a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

GET INVOLVED GUIDE: BRANDS, WHOLESALERS, RETAILERS, DISTRIBUTORS Your guide to getting involved in Fashion Revolution Week 2020

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


We are Fashion Revolution. We are designers, academics, writers, business leaders, policymakers, brands, retailers, marketers, producers, makers, workers, trade unions and fashion lovers. We are the industry and we are the public. We are world citizens. We are you.

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


1 mobilisation: social mobilisation seeks to facilitate change by encouraging and enabling a significant number of people to engage in interrelated and complementary efforts.

advocacy: advocacy in all its forms seeks to ensure that people, particularly those who are most vulnerable in society, are able to: 2

1. Have their voice heard on issues that are important to them. 2. Defend and safeguard their rights. 3. Have their views and wishes genuinely considered when decisions are being made about their lives.

systemic: relating to an entire system, as opposed to a particular part. 3

We campaign for a clean, safe, fair, transparent and accountable fashion industry. We do this through research, education, collaboration, mobilisation1 and advocacy2. The issues in the fashion industry never fall on any single person, brand, or company. That’s why we focus on using our voices to uproot the entire system. With systemic3 and structural change, the fashion industry can lift millions of people out of poverty and provide them with decent and dignified livelihoods. It can conserve and restore our living planet. It can bring people together and be a great source of joy, creativity and expression for individuals and communities. We believe in a global fashion industry that conserves and restores the environment and values people over growth and profit.

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


click tlo trave

Contents

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


Photo: Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev

@fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev

fashionrevolution. fashionrevolution.


org org

@fash_rev @fash_rev @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev fashionrevolution.org fashionrevolution.org fashionrevolution.org @fash_rev

@fash_rev fashionrevo


Fashion Revolution week happens every year in the week surrounding the 24th of April. This date is the anniversary of the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse. Rana Plaza, a building in Bangladesh, housed a number of garment factories, employing around 5,000 people. The people in this building were manufacturing clothing for many of the biggest global fashion brands. @fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Over 1,100 people died in the collapse and another 2,500 were injured, making it the fourth largest industrial disaster in history. The victims were mostly young women. To read more about the Rana Plaza disaster and the formation of the Fashion Revolution movement, visit our website: www.fashionrevolution.org org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


#fashionrevolution

Current estimates suggest that 150 billion new garments are produced annually.

Source: Sustainable Apparel Materials, 2015. @fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Consumption Global fashion consumption continues to gain speed at unsustainable levels and relies on a culture of disposability. Around the world, we produce too much clothing, from harmful materials, much of which ends up incinerated or in landfill. We must rethink the nature of fashion consumption, adopting new ways of engaging with fashion, and calling on brands to rethink linear business models, honouring those who make our clothes and treasuring the clothes we own.

click to travel

Actions: Increase the lifespan of your products, host a clothes swap org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


#fashionrevolution

Producing plastic-based textiles uses approx. 342 million barrels of oil each year.

Source: Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2017 @fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Composition The textiles we wear are made from precious natural resources and generate massive environmental impacts in their production. Plasticbased materials that now comprise the majority of our clothes are shedding microfibres into waterways and endangering human health and nature’s ecosystems. And, many of the fibres we wear use harmful chemical processes in dyeing and finishing, which comprises the health of worker and wearer.

Actions: Respond to #whatsinmyclothes, review policies & commitments org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


#fashionrevolution

77% of UK retailers believe there is a likelihood of modern slavery in their supply chain.

Source: Hult Research & Ethical Trading Initiative, 2016 @fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Conditions From child labour on cotton fields to trafficking and forced labour in the garment industry, the fashion supply chain routinely exploits some of the most vulnerable people. We are calling for deeper transparency to help end modern slavery and uphold the human rights of everyone in the fashion supply chain.

Actions: Respond to #whomademyclothes, review brand policies & commitments org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


#fashionrevolution

Over 90% of workers in the global garment industry have no possibility to negotiate their wages or conditions.

Source: IndsutriALL @fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Collective action From gender inequality to environmental degradation, the fashion industry continues to exploit people and resources. What we can’t achieve alone, we can champion together. When people join together their voices are amplified. This is as true for workers in the supply chain as it is for activists and campaigners. We want to mobilise everyone to join together and make change.

Actions: Review policies & commitments, donate. org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Since Fashion Revolution started, people from all over the world have used their voice and their power to demand change from the fashion industry... And it’s working. The industry is starting to listen. We’ve seen brands being open about where their clothes are made and the impact their materials are having on the environment. We’ve seen manufacturers make their factories safer and more of the people in the supply chain being seen and heard. Designers are now considering people and planet when creating new clothing. Citizens are thinking before they buy. org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

But the story is far from over. We are only just getting started. We can’t stop until every worker who makes our clothes is seen, heard and paid properly and the environments they live and work in are safe. We can't stop until the culture of consumption is changed and we learn to love and appreciate our clothes and the people that made them.

Together, we will create a revolution.

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


TRANSPARENCY ACCOUNTABILITY CHANGE

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


We believe transparency is the first step to transform the industry. We don’t know enough about the impact our clothing has on people and planet. While we are seeing companies share their policies and commitments on human rights and the environment, there is still much crucial information about the practices of the fashion industry that remains concealed. In our annual Fashion Transparency Index, we review and rank the biggest global fashion and apparel brands and retailers according to how much information they disclose about their suppliers, supply chain policies and practices, and social and environmental impact. We publish the results so brands can be held accountable, which we believe will lead to real change.

Read the latest Fashion Transparency Index

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


HOW TRANSPA WORLD’S BIGGEST

(2019 RE 10 brands (5%) score 0% in 2019

Average score is 53 out of 250 (21%).

60

NO. OF BRANDS

40

20

0

1-10

11-20

21-30

31-40

FINA

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


ARENT ARE THE FASHION BRANDS?

ESULTS) Not a single brand scores above 70%

 Only 5 brands score higher than 60%

41-50

51-60

61-70

71-80

81-90

91-100

AL SCORE (%)

TRANSPARENCY

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Action:

Respond to #WhoMadeMyClothes? / #WhatsInMyClothes? One of the simplest ways your brand can get involved is by using social media to answer your customers’ questions during Fashion Revolution Week. We’ve seen our #whomademyclothes hashtag grow year on year, with more people than ever asking this important question. More brands are listening and responding but some brands won’t answer at all. Some might tell us where their clothes were made but not who made them. Some will direct people to their corporate social responsibility policy. Only a few pioneers will show that they know something about the people who make their clothes. Let us know how you respond by tagging us at @fash_rev. In 2020, we are adding another layer to our quest for transparency by introducing the #whatsinmyclothes question and hashtag. With this, we hope to shed light on the story behind the materials and hidden substances that exist in our clothes. By improving the material and fibre literacy of citizens everywhere, we will empower more people to make informed decisions about the textiles they choose.

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


Action: Review your brand’s policies

and commitments

If a customer ask you these questions, prepare to get specific.

@fash_rev

Gender Equality

“What policies do you have in place to make sure harassment?”

Safe working conditions

“Do you conduct independent audits to every fact people who make your clothes? Do you have any

Fair pay

“Do you know how many workers in your supply c you working to ensure that all of the workers in yo

Modern Slavery

“Do you publish your 2nd (processing facilities) an organisations perform due diligence around mod

Water Contamination

“Do you published a ‘Restricted Substances List’? commitment?”

Waste + Landfill

“Do you incinerate your unsold stock? Do you sen to reduce pre-consumer and post-consumer was waste?”

Carbon Emissions

“Do you publish your annual carbon footprint, for y your carbon footprint? What is your target carbon

Animal welfare

“Do you publish an animal welfare policy? Do you sourcing transparency initiatives, including the Le Responsible Wool Standard?”

Ocean Plastic

“Do you have a strategy in place to eliminate plas your supply chain? Do you disclose what you are

Deforestation

“Do you source viscose and man-made cellulose Is your leather supply chain traceable to the raw m

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


We are asking citizens to follow up on responses from brands to help improve transparency around social and environmental policies. We’ve drafted some things for them to ask. Use these prompts to provide more information about your supply chain.

e women working in your supply chain don’t experience verbal, physical and sexual

tory you source from? Do you require mandatory fire & safety training for the programs or partnerships in place to improve worker health & safety?”

chain earn a living wage rate, as defined by Global Living Wage coalition? How are our supply chain can excerise their right to join a union?”

nd 3rd tier (raw materials) supplier lists to help NGOs and independent dern slavery further down the supply chain?”

? Do you adhere to the Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC)

nd returned items bought online to landfill? What practices do you have in place ste? What do you do with your offcuts, damaged goods and other supply chain

your own operations and your entire supply chain? Do you have a goal to reduce footprint by 2025? Do you offset your emissions?”

u source mulesing-free wool? Are you signed up to any animal welfare and animal eather Working Group, Responsible Down Standard, Traceable Down Standard or

stics from your packaging? Will you commit to eliminating virgin polyester from doing to reduce microfibre shedding from clothing?”

e materials from sustainably managed forests, through initiatives such as Canopy? material?”

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Action: Increase the lifespan

of your products

Fashion has a huge waste problem. In the UK, 38 million items of new clothing are bought every week and 11 million items go to landfill. The pressure to keep up with this rapid over-consumption has negative effects on the people making our clothes. Research from Clean Clothes Campaign estimates that, on average, employees in garment factories are typically made to work between 10 and 12 hours, sometimes 16 to 18 hours a day. When order deadlines loom, working hours get longer. Workers are often unable to turn down overtime due to the low wage they are paid and can, in some cases, be financially penalised if they dont take the extra hours. “Instead of designing for landfill, we must design for longevity, and encourage a generational and cultural shift that rely on keeping our clothes.“ - Orsola de Castro Design your products in a way that is meant to last and encourage your customers to care for their clothes, to keep them for longer, to repair them, swap them or upcycle them. By doing this, you are breaking this consumptiondriven cycle and you are showing customers that you respect the people in the supply chain, who’s skills and time are valuable and should not be exploited, and the natural resources that are grown, harvested, recycled or otherwise obtained to create the pieces you sell.

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Action: Host an event Hosting an event is a great way to engage with your customers in a unique and personal way. You can use the opportunity to find out more information about their wants and needs and how you can increase brand loyalty and trust. At the same time, you can showcase practices you are proud of and that show your commitment to bettering the system. Read our How To: Host an Event guide for some indepth info or see a list of ideas below.

Read ‘How To: Host an Event’ Some event ideas • Host a Film Screening • Host a Roundtable conversation or panel discussion • Host an exhibition • Hold a creative workshop such as a repair session or an upcycling activity • Host a clothes swap • If you’re within close poximity to your makers, you could host a ‘meet the maker’ event where customers can be introduced to the people that makes their clothes. If you do decide to host an event. Advertise it by uploading it to the event map on the Fashion Revolution website. You can download and print our free resources to display during your event and our posters and logos to brand and advertise your event. Make sure you tag as @fash_rev so we can see what you got up to. org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


WATCH

WATCH

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Action: Make a film A great way to show that you’re proud and passionate about transparency in your supply chain is to create a film showing us exactly that - your supply chain. You could follow the journey of one item, from raw material to finished product. Or make a factory, farm or mill visit and interview some of the people who make clothes for your brand. See some great examples of films created for past Fashion Revolution Weeks here.

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


DONATE

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


Action: Donate Fashion Revolution is a registered charity in England & Wales (No. 1173421). Donations are vital to our work - even the smallest contribution can help keep our movement going from strength to strength. Some ways to help support our cause: • Encourage your staff and customers to support Fashion Revolution by linking to our donation page on your website and social media platforms. • Make a company gift or donate a percentage of your online sales during Fashion Revolution Week to Fashion Revolution. As we are a registered charity (No. 1173421), a corporate gift from a UK company could qualify for tax relief. Please note though that Fashion Revolution does not endorse any Fashion Revolution branded products for resale or wholesale distribution so please do not use our logo or name on any merchandise. • Donate a portion of ticket sales if you are planning to host an event during Fashion Revolution Week. We have a handy donation envelope template available here. You can pay in donations on our donation page. • Allow your customers to make a donation to Fashion Revolution at your checkout using platforms like Paypal Giving Fund. PLEASE NOTE: Any donation over £5000 must adhere to our Ethical Funding Policy.

org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


Other ways to get involved

Read up Educate yourself on the issues and get inspired by new ways to help create change here.

Find your country Join your local Fashion Revolution team or group here and support your local Fashion Revolution Week campaign.

Spread the word Invite others to join you in taking part in Fashion Revolution Week. Find our social media assets, posters and campaign materials here.

Producer get involved guide Share this guide with farmers, producers & factories within your supply chain and encourage them to take part this Fashion Revolution Week.

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.


org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevolution.org

@fash_rev

fashionrevo


Help us keep our resources open source and free for all, so we can continue to drive change in the fashion industry and improve the lives of the people who make our clothes. DONATE

If you found this resource useful, please consider making a small donation of ÂŁ5/$5/â‚Ź5 to help us keep going. This publication was produced with the financial support of the European Union. Its contents are the sole responsibility of Fashion Revolution and do not necessarily reflect the views of the European Union.

Profile for Fashion Revolution

Get Involved Pack: Brands, Retailers, Wholesalers & Distributors  

This is your ultimate guide to taking part in Fashion Revolution Week 2020 if you represent a brand, retailer, wholesaler or distributor.

Get Involved Pack: Brands, Retailers, Wholesalers & Distributors  

This is your ultimate guide to taking part in Fashion Revolution Week 2020 if you represent a brand, retailer, wholesaler or distributor.