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COLGAN GIRLS TAKE CARDINAL LEAD: The Sharks are 3-0 and looking potent.

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January 15, 2020 | Vol. 19, No. 3 | www.princewilliamtimes.com | 50¢ Covering Prince William County and surrounding communities, including Gainesville, Haymarket, Dumfries, Occoquan, Quantico and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park.

Dumfries wants more say on ‘Rosie’s’ By Jill Palermo

Times Staff Writer

The Dumfries Town Council decided Tuesday it wants some additional say in the opening of any new gaming facility in Dumfries, including the “Rosie’s Gaming Emporium” planned for the Triangle Shopping Plaza. In a unanimous vote, councilmembers decided Jan. 7 to require Colonial Downs to apply for and receive a “conditional use” permit for the off-track See ROSIE’S, page 4

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Top: Colonial Downs has an option to lease this 18,000-square-foot space in the Triangle Shopping Plaza for its planned Rosie’s Gaming Emporium. The company has promised a facelift for this section of the 59-year-old shopping center. Right: An artist’s rendering.

Wheeler lays out goals for schools, transit, jobs In ‘state of the county’ address, new chair outlines her priorities

Top: Ann Wheeler, the newly elected chair of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors, gave her “state of the county” address during the first meeting of the new board on Tuesday, Jan. 7. Bottom: Wheeler was among five new supervisors who were ceremoniously sworn into office on Monday, Jan. 6. COURTESY PHOTOS

See RED FLAG, page 5

By Daniel Berti

See WHEELER, page 2 INSIDE Calendar.............................................12 Classified............................................21 Lifestyle..............................................11 Obituaries...........................................20

By Daniel Berti

Times Staff Writer

A ‘red flag’ gun bill sponsored by Sen. George Barker, D-39th, to allow law enforcement Sen. George to temporarily Barker seize firearms from people found to be a danger to themselves or others passed a state Senate committee along party lines Monday morning. Barker represents constituents in Prince William County, Fairfax County and Alexandria City. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 9-5 to report the bill out of committee, with all nine Democrats voting in favor of the measure and all five Republicans voting against. It will now go to a floor vote in the state Senate at a date that hasn’t yet been scheduled.

Times Staff Writer

Newly elected Board Chairman Ann Wheeler says she’ll focus her efforts on school funding, transportation improvements and economic development as the new chair of the Prince William Board of County Supervisors. During her “state of the county” address, given at the inaugural 2020 supervisors meeting Tuesday, Jan. 7, Wheeler laid out ambitious goals to improve the county’s school system, including goals to provide incremental raises for teachers, hire additional teachers to reduce class sizes and expand the county’s current pre-K program.

‘Red flag’ bill advances in state Senate

Opinion.................................................7 Puzzle Page..........................................8 Real Estate..........................................19 Senior Living.......................................13 Sports...................................................9

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Wheeler lays out goals for schools, transit, jobs WHEELER, from page 1 Wheeler also said the county would need to find a way to update older school facilities to make sure students have the same educational experience regardless of the school they’re zoned to attend. “We must invest in our public schools and capital infrastructure to make Prince William County a community where families throughout Northern Virginia seek to locate in order to provide advantages for our children’s future,” Wheeler said. In an interview Sunday, Wheeler said the board hasn’t had any explicit talks about the county’s revenue sharing agreement yet. The county’s portion of funding to local is generally limited by the agreement, which allocates 57.23% of the county’s general fund tax revenue to the school division. During the campaign, Wheeler and the board’s other Democratic supervisors said the revenue sharing agreement should set a floor but not a ceiling on the county’s contribution to local schools. “I expect that [conversation] to take place, as well as additional school funding, after we see the county executive’s proposed budget and the schools’ proposed budget,” Wheeler said. Transportation projects also topped the list of priorities for the new chair. Wheeler said she would focus on improving the county’s roads and look for ways to fund the $355 million road bond approved by voters in November. Prince William County has been plagued by increased traffic congestion as more residents have moved to the county. The county has added nearly 200,000 new residents since 2000, and 100,000 more residents are expected to move to the county by 2040. “We must find ways of improving our transit system as voters overwhelmingly approved the $355 million bond program,” Wheeler said. “We must find ways to invest in the road projects in the referendum, especially a solution to Route 28.” The road bond includes $200 million for improvements for Va. 28. The county is looking at options to either widen the road between Liberia Avenue and Fairfax County or to create a four-lane bypass that would extend Godwin Drive beyond its current terminus at Va. 234 Business or Sudley Road. The bypass would cut through about four miles of mostly undeveloped land behind the West Gate area alongside Flat Branch creek, a tributary of Bull Run. Wheeler also said she would examine new options for increased public transit in Prince William, including studying the extension of the Metro line to Woodbridge and reconsidering the extension of VRE to Gainesville. The VRE Operations Board decided in March 2017 that the more than $600 million cost to extend the VRE to Gainesville or Haymarket

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Chair Ann B. Wheeler

Elected: Nov. 5 with 55% of the vote Age: 58 Party: Democratic Education: B.S. in mechanical engineering, Tufts University MBA in finance, University of Chicago Family: husband John, two daughters Home state: New Jersey Prince William resident: since 1996 Experience: NOVEC board, 2005-18 Hylton Performing Arts Center Board Prince William Board of Social Services, 2006-11 Prince William Committee of 100, president 2016-18 Energy industry consultant, 15 years was too expensive given the projected number of riders likely to use the new service. “We must dream big and lay the groundwork for a future that brings multiple transit opportunities to Prince William County,” Wheeler said. “We must make land use decisions that support development around key bus, road and rail transportation hubs.” Wheeler said Sunday that studies to examine extensions of Metro land the VRE have support from the county’s state delegation. Wheeler said the recently announced Long Bridge expansion shows that opportunities to expand regional transportation infrastructure are a possibility. “That, to me, happened very quickly, which indicates to me that regional projects can come about in a short amount of time. I don’t want to sit around and pretend it’s never going to happen,” Wheeler said. Wheeler also addressed the need for increased economic development in the county, saying the county had relied on residential tax revenue to fund community needs while also trying to hold the lowest tax rates in Northern Virginia. “This has left our county behind in our ability to provide certain critical services and infrastructure,” Wheeler said. “While our economic development efforts have prioritized commercial investment, in the future we need to further increase the number of high wage jobs here in our own community.” Prince William has one of the highest percentage of residents in the region who work outside of the county, contributing to long commute times for county residents. Wheeler said bringing more businesses to the county, “small and large,” would help shorten commutes and lessen residents’ tax bills. Wheeler concluded her speech by highlighting the county’s changing demographics, noting that nearly one-third of the county’s population speaks a language other than English at home and 25% of county residents are foreign-born. “We are different community than we were 20 years ago and today, Prince William County is a majority-minority community,” Wheeler said. “Together, we must strive to make decisions that will lead Prince William County into the future as we discard the vestiges of divisiveness and intolerance, and we have much to do as we embark on this journey.” Reach Daniel Berti at dberti@ fauquier.com

Officials sworn in:

Five newly elected Prince William supervisors were sworn into office Jan. 6, creating the most diverse slate of elected officials in the county’s history. Joining them in the ceremony, conducted in the Hylton Performing Arts Center’s Merchant hall, were Commonwealth’s Attorney Amy Ashworth (D) and Sheriff Glendell Hill (R). All took office effective Jan. 1, and will serve four-year terms.

PHOTOS BY MIKE BEATY

Left: Commonwealth’s Attorney Amy Ashworth replaced longtime former commonwealth’s attorney Paul Ebert, who served for 52 years. Ashworth is the first woman to serve as the top prosecutor for Prince William County and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. Right: Hill, the county’s first African-American sheriff, was sworn in for a fifth term. Hill was first elected sheriff in 2003.

Led by Chair Ann Wheeler, D-At Large, (bottom, second from left) the new board is now majority-minority, majority female and majority Democratic for the first time. The board now includes its first two African-American women -Supervisors Andrea Bailey, D-Potomac, and Margaret Franklin, D-Woodbridge (bottom, third and fourth from left, respectively) -- as well as its first Latina, Supervisor Yesli Vega, R-Coles (bottom left). Supervisor Kenny Boddye, D-Occoquan (top left) is the first mixed-race supervisor elected to the board. Supervisors Jeanine Lawson, R-Brentsville, Peter Candland, R-Gainesville, and Victor Angry, D-Neabsco (top second, third and fourth from left, respectively) are returning to the board. During the supervisors’ first meeting Jan. 7, the board elected Supervisor Victor Angry to serve as its vice chairman and Supervisor Margaret Franklin to serve as its chair pro-tem.

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Supervisors to revisit gun resolution Jan. 21 By Daniel Berti

Times Staff Writer

The Prince William Board of County Supervisors will revisit on Tuesday, Jan. 21, a resolution to back a slate of gun-safety proposals and seek more state funding for mental health treatment and firearm safety training. The decision came at the end the newly elected board’s first meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 7. More than 200 gunrights proponents turned out to the meeting despite its 2 p.m. start time and the inclement weather. The meeting occurred just as Prince William received its first snowstorm of the year. The meeting stretched on for nearly five hours as more than 100 people spoke against the measure, which was proposed by Chair Ann Wheeler, D-At Large. Six people spoke in favor of the resolution, but they were far outnumbered by opponents. Many gun rights supporters asked the board to remove its support for extreme risk protective orders, also known as “red flag” laws, and universal background checks. Prince William County resident Brent Simpson said more money should be spent on mental health programs instead of implementing new gun laws that might restrict gun ownership in Virginia. “It’s not the gun. It’s the person behind the gun. We’re focusing on the wrong thing here,” Simpson said. Several other county residents took issue with the timing and short notice given before the vote. The resolution was posted online on Friday, Jan. 3. Wheeler said she had hoped to vote on the measure before the start of the General Assembly session, which began Jan. 8. “Our legislature starts next week. This is adding to our legislative agenda. It needs to get on,” Wheeler said. “I called supervisors and let them know I was putting it on, and then it went out of dispatch last Friday. I know people are aware of it.” Several speakers were also upset the hearing was scheduled for 2 p.m. instead of 7:30 p.m., making it difficult for many residents to attend. “You’re squelching public input,” said Brentsville District resident Tammy Spinks. “What’s the harm in waiting one more week?” County attorney Michelle Robl,

“Most folks are at work. It’s 2 o’clock in the afternoon and to expect that on an issue that is this controversial and personal … troubles me greatly,” SUPERVISOR PETE CANDLAND, R-Gainesville

BOCS resolution to prevent gun violence

During the 7:30 p.m. meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 21, the Prince William Board of Supervisors will revisit a measure that urges the Virginia General Assembly to: • Pass the proposed “red flag” law to temporarily limit access to firearms by people deemed dangerous “while preserving due process;” • Require background checks for all gun purchases through a federal firearms license; • Limit children’s access to firearms to reduce suicides and accidental shootings; • Provide additional state funding for firearms safety education; • Waive the sales tax on gun safes and gun safety locks; • Strengthen penalties for adults who allow children unsafe access to guns speaking during the meeting, said no 7:30 p.m. meeting had been scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 7 because supervisors had scheduled active-shooter and meeting security training at that time. The training was scheduled in November by the previous board, Robl said. Supervisor Pete Candland, R-Gainesville, said he was dismayed Wheeler had scheduled the vote for the 2 p.m. meeting instead of an evening meeting. “Most folks are at work. It’s 2 o’clock in the afternoon and to expect that on an issue that is this controversial and personal … troubles me greatly,” Candland said. Many citizens were under the impression that Wheeler’s new resolution would reverse the “constitutional county” resolution passed by the previous board in December and asked the new board not to overturn the resolution. Democratic supervisors said they plan to leave the “constitutional county” resolution in place, however. “That ‘constitutional county’ status is not up for debate. We’re not changing that. I just want to be really clear on that,” said Supervisor Victor Angry, D-Neabsco. Wheeler said as early as Saturday, Jan. 4, that she had no intention of reversing the “constitutional county” resolution. Virginia Citizens Defense League, a Virginia gun-rights organization, posted an “action item” ahead of Tuesday’s meeting calling on Prince William gun rights supporters to attend the meeting. The statement falsely claimed that the new board was planning a vote to “repeal Prince William County’s sanctuary status.” Many residents who spoke said they came to the meeting to oppose the repeal the previous board’s “constitutional county” resolution. Reach Daniel Berti at dberti@ fauquier.com

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Dumfries wants more say on ‘Rosie’s’ ROSIE’S, from page 1 and pari-mutuel betting parlor it plans to open in Dumfries during the coming year. To prepare for the new Rosie’s, which could open in Dumfries as early as August, the council adopted on Jan. 7 a zoning text amendment to add the definition of a “gaming facility” to its zoning ordinance. The measure specifies that such entities will be allowed in areas of the town zoned B-1 as long as the town council approves a conditional use permit for the site. The move means Dumfries will retain more control over the details such as traffic control, lighting, parking and other impacts of such new facilities. A conditional use permit process – which is similar to the special use permit the Prince William Board of County Supervisors requires for things such as gas stations and drive-thru restaurants -- was recommended by both Dumfries Director of Planning and Community Development William Capers III as well as the town’s planning commission. The planning commission held a public hearing and vote on the matter the day before, on Monday, Jan. 6, during which it also voted unanimously to recommend that town council require a conditional use permit for gaming facilities.

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Rosie’s Gaming Emporium

Where: Triangle Shopping Plaza When: As early as August 2020 What: Pari-mutuel betting parlor slated to bring more than 100 jobs and $54,000 in annual tax revenue to the Town of Dumfries. Next steps: Town staff are reviewing Colonial Downs’ application for a conditional use permit for the ne betting parlor to be reviewed by the town planning commission and town council in the coming weeks.

What is pari-mutuel wagering?

The system of wagering on horse races in which those who wager on horses that finish in the position or positions for which wagers are taken share in the total amounts wagered, plus any amounts provided by a licensee, less deductions required or permitted by law and includes parimutuel wagering on historical horse racing and simulcast horse racing originating within the commonwealth or from any other jurisdiction. SOURCE: THE CODE OF VIRGINIA.

ri-mutuel wagering facilities in the commonwealth. The Dumfries locaThe decision comes about two tion would be the company’s first in months after Dumfries voters ap- Northern Virginia. The decision to require a condiproved a ballot resolution that gave the town their blessing to allow off- tional use permit runs counter to Cotrack betting and pari-mutuel gam- lonial Down’s request that Dumfries ing in Dumfries. The measure was allow gaming facilities “by right.” Stephanie Gilapproved last liard, Colonial Nov. 5 by a vote “It is important that we Downs’ attorney, of 467 to 306. said requiring a C o l o n i a l as a council do our due conditional use Downs owns diligence and not take could and operates a decisions like this lightly,” permit slow down or live horse raceven risk the ing track in New MONAE NICKERSON Kent County as Dumfries Vice Mayor opening of the Rosie’s if town well as four Rosofficials set conie’s Gaming Emditions beyond what either Colonial poriums in Virginia. One is located Downs or Curtis Properties, which adjacent to the racing track in New own the Triangle Shopping Plaza, Kent County, while the others are in can meet. Vinton, Richmond and Hampton. “Honestly, we don’t know what So far, Colonial Downs is the [conditions] you all could come back only entity licensed by the Virginia with, and if it’s some kind of incredRacing Commission to operate paibly onerous change to the property that the landlord is required to make, he may not make it,” Gilliard said. “He may say it’s not worth it to us to make these changes, and at that point our project is at grave risk.” During her presentation to the council, Gilliard reiterated the benefits Rosie’s promises for Dumfries. The facility will bring more than FACING FORECLOSURE? 100 new jobs with an average annual salary of $47,000. Rosie’s is also BEHIND ON YOUR MORTGAGE PAYMENTS? projected to generate about $54,000 Esta atrasado en su hipoteca? Servicio Gratuito a month in tax revenue for Dumfries that will be generated by gambling Free Foreclosure Help alone. Rosie’s Gaming Emporium in Dumfries is planned to have 150 Worried about losing your home? Don’t wait for the gaming machines, according to a foreclosure letter. Meet with one of our HUD Certified limit imposed by the Virginia RacHousing Counselors. We work with the lenders to reduce ing Commission based on the town’s your monthly payment & no cost for our services. population. The machines look like slot machines but allow users to ¿Está preocupado de perder su casa? No espere por la make bets on “historical” horse raccarta de ejecución hipotecaria. Tenemos consejeros de es, or actual horse races that hapvivienda certificados por HUD para ayudarle! Trabajamos pened in the past in various racing venues around the world. con los prestamistas para ayudarle a obtener una The machines pull from a datamodificación de préstamo. Llame ahora! base of 60,000 horse races, making it virtually impossible for users to know the outcome of the races beDon’t wait! Contact us today for a phone consultation fore placing their bets. 703-792-4713 or 703-792-6287 Rosie’s Gaming Emporium will also allow visitors to vote on live Tenemos consejeros de vivienda que hablan Español llamar a 703-792-4713 o 703-792-4633 racing happening around the world in real time. The facility will also Virginia Cooperative Extension Prince William have a gift shop, restaurant and bar, www.pwcgov.org/money Or email Smartmoney@pwcgov.org which will generate sales tax revenue for the town. Colonial Downs is also promising a facelift of sorts for the 59-yearold Triangle Shopping Plaza. The company has a contract to lease a

Gaming approved by Dumfries voters

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18,000-square-foot space that has sat empty for 10 years. The company hasn’t said exactly what renovations will be made, but an artist’s rendering of the new facility depicts a white-washed exterior with a brightly-lit façade. Gilliard and other Colonial Downs staff stressed that the existing Rosie’s Gaming Emporiums require no more parking or traffic adjustments than a normal restaurant or shopping area. Colonial Downs has not yet completed a traffic study for the Dumfries facility, but staff projections suggest the facility will generate 817 daily trips on weekends and 350 trips on weekdays. During “peak” weekday hours in the early evening, about 71 trips per hour would be generated, while 126 would be generated during peak weekend hours on Saturday evenings. Curtis Marshall, Colonial Downs’ vice president for security, said the company is already taking steps to ensure the facility is safe for visitors. The company hires its own security guards, installs surveillance cameras and ensures that parking lot lighting in sufficient to ensure patrons’ safety. Town Councilwoman Selonia Miles noted the number of visitors Rosie’s will draw will be significant for both the Triangle Shopping Plaza and downtown Dumfries. “It’s is a considerable amount of people, so it is something we have to take into consideration going forward,” Miles said. Town Councilman Cliff Brewer and Vice Mayor Monae Nickerson echoed Miles’ remarks, stressing that the council must ensure the new betting facility does not negatively impact Dumfries residents. “It is important that we as a council do our due diligence and not take decisions like this lightly,” Nickerson said. “… While it is our goal to make doing business with the town of Dumfries easy and welcoming, we have to perform our due diligence.” Brewer said the town council is concerned about more than just the new revenue Colonial Downs will bring to Dumfries. “I wish Colonial Downs would quit trying to dangle the money carrot here,” Brewer said before the vote. “Guys, it’s not about money. It’s about will this fit in the town?…. It’s up to us to decide: Do we want it here? That’s number one. Number two, do we put regulations on you [and require that] you have to honor the agreement? We have to look at the impact it has on the citizens here.” Capers said Colonial Downs had already submitted an application for a conditional use permit application in case the town council decided to require one. That application is currently under review by town staff and will be brought to the town’s planning commission and the town council for their approval once it is complete, Capers said. Reach Jill Palermo at jpalermo@ fauquier.com


FROM PAGE 1

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

‘Red flag’ bill advances in state Senate

Loving Homes Needed

RED FLAG, from page 1 It’s one of several gun laws the new Democratic majorities are expected to pass during the 2020 General Assembly session that have been backed by Gov. Ralph Northam. Virginia Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian J. Moran, speaking on behalf of Northam, said the governor strongly supports Barker’s bill and that the administration had spoken with a number of states that have passed similar laws. “We can adopt those best practices that have been adopted by those 17 states to ensure the effective and safe implementation of this law,” Moran said at the meeting. Red flag gun laws have been adopted by 17 states and Washington D.C. Moran also drew attention three state court cases in Connecticut, Indiana and Florida in which red flag gun laws had been challenged. Barker, addressing the committee, said the law had been successfully defended in court. The bill creates a procedure by which any attorney for the commonwealth or any law-enforcement officer can apply to a general district court, circuit court, or juvenile and domestic relations district court judge for an emergency substantial risk order. Republican lawmakers Sens. Richard Stuart, R-28th, Ben Chafin, R-38th, Mark Obenshain, R-26th, Ryan McDougle, R-4th, and Tommy Norment, R-3rd, voted against Barker’s proposed ‘red flag’ law. Stuart represents part of Prince William County. Several lawmakers expressed concern that the law would violate citizens’ due process and Second Amendment rights. “You’re flipping due process and the Constitution on its head,” Stuart said. “This bill probably scares me more than any bill I’ve seen in the Senate of Virginia in the 12 years I’ve been here, because of the mischief that could be done with it.” Philip Van Cleave, president of Virginia Citizens Defense League, also spoke out against the bill. VCDL has been at the center of the push to declare Virginia localities “Second Amendment sanctuaries.” Over 100 localities have passed either Second Amendment or “constitutional county” resolutions since Nov. 5, including Prince William County, which declared itself the latter in December. “If you were a danger to your family, you could still kill your family. They’ve just arrested the guns,” Van Cleave said about Barker’s bill. “You could be disarmed for life and you’ve done nothing wrong.” Democrats approved two additional gun bills – a watered down universal background check bill and a bill allowing localities to ban firearms in public buildings, parks and permitted events – at the same committee meeting. The latter bill was sponsored by state Sen. Scott Surovell, D-36th, who represents part of Prince William County. Reach Daniel Berti at dberti@ fauquier.com

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Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Gunning for the NRA? Critics say shooting range bill is aimed at group’s Fairfax headquarters Sub: By Daniel Berti Times Staff Writer

Del. Dan Helmer, who represents parts of Prince William County, has introduced a bill to ban indoor gun ranges in buildings where more than 50 people work, a move that would likely affect the indoor gun range at National Rifle Association headquarters in Fairfax. “Yes, this plan would affect the NRA, we also think it will save lives,” Helmer, D-40th, said about the bill in an email Tuesday. Helmer, a West Point grad and U.S. Army veteran elected in 2019, said his bill, HB567, is aimed at keeping Virginia workplaces safe in the wake of numerous workplace mass shootings throughout the country, including a mass shooting at a Virginia Beach municipal building in May 2019 that killed 12. “This bill would make sure that we don’t have people bringing large quantities of firearms and ammunition into office buildings,” said Helmer aide

Fauquier County Board of Supervisors Chairman Chris Butler, R-Lee, said he opposes the bill but Noah Bardash. “This bill would likely doesn’t think it would impact any gun ranges in Fauquier County. impact the NRA’s indoor range.” “I would think having safe ranges NRA spokesperson Catherine Mortensen said the organization op- that will educate novice shooters and poses the measure because it would offer a place for experienced shooters to go and remain profieliminate jobs and “destroy cient with their firearms is small businesses in Virginia what we want in Virginia. without reducing crime.” I see no ‘safety measure’ in “In addition to generating this proposal,” Butler said. about $18 million each year Helmer, who defeated in revenues, the state’s rangformer Republican delegate es are the epicenter for vital and caucus chair Tim Hugo safety training. This is where last November, campaigned our law enforcement comDel. Dan heavily on tightening Virginmunity comes to train alongHelmer ia gun laws in the run-up to side families and individuals the election. seeking skills for home and “I heard in so many conversations self-defense,” Mortensen said. The bill would not prohibit indoor this past year that gun violence preshooting ranges in buildings owned or vention is the top priority of my conleased by the state or federal govern- stituents,” Helmer said. Helmer filed two additional gun ment or at ranges where at least 90% of the users are law-enforcement officers. bills this week – HB568 and HB569 – The bill would also require indoor to prohibit the open carry of firearms in shooting ranges to keep a log of each vehicles and to require those who hold user’s name, phone number, address concealed carry permits from other and the law-enforcement agency states to meet Virginia’s concealed-carwhere users are employed. It would ry permit standards to carry their conalso require all indoor gun range us- cealed weapon in the commonwealth. “As someone who carried weapons ers to present a government-issued photo-identification card upon entry. in Iraq and Afghanistan. I’m deter-

Assistant principal arrested in sports trading card theft By Jill Palermo

Times Staff Writer

An assistant principal at a Prince William middle school has been placed on leave following his Dec. 13 arrest in connection with the theft of more than $600 worth of sports trading cards. Todd Daniel Yoho, 40, who had been an administrator at Gainesville Middle School for nine years, was arrested at the Target at 9900 Sowder Village Square on Friday, Dec. 13, according to 1st Sgt. Jonathan Perok, spokesman for the Prince William County Police Department. Yoho was charged with grand larceny, a felony, in connection with shoplifting $611.14 worth of trading cards, according to court documents. He is scheduled to appear in court on Tuesday, Jan. 14. Yoho’s image had been captured on Target’s surveillance cameras in similar incidents dating back to October, according to a Prince William County police officer’s sworn statement on a criminal complaint filed in Prince William County District Court. “I observed the accused … alter price tags, conceal merchandise and walk past all points of sale and was advised of the following criminal activity by Target loss prevention: Since October [the suspect] has been observed by Target loss prevention on numerous occasions committing similar acts as I witnessed today,” Officer S. F. Mushalko wrote in the criminal complaint. “He provided a written statement admitting to committing these larcenies.” Mushalko wrote. Diana Gulotta, spokeswoman for

Prince William County schools, said Yoho had been placed on leave. But she said Yoho was not arrested on Todd Daniel Yoho G a i n e s v i l l e Middle School property despite county arrest records that list the school’s address. Perok confirmed Friday evening that the arrest took place at the Target store. Gainesville Middle School parents and guardians were notified of Yoho’s status on Friday, Jan. 10, in a letter from Principal Catherine Porter-Lucas. The notice said Yoho had been placed on leave “pending the resolution of a non-school related personal matter.” “Due to privacy regulations, I cannot comment further on this matter and we ask that you encourage your student to not engage in speculation or rumors,” Porter-Lucas’s letter said. Yoho’s picture and biography remained on Gainesville Middle School’s website Friday. Yoho was in his ninth year as a school administrator after teaching for 10 years at Benton Middle School, the website states. Yoho supervised eighth grade “core content and discipline” as well as performing arts, English for speakers of other languages, world languages and social studies, the website states. Calls and emails to Yoho’s attorney, William Stephens, were not returned. Reach Jill Palermo at jpalermo@ fauquier.com

mined to deliver commonsense measures for our community & commonwealth,” Helmer said in a press release. Virginia Democrats vowed to enact gun reforms after the Virginia Beach mass shooting. Now that they control the House of Delegates, state Senate and the governor’s mansion, it’s likely that many proposed reforms will reach the governor’s desk later this year. In the past, Virginia Republicans have stymied most gun reform or gun control measures introduced in the General Assembly. Until 2019, Republicans had majority control of the House of Delegates and state Senate for nearly a decade. In 2017, 1,028 Virginians died as a result of gun violence, including 674 by suicide. A Dec. 16 poll from Christopher Newport University’s Wason Center showed that Virginia voters strongly support further gun control restrictions. According to the poll, 86% of Virginia voters support requiring background checks on all gun sales, and 73% were in favor of passing a “red flag” law. Only a slight majority – 54% –were supportive of banning assault-style weapons. Reach Daniel Berti at dberti@ fauquier.com

POLICE BRIEF Manassas man killed, 3 injured in snowy school bus crash One Manassas man was killed and three other people were injured in a crash involving a Fauquier County school bus that occurred amid the Jan. 7 snowstorm. Mark R. Tee, 48, of Manassas, died at the scene of the accident, which occurred just before 1 p.m. at Va. 55, also known as John Marshall Highway, and Va. 729, also known as Carrington Road. Tee was a passenger in a GMC 2001 Savana van that was traveling east on Va. 55 when the driver lost control, crossed a double, solid-yellow centerline and collided with the westbound school bus, according to Sgt. Brent Coffey, spokesman for the Virginia State Police. There were no children aboard

Man arrested after rape reported in Locust Shade Park A man was being held without bond Friday after a Woodbridge woman reported that a man forced her into a car, drove her to Locust Shade Park in Triangle and sexually assaulted her, according to police. The woman told police she was at home on Thursday, Jan. 9, when the man, whom police identified as a family member forced her into a vehicle, drove her to a wooded area of Locust Shade Park, 4701 Locust Shade Drive in Triangle, struck her and sexually assaulted her, according to Officer Renee Carr, spokeswoman for the Prince William County Police Department

the bus when the crash occurred, Coffey said in a news release. The driver of the GMC van, Charles E. Anderson, 71, of Manassas, suffered life-threatening injuries in the crash and was flown to INOVA Fairfax Hospital. Anderson was wearing a seat belt, but Tee was not, Coffey said. The driver of the school bus, a 59 year-old Warrenton woman, suffered minor injuries in the crash and was transported to Fauquier Hospital. She was wearing a seat belt, Coffey said.  A passenger on the school bus, a 68-year-old woman, also suffered minor injuries in the crash and was transported to Fauquier Hospital. Another adult passenger on the school bus was uninjured, Coffey said. Slick road conditions were factors in the cause of crash, which remains under investigation. The woman convinced the man to drive her home, and the two separated, Carr said. Throughout the next day, the man made threatening phone calls to the victim, Carr said in a news release. The woman reported minor injuries. Following the police investigation, Rodney Mershion Livatt, 44, of no fixed address, was located by the U.S. Marshal’s Task Force and charged with rape, abduction, domestic assault & battery and phone threats in connection with the incident, Carr said. Livatt was being held without bond Friday at the Prince William County Adult Detention Center, the release said.


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Prince William Times | January 15, 2020

It’s 2020, Virginia, time for change In Virginia, change tends to take time, sometimes too long. For example, when Virginia finally expanded Medicaid in 2018, allowing its kickoff in 2019, more than 300,000 people had already waited five years to receive the health care benefits people in other states had back 2014. Change came – finally – because enough voters were fed up with waiting for Virginia to allow our residents to access benefits they were already paying for in federal taxes. In 2020, Virginia finds itself with pent up demand on a long list of other issues. While there’s truth in the adage “better late than never,” waiting too long to make necessary changes is counterproductive. Here are just a few things we urge our legislators to accomplish sooner rather than later during their remaining 53 days in Richmond. Raise the minimum wage: Virginia is one of only 21 states stuck at the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, an amount that hasn’t changed since 2009 and has 31% less buying power than the $1.60/hour minimum wage paid back in 1968. A full-time worker making the minimum wage earns just $15,080 a year, not nearly enough to pay for even a one-bedroom apartment in most of the U.S. And while many minimum wage earners are young, not all of them are. Nearly 90% are at least 20, and two-thirds are women.

Myths about raising the minimum wage, including that it kills job growth, have been debunked by studies in other states. Maryland ($11) and even West Virginia ($9.50) have higher minimum wages than Virginia. Bills before lawmakers could raise Virginia’s minimum wage to $10 by July 1 and to $15, incrementally, by 2024. Ban cellphones while driving: Credit for persistence must be given to state Sen. Scott Surovell, who’s been trying since about 2012 to make it illegal for Virginians to use hand-held cellphones while driving. Surovell’s bill (SB 160) was inspired by the death of an 18-year-old who was struck while standing outside his vehicle by a motorist who was texting up until impact. The issue was given a fresh sense of urgency this year by a Loudoun family whose 5-month-old son was killed when his stroller was struck by a texting driver. It’s impossible to know how many accidents can be attributed to texting, but fatalities are on the rise for both motorists and pedestrians. Surovell argues Virginia’s current law is toothless because it forbids people from entering text into a phone while driving but effectively allows scrolling through Facebook or playing a video game while behind the wheel. Once again, Virginia is behind much of the country on this issue. Twenty-one states and the Dis-

trict of Columbia already ban cell phones while driving. Extend in-state tuition to refugee and DACA-eligible students: Back in 2001, before most of today’s high school seniors were even born, Texas (yes, Republican Texas) became the first state in the U.S. to grant in-state tuition to students based solely on graduation from a Texas high school and acceptance into a public university. Fifteen states, including Republican Utah, Kansas and Nebraska, now have similar laws. This year, Sen. Dave Marsden and Del. Kathy Tran want to add Virginia to the list. Tran’s bill would extend instate tuition to refugee students, while Marsden’s would offer it to those eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Back in 2014, Attor-

ney General Mark Herring ruled that DACA recipients who live in Virginia should qualify for in-state tuition. Marsden argues that students brought to the U.S. as children, through no choice of their own, should be able to pursue a higher education just like any other Virginia student. Business groups such as the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce agree because Virginia needs educated young adults for our economy to thrive. There’s much more on Virginia’s to-do list this year, including votes on high-profile issues such as the Equal Rights Amendment and bills aimed at preventing gun violence. We expect civil debate, wise compromises and a sense of urgency to finally get things done.

Time to focus on underserved students, schools Earning a college degree used to be considered a luxury in our country. However, in just a few decades, Guest Opinion it has become a requirement to live even just a decent life. In a world Del. Hala Ayala that is so much more interconnected and complex, the most underserved among us fall further behind. While many of us are lucky to go to good schools, earn college de- students. The inequitable availgrees and have a good-paying jobs, ability of advanced coursework for the folks in the lower half of the students across the commonwealth wealth gap continue to lag because hurts our students of color. of the barriers put in front of them. According to the most recently We cannot forget about them. available federal Civil Rights Data Most good-paying jobs require ed- collection, among Virginia’s students ucation beyond high school, yet many who enrolled in at least one Adof Virginia’s students do not make it vanced Placement course, only 38% to college, especially students who were students of color, even though have been historically underserved. students of color comprised 48% of Of those who do go onto college, the schools’ population that year. there are major gaps among those Making these rigorous courses availwho graduate: 56% of white Virginia able allows more students to earn students earn a bachelor’s degree in college credit while in high school, four years, while only 32% of our save money and improve the likeliAfrican American students earn the hood of completing their degree. same degree in the same time. Evidence suggests that college As a former PTO president and and career pathways, including those mother, it also deeply concerns that incorporate rigorous coursework me that only 35% of Hispanic and with work-based learning and opporAfrican American students and tunities to earn college credit while only 10% of students with disin high school, can improve preparaabilities earn Virginia’s advanced tion for — and ultimately completion diploma, compared to 60% of white of — a college credential.

Picture this: Students are learning about the heart in their biology class in the morning, and then going to an internship at a local hospital in the afternoon where they perform echocardiograms on real patients. Or, students are developing a proposal for an affordable housing complex in class, then visiting the actual site and presenting their proposal to city planners. It’s one thing when a student learns from a book or gets feedback from a teacher. It’s another thing entirely when students learn by doing and receive feedback from real employers. This approach to education makes learning more like the real world of work and helps students answer the question: “Why do I need to know this?” Too often, the students in our underserved schools are often not given the chance to show their true potential for success in a professional field unless it’s in something “exciting” like sports. Now, sports are an important part of the education system, both to give students’ academic careers balance and to give a chance for a career in sports to those who do have the opportunity to make it. However, I think NBA Superstar LeBron James puts it best: “We don’t

need more LeBrons, we need more physical therapists, scientists, police officers, teachers, doctors, professors, physicists, computer engineers…” Remedying inequities in our system, like this one, is about creating a just society where all students have the access and resources needed to succeed in our complex economy. We must take a bite of the equity apple and address the challenges in our education system. The General Assembly must redouble our efforts to support all our children, particularly those who have been historically underserved. Together, we can provide each and every child with an education that is rigorous and relevant to the economy. I am excited to introduce legislation that would establish a College and Career Readiness Steering Committee. This bill will bring together K-12 schools, higher education institutions and employers to help close the equity gap we face here in the commonwealth — building on a shared vision for all our students. The writer represents the 51st District, which includes much of Prince William County, in the Virginia House of Delegates. This piece was originally published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch.


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PUZZLE PAGE

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

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JAMES LEADS HERITAGE CHRISTIAN BOYS

Hayden James had 25 points and eight steals Monday to lead Heritage Christian (Woodbridge) to a 49-22 boys basketball victory over Faith Baptist.

FOREST PARK BOYS PREVAIL

Kenneth Clark scored 20 points, Kyle Bond 11 and Tyler Smith 10 as the Forest Park boys basketball team downed Freedom 66-50.

SPORTS WWW.PRINCEWILLIAMTIMES.COM

Prince William Times | January 15, 2020

Start spreadin’ the news about Andrews

Junior tops 1,000 points as Colgan girls improve to 3-0 in Cardinal District By Jeff Malmgren Times Staff Writer

Alyssa Andrews tripped over a milestone Friday. But that only made her eventual moment even more memorable. Standing at 998 career points, the Colgan junior uncharacteristically missed a relatively open layup late in the second quarter as her parents leapt up in the stands in celebratory anticipation. So they had to sit back down with a sigh. But one of Prince William County’s best scorers in recent girls basketball history didn’t disappoint the next time. With 1 minute, 59 seconds remaining before halftime, Andrews converted a pass from teammate Kennedy Fuller for layup and her a milestone moment in a 49-40 victory at Potomac. The Sharks are 7-3 and 3-0 in the Cardinal District, with Potomac 5-9 and 2-2. Officials paused the game so Andrews could be presented with a basketball and four balloons that collectively read “1,000.” “I don’t think, I just play,” said Andrews, a 6-foot-1 forward with agility, wing span, post moves, outside shooting and dribbling skill. Andrews, who finished with 18 points and 1,010 in her career, has averaged 16.4 per game since joining Colgan as a freshman. Andrews had 12 rebounds, giving her eight double-doubles in only 10 games. “I’m very impressed with her. A tremendous player. She’s tough to handle,” said Colgan coach Fred Milbert. “She’s versatile. And as a rebounder, she’s really smart. She’s got great timing.” Andrews needed a remarkably few 61 games to top 1,000. By comparison, former Woodbridge star Aaliyah Pitts, the 2018-19 Class 6 state Player of the Year, took 86 games to reach exactly 1,000, which she did last year with 16 in a state final win. Fuller was also impressive with 16 points, seven steals and six assists.

Girls basketball standings Cardinal District Colgan Forest Park Woodbridge Potomac Freedom Hylton Gar-Field

3-0 7-3 3-1 6-5 2-1 4-6 2-2 4-9 1-2 1-7 1-3 2-10 0-3 0-9

Cedar Run District Osbourn Park Stonewall Patriot Battlefield John Champe Osbourn

2-0 8-5 2-0 8-4 2-1 7-6 1-2 5-8 1-2 4-7 0-3 8-4

“I’m so happy for her. It’s well deserved.” COLGAN GUARD KENNEDY FULLER, SPEAKING ABOUT ALYSSA ANDREWS REACHING 1,000 POINTS

Andrews and Fuller have accounted for 66 percent of Colgan’s points. “In the girls’ game, if you have one [prolific scorer] you’re doing well. If you have two, you’re doing damn good,” said Potomac coach Tiffany Gresham, who filled in for Shanice Fuller. Colgan coach Milbert also praised Grace Damato “as a blue collar worker.” Damato finished with three points and four rebounds while Josie Rodas made four 3-pointers for 12 points. The Sharks went 17-9 and lost in the Class 6 Region C quarterfinals last year, but have four returning starters in Andrews, Fuller, Jennifer Roderick and Peyton Ray, who came off the bench Friday while Rodas and Najah Perryman started. “Everyone knows their roles on the team, and I think our team dynamic is way better,” Andrews said. “We’ve connected way better, but not [only] on the court. … I think that’s going to carry us a long way.” Colgan appears to be the favorite to win the Cardinal District title after

PHOTO BY DAMON MORITZ

Colgan junior Alyssa Andrews topped the 1,000-point barrier in last Friday’s 4940 win at Potomac. The first-place Sharks faced a key showdown with secondplace Forest Park on Tuesday. On Thursday they visit third place Woodbridge at 7:30 p.m. On Friday they host Freedom at 7. beating perennial champion Woodbridge 54-45 Thursday to end the Vikings’ 29-game winning streak in Cardinal District/Conference 4 play. For Potomac, Natayria Lipscomb had 15 points, five rebounds and four steals while post Victoria Hinton had nine points, 19 rebounds, five blocks

Smith leads Colgan boys to historic first win over Potomac, 62-59 By Jeff Malmgren Times Staff Writer

Tazir Smith scored 28 points and made 11 of 12 free throws in the fourth quarter Friday to help Colgan beat Potomac in boys basketball for the first time since the school opened in 2016, winning 62-59 at home in Manassas. Colgan saw a 13-point lead cut to three in the fourth quarter, but Smith scored most of Colgan’s 18 points down the stretch to end a four-game losing streak against Potomac.

The Sharks improved to 7-6 overall and 2-2 in the Cardinal District. Potomac is 9-3 and 3-1.

Seton stays perfect in DAC

With an incredibly efficient game from Dominic Olszewski, the Seton Conquistadors took sole possession of first place in the Delaney Athletic Conference boys basketball standings Friday by beating Tandem Friends 87-57 at home in Manassas. Olszewski scored 35 points as Seton improved to 4-0 and 9-5 overall, including a three-game winning streak. He made 10 of 11 field goals

(90 percent) and 15 of 17 free throws (88 percent) en route to a double-double with 13 rebounds and three assists. John Paul Vander Woude added 14 points on 5-for-7 shooting, helping Seton make 56 percent of its field goals in the game (29-for-52).

Other boys games

Trey Nelson scored 15 points and Zack Blue had 13 points and seven assists as Patriot beat Gar-Field 7248. Michael Cooper scored 18, Shane Feden 15 and Nazir Armstrong 10 as Woodbridge slipped past Colgan 6057 in overtime.

and four assists. “I felt like she could have dominated a lot more than she did,” Gresham said of Hinton’s offensive production. “Maybe my expectations are a little bit too high. I didn’t feel like they had anybody that could match-up with her.”

Boys standings Cardinal District Potomac Hylton Forest Park Woodbridge Colgan Freedom Gar-Field

3-1 10-3 3-1 4-8 2-2 6-6 2-1 6-6 1-2 7-6 1-2 3-8 0-3 2-10

Cedar Run District John Champe Battlefield Patriot Osbourn Osbourn Park Stonewall

3-0 10-3 2-1 8-6 1-1 9-4 1-1 4-9 0-2 6-5 0-2 4-8


10

SPORTS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

OP girls rout Champe; Stonewall also wins By Jeff Malmgren Times Staff Writer

Jo Raflo scored 13 points as Osbourn Park maintained a share of the girls basketball lead in the Cedar Run District standings by beating host John Champe 45-25 in Aldie. The Yellow Jackets improved to 2-0 in the district and 8-5 overall. Maddie Scarborough added six points and Kori Cole had five points and 13 rebounds.

Stonewall girls win again

Hannah Williams scored 23 points to help the Stonewall Jackson girls beat Patriot 54-39 to keep the Raiders in a tie for first place in the Cedar Run District standings. Williams finished with nine steals and seven

rebounds to boost Stonewall’s record to 2-0 in the district and 8-4 overall while dropping the Pioneers to 7-6 and 1-1. Maryan Yusuf added 10 points and Nataezja Gaskins had seven as nine Raiders scored.

Defense keys Pioneers

Eleven Patriot players scored Monday in 53-41 home victory over Osbourn. Kayla Amoah led that Patriot defense with five blocks as the Pioneers took a 13-6 lead in the first quarter, a 24-9 advantage at halftime and a 41-26 lead entering the fourth period. Patriot improved to 7-6 overall and 2-1 in the Cedar Run District while Osbourn fell to 8-4 and 0-3. Elena Bertrand led Patriot with 12 points, Amoah had nine, Lauryn Moore had eight and Taylor Booker had six.

PHOTO BY DOUG STROUD

Osbourn’s Love Delaney tumbles toward the basket as Battlefield’s Sarah Smith looks on.


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Prince William Times | January 15, 2020

Manassas Ballet takes tribute ballet to Maryland ‘Colin: Son, Marine, Hero’ onstage in Rockville Sunday, Jan. 26 By Christina Brooks Contributing Writer

Amy Grant Wolfe, Manassas Ballet Theatre’s artistic director, is preparing to take her signature and very personal ballet, “Colin: Son, Marine, Hero,” to the Bender Jewish Community Center in Rockville, Maryland. The ballet is the story of Wolfe’s son, Colin Wolfe, who lost his life in Iraq to a roadside bomb in 2006. In 2013, Mark Menza, a composer and Amy Wolfe’s longtime friend and colleague, approached her about composing a musical piece for MBT that was patriotic and in memory of her son, Colin. This led to the birth of a one act ballet about his life, and it caught the attention of the worldwide media. News agencies around the world, including NPR, BBC, and Czech TV, responded with great enthusiasm, and many called for an expansion of the ballet to include more details. After touring the one act ballet to Bakersfield, California, Wolfe went back to Menza to collaborate on composing additional music to expand the ballet. The full-length ballet debuted in November 2014 at the Hylton Performing Arts Center after Amy Wolfe, gathering inspiration by interviewing Colin’s commander and fellow Marines during the summer of 2014, added new layers to the original heart of the story.

If you go:

“Colin: Son, Marine, Hero” 3 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 26 Kreeger Auditorium, Bender Jewish Community Center 6125 Montrose Road, Rockville Tickets: $20 Website: www.manassasballet.org Phone: 703-257-1811, 301-348-3714 In May 2018, the ballet was presented once again at the Hylton Performing Arts Center. In that audience were two Israeli women from Rockville. They were so touched and moved by the ballet and felt it needed to be shared with their community, especially those in the Jewish community. The ballet depicts three central aspects of Colin Wolfe’s life: the discipline he developed from studying ballet as a child and teenager; his love and pride of his Judaism; and his call to serve his country. Colin Wolfe grew up dancing with the Manassas Ballet Theatre, performing each year through 2005. A visit from Marines while in elementary school inspired him to join the service, a decision that was solidified after the terrorist attacks of 9/11. In June 2005, Colin Wolfe enlisted with the Marine Corps, graduating that September. “Colin became a Marine because he was passionate about making the world a better place,” Amy Wolfe said. The younger Wolfe was deployed to Iraq in July 2006. He was killed by a roadside bomb only seven weeks later on August 30, 2006.

Scenes from “Colin: Son, Marine, Hero.” Christina Brooks is part of Manassas Ballet Theatre, a 501c(3) nonprofit corporation founded in 1983 whose mission is to improve the quality of life in Northern Virginia

by providing accessible and affordable professional ballet performances, educational outreach and the highest level of training to the serious student.

Volunteers needed to count the homeless The annual Point in Time Count, sponsored by Prince William County and the Prince William Continuum of Care, happens Jan. 22. The Point in Time survey is an annual count of persons experiencing homelessness on a single night each year in January as required by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Prince William County Department of Social Services is the lead for the Prince William Area Continuum of Care, which includes the areas of Prince William County and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. Register online at http://pwacoc. eventbrite.com. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old, must be comfortable with technology and must be available the night of Jan. 22, from 6 p.m. to midnight. In the event of inclement weather, the back-up date is Jan. 23. Volunteers must also be available for training on Jan. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Community outreach volunteers are needed for the Prince William census. Volunteer trainings are Tuesday, Jan. 14, 7-8:30 p.m. at the Ferlazzo Building

MARY FOLEY

and Thursday, Jan. 16, 7-8:30 pm at the Sudley North Center. Making sure the census is correct will only improve our community. Please visit www.pwcgov. org/census to learn more. Habitat for Humanity is having its first volunteer day on Jan. 23 to renovate a home in Manassas. Please sign up on the website at: www.habiatpwc.org. The Joe 15 Team is having its annual blood drive in memory of Joe Page on Jan. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Manassas Church of the Brethren. Please sign up at: www. redcrossblood.org; search for keyword “The Joe 15 Team.”

The Kennedy Center invites volunteers age 40 and under to its second annual Carrying the Torch Forward Service Day. Please email Jessica at: volunteers@kennedy-center.org to learn more. Novant Health UVA Health System needs volunteers at its three gift shops. Please register online at: www. novanthealthuva.org/giving/volunteering/novant-health-auxiliary.aspx or call 703-369-8173 to learn more. The Warrior Retreat needs volunteers to assist with snow removal this winter. Please email Sarah at: sarah.ford@willingwarriors.org to learn more. Keep Prince William Beautiful invites you to adopt a spot near you. It’s a great way to spruce up your neighborhood. Please email Laura at: ltalbert@kpwb.org to learn more. The Alzheimer’s Association is looking for support group facilitators to help participants develop coping skills, share valuable info, give caregiving tips and more. Preferred skills include professional health

care experience, experience working with people affected by Alzheimer’s, comfort with expression of emotion and good listening skills. Please call Ben at 703-766-9007 to learn more. The Martin Luther King Community Choir needs children in grades K-12 to sing in the choir. Rehearsals are Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. in Manassas and Jan. 18 at the Hylton Memorial Chapel. This program concludes on Jan. 20 at the 30th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Oratorical Program. Please email pwc.mlkcommunitychoir@gmail.com to learn more. The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program is looking for volunteers age 55+ to drive veterans or spouses to their doctor’s appointments. It’s very easy to help these individuals get the care they need while remaining in their homes. RSVP members receive a mileage reimbursement and additional insurance coverage at no cost to the volunteer. Please call Jan at 571-292-5307 to learn more.


12 LIFESTYLE

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

UPCOMING EVENTS JAN. 15 – 21, 2020 Wednesday, Jan. 15

Census 2020: 2-3:30 p.m. For adults. Earn extra income while helping your community. Potomac Community Library, 2201 Opitz Blvd., Woodbridge. Free. English Conversation: 7-8:30 p.m. For adults. Speakers of all languages are welcome. Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, 14870 Lightner Road, Haymarket. Free.

Thursday, Jan. 16

Veteran Connect Networking Event: 5-8 p.m. For those who served active duty, military spouse, veterans and civilian entrepreneurs. Brew Republic Bierwerks, 15201 Potomac Town Place, Woodbridge. Free. Passport Acceptance Services: 3-7 p.m. For all ages. Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, 14870 Lightner Road, Haymarket. Free.

Friday, Jan. 17

Jim Steele Live: 2-6 p.m. Farm Brew Live, 9901 Discovery Blvd., Manassas. Tickets available. Wil Gravatt Live: 6:30-10:30 p.m. Farm Brew Live, 9901 Discovery Blvd., Manassas. Tickets available.

Saturday, Jan. 18

PWC Libraries Closed All Day: Dale City Neighborhood Library, Dumfries Neighborhood Library, Independent Hill Neighborhood Library, Lake Ridge Neighborhood Library, and Nokesville Neighborhood Library. Crime and Punishment at Brentsville Courthouse: 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre, 12229 Bristow Road, Bristow. $5 per person, free for children under 6. Meet the Poet Reception: 6-9 p.m. Featuring local poet and photographer JoAnn Lord Koff. Center for the Arts, 9419 Battle St., Manassas. Free. Children’s Day at the Museum: 1-3 p.m. Children can make pinecone bird feeders. Crafts and snacks. Weems Botts Museum, 3944 Cameron St., Dumfries. Free.

Sunday, Jan. 19

History in Your Hands: 1-3 p.m. A program for visitors of all ages who are blind or have low vision. To register call 703-432-8455. National Museum of the Marine Corps, 18900 Jefferson Davis Highway, Triangle. Free. Free Book Talk: 1:30-2:30 p.m. Author Jenny Masur will talk about her book “Heroes of the Underground Railroad Around Washington, D.C.,” Manassas Museum, 9101 Prince William St., Manassas. Brent Peterson Live: Noon-4 p.m. Farm Brew Live, 9901 Discovery Blvd., Manassas. Tickets available. Larry Thomas Live: 4:30-8:30 p.m. Farm Brew Live, 9901 Discovery Blvd., Manassas. Tickets available.

Monday, Jan. 20

Prince William County Libraries: Closed for Martin Luther King Day. Dr. Martin Luther King Oratorical Competition: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Hylton Memorial Chapel, 14640 Potomac Mills Road, Woodbridge. Free Admission Day: All day. Entrance

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Oratorical Competition will take place Monday, Jan. 20 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Hylton Memorial Chapel, 14640 Potomac Mills Road, Woodbridge.

fees are waived, come and enjoy the park. Prince William Forest Park, 18100 Park Headquarters Road, Triangle. Ice Skating: Noon-8 p.m. Harris Pavilion, 9201 Center St., Manassas. $9 adults, $8 child (10 and under), $6 skate rental.

Tuesday, Jan. 21

U.S. Colored Troops and Black Confederates: 8:30 p.m. For adults. Presentation by Dr. Eugene Betit. Register by calling 703-792-4540. Bull Run Regional Library, 8051 Ashton Ave., Manassas. Free. Passport Acceptance Services: 3-7 p.m. For all ages. Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, 14870 Lightner Road, Haymarket. Free. 9th Annual Prince William County Public Schools Student Exhibition: 10 a.m. Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Circle, Manassas.

Ongoing Events

We, The Marines: The film will show daily every hour on the hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. until Jan. 3, 2021. Action packed film where audiences will experience becoming and serving as a member of the U.S. Marine Corps. Narrated by Academy Award winning actor and Marine, Gene Hackman. National Museum of the Marine Corps, Medal of Honor Theater, 18900 Jefferson Davis Highway, Triangle. $5 per person. Native Legacy-The Patawomeck Indians of Virginia: On display until Feb. 23. Learn how the first people to settle this area lived. Reproduction tools, sketches by 17th century artist John White, and other objects will illustrate the life of the Native peoples who lived here for thousands of years before Europeans arrived. Manassas Museum, 9027 Center St., Manassas. Free. John Grunwell Exhibit: On display until Jan. 18. Featuring the art of John Grunwell, multi-media artist and muralist with work in private and public collections throughout the United States and abroad. Hylton Performing Arts Center, Buchanan Partners Art Gallery, 10960 George Mason Circle, Manassas. Free. Camera Eyes: On Poetry: On display until Feb. 5. Featuring local poet and photographer, JoAnn Lord Koff. Cultivates a visceral connection between JoAnn’s original, timeless photographic images and the heartfelt vision within her accompanying poems. Center for the Arts, 9419 Battle St., Manassas. Free.

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13

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Senior Living Winter 2020

• Aging in place • It’s not too late to travel • New year, new you

The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes. Frank Lloyd Wright


14

SENIOR LIVING

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Chapter one

Reading is good for the body, mind and spirit By Anita Sherman Community Editor

“I loved it.” “I liked it too … it was sweet.” “What … I’m the lone voice but I don’t get it … A 70-year-old woman decides to approach her neighbor about spending nights with her?” Laughter erupted among the women sitting at the table in The Open Book, an independent bookstore on Main Street, in mid-December. Co-owner Cammie Fuller was among them. The occasion was the monthly gathering of the adult book club that Cammie created just after the store opened last summer. December’s read was “Our Souls at Night” by Kent Haruf. The book is short and was a good selection for a busy month. The theme – a senior couple finding love and friendship in a small town – sparked lots of conversation. The group ranges in age, professions and personal interests. But our common thread is a love of reading

FROM WHERE I SIT ANITA SHERMAN and discovering new authors; the list of possibilities is long. I credit my mother for my lifelong pleasure of picking up a new book. Many of my memories of her are her sitting comfortably in the living room or on the front porch during the summers engrossed in a good read. She introduced me to Carlos Castaneda when I was in my 20s – that was a surprise. And Wallace Stegner was another of her favorites. My older sister is currently rereading and discovering other titles by John Steinbeck. Walt Whitman. Isabel Allende. Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Ernest Hemingway. John Grisham. James Patterson. The list is endless, and the mind travel limitless.

One of my best friends is eagerly awaiting the ninth in the Outlander series of books by Diana Gabaldon. Fighting ageism, Ashton Applewhite has written a manifesto of sorts, “This Chair Rocks,” that kicks back against aging stereotypes and inspires those of us over 60. Popular author Judith Voirst, who delighted many of us, and our children, with “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” shares her wit, humor and empathy in “Suddenly Sixty (and other shocks of later life),” a funny and touching book that speaks directly to the 60-ish woman, inviting us to laugh, sigh and come to terms with the challenges of new decades in life. She goes on with “I’m Too Young To Be Seventy (and other delusions)” where she explores our sex lives and status of our teeth in addition to the joys of being a grandparent. Several of the women in the book club have shared that they have stacks of books bedside, another stack in the living room and books

on tape for when they are traveling. For those of us who share in the joys of being a bibliophile, know that you are in good company and that reading is not only good for your soul but adds to our years of living healthier. I found some stats that say good reading habits not only preserve our mental faculties but enable folks to live independently longer. My mother lived to be 93. Sadly, her eyes wouldn’t cooperate toward the end so her ability to read was interrupted, but her mind never faltered. Her journals over the years are filled with books that she was reading or wanted to read. As we enter a new year, let’s keep those books piling up. Reading is proven to enhance our memories, sharpen our decision-making skills, possibly delay the onset of Alzheimer’s and dementia, reduce stress and help us sleep better. So, read on! Reach Anita Sherman at asherman@fauquier.com

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SENIOR LIVING

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

To sell or not to sell

15

Moves to consider before making a change

By John Hagarty

Contributing Writer

The memories may be decades deep. A litany of holiday and family celebrations, neighborhood friendships, favorite nearby shops and restaurants and a deep connectedness that comes from the bond forged between couples and their home. But time moves on and often owners are compelled to move with it. Yards that need regular attention, maintenance of living spaces larger than needed, and health issues that make navigating stairs, rooms and basements a challenge; any or all of these can make a move necessary. Many couples delay the decision as long as possible. Understandably so. The mere idea of tossing away years of accumulated stuff, packing endless boxes of possessions and relocating to a smaller home or townhouse can force a decision to the backburner.

But there are alternatives

A growing strategy for maintaining the status quo is aging in place. Some researchers believe that employing relatively modest changes can keep older homeowners nestled next to their hearth for years. Advanced planning can start with an assessment of major home repairs that are looming. Is the roof more than 20 years old? Are the heating and air-conditioning units past their prime? Are some rooms ready for a new paint job? The point is to invest in the home with the goal of avoiding large expenditures in the later years. This has the collateral benefit of emotionally reinforcing that the home will continue to be a safe and sound refuge. Next, consider the balance of selling with the expense of seeking outside help with home maintenance and personal care. It can be difficult shelling out money for yard and landscape work when it’s a task that’s always been the purview of the homeowner. But eliminating the worry of maintaining an attractive home can be worth the added expense of a seasonal contract for property maintenance. Employing in-home caregivers and housekeepers may seem like a luxury, but if the money is available, it may be worth spending. Commercial maid services cover the gamut of cleaning services ranging from dusting, vacuuming, washing dishes, cleaning bathrooms and more. While cleanliness is next to godliness it’s also next to happiness. Employing outside and inside home services strengthens the commitment to

COURTESY PHOTO

According to statistics from AARP, nearly 90% of those age 65 and older want to stay in their own homes as they age. age in place. Visiting Angels, for instance, is a private duty network of reasonably priced non-medical home care agencies providing in-home care, respite care, personal care and companion care. The company has an office in Culpeper. Betsy Walker, a northern Culpeper County resident, recently employed Visiting Angels to help her and her husband Fred during her recovery from hip surgery. “My caregiver has been my lifesaver. The moment she enters the house she gets busy working. She has adapted to my routine. It’s a wonderful local service. We are lucky to have such caring people to call upon,” says Walker. The budget for such expenditures may come from previous expense items. Vacations, auto travel and dining out tend to be less frequent as folks age. These monies can shift from the pleasures of the past to the security of having increasingly stronger in-home support systems. Beyond any additional expenses, there may be opportunities to have family and friends pick up some of the slack. Is there a friend, son or daughter that might swing by occasionally to wash hair, give a permanent, clean gutters, etc.? Seniors should not feel guilty calling on people who they’ve supported in the past. Finally, online shopping for home-delivered groceries, prepared meals and the ubiquitous Amazon one-click world are other strategies making life easier during the golden years.

When it’s time

When declining health increasingly affects daily living, a move

may be inevitable. Work together as a couple to make sure there is agreement on what the next move will be. The goal is to make the shift on your terms and not be forced into a quick or ill-considered decision. While choices may seem to be limited, there are options: • Moving to a small home, condo or apartment. • Choosing to live in a retirement community. • Selecting a continuing care retirement community. The third option has the benefit of a move that can include an eventual nursing home environment, if the need arises. Once a decision is made to move, prepping is important. Begin by making a room-by-room assessment of what needs to be moved, what can be sold and what can head to the dump. There are services that are available to make the process easier. Home junk-removers are plentiful and can make the odious task as easy as pointing and saying, “That goes, that goes and that goes.” Boom. Done. An effective way to brace for moving day is to start pitching stuff

today. Start small. Regularly look for opportunities to toss out what’s not needed. If you have not worn a garment in more than a year, there’s a good chance you will never don it again. Donate it. Begin with cleaning out the garage, closets and the basement. These can be difficult areas of the house to tackle since often they contain years of accumulated detritus. Momentum builds when discarding; the more you do, the easier it gets. Regularly donating clothing items to charitable organizations, along with serviceable home furnishings creates a mindset that if it’s not being used, it needs to be moved out. It also makes the ultimate move easier since there are fewer things to deal with. Life might be like a car transitioning through its gears. As one accelerates through the early years the shifts are fast and furious. But when a couple hits the back roads of retirement, they should consider dropping into easy riding overdrive and ease off the pedal -- time to relax and enjoy the view. To see more business and wine tales, visit Hagarty-on-wine.com

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SENIOR LIVING

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Let’s start off the new year right Let’s think about positive aging Every day, around 10,000 baby boomers turn 65. When we think of old age, we tend to envision a frail, ill, or sleepy person napping in a rocking chair. However, these beliefs only serve to propagate the widespread misconceptions of aging that ultimately lead to ageism. Contrary to popular belief, there is no typical “older personality.” Here are some common myths and misconceptions about older adults as outlined by Donald E. Riesenberg, M.D., in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Older people aren’t interested in the outside world.

The over-65 age group uses the internet -- a lot. Far from being passive television-watchers, more than 100,000 individuals over age 50 participate in the nonprofit Road Scholar experiential learning program each year to better understand other cultures around the world.

Older people don’t want or need close relationships.

We are social creatures. Families, tribes, teams and whole organizations have a better chance of survival and actually thriving when they are socially connected. The need for meaningful re-

from adversity has been demonstrated many times.

AGING TOGETHER

Mental and physical deterioration are inevitable in old age.

ELLEN PHIPPS lationships does not diminish with age. Maintaining social relationships allows older adults to reap numerous rewards: intellectual challenges, maintaining information processing skills, feedback and just plain sharing of feelings.

Older people contribute little to society.

With years of personal skills and professional expertise, older adults are highly valued employees, colleagues and volunteers. Senior Corps has more than 200,000 volunteers age 55 and older who contribute to their communities by tutoring, helping small businesses, assisting in placing foster children, providing fellow seniors who are homebound with companionship and help with daily tasks, and participating in other valuable endeavors. Older workers have a strong work ethic and are great mentors and models for younger generations.

As you age, you get more set in your ways.

Older people tend to have high levels of mental resilience. The older generation’s ability to accept and rebound

There is a certain amount of loss of function as we age, but much can be done to prevent (or at least slow down) the physical and mental aging processes. Weightlifting helps retain muscle and bone integrity. Aerobic exercise and diet lessen the chances for physical and mental deterioration. Exercising the brain and continuously learning help to fight cognitive decline.

Older people are impoverished.

According to a Congressional Research Service report, “The poverty rate among Americans aged 65 and older has declined by almost 70 percent in the past five decades.” However, certain groups are still struggling financially. For example, the poverty rate among aged African Americans in 2017 was 19.3 percent and the poverty rate among the aged Hispanic population was 17 percent. Being on a fixed income as inflation takes its toll is a liability for older folks.

Older people are not interested in sex or intimacy.

This myth has persisted largely due to sexual activity and sexual health among seniors being infrequently discussed and studied. A 2017 University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging asked a national sample of adults

ages 50 to 80 about their perspectives on sex and relationships. The results showed that nearly two in three respondents (65 percent) were interested in sex, and most (76 percent) agreed that sex is an important part of a romantic relationship at any age. Forty percent of respondents indicated that they were still sexually active.

Older people can’t make good decisions about important issues.

Age brings wisdom. Cognitive skills are based on a lifetime of experience and education.

Older adults lose their desire to live.

Older folks become more accepting of death when they have some sense of control over it. A comfortable and controlled environment is desired by most, regardless of age. Well people want to live and live well. No one who is mentally stable desires to shorten his or her life. Aging Together supports positive aging. If you are interested in becoming involved with Aging Together either as a vital team member or volunteer, please contact us. Upcoming Local Events: Dementia Friends Training in Warrenton; Veterans Fair; 5 Over 50. For information please visit www.agingtogether.org or, 540-829-6405 Ellen Phipps is the executive director of Aging Together. Reach her at ephipps@agingtogether.org or 540321-3068.

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Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

It’s not too late to travel

17

There are a lot of options available for bus tours focused on senior travelers. If you’ve reached retirement, now is the perfect time to travel. You’ve worked hard, your responsibilities have shifted, and your time is more flexible. So, let’s talk travel! As a travel advisor, I am familiar with the many “hot spots” for seniors; there are many. One popular choice for senior travel is a train ride through Canada and the Rocky Mountains. These trips treat you to beautiful scenery and top-of-the-line service. Some of my senior clients chose a bus/ train tour in Canada because their baggage is handled by attendants, transportation is provided, and most meals are covered. All they have to do is show up and enjoy the ride! Ocean cruising is another great option. With ports in Baltimore, New Jersey and New York, getting to the ship is fairly easy for us on the East Coast. Even leaving out of Florida is an easy non-stop flight, and it’s convenient to set up all the transfers to get you from the airport to the port. A lot of seniors like the option of cruising because the ships have great entertainment and food, along with shopping and casinos. Each port has many senior-friendly excursions and tours available, but you can always choose a relaxing day on the ship.

ALESIA HOUSE Besides vacationing on ocean liners, many seniors enjoy river cruising, either in the United States or Europe. If you prefer Europe, a non-stop flight from Dulles to Amsterdam is readily available. Once in Amsterdam, you’ll be greeted in the airport by your cruise line representative. They’ll walk you to your transportation that takes you directly to your river boat. Then you can unpack, relax and prepare to see some amazing sites. If you sail the Rhine through Germany, you’ll see incredible castles and quaint little towns. Each stop has guided tours available that are set up for different ages and levels of activity. The Rhine also enables you to see France and Switzerland as well. River cruises offer many itinerary options; it’s simply a matter of finding which one you’d like. If Europe is too far, try a river cruise right here in the states. There

are many to choose from, even a seven-day seafood-themed cruise on the Chesapeake. You could also opt to see the Great Lakes, the Mississippi, San Juan Islands, Canada, the Columbia and Snake Rivers, or more than 121 more places! Bus trips across the country are popular as well. The wonderful thing about each of these options is that any type of assistance is available: scooters, wheelchairs, oxygen, etc. Whatever the case may be, assistance and accommodations can be

easily made. Don’t let anyone tell you that it’s too difficult to travel, and don’t disregard that one place you have always wanted to go. Make 2020 your year to travel. Alesia House is a local travel concierge who can plan and orchestrate all the details of your vacation. Her goal is to help clients have stress-free vacations that will create lasting memories. Contact alesia@ ibooktravelforu.com or www.ibooktravelforu.com.

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Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Newspapers in Education

Teachers deliver valuable information through our Newspapers in Education Program. From art, math, social studies, to local events, the creative lessons our teachers present using the Prince William Times makes it an indispensable teaching tool...a living textbook enabling students at all levels to develop good reading skills while gaining an understanding of their community and the world around them. Thank You to our Prince William Times Newspaper in Education Partners for providing newspapers to Prince William County classrooms every week.

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OMNIRIDE.com • (703) 730-6664 Half-fares on this route are funded by the Virginia Department of Transportation and the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation to mitigate congestion

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Half-fares on this route are funded by the Virginia Department of Transportation and the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation to mitigate congestion along I-66 during the Express Lanes construction project.

Half-fa Depar of Rail along


19

REAL ESTATE WWW.PRINCEWILLIAMTIMES.COM

Prince William Times | January 15, 2020

Enjoy country living in Catlett

Elegance at its best is the best way to describe this lovely home as it sits on a hill overlooking 9-plus acres. It has been meticulously cared for and boasts more than 3,600 square feet of living space. Invite your family and friends over for an outdoor cookout and relax on the large deck while watching nature that is abundant. If you are an animal lover, bring them! There is lots of area here for a horse or two. The master bedroom has two large windows that let in the all-natural light that is perfect for curling up with a blanket and your favorite book. The master bath also has a separate room for your vanity so you can get ready while the shower is in use. The large work out/craft room/ nursery attached over the garage is

a completely finished area with endless possibilities. Enjoy making a big Sunday breakfast in the large country kitchen with lots of cabinets and counter space and separate dining room. Spend some downtime relaxing with family in one of the two living areas, a formal living room and an extra-large family room with gas fireplace. This beautiful home, at 1503 Grace Estates Drive, Catlett, offers four bedrooms with two and a half baths. It is close to Quantico and Garrisonville for an easy commute. Call today to schedule an appointment to see country living at its finest! Brenda Rich  Century 21 New Millennium 540-270-1659

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of Virginia’s policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Commonwealth. We encourage and support advertising and marketing programs in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, age, familial status, or national origin. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Virginia and federal fair housing laws, which make it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, or elderliness, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.   For more information or to file a housing complaint, call the Virginia Fair Housing office  at 804-367-8530 or toll-free at 888-551-3247. For the hearing impaired, call 804-3679753. EMAIL: fairhousing@dpor.virginia.gov WEBSITE:dpor.virginia.gov/fairhousing

THE NATALIE AND CURT TEAM

December is YEAR a30 great MARKET LAST DAYS time HAPPY NEW FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS! to sell! January checklist to organize your home #1- As you take down holiday decorations, keep, toss or donate old ornaments. Store lights around a paper towel roll so as they don’t tangle

20136 – Bristow 52 Homes Sold $260-655,000

Middleburg Farm for Sale: Country Estate offered on 44 or 102 private acres. The 5 bedrooms, 5 baths modern farmhouse is designed to take full advantage of the setting and views of the Bull Run Mountains. Open floor plan is perfect for entertaining. Luxury master suite with fireplace is on the main level. Great options for a home office with highspeed internet available. Outdoors; large screened porch, flagstone patio, pergola and firepit surrounded by beautiful gardens and landscaping with a peaceful pastoral and mountain backdrop. Outbuildings include a shop, storage build and 4 bay oversized equipment garage. For more information contact Toni. VALO356874 44.9ac $2,700,000 or VALO357382 102.5ac $3,800,000

7608 Lakota Road Remington, VA 22734 (540)937-3887

farms • fine homes country living

Happy New Year

National Marketing. Local Expertise

Toni Flory 866-918-FARM

www.ucpiedmont.com

#2- Clean all Appliances inside Out. Active Vacuum Refrigerator 51and Homes $340-699,000 underneath and rear coils. Wash and clear off the screen inside your dishwasher, clean microwave vent and the stove exhaust fan screens. 20155 Gainesville 69 Homes Sold $230-995,000 Get dryer vent cleaned out to prevent clogging and potential fire and 106 Homes Active $189-3.8M wash inside your clothes washer. #3. Grout and tile needs annual maintenance keep$175-1.15M it looking fresh. 20169 Haymarket 38 HomestoSold

92 Homes Active $270-1.5M

Less For contractors or Competition maintenance vendors,Serious just call orBuyers email us.

CALL TODAY A PERSONAL ANALYSIS! HomesFOR Show Beautifully atMARKET the Holidays

plus Mandy, Coco & Casey at Long and Foster NatalieandCurt.com

Call us today Creating Clients to get started for Life.

NatalieandCurt.com info@NatalieandCurt.com 703-200-4703 Main Office 571-261-1400 info@NatalieandCurt.com 7526 Limestone Drive, Gainesville NatalieandCurt.com 703-200-4703 Main Office 571-261-1400 7526 Limestone Drive, Gainesville

info@NatalieandCurt.com 703-200-4703

7526 Limestone Drive, Gainesville

Main Office 571-261-1400


20

OBITUARIES

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

OBITUARIES Richard Lee Pressley

Annie Lee Yates

Richard Lee Pressley, 69, of Warrenton, Virginia, passed January 9, 2020. A memorial service will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. Online condolences can be given at www.joynesfuneralhome.com

Annie Lee Yates, 79, of Manassas, Virginia, passed January 4, 2020. Funeral services were held on Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11:00 am at Joynes Funeral Home, 29 N. Third St., Warrenton, Virginia. Online condolences can be given at www.joynesfuneralhome.com

Margaret E Shell Margaret E Shell, 95, passed away on Saturday Jan. 4, 2020. She and husband Eugene were longtime residents of Warrenton. Margaret was an avid sports woman, participating in golf, tennis, swimming, flying her own plane, and horseback riding. She was a member of the Casanova Hunt for many years. Margaret is survived by her children; Martha Jones of Martinsville, VA and Jeff Shell of Fayetteville, NY. Also a granddaughter; Jessica Baum (Brian) and five great grandchildren, all of Phoenix, AZ. A graveside service will take place on Friday, January 10, 2020 at 1:00PM, at Hillcrest Memorial Gardens in Jeffersonton, VA. Arrangements by Moser Funeral Home, Warrenton, 540-347-3431, online condolences can be made at: moserfuneralhome.com

Peter Van Deman Peter Van Deman, 79, of Marshall, passed away at Fauquier Hospital on Jan 7, 2020. Pete was born in Nashville, TN on Nov 26, 1940, to Frank E. Van Deman and Kathryn Ayers. He was owner/agent of Van Deman Insurance Agency for 41 years. After his 2-day retirement, he became the principal broker/coowner of Fauquier Realty. Pete moved to Marshall with his family when he was 12. He graduated from Marshall High School in 1959 and attended Bridgewater College. He served his country in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve. He was a charter member of Boy Scout Troop 177, a Charter/Life member of the Marshall Vol. Fire & Rescue Dept., a Charter member of The Fauquier Citizens Academy. He served on the Board of Directors of The Fauquier Heritage Society, a Life Member of the Fauquier Lions Club, a member of Cochran Masonic Lodge, Past President Randy Carter Chapter Float Fishermen of VA, Eastern VA Surf Fishing Team, Ocracoke Island Realty Surf Fishing Team and N.C. Beach Buggy Assoc. Pete was a member of Marshall United Methodist Church. He is survived by Marge, his wife of 37 years and his beloved children, John Nalls (Dana), Susan Owens (Frank) and his grandchildren, Lauren Owens, Thomas, David, Brigid, Steven and Karen Nalls; his niece, Judy Russel and his grandniece, Elizabeth Payne and his grandnephew, Zac Payne. Pete’s great love was fishing and spending as much time as possible on a river or beach. He loved carpentry and worked on many rehab projects with both the Marshall United Methodist Church Mission Team and with “Miss” Anne Davis’ mission projects at Pine Ridge Native American Reservation in So. Dakota. He was predeceased by his parents, his brother, Frank Van Deman, his nephew, Chuck Van Deman and his niece, Stacy Payne. A Celebration of Life will be held at Marshall United Methodist Church, 8405 W Main St., Marshall, VA 20115 on Jan. 18 at 11:00 a.m. A reception will follow at the Marshall Ruritan Bldg. Memorial contributions may be made to Marshall Vol. Fire & rescue Dept., P.O. Box 225, Marshall, VA 20115. Arrangements by Royston Funeral Home, Marshall, VA. Please visit www.roystonfh.com to express online condolences to the family.

Frances Eileen Rhodes Frances Eileen Rhodes, age 79, of Berkeley Springs, WV formerly of Manassas, VA died on Tuesday, January 7, 2020 at her home. Born September 5, 1940 in Washington, DC she was the daughter of the late Ashby Nelson USN and Dorothy Mildred Poole Butler. She is survived by her husband of 61 years, Wayne Rhodes, one daughter, Cynthia Lynn Rhodes of Gaithersburg, MD, two sons, Bryan Keith Rhodes of Boston, VA and Duane Michael Rhodes of Warrenton, VA, one sister, Linda Jean Robinson of Sterling, VA and one brother Wayne Ashby Butler of Point Venture, TX, six grandchildren, Matthew Hamilton Rhodes of Jacksonville, NC, Erica Jean Rhodes of Falls Church, VA, Kellen Elizabeth Rhodes of Manassas, VA, Selena Alexandra Michelle Rhodes of Jacksonville, NC, Jarod Alden Horner of Gaithersburg, MD and Mason Thomas Rhodes of Manassas, VA. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her infant son Anthony James Rhodes and two grandchildren, Conner Michael Rhodes and t Lauren Ashly Rhodes. Family will receive friends on Saturday, January 11, 2020 from 2-4. Services and interment will be private. Arrangements by Hunter-Anderson Funeral Home, 36 South Green Street, Berkeley Springs, WV.

Donald Ray Embrey Donald Ray Embrey, 69 of Sumerduck, VA passed away on Jan. 6, 2020 at Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. He was born on July 19, 1950 in Fauquier County, VA a son of the late William and Pauline Heflin Embrey. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by two brothers, Thomas and Larry Embrey. Mr. Embrey owned and operated Donald Embrey Seamless Guttering and lived for his business. Mr. Embrey loved to hunt, fish, and spend time at the beach and he loved his family tremendously. He was a member of Sumerduck Ruritan Club. He is survived by his wife to whom he was married on June 21, 1974, Mary Novak Embrey; two children, Angel Patterson and Jeremy Embrey both of Sumerduck; two sisters, Hazel Cooper and Donna Sue Compton; and four grandchildren, Austin Embrey, Kainen Patterson, Isaiah Patterson and Kevin Myers. The family received friends from 4-6 PM Sunday, Jan. 12 at Moser Funeral Home, Warrenton. Funeral services were held on Monday, Jan. 13 at 1:00 PM at Mt. Carmel Baptist Church, 12714 Elk Run Road, Midland, VA by Rev. M. Peyton Embrey. Interment will follow at Sumerduck Baptist Church Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Sumerduck Ruritan Club. Online condolences may be made at www.moserfuneralhome.com.

“It’s not the length of life but the depth of life” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Share your loved one’s story. 540-351-1664 | www.PrinceWilliamTimes.com


CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

21

PRINCE WILLIAM

CL A SSIFIEDS ADVERTISING DEADLINES: Business Directory: Thursday at noon, All other Classified ads: Monday at 3 p.m. To place your ad, Call: 540-351-1664, Toll Free: 888-351-1660, Fax: 540-349-8676, Email: classifieds@fauquier.com Business Opportunities Well established Fredericksburg area window treatment business for sale. Extensive customer base, turnkey, owner retiring. $35,000.00. Reply: PO Box 9144, Fredericksburg, Va. 22403

001

Rentals — Apartments

261

Miscellaneous Wanted

350

Business Services

Hagan Build & Design. Specializing in basements but we do it all! 540-522-1056. Free estimates, licensed and insured.

605 Automobiles - Domestic

2012 Nissan, 73K mls, $3500.

703-380-5901 GOOD CONDITION! 640

Charming 1 BR apt, eatin country kitchen, porch, W/D, garden, historic Old Town Warrenton. $1225/mo inclds some utlities 540-270-3062 Antiques &

200 Collectibles Beatles memorbiliapicture, black & white (60´s), albums, 45´s & magazines.571-3444300

WANTED FREON

R12. We pay CA$H. R12 R500 R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. 312-827-6204 refrigerantfinders. com/ad Musical

262 Instruments

Elvis memorabilia, Yankee memorabilia, Celtics Merch, Hot Wheels/Matchbox cars 571-344-4300

45 RPM record collection, orginial 50´s/ 60´s. Approx 3000. Va r i o u s p r i c e s . 571-344-4300

Frank Sinatra, JFK, MIchael Jackson, Redskins, & sports books & mags. Michael Jordon mini chanpionship basketballs + magazines. 571-344-4300

45 RPM records (lots of 50) 0.50-$1.00 ea, comics $2+ ea, beanies $2+ ea, pez $1+ ea, 571-344-4300

220

Farm Equipment

Ford 7700 Farm Tractor Asking $8000. Call 540-292-1242 After 4 pm

224

Acoustic Guitar - 2010 C F Martin D-28 and hard shell case. Like new. $1800. Owner has too many guitars and will sell cheap. dwmartin695@gmail. com Record albums $5+ ea, Sports Illustrated mags incld swimsuit $5+ ea, Old books $7+ ea, Snoppy merch $1+ ea, 571-344-4300

Firewood

273 1 rack, seasoned firewood, $50 per rack. You pick-up. 5136 Steward Rd, Bealeton/ Sumerduck area. 540-878-9044

FIREWOOD

seasoned hdwood, $200/ cord + delivery more then 15 m l s f r o m Nokesville.

B E S T P R I C E S AROUND!! 703-577-1979

256

Miscellaneous For Sale

Genie Garage Door Opener, 1/2 HP, chain dirven with wired rail, extra wiring, sensors, switch, 2 remotes & misc hardware. $40. 540-428-0038 Olympic merch $2+ ea, Sports cards $3+, playing cards $3+ ea, Disney Merch $3+ ea, 571-344-4300

Pets

Prince William SPCA

ADOPT VOLUNTEER DONATE ADVOCATE www.pwspca. org

JBS Excavation & Clearing, Free estimates, tree removal, horse arena, d r i v e w a y s & landscaping. No job too big or too small. 703-582-0439 JENKINS EXCAVATING & LOGGING. Free Estimates, Class A Contractor, Commercial, Residential. Demolition, land clearing, site prep, roads, drives. 540-661-0116 NO SWETT CARPENTRY & REMODELING. FOR ALL YOUR HOME REPAIR AND REMODELING NEEDS. 540-522-5577

N U T T E R S PA I N T I N G & SERVICES Call Erik, 540-522-3289

376

Addison´s Building & Remodeling. Additions, basements, b a t h r o o m s , sundecks, repairs. Licensed Insured. 540-244-2869 Design/build services. New, renovations, additions for residential. Commercial renovations & tenant uplifting. Licensed & i n s u r e d . 540-428-3050 www. s o u t h s t a r construction.com Remodels; New Homes; Windows; Painting; Garages; B a t h r o o m s ; Kitchens; Decks;. Class A. Lic & insured. GMC Enterprises of VA, LLC. 540-222-3385

385

350

Business Services

For all your heating and cooling needs. Rc´s AC Service and Repair, 540-349-7832 or 540-428-9151 G R AV E L : A L L PROJECTS. Topsoil; fill dirt; mulch. No job too small.540-8254150; 540-219-7200 GUTTERS, FREE ESTIMATES.Jack´s Seamless Gutters. 703-339-6676 or 540-373-6644. We keep our minds in the gutter. ADS WORK Call 540-347-4222

Home Improvement

Lawn/Garden

GORMANS TREE AND LANDSCAPING SERVICES. Seasonal Clean up. Snow removal, grinding, mowing, take downs. Free estimates. 540-222-4107; 540-825-1000 Total Lawn Care, home services. Cranium Services giving you peace of mind. Call Glenn 571-839-8495; glenn@ craniumservices. com; cranium. services.com

Ads Work Call a Rep Today Call 347-4222

Motorcycles

’06 HONDA GOLDWING TRIKE 1800 series, 1 owner, 12,000 miles, like new. Call 540-298-8128 or 540-421-9509. 2003 Hyosung GV250 Motorcycle ($800). Vtwin engine with dual exhaust; Garage kept; low mileage; new battery; needs minor work to get up and running as it’s been unused for 3 years. E-mail nefaunt@aol.com YAMAHA - VW TRIKE will trade for car or motorcycle. As is. REDUCED TO $5000.00 Firm. 540-221-1302.

675

Trucks/ Pickups

1995 F150 4.9L 224k mls. New oil change, replaced rear fuel tank 2 yrs ago, tune up, new shocks, wipers, asking $1500 cash only or cashier check. 540-454-4884 2005 FORD F250 SuperDuty 6.0L Turbo Diesel. 4x4, insp. May. 51K, garage kept, great tow vehicle (13,500#). ARE cap. $15,000 obo. Call 434-589-1420.

Place an Ad They WORK! 888-351-1660

490

Public Notices

Announcements Did you know...

Prince William Public Library offers... Digital Library, some of our newer/ more popular digital resources include: o Creativebug o Lynda.com o Hoopla o OverDrive (Libby) o Newspapers pwcgov.org/library

ABC Licenses {Full name(s) of owner(s):} WHISTLE PIG CIDERY, LLC Trading as: WHISTLE PIG CIDERY 3704 Sanders Lane, Catharpin, Prince William, Virginia 20143-1023 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY For a Class A Farm Winery license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. James A. Lough, President NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license must be submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.

Full name(s) of owner(s):

T & N LLC Trading as: MANASSAS PARK EXXON 8500 Centreville Road, Manassas Park, Prince William, Virginia 20111-2357 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a BEER AND WINE OFF PREMISES license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Tajammal Ali NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license must be submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc. virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.

The Prince William County Floodplain Administrator, in accordance with National Flood Insurance Program regulation 65.7(b)(1), hereby gives notice of Prince William County’s intent to revise the flood hazard information, generally located between the confluence of Dawkins Branch and a point approximately 6,670 feet upstream of Sudley Manor Drive. Specifically, the flood hazard information shall be revised along Broad Run from a point approximately 1,190 feet downstream of Linton Hall Road to a point approximately 6,670 feet upstream of Sudley Manor Drive. The flood hazard information shall be revised along Rocky Branch from the confluence with Broad Run to approximately 3,820 feet upstream of the confluence with Broad Run. The flood hazard information shall be revised along Piney Branch from the confluence with Rocky Branch to approximately 1,250 feet upstream of the confluence with Rocky Branch. As a result of the revision, the floodway shall widen and narrow, the 1% annual chance water- surface elevations shall increase and decrease, and the 1% annual chance floodplain shall widen and narrow within the area of revision for Broad Run. There is no revision in the floodway along Rocky Branch. The 1% annual chance water surface elevation shall decrease, and the 1% annual chance floodplain shall widen and narrow along Rocky Branch. The 1% annual chance water surface elevation shall decrease, and the 1% annual chance floodplain shall widen and narrow along Piney Branch. Maps and detailed analysis of the revision can be reviewed at the Prince William County Floodplain Administrator’s Office at 5 County Complex Court, Woodbridge, Virginia 22192. Interested persons may call the Prince William County Floodplain Administrator, Raj Bidari, at (703) 792-7078 for additional information within two weeks from the date of this publication from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

Legal Notices Classified ADS Work!

490 ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ145488-05-00; JJ14548905-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re CORBIN, SOPHIE ANN; CORBIN, SKYLAR DANIELLE The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF SOPHIA CORBIN (D.O.B. 9.14.16) BORN TO SARAH CHRISTINE NEFF AND OSCAR CORBIN; II; AND SKYLAR DANIELLE CORBIN (D.O.B. 8.13.13) BORN TO SARAH NEFF AND OSCAR CORBIN; II It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) SARAH NEFF appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/19/ 2020 10:00AM Justine Bailey, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices

490

Legal Notices

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147883-01-00; JJ14788201-00; JJ147881-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re PADILLA, GABRIELA BLANCA; PADILLA, KIARA A; PADILLA, JOSHUA ELIAS The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF GABRIELA BLANCA PADILLA; PADILLA, KIARA A; JOSHUA ELIAS PADILLA It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) MARISOL A PADILLA appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/ 2020 10:30AM Keshara Luster, Deputy Clerk

Classified Has It! Place Your Ad TODAY 540-347-4222 or FAX 540-349-8676


22

CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Legal Notices

Advertise in the classifieds.

keep it classy

540-351-1664 540-349-8676 (fax) classifieds@fauquier.com


CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

23

Legal Notices Public Notices

Free Prince William County House for Deconstruction/Salvage · · · · ·

All required permits to be obtained, and all work completed at contractor’s sole cost and expense Contractor may keep all materials salvaged from site Must enter into Salvage Contract with additional terms and conditions Submission Deadline: February 4, 2020 For full details contact salvage@vfnlaw.com

Legal Notices

490

Legal Notices

490

Legal Notices

MANASSAS PARK VOTERS OFFICIAL VOTING INFORMATION The deadline to register to vote for the March 3, 2020 Democratic Primary is February 10, 2020, the office will close at 5:00pm on that day. Voter Registration is located at City Hall, One Park Center Court. City Hall will be open on Saturday, February 29, 2020 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm for the convenience of registered voters who need to vote an absentee ballot. February 29, 2020 is the last day for this election on which qualified applicants may vote by absentee ballot. All Virginia voters will be required to present photo identification when they come to vote. For more information, call Manassas Park Voter Registration at (703) 335-8806.

Legal Notices

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ123639-02-00; JJ12366002-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re HUNT, KIRSTEN MICHELLE; HUNT, QUINTIN The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF KIRSTEN MICHELLE HUNT; QUINTIN HUNT It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) CHRISTIAN HUNT appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/24/ 2020 10:30AM Keshara Luster, Deputy Clerk

The Prince William County Board of Zoning Appeals will hold a public hearing on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 2 p.m. in the Board of County Supervisors’ Chambers, James J. McCoart Administration Building, 1 County Complex Court, Prince William, Virginia on the following case: Variance Request Case #VAR2020-00014, Earl P. Basher To consider a request for a variance from the provisions of Section 32-300.03 of the Prince William County Zoning Ordinance to allow construction of a detached accessory garage building, exceeding the maximum allowed aggregate gross floor area, in a front yard of a lot less than 3 acres containing a one-family dwelling in the A-1, Agricultural zoning district; GPIN 7791-18-9541; located at 9614 Leeta Cornus Ln., Nokesville, VA 20181in the Coles Magisterial District E-Mail Address: planning@pwcgov.org Internet: www.pwcgov.org Copies of the above file can be viewed in the Planning Office, 5 County Complex Ct., Ste. 210, PW, VA. Copies of staff reports may be requested after 1/17/2020, viewed @ www.pwcgov.org/planning or by contacting us @ 703-792-7615 or emailing planning@pwcgov.org. ACCESSIBILITY TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: The hearings are being held at a public facility believed to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Any person with questions on the accessibility of the facility should contact the Planning Ofc. @ the above address & No., or TDD (703) 792-6295. Persons needing interpreter services for the deaf must notify the Clerk no later than 1/17/20. Run Dates: January 15 and January 22, 2020

ADS WORK! Call

Your

Rep

TODAY! 540-347-4222 or FAX 540-349-8676

Legal Notices

Classified Has It! Place Your Ad TODAY

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS ONE COUNTY COMPLEX COURT PRINCE WILLIAM, VIRGINIA 22192 January 21, 2020 Public Hearings 2:00 p.m. 1.

Authorize Condemnation and Exercise Quick-Take Powers to Acquire a Temporary Construction Easement on Property Located at 10900 George Mason Circle, Owned by Comcast Cablevision of Virginia, Inc. in Connection with the Innovation Pedestrian Project: To receive comments on authorizing condemnation and exercise quick-take powers to acquire a temporary construction easement on property located at 10900 George Mason Circle in connection with the Innovation Pedestrian Project – Brentsville Magisterial District – Transportation

2.

Authorize Conveyance of 0.7677 Acres of Abandoned Right-of-Way Adjacent to Hornbaker Road to Sweeney Barns, LLC: To receive comments on authorizing the Prince William County Department of Transportation to request the Board of County Supervisors to convey 0.7677 acres of abandoned right-of-way adjacent to Hornbaker Road to Sweeney Barnes, LLC – Brenstville Magisterial District – Transportation

3.

Authorize Condemnation and Exercise Quick-Take Powers to Acquire Property and Easements on Property Located at 14405, 14431 and 14493 Gideon Drive and 14139, 14500 and 14651, Potomac Mills Road in Connection with the Smoketown-Opitz Pedestrian Improvements Project: To receive public comments on authorizing condemnation and exercise quick-take powers to acquire property easements on property located at 14405, 14431 and 14493 Gideon Drive and 14139, 14500 and 14651 Potomac Mills Road in connection with the Smoketown-Opitz Pedestrian Improvements Project – Neabsco and Occoquan Magisterial District – Transportation

540-347-4222 or FAX 540-349-8676

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING COMMISSION TOWN HALL, 15000 WASHINGTON STREET, ST. 100 HAYMARKET VA 20169 JANUARY 21, 2020 - 7:00 P.M. Notice is hereby given that the Haymarket Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing for a Special Use Permit at 14850 Washington Street and 14860 Washington Street and 6701 Hunting Path Road, to permit 38 townhouse units by special use permit. All interested parties are encouraged to present their views at these hearings. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday, January 21, 2020, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Haymarket Town Hall, 15000 Washington Street, Suite 100, Haymarket, Virginia. All are invited to attend the Public Hearing at the time and place described above and present their views pertinent to the requested Special Use Permit. Public comments can also be mailed to 15000 Washington Street, Suite 100, Haymarket, Virginia, 20169, or submitted via email to khenry@townofhaymarket.org. A complete copy of the application for the Special Use Permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours at the Town Planner’s Office of the Town of Haymarket immediately upon the advertising of this notice, The Public Hearing is being held in a public facility believed to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Any person with questions on the accessibility to the facility should contact the Clerk of the Council at the above address or by telephone at (703) 753-2600. BY ORDER OF THE HAYMARKET PLANNING COMMISSION Run date: January 15, 2020

Classified

For additional information, contact Andrea P. Madden, Clerk to the Board of County Supervisors, at 703-792-6600. You may appear at the Board of County Supervisors’ Chamber in the McCoart Building, One County Complex Court, Prince William, Virginia, at the designated time to express your views. ACCESSIBILITY TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: The hearings are being held at a public facility believed to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Any persons with questions on the accessibility of the facility should contact Andrea P. Madden, Clerk to the Board, at One County Complex Court, Prince William, Virginia, or by telephone at (703) 792-6600 or TDD (703) 792-6295. Persons needing interpreter services for the deaf must notify the Clerk to the Board no later than Thursday, January 16, 2020. Run Dates: January 8 and January 15, 2020


24

CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147869-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re REYES REYES, KAREN MELISSA The object of this suit is to: PETITION FOR CUSTODY OF KAREN MELISSA REYES REYES It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) SANTA ABIGAIL REYES appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/20/2020 10:30AM Abby Cook, Deputy Clerk

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147932-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re PADUA, TIAGO MANUEL The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF TIAGO MANUEL PADUA It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) WALTER GUZMANappear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/ 2020 10:30AM Stephanie Wilson, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147800-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re RIVERA, JOSE NOEL The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF RIVERA, JOSE NOEL It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) GERMAN MENJIVAR LOZANO appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/27/2020 10:30AM Theresa Robinson, Deputy Clerk

Notice is hereby given that PODS Enterprises, LLC will sell the contents of certain containers at auction to the highest bidder. Credit/Debit card payment only accepted. Auction will be held online at www. StorageTreasures.com starting on January 15, 2020 and ending January 22, 2020 at 10:00am. Contents to be sold may include general household goods, electronics, office & business equipment, furniture, clothing and other miscellaneous property.

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147954-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re FELDER, DERRION DOMINIQUE The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF DERRION FELDER D.O.B.2.10.18 BORN TO ORRIANA RENEE LEWIS It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) UNKNOWN FATHER appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/25/ 2020 10:00AM Justine Bailey, Deputy Clerk

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ146711-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re MONTOYA AVALOS, MARLIN NAYELI The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF MARLIN NAYELI MONTOYA AVALOS It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) JENNI ARACELY MONGE appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 01/15/2020 10:30AM Abby Cook, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147865-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re ARGUETA COCA, JENNIFER The object of this suit is to: DETERMINE CUSTODY OF THE MINOR CHILD JENNIFER ELIZABETH ARGUETA COA, DOB 01/10/2003 It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) ELMER ARGUETA appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/27/ 2020 10:30AM Abby Cook, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147933-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re OLIVARES CALVI, JOSELYN G The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF JOSELYN G. OLIVARES CALVI It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) GUSTAVO OLIVARES BARILLAS appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/2020 10:30AM Stephanie Wilson, Deputy Clerk

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ146628-02-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re DAVENPORT, CAYLIB JIAIR The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF DAVENPORT, CAYLIB JIAIR It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) BLECKER, MALAYA appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/11/ 2020 10:00AM Theresa Robinson, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147933-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re OLIVARES CALVI, JOSELYN G The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF JOSELYN G. OLIVARES CALVI It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) JULIETA CALVI ANDIA appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/ 2020 10:30AM Stephanie Wilson, Deputy Clerk

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ110992-04-02 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re GOLLO, REGINA SELASI The object of this suit is to: MODIFY VISITATION OF GOLLO, REGINA SELASI It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) EMMANUEL GOLLO appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/11/ 2020 10:30AM Keshara Luster, Deputy Clerk

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147678-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re GOMES, SAMARA MI’ANGEL The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF SAMARA MI’ANGEL GOMES It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) DONNELIA CADISE RICHARDSON appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/14/2020 10:00AM Helen Cisler, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147931-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re JIMENEZ, JEFFREY JAXIEL The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF JEFFREY JAXIEL JIMENEZ JIMENEZ It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) JOE JENNIFER JIMENEZ JUAREZ appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/2020 10:30AM Stephanie Wilson, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147930-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re MAYS, DEVON DEVONTE, JR The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF DEVON MAYS JR It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) DEVON MAYS appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/18/ 2020 10:30AM Stephanie Wilson, Deputy Clerk

Legal Notices ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 CASE# JJ147953-01-00 PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY J&DRJUVENILE ( ) General District County (X) Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re WHYMS, KAYLIE C (DOB 6.11.12) The object of this suit is to: OBTAIN CUSTODY OF KAYLIE C WHYMS It is ORDERED that (X) the defendant (X) UNKNOWN PARENT appear at the above-name Court and protect his or her interests on or before 02/21/ 2020 10:00AM Justine Bailey, Deputy Clerk


CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

Legal Notices Legal Notices

PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING FEBRUARY 5, 2020 7:00 PM 1.

2.

3.

Special Use Permit #SUP2020-00011, Potomac Pediatric Dentistry: To allow a sign modification to add one additional facade sign on the front of a tenant space. The site is identified on County maps as GPIN 8289-49-3098; is addressed as 16708 Jefferson Davis Hwy (Suite 115 & 117); is zoned B-1, General Business; is designated ER, Environmental Resource, and SRH, Suburban Residential High, in the Comprehensive Plan; and is located in the Route 1 Highway Corridor Overlay District and the Potomac Communities Revitalization Plan. Potomac Magisterial District Agricultural and Forestal Districts AFD2019-00002, Farmview Enterprise, LLC.: To modify the Agricultural and Forestal District AFD #91-1 to add ±4.05 acres per VA Code Sec. 15.2-4307. The property fronts Farmview Rd., and is located ± 290’ southwest of the intersection of Farmview Rd. and Rt. 28. The site is addressed as 13209 Farmview Rd.; is identified on County maps as GPIN 7493-17-8304; is zoned Agricultural; and is designated Agricultural or Estate in the Comprehensive Plan. Brentsville Magisterial District Agricultural and Forestal Districts AFD2019-00003, TCB Land Management LLC.: To modify the Agricultural and Forestal District AFD #91-1 to add ±80.17 acres per VA Code Sec 15.2-4307. The property is located ±1400’ south of the intersection of Rt. 28 and Farmview Rd. between the railroad tracks and Nokesville Park. The site is addressed as 13063 Hickerson Ln.; is identified on County maps as GPIN 7493-35-9065; is zoned Agricultural; and is designated Agricultural or Estate and Environmental Resource in the Comprehensive Plan. Brentsville Magisterial District

25

Employment Micro Assembly Technician

Small Charlottesville company is currently accepting resumes for a Micro Assembly Technician. Two years Electronics technician degree or equivalent/similar is preferred. Experience working under a microscope with microelectronics if preferred. Retirement and health benefits provided. EOE. Send resume as pdf to: electech2@gmail.com

Millimeter-Wave Engineer

Small Charlottesville company is currently accepting resumes for a Millimeter-Wave Engineer. BScEE Preferred. Job involves RF Engineering activities related to the production and testing of 100-1000GHz Transmitters and Receivers. Recent grads are encouraged to apply. Retirement and health benefits provided. EOE. Send resume as pdf to: rfengineer2@gmail.com

PT Medical Admin

with exp. in bookkeeping and HR needed for home health care agency. Knowledge of QuickBooks preferred. Must be mature and professional. Call 540-341-0212 for more information and to schedule interview.

Administrative Assistant

FT, M-F, Marketing Company located in Warrenton is seeking a Administrative Assistant to join our team. Qualified applicant must be highly organized, with excellent administrative & computer skills, ability to work independently & multi-task in a fast paced environment.

E-mail cover letter & resume to: Resume@infocusmarketing.com Or Fax to: 866-708-5478 Micron Technology, Inc. has openings for Probe Equipment Engineers in Manassas, VA. Support probe manufacturing needs and prepare the probe area for cost effective parametric and functional probe equipment solutions to meet capacity and availability requirements. Mail resume to Nate Burt, 4000 N Flash Drive, MS 2-702, Lehi, Utah 84043. Please reference Job #10878.2013.

QUALITY SPECIALIST Flaggers Full time, to provide traffic control & safety around construction sites. A valid driver license & clean driving record a must. Starting $13/hr & scheduled raises. Company-paid medical & dental premiums.

Please fill out an application at careers.trafficplan.com or come to our office Tuesdays or Thursdays (8am-10am).7855 Progress Ct., Suite 103; Gainesville, VA

Small Charlottesville business is currently accepting resumes for a Quality Specialist. 2-year degree beyond high school is preferred. Responsibilities include incoming QC, inspections using microscope and supplier management. Must be able to read machinist drawings, use measurement gauges, and have basic knowledge of Office software. Retirement and health benefits provided. EOE.

Send resume as pdf to: qualityspecialist2@gmail.com

Copies of the above files can be viewed in the Planning Ofc. @ 5 County Complex Ct., Ste. 210, PW, VA. Copies of staff reports may be requested after 1/29/20, or you can view reports @ www.pwcgov.org/planning or contact us @ (703) 792-7615 or email us @ planning@pwcgov.org. For the full list of items scheduled for this agenda see www.pwcgov.org/pc. ACCESSIBILITY TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: The hearings are being held at a public facility believed to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Any person with questions on the accessibility of the facility should contact the Planning Ofc. @ the above address & No., or TDD (703) 792-6295. Persons needing interpreter services for the deaf must notify the Clerk no later than 1/29/20. Run Dates: 1/15/20, 1/22/20

590 Jobs Wanted

Looking for someone to snow plow three short driveways on an asneeded basis. 5 miles from downtown Warrenton and Marshall in Bellevue. Please text 202 210 0950 It took 6 YEARS to graduate. Find a job in about 6 MINUTES. Times Classified 347-4222

GENERAL ASSIGNMENT REPORTER Virginia’s top community newspaper (2018) is looking for an experienced general assignment reporter. Breaking news, public safety, agriculture, environmental issues, local politics and education are all topics that need to be covered in this largely rural -but never boring -- central Virginia county. Looking for a strong fulltime writer with a persistent news focus, to file stories for a weekly print paper and robust website. Best candidate will live or relocate to Fauquier County or nearby. Fulltime salary and benefits. Send resume and cover letter, plus at least ten news clips to: Robin Earl, managing editor, Fauquier Times – rearl@fauquier.com. Call 540-272-1852 with questions.


26

CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

BUSINESS SERVICE DIRECTORY Heating and Air Conditioning

Builder

Excavation

Lawn

For all your

Heating and Cooling

Lawn Maintenace • Planting • Mulching Bed Design • Spring/Fall Cleaning • Seeding Aeration • Dethatching • Top Soil • Sod Fertilization Programs • Trimming/Pruning Gutter Cleaning • Debris Removal

needs, call on

RC’S A/C SERVICE & REPAIR (540) 349-7832 or (540) 428-9151

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Cleaning

Lawn

Paint/Faux Finishes

Gutters Construction

SEAMLESS GUTTERS Free Estimates

JACK’S SHEET CO, METALINC. 703-339-6676 5, 6, 7, 8 AND ½ GUTTER SIZES. COLORS AVAIL., HIDDEN HANGERS, GUTTER GUARDS, ALUMINUM & COPPER

“We keep our minds in the gutter!” Since 1966

Home Improvment Carpentry

Driveways

G RAVEL ALL PROJECTS

  We deliver days, evenings and even weekends!

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Nutters Painting & Services – SPECIALIZING IN – • Painting (Int&Ext) • Roofing/Repairs • Siding • Gutters • Drywall • Carpentry

• Fencing • Vinyl Trim & • Gutter Cleaning Fascia Wrap • Bathroom • Brickwork • Pressure Washing Remodeling • Deck Water Sealing • Crown Molding • Yard Maintenance • Tree Removal

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Home Improvment

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 

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 

Landscaping Mowing, Lawn Maintenance, Trimming, Topping, Spraying, Removal, Stump Grinding, Mulching, Pruning, Cabling, Planting, Grading, Seeding, Power Washing, Retaining Walls, Patios, Walkways

540-923-4087 540-214-8407

Licensed & Insured Free Estimates All major credit cards accepted

GEORGEDODSON1031@GMAIL.COM

www.DODSONTREECAREANDLANDSCAPING.com

Masonry


CLASSIFIEDS

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

27

BUSINESS SERVICE DIRECTORY Power Washing

Windows Cleaning

Tree Service/Firewood

Remodeling

POTOMAC WINDOW CLEANING CO.

WINDOW CLEANING: Inside & Outside • By Hand • Residential Specialist POWER WASHING: No Damage, Low Pressure. Soft Brushing By Hand • Removes Dirt On Brick, Concrete, Wood & Siding

CHASE FLOOR WAXING SERVICE

 

Family Owned & Operated for 30 Years | Working Owners Assures Quality & Knowledgeable Workmanship

703.777.3296 | LICENSED • BONDED & INSURED

Moving/Storage

Classified Ads Work Call 347-4222

Power Washing

Tile T&J Ceramic Tile, Inc.

LICENSED & INSURED • FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

Free Estimates • Installation & Repair • Residential & Commercial • New Homes or Remodel Work

Tim Mullins (540)439-0407 • Fax (540)439-8991 tandjceramictile@comcast.net www.tandjceramictile.com

Tree Service/Firewood Pet Services

Roofing Tree Service/Firewood

Tree Service/Firewood THIS COULD BE YOUR AD! CALL 540-347-4222 OR FAX 540-349-8676

FIREWOOD SEASONED HARDWOOD, $200/CORD PLUS DELIVERY MORE THAN 15 MILES FROM NOKESVILLE.

Roofing

SNOW PLOWING YARD CLEAN UP 703-577-1979

Tree Service/Firewood

Tree Service/Firewood CHARLES’ TREE SERVICES Family Owned Since 1970

LOT CLEARING • TOPPING • TRIMMING • MULCHING EDGING • FERTILIZING • TREE REMOVAL • SPRAYING

ALSO SEASONAL SPECIAL ON FIREWOOD Call for prices on Seasoned Firewood. Load or Cord.

Painting/Wallpaper

Delivery Avail.

If you want a Classy Job call ...

Cell: 540.422.9721  “A Country Boy’s Dream”

Painting & Decorating, LLC

INSURED - BONDED - LICENSED

• Home painting & carpentry repairs • 30 years of hands on experience • Small company with personal service

Tree Service/Firewood

Free Consultations & Estimates. Creative • Professional • First Class Painting Services

NORTH'S TREE SERVICE & LANDSCAPING

Call today! 540-349-1614 or 703-444-7255 Fully licensed & Insured

Painting/Wallpaper Piedmont Painting

Remodeling

* Free Estimates * Many References * Drywall & Plaster Repair

Family Owned & Operated for Over 30 yrs. Quality Work Guaranteed CALL ABOUT - COMPLETE TREE SERVICE OUR

- ALL PHASES OF LANDSCAPING - All phases of Masonry - Gravel & Grading Driveways - Fencing Honest and Dependable

25% OFF SPECIALS

540-533-8092

Free Estimates • Lic/Ins • BBB Member • Angie’s List Member

540-364-2251 540-878-3838 LICENSED & INSURED

Advertise Here and Watch Your Business GROW

Professional Services Fauquier Community Food Bank & Thrift Store Donations - No Monday Tues - Friday 9:00 - 3:00 Sat 9:00 - 1:00 249 E. Shirley Ave. Warrenton, VA 20186 540-359-6054 Fauquier_thrift@yahoo.com


28

Prince William Times | www.princewilliamtimes.com | January 15, 2020

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