insertion or  volume of space used. •   Terms: Payment due upon receipt of invoice. •   Price quoted does not include GST.

bonus weeks run consecutively and cannot be used separately from  original ad; additions and changes accepted only during first 3 weeks. •   Your complete name and address must be submitted to our office  before publication. (This information will be kept confidential and will  not appear in the ad unless requested.)

Drs. Burwash, Nyrop, Butters, Penttila & Quaschnick Ph: 403.242.1913 Fax: 403.242.9361 email: eslvet@telus.net Visit our website for more information: www.eslvet.ca

EQUINE MASSAGE

EQUINE MASSAGE

Animals benefit tremendously from the power of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). As they do not suffer from the so-called placebo effect, you can observe instant results virtually every time. MediConsult is the worldwide leader of PEMF devices for home use. Please consult BJ Lafond for Enerpuls® Rentals

EQUINE MASSAGE

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The Enerpuls® assists to: • Improve performance • Promote bone healing • Increase circulation

53339 Highway 21 Sherwood Park, AB Canada T8A 4V1

Phone: 780-719-2740 doubledcustomhats@albertacom.com www.doubledcustomhats.com

Certified Equine Massage Therapy

• Speed up recovery • Prevent injury • and more

Please contact B.J. Lafond at 780-293-3193 for more information.

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The Health Technicians Canada INC.

Working Hats – Don Weller

Working Hats - Don Weller

SE LL 53339 Highway 21 Sherwood Park AB Canada T8A-4V1

Place an ad in our classified section by calling: Crystal at 1-866-385-3669

Hat Materials

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Find Ag Equipment:

Holly Johnson-Schultz, EEBW (780) 984-3648 www.wildhorseequinemassage.com Wildhorse127@gmail.com

SPECIALTY HatS

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doubledcustomhats@albertacom.com The largest selection of searchable ag equipment and machinery. Thousands of local and national listings added weekly. www.doubledcustomhats.com

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MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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january 2010

www.horsesall.com 2


HORSE TRAILERS

HORSE TRAILERS

2012 EXISS

STALLIONS AT STUD

STALLIONS AT STUD

STALLIONS AT STUD

Your Source for new and used trailers in Western Canada

Stock #T2216

CAM CLARK TRAILERS Bay 1, 925 Veterans Blvd NE Airdrie, AB T4A 2G6 Tel: 1-403-948-6660 Toll Free: 1-888-948-6660

www.camclarktrailers.com 6816 STOCK 16’ GOOSENECK MODEL STOCK ALL ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION $14,595

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AMERICAN FURY

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16HH Dark Bay Thoroughbred Mr. Prospector, Seattle Slew & Northern Dancer Bloodlines! Disposition, Conformation & Athletic Ability. All in one Package! Earned over $200,000 AQHA, ApHC, APHA Approved Stud Fee: TB $1,000; Q&H Sporthorse $600 Others $500 LFG

16HH AQHA Palomino HS Thirty Thirty/Jest The Good Times, Windchester, Stormy Jester & Tonto Bars Gill Bloodlines A pedigree that can do it all! Arab Assoc. Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Stallion Stud Fee: Quarter $600 Arb $500 Others $450 LFG All breeds welcome.

15.3HH Gray AQHA Stallion Wiescamp, Windchester, TE N TE Bloodlines Size, Style, Athletic Ability APHA Approved Stallion A pedigree that can do it all! Breeding Fee: Quarter Horse & Sport Horse $600 Others $450 LFG All breeds welcome

GW EQUINE SERVICES

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Chics Bandit 1989 Bay Tobiano Homozygous Stallion Whata Lethal Weapon

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Producing talented versatile offspring; HYPP N/N Champion Bloodlines, Champion Producers Offspring available for sale Colt starting, boarding & rehab training also availbable

STALLIONS AT STUD

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STALLIONS AT STUD Sire: Mystic Chic X Mystic Warrior Dam: Bonnington Cody x L&M’s High Socks Produces Versitile minded foals with good conformation All Reg APHA foals eligible for CCF Nomination

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Own son of Marthas Six Moons, the Nation’s #7 Leading Barrel Sire of the Decade! The Nation’s #1 Leading barrel sire of the Decade!!!!

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$

Standing:

Jaz Poco Goldun Blue

Hezgottabefamous, son of the Nation’s #1 Leading Barrel Sire of the Decade, Dash Ta Fame A Classic Guy, son of the Nation’s #2 Leading Barrel Sire of the Decade, Frenchmans Guy Crimson Jess, son of the Nation’s #1 Leading Race Sire 1994 AQHA Grulla Stallion of Money Earners, Mr Jess Perry By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of Poco Bueno) andBoots, out of ason mare by Pocos Gray Root Beers of 1987 AHA HiComet Pt Jr Working (Grandson of PocoRoot Bueno) Cowhorse, Beer Doc Homozygous Dun -Prime ALL his foals WILL be red dun, Time Chivato, by Dash to Chivato si96, sire dun or grulla, regardless of$3,279,722 the dam’s color! offspring of 1994 AQHA Grulla “All outStallion of producing mares!!!”

R and R Paints Langdon, AB • 403-816-7567 www.randrpaints.com

Jaz Poco Goldun Blue

TACK/SADDLES

By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of Poco Bueno) and out of a mare by Pocos Gray Comet (Grandson| of Poco Bueno) More Info: Doug & Carol Schaffer, Bassano, AB 403-641-2511 www.sandyridge.ab.ca Homozygous Dun - ALL his foals WILL be red dun, HERDA N/N dun or grulla, regardless of the dam’s color!

Jaz Poco Goldun Blue HERDA N/N Pocos Gray Comet (Grandson of Poco Bueno) Homozygous Dun - ALL his Registry foals WILLof beMerit red dun, AQHA dun or grulla, regardless of the dam’s 1994 color! AQHA

1994 AQHA Grulla Stallion

GBED N/N Grulla Stallion PSSM N/N By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of Poco Bueno) and out of a mare by (ROM) Reining

Cimarron 20ft stock

Pocos Gray Comet (Grandson of Poco Poco Bueno) By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of HERDA N/N • GBED N/N •Homozygous PSSM IBHA Registry of MeritN/N Dun - ALL his Registry foals WILLof beMerit red dun, AQHA Registry (ROM) Reining dun or Pocos grulla, regardless ofGray the dam’s color! Bueno)AQHA and of ofaMerit mare by (ROM) Reining (ROM) ReiningComet IBHA Registry of Merit (ROM) Reining HERDA N/N • Bueno) GBED N/N • PSSM IBHA Registry of MeritN/N (Grandson of Poco 2000 Working Cow Circuit 2001 Open Reining Circuit AQHAHorse Registry of Merit (ROM) Reining (ROM) Reining 2001 Open Reining Circuit Champion Colorado Champion IBHA Registry Merit (ROM) Reining Homozygous Dun - Colorful ALL hisoffoals WILL be 1998 MHBHA Reining Champion2000 Working Cow Horse Circuit Champion 2001 Open Reining Circuit 2001 MHBHA Working Cow 2001 Champion Open Reining Circuit Colorful Colorado Champion red2001 dun, dun or grulla, Horse First Place 1998 AQHA Junior Reining Colorful MHBHA Working Cow 1998Champion MHBHA Reining Champion 2001 MHBHA Working Cow Colorado Circuit Champion 2000 NRHA Limited Open Res. Horse Placedam’s Horse First Place regardless ofFirst the 1998color! AQHA Junior Reining 2001 MHBHA Working Cow Colorful Champion Sandhills Slide 1998 IBHA Open Reining ColorfulColorado Circuit Champion 2000 NRHA Limited Open 2000 NRHA Limited Open Res.Res. Horse First Place Circuit Champion 2000 NRHA Limited Open Res. Champion Sandhills Slide$950 1998 IBHA Open Reining Colorful 2012Colorado Stallion Fee: 2000 NRHA Limited Open Res. Sandhills Slide Colorado Circuit Champion NRHA Earner Champion High Desert Slide Champion 2000Money NRHA Limited Open Res. Champion Sandhills Standing At:NRHA Burwash Equine LtdEarnerSlide NRHA Money Champion High DesertRes. SlideServices 2000 Limited Open Fresh cooled or frozen shipped semen available anywhere in North America 2000 NRHA Limited Open Res. Champion High Desert Slide 403-242-1913 www.eslvet.ca Champion Standing At: Burwash Equine Services Ltd High Desert Slide

Circuit Champion ColorfulOwned Circuit By:Champion ColorfulOwned By: Champion, AB Canada Ryan Smith Colorado Ryan Smith Colorado Search for Jaz Poco 403-634-0042 / 403-897-3787 1998 MHBHA Reining AB, Canada Champion, 1998 MHBHA Reining Champion, AB, Canada Goldun Blue for periodic 403.634.0042 Champion | 403.897.3787 exclusive Facebook offers www.fleetwoodfarms.com 403.634.0042 | 403.897.3787 Champion championauctions@gmail.com 1998 AQHA Junior ryan@fleetwoodfarms.com championauctions@gmail.com 1998 AQHA Junior Reining Colorful Colorado 2012 Stallion Fee: $950 Reining Colorful Colorado Circuit Champion 2012 StallionStanding Fee:At:$950 Burwash Equine Services Ltd 1998 IBHA Open Reining Circuit Champion 403.242.1913 www.eslvet.ca Colorful ColoradoStanding Circuit At: Burwash Equine Services• Ltd 1998 IBHA Open Reining Champion 403.242.1913 • www.eslvet.ca Colorful Colorado Circuit NRHA Money Earner Owned By: Champion Ryan Smith NRHA Money Earner Fresh cooled or frozen shipped Owned By: Search for Champion, AB, Canada semen available anywhere in Jaz Poco Goldun Blue Ryan Smith 403.634.0042 403.897.3787 for periodic exclusive North America Fresh cooled or frozen shipped Facebook offers Search for championauctions@gmail.com Champion, AB, Canada semen available anywhere in Jaz Poco Goldun Blue 403.634.0042 403.897.3787 for periodic exclusive North America Facebook offers

Search for Jaz Poco Goldun Blue for periodic exclusive Facebook offers

Ima Bootscootin Lena

2004 ApHC Registered Stallion Canadian Supreme Nominated LTE $15,860

championauctions@gmail.com

PHOTO CREDIT: CHERYL SMYTHE PHOTOGRAPHY AND DESIGN

Nev Giberson RR #4; Innisfail, AB 403-357-4888 email: n.giberson@xplornet.com www.gibersonperformancehorses.com

Ed & Connie Masson Cadogan, AB Phone: 780-857-2254 Email: ranchboss@myterraranch.com www.myterraranch.com

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“Quality for you & your horse Our customers ask for all types of harness Leather, leather-Nylon, Biothane & Granite

www.georgesharnessandsaddlery.com harnsad@mcsnet.ca Morley Knudslien - 2nd generation saddlemaker Jason Lusk - Harnessmaker 19 YearsPo Box 29 Ryley, AB, Canada 780-663-3611

VARIOUS EQUINE SERVICES

Innovative PRODUCTS... When PERFORMANCE Counts

Giberson Performance Horses

Circle Bar Gray Gun Pepinics Master’s is sired by Playgun performing offspring who is the Equi-Stat have earned $550,000 #9 Leading Cutting in cutting, working Sire and an NRCHA cowhorse, reining & Leading Sire, siring barrel racing the earners of over (Equi-Stat) $6,900,000

29,995

$

C.N.T.

HARNESSES MADE RIGHT HERE FOR 35 YEARS

Fresh cooled or frozen shipped semen available anywhere in North America

Pepinics Master

5010 HST Cab w/ loader

$16,995

Standing At: Burwash Equine Services Ltd 2000 Working Cow• www.eslvet.ca Horse $950 2012 Stallion Fee: $950 403.242.1913 2000 Working Cow• www.eslvet.ca Horse 2012 Stallion 403.242.1913 Owned By:Fee: Ryan Smith

Circle Bar Gray Gun

BAR T5 TRAILERS

GEORGE’S HARNESS & SADDLERY

GBED N/N 1994 AQHA Grulla Stallion PSSM N/N By Little Steel Dust (Grandson of Poco Bueno) and out of a mare by

Breeding Fees: $1,000 plus $250 booking fee Mare Care: $8/day wet; $6/day dry Live Foal Guarantee

Alicia Quist-Wopereis Fine Art & Photography Capturing Life’s Moments 403-601-0662 backroadshighriver.com

Anivac Animal Bathing Systems Pure Oxygen Accel Surface Cleaner Happy Horse Hay Steamers RejuvGelz The Best Magnetic Bandages

at Marsh Haven Farm

www.marshhavenfarm.com

HORSES ALL - The monthly newspaper for equine enthusiasts covering all horse disciplines. Call Kathleen or Charla Rae toll free at 1-800-665-0502 to subscribe today.

403-931-2212

www.bart5trailers.com

FOR SALE CROSSBRED COLTS 2 coming two year old Clydesdale x Hackney colts. Excellent bone, temperament, feet & movement. Should finish over 16HH. Both are bay with white faces & 4 white legs. Both come from excellent bloodlines - same sire & closely related mares. They are capable of any discipline, with a wealth of strength & grace. Very athletic. Pleasure to be around.

Call Marilyn at 780-464-0679 | Email: hackneycross@gmail.com

Subscribe to Horses All! $28.67 for 1 year $63.59 for 3 years

1-800-665-0502 www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012


MARKETPLACE

In Harmony

Husbandry

NATURAL ALTERNATIVE GRAZERS website: slowfeeder.com To beat the wasted hay/bored horse conundrum, and the many email: slowhayfeeders@live.ca phone: 1-250-308-6208 health issues with limited feedings. NAG bag slow feeders will break up the monotony and simulate. A more Natural feeding environment. Veterinarian recommended and approved.

parks nnovations

Presents

MARKETPLACE

Dealer for the TR3™Rake

ArenA rAscAl PrO • sOIl MOIst

#1 Ground Groomer Canada Wide

SPARKS INNOVATIONS Allan & Joyce sparks • rr#2, Innisfail, AB t4G 1t7 Fax: 403-227-2421

403•227•2241

Visit us at edmonton's Farm & ranch show & college rodeo Finals March 29-31 Mane event April 27-29

www.sparksinnovations.ca NEw TO CaNada! Fluidity™ is a palatable oral paste that will outperform Adequan® I.M. and Legend® for joint care in Equine athletes. Using Natural ingredients Fluidity helps rebuild joints & cartilage

The Fluidity Advantage • Outperforms Adequan & Legend in joint care!! • Replaces the need for joint injections!! • Safe for both mares & bleeders! • Palatable to even the fussiest horse! Our customers have experienced that Fluidity™ provides both short & long-term relief for their horses, & Fluidity™ reduces inflammation from day one improving stride length, overall freedom of movement & performance Oxy-Gen®.offers horses a dependable source of safe, legal, all-natural products that are the industry’s finest & have helped make Oxy-Gen® a barnyard name.

Small Spurs Rodeo Results Top 3 in Each Event - Feb. 11, 2012 (Place/Name/Time/Points) Steer Riding Guest, Colton 76 Shuckburgh, Ryan 71 Brown, Kyle 70

60 50 40

Poles 6 & Under Day Chief, Jayton 28.37 Scheller, Shayanna 35.63 Day Chief, Makeisha 39.37

60 50 40

Poles 7 -8 yrs Crombez, Justise Kelly, Kyla Aleman, Avery

DESERT’S PURE GOLD Imported American Saddlebred Palomino Stallion 2012 Stud Fee: $800 Syndicated Share: $500 Standing near Strathmore, AB For more information call Christine 403-318-5872

desertspuregold.blogspot.com PINTO

PINTO

60 50 40

Breakaway 11-12 yrs. Schlosser, Stran 3.47 Stevens, Hayze 5.24

60 50

Breakaway 10 & Under Holt, Colby 9.1

60

24.52 24.59 24.64

60 50 40

Goat Tail Untying ( 7 & Under) Day Chief, Jake 8.49 Berreth, Garrett 8.9 Powelson, Maysa 9.32

60 50 40

Goat Tying 8 & Under Crombez, Justise 16.8 Brost, Braden 19.63 Hann, Danielle 24.44

60 50 40

Team Roping Perry, Shody 10.95 Olson, Wyatt Penner, John 13.5 Koehler, Colten Hays, Taylor 13.8 Zur, Cooper Goat Tying 9-11 Yrs. Whiteside, Kylie 10.53 Nunn, Hanna 10.75 Stevens, Destiny 11.93

60 50 40

Goat Tying 12-14 Yrs. Savage, Reili 9.37 Park, Caitlin 9.62 Weltz, Karlene 9.96

60 50 40

60 50 40

Boys Goat Tying 9-14 Yrs. Zur, Cooper 11 Schlosser, Stran 13.38 Kaenel, Wyatt 14.31

60 50 40

Barrels 6 & Under Day Chief, Jayton Borsy, Kasha Scheller, Shayanna Barrels 7-8 yrs Statham, Kenda Kelly, Kyla Powelson, Maysa

21.15 23.06 23.49 16.88 16.89 17.05

MARKETPLACE

60 50 40

60 50 40

HELP WANTED

Barrels 9-10 Yrs. Akune, Brooke Stevenson, Alisha Schlosser, Reata

16.3 16.33 16.4

60 50 40

Barrels 11-12 Yrs. Moore, Makenna Berreth, Logan Savage, Reili

16.36 16.6 16.7

60 50 40

Barrels 13-14 Yrs. Zur, Abby 15.49 Scheidt, Sierra 16.24 Pugsley, Emily 16.25

60 50 40

Poles 9-10 Yrs. Schlosser, Reata Powelson, Talia Stevenson, Alisha

21.38 23.14 24.77

60 50 40

Poles 11-12 Yrs. Nelson, Ashley Bodkin, Carlee Stevens, Destiny

22.68 23.62 23.74

60 50 40

Poles 13-14 Yrs. McElhone, Cheyenne Weltz, Karlene Scheidt, Taylor

21.91 21.97 22.6

60 50 40

HELP WANTED

ANIMAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY

866-571-7537

www.oxy-genca.com

Breakaway 13-14 yrs. Koehler, Colten 3.57 Cahoon, Bailey 3.84 Penner, John 4.31

Saddle Bags Chaps. Rifle Scabbards. Pack Saddles & Riggings. Pokiak Pack Boxes. New & Used Saddles Collector Saddles Show bridles & breast collars, spurs, ropes, bits, etc... Book now for winter saddle repairs, cleaning and restringing.

2 year diploma since 1974. Training with large & small animals!! On-site working farm. aht@gprc.ab.ca 1-888-999-7882 Fairview, AB

www.gprc.ab.ca

NEED EXTRA HANDS DURING BUSY SEASONS? International AgriVenture trainees fill gaps on your equine, ranch, farm or horticultural operation. Trainees aged 18-30 spend 7-9 months hosted and employed by your family. Canadians aged 18-30 are also encouraged to apply for placements in Europe, UK, Australia and New Zealand. www.agriventure.com 1-888-598-4415

Advertise in the Horses All Classifieds. Call our toll-free number & place your ad with our friendly staff. Don’t forget to ask about our bonus special. 1-800-665-0502. HORSES ALL - The monthly newspaper for equine enthusiasts covering all horse disciplines. Call Kathleen or Charla Rae at 1-800-665-0502 to subscribe today.

CANADIAN PINTO HORSE ASSOCIATION Registering Canadian Pinto Horses & Ponies – Since 1963 Color Your World With A Pinto!! A Colorful Organization Where People are the foundation of our success...& Friends are made for Life WHY WAIT CALL TODAY Your horse may qualify for Registration (ONE Registered Lighthorse Parent Sire or Dam)

Canadian Pinto Horse Association 26117 Hwy. 16A, Acheson, AB Canada T7X 5A2 Ph/Fax. 780-470-3786 www.canadianpinto.com | E-mail: info@canadianpinto.com

Subscribe to Horses All! $28.67 for 1 year $63.59 for 3 years

1-800-665-0502 MARCH 2012 | www.horsesall.com

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Let’s have a barn raising at your place!

Standard Features: * All Steel Frame: * 4 - 12’ x 12’Woodlined Box Stalls: * Heavy Duty Sliding Boxstall Doors or 6’ Calving Gates: 36’ x 24’ 4 Stall Barn Built in your yard

* 12’Wide Center Alley * 6’ Exterior Sliding Door * Colored Metal Siding of Choice

Barn Options Available:

ready to use!! $17,995. plus delivery

Larger Sizes Available in 12’ increments We don’t give estimates we give you the price!!!

* * * * *

Skylight Roof & Wall Insulation Tack Room Windows Wider & Insulated Exterior

* Stall Feeders * Stall Mats * Tie Stalls * Stallion Stalls Doors

Garages: Sold in Sizes: 15’, 18’, 24’ wide and variety of lengths. 8’3”& 9’6” wall heigths. All Steel Framed Many options available Check out the website www.theaffordablegarage.com

Garage Options Available:

Ultimate in Hay Savers for Horses

1. Horses don’t have their heads in a dusty bale 2. Horses don’t waste hay 3. Really helps in parasite control $459.

Very Safe 50’ Round Pen Package: 7 Bar - 6’ HIgh - comes with 5’ ride through gate $1695. HW $1995.

HD Framed Gate 10’ wide, 8’ high, 5 bar cattle $459. 6 bar bison, $479.

HD Well Pipe Panel with Gate 24’, 4 bar with 10’ gate $479. 30’, 5 bar, with 10’ gate $549. other gate sizes available

* Ground Anchors * Treated Wood Base Frame * Skylight

HD 5 Bar Swinging Gates: 16’ $179. 12’ $159. 10’ $149. Also 6 Bar Bison Gate

* Windows * Walk In Door * Colored Roof

5’ High, 10’ long, 5 Bar $69. 6 bar $79. Quantity Discounts Available

$299 Haysaver Goat & Sheep Feeder $459.

Sheep & Lamb Panels 7’ long,4’ high, 7 bar, $59.

Tombstone Round Bale Feeder $369.

Hay & Grain Haysaver 6’ long, 4 horse, $389

Round Bale Feeders $349

Freestanding 21’, Corral Panels with chain connectors for cattle, bison, horse and sheep 4’ high, 7 bar sheep panel $169. 5’ high, 6 bar, lightest weight $179. 5’ high, 6 bar, low pressure $199. 5’ high, 5 bar, heavy duty $239. 6’ high, 7 bar, Bison or stallion panels $289.

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Windbreak Frame made with 2 7/8” well pipe 30’ long, 10’ cross leg, less boards $399.

www.horsesall.com | MARCH 2012

HA120301  

Act of the year / 6 T2092 T2205 COVER ART: Morning Light by Alicia Quist / See page 3 Managing your surface water / 18 Inspired by people an...

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