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Fall 2011


BOSS Black

HUGO BOSS FASHIONS INC. Phone +1 212 940 0600 www.hugoboss.com


Passion for Life 15MilMil15 Suit


CONTENTS

WE MAKE GLOBAL LOCAL FALL 2011 EDITORIAL PORTLAND MARIO’S MEN + WOMEN 833 SW Broadway Portland, OR 97205 503.227.3477 SEATTLE MARIO’S MEN + WOMEN 1513 6th Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 206.223.1461

MEN’S FASHION DIRECTOR Mario Bisio WOMEN’S FASHION DIRECTOR Lynwood Holmberg DESIGN / CONCEPT / PHOTO ART DIRECTION Steve Kennevan FASHION & PRODUCT PHOTOGRAPHY / COLOR Ryan McVay & Hank Drew / Ian Goode MARKETING MANAGERS Rachel Stroble & Lisa Hanninen HAIR & MAKEUP

BRIDGEPORT VILLAGE MARIO’S 3.10 17031 SW 72nd Avenue Tigard, OR 97224 503.601.7310

Shannon Rasheed & Tom Pollock CREATIVE & STORE DIRECTORS Patrick Angus & Patsy Carlson

FORUM FEATURE ARTICLES EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MARIOS.COM

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR Jillian Sprague

FEATURES 6 8 14 54 64 66

Locally Grown Hip Happenings Welcome Letter Profile: Luciano Barbera Design: Haute Hospitality Spirits: Cutting-Edge Cocktails

PROJECT MANAGER Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti PRODUCTION MANAGER Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS Hugh K. Stanton

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

FASHION 15 We Make Global Local 58 Life Is But A Dream 70 Style: The Finer Things

Stuart Nifoussi PRESIDENT AND CEO Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Christine Sullivan

DEPARTMENTS 50 Ask Mario 52 Ask Lynwood 72 In-Store Services

APPAREL FORUM ANDRISEN MORTON, DENVER, CO GARYS, NEWPORT BEACH, CA HUBERT WHITE, MINNEAPOLIS, MN KILGORE TROUT, CLEVELAND, OH LARRIMOR’S, PITTSBURGH, PA MALOUF’S, LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX MARIO’S, PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA

Fashion Forum Magazine is published in 12 regional editions for member stores of the Apparel Forum Copyright 2011.

MITCHELLS/MARSHS, HUNTINGTON, NY

Published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856,

MITCHELLS/RICHARDS, WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT

203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office:

OAK HALL, MEMPHIS, TN

1384 Broadway, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other

RODES, LOUISVILLE, KY RUBENSTEINS, NEW ORLEANS, LA

materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written

STANLEY KORSHAK, DALLAS, TX

permission of the publishers. Volume 14, Issue 2. Printed In The U.S.A

WILKES BASHFORD, SAN FRANCISCO/PALO ALTO, CA

Mario’s would like to thank everyone at the Melrose Market in Seattle, for welcoming us into their world. Learn more about this unique collection of shops and restaurants at melrosemarketseattle.com


Black Label

RALPH LAUREN BLACK LABEL


locally grown ore and more people in our communities are choosing to get their farm products from CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture). CSAs are a great way to support local farming and get fresh foods directly from the source. The way most CSAs work is that participating local farms each offer a certain number of shares to the public. Consumers buy a share (or half a share) of the farm’s production and in return receive a box (or bag or basket) of seasonal items each week throughout the farming season. Depending on the farm’s output, consumers can choose a CSA to suit their eating habits. Shares usually include produce and/or dairy, but other products including organic chickens, meats, homemade breads, fruits and flowers are sometimes offered. Many farms offer a choice in what shareholders can order.

CSAS IN OUR AREA INCLUDE: SEATTLE

PORTLAND

Garden Treasures Local Roots Nash’s Organic Produce New Roots Organics Seattle MicroFarm Spud! Seattle

Abundant Harvest Creature’s Farm Dundee Dirtbox Pacific Way Singer Hill Gardens Winona Farms

Check out ecovian.com or localharvest.org to learn more and find a CSA near you.

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BENEFITS TO THE FARMS When farmers run their farms as CSAs, it enables them to market their goods early in the year, before they become immersed in the farming season and its requisite 16-hour days in the field. Receiving funds from members prior to the season helps with a farm’s cash flow and gives farmers an opportunity to get to know the people who eat their foods. CSAs also allow farmers to share the risk with their communities; all benefit from high-yielding seasons and slightly leaner seasons are not as disabling to the farms.

BENEFITS TO CONSUMERS Shareholders get to enjoy very fresh food that has a quicker farm-to-table turnaround with all of the resulting flavor and nutritional benefits. They get to discover new vegetables and expand their culinary horizons. Shareholders often like to visit their CSA farm at least once each season, and often find that their kids start to favor food from “our farm”—even vegetables they’ve never been known to eat!

BENEFITS TO THE PLANET When you support a CSA, you’re helping to keep the environment around you healthy and thriving. CSA farmers and shareholders alike are community-minded. They enjoy the camaraderie associated with common goods and goals and find the whole process... fun! Together they support local hunger projects and avoid waste, as overproduction and anything that is not picked up gets sent to local food banks. Join the fun: become a member of your local CSA!


www.akris.ch


MAR.10 -Event

Brunello Cucinelli -Trunk Show

Hugo Boss - Event


The Row -Trunk Show with Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen

HIP HAPPENINGS Parties, People & Fashion

Portland Art Museum / Allure - Event


Lanvin Paris -Trunk Show

Young Presidents’ Organization - Event

Ermenegildo Zegna -Made-2-Measure Trunk Show


paulshark.it

MADE IN ITALY


Diesel Island´s Stupid Constitution is being written. Learn more at diesel.com


Hello, Fall! Our Northwest weather’s starting to change. It’s time to think about rich autumn colors, layers of soft cashmere and that amazing new coat you can’t wait to wear. Fashion feels inspired, yet authentic—a quality we especially appreciate having just celebrated our 50th anniversary. Because after all these years, we understand that you want a shopping experience that’s unique, fun and genuinely enhances your life. That’s why we travel the world—Milan, Paris, New York—to bring you our edit of fall’s finest. It’s how we make global local—and personal. In fact, we often collaborate with the most celebrated brands in fashion, tweaking their designs to better fit your needs and tastes, even your special occasions. If ever there was a season to live with passion and play with style, this is it. Enjoy!


Like an artisan marketplace, Mario’s brings you the world of fashion each season. And this fall, that means a bounty of fresh, wearable styles. Everything’s rich with texture and detail and ready to make your own.

WE MAKE GLOBAL LOCAL

Moncler AG Adriano Goldschmied 15


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CLASSICS REIMAGINED

Santoni

Paul Smith

Vintage


Loro Piana 17


Oscar de la Renta

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The Row

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DELICIOUS ACCENTS MAKE EVERY

Narciso Rodriguez

Faliero Sarti

Tina Negri

Manolo Blahnik

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Jason Wu


B.May

THING NEW

Irene Neuwirth

Veronica Beard 21


Gimo’s Hudson

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Etro

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Clare Tough

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Dean Harris

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Corneliani

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Hugo Boss

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Paul & Shark

Loro Piana

Ermenegildo Zegna

ITALIAN LUXURY + PERFORMANCE 28


Brunello Cucinelli

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Kiton Incotex

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Lanvin Paris

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PATTERNS WITH FLAIR

Alexander McQueen


Ermenegildo Zegna

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Ralph Lauren Black Label

Nina Ricci

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Isaia

MARIO’S GIFT CARDS ...always the perfect fit!

Emilio Pucci

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BOSS Black

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Vince

LAYER UP WITH TEXTURE 37


Rag & Bone

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> T S I L Y A L P R U O Y E K MA


Paige Premium Denim

Alberto Fermani

Alberto Fermani

AG Adriano Goldschmied

Hudson

Paige Premium Denim

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Edun

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L’Agence

Peter Cohen

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BOSS Orange

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Vince

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Agave Denim

Victorinox

Boglioli

PRPS Denim

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Levi’s Made & Crafted

Majestic 7 for all Mankind 45


L’Agence

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FANTASTIC FINISH


ASKMARIO Q:

My suits still fit and they don’t look worn: why do I need to buy new ones?

FALL 2011 FASHION WISDOM FROM ONE WHO LIVES IT

There are several barometers that indicate whether or not a suit is up-to-date: the shape and length of the jacket, the width of the lapels, the jacket’s button stance and back vents, the pleats in the trousers. Although change in men’s clothing is evolutionary rather than revolutionary, after a few years your old suits will start to look dated. For example, the length of a suit coat today is three to four centimeters shorter than it was just three years ago. (Our most fashion forward models are even shorter!) For fall 2011, the go-to suit is a trimmer, two-button, side-vented model with a somewhat shorter jacket, narrower lapel and flat-front trousers. (Of course there are fashion alternatives, e.g. peak lapels, three-button rolled to two…) If this isn’t what’s in your closet, come into the store and we’ll help update your look.

Q:

I just bought brown shoes. Can I wear them with my gray and navy suits?

We love brown shoes, whether leather or suede, oxfords or loafers, worn with almost any color suit or trouser, be it navy, gray or even black. (With black, choose a lighter shade of brown for the shoes.) Of course, black shoes are always appropriate for formalwear and with ultra-modern black suits, but other than that, brown shoes are a good match for almost everything you wear. Although it need not match exactly, your belt should generally be the same tone as your shoes. As for socks, the rule is they should match the tone of your trousers (but we say that certain rules can be broken). For less serious occasions, your socks can be colorful, whimsical, even conversational. It’s one of the few categories with which you can have some fun!

Q:

Why buy men’s clothing in a specialty store when so much is available online?

While shopping online can be tempting with all the so-called discounts, free shipping, etc., there are numerous caveats. First of all, not all designers produce the same quality goods for all accounts. So sometimes a designer shirt on a flash sale site or in an off-price outlet might be a different weight or last season’s color or a discontinued pattern vs. the “same” designer shirt in an upscale store. Second, in an independent specialty store, you’re dealing with not just sellers, but owners and wardrobe consultants and expert tailors whose reputation depends on making you look terrific. Third, we will always stand behind the brands and designers we carry so you’ll never get stuck with an impulse-purchase-gone-wrong. Finally, our talented buyers scout out fashion from around the globe, so in addition to a curated assortment featuring top designers and brands, you’re sure to find unique items you won’t see elsewhere. Come in and check it out!

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ASKLYNWOOD ADVICEFOR FALL2011 FROM MARIO’SFASHION GURU

Q:

I own a few scarves but am not sure how to wear them. Any ideas?

Q:

I love wearing fur but I’m never sure if and when it’s appropriate; please advise.

Scarves and shawls are bigger than ever for fall 2011, in cashmere, silk and blends. Fold a large square diagonally and drape it around your shoulders. (Keep one in your handbag if you tend to get cold.) Or take a long oblong, fold it in half and put the ends through the loop (very European) or else wrap it a few times around your neck or waist or handbag. Stop by and we’d be happy to demonstrate. And while you’re here, check out our newly arrived scarves in fabulous colors and textures. With a simple top and trousers, the scarf makes the outfit (and makes a perfect gift if you’re unsure of sizes)!

Fur is very on-trend for fall ’11; we love it as trim on jackets and accessories. Of course, we’re aware that some of our customers have strong personal feelings about fur, so know that we carry only non-endangered furs and only as trim rather than serious outerwear pieces. That said, fur is a huge fashion direction this season and a great way to add texture and style to your wardrobe.

Q:

I wear jeans almost everywhere, but wish I had alternatives. Can you recommend some other stylish options?

Colored denim is the way to go for fall 2011. Not your typical jeans, the new colored bottoms add personality and creativity to all kinds of tops and jackets. We love a bright jean (preferably skinny ankle length with a high heel shoe or boot) worn with a contrasting bright top, or else with black or ivory. They’re great with soft suede boots in charcoal or dark taupe as well as exotic-skin belts or bags. (We’re seeing lots of lizard and python in the market!) Come in and see what’s new from Hudson, Paige Premium Denim and AG Adriano Goldschmied.

Q:

I’ve been thinking about buying a new evening clutch. Shouldn’t it be relatively basic?

It shouldn’t be basic and it shouldn’t be limited to evenings. Small fashion bags are a great way to add flair to an outfit, be it a party dress or jeans. Let the bag add elegance, sophistication, or whimsy to your look, depending on your mood and personality. Come in and check out our dazzling new arrivals, from pretty printed silks to Bottega Veneta’s woven leathers to jeweled-clasp models from Prada, each a real conversation piece!

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profile

LUCIANO BARBERA

L

GIUSEPPE PINO

ITALY’S AMBASSADOR OF STYLE BY WILLIAM KISSEL

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uciano Barbera always wears white for tennis, prefers dress slacks on the driving range, and would never consider putting on a colorful, patterned shirt to attend a dinner party. “Can you imagine someone going to dinner in a fancy collar and checks and stripes?” he once said incredulously. “It’s not possible. It will not match with the situation.” Barbera appreciates the established rules of proper dressing, but the dapper designer’s passion


also extends to the fabrics and fine craftsmanship of his clothing and the factories where they are made, which must be in Italy, of course. This last mandate has proven a bit problematic, because current Italian law allows clothing makers to put ‘Made in Italy’ on their garments even if only one simple element, such as adding buttons or sewing on a label, is done in that country. Like most true Italian designers, he is strongly opposed to regulations that intentionally deceive the consumer, and he has been a pioneer in the efforts to change those laws.

deliberately blur the lines between casual and dress.) Barbera’s suits, while clearly influenced by oldworld English tailoring, are designed in the Milanese manner that stresses softly padded, narrow shoulders and a gently tapered waist. Yet most of his suits and sportcoats are made not in Milan but in southern Italy, by many of the same Neapolitan tailors producing clothing for other world-renowned brands. “They have a saying in Naples: ‘It’s like a second skin.’ This is exactly how a well-made suit should fit,” he says. Unlike other bespoke suit makers who emphasize

Understated and deluxe, like Italian cashmere, is how friends and colleagues describe both Barbera and his label. Opposite page: Luciano Barbera This page: A men’s look from Barbera’s fall 2011 collection

“Italian culture, quality and style should be promoted in the right way and not get jeopardized by other clothing producers outside the country. The customer has the right to know the truth,” he insists. Barbera has good reason to be proud of Italian style and production. Italy is unquestionably the producer of the finest luxury fashion in the world. Barbera’s collection, very much a product of the man himself, is no exception. Understated and deluxe, like Italian cashmere, is how friends and colleagues describe both Barbera and his label. Indeed, admits the designer, “I’ve always been considered the natural ambassador of everything we produce.” This fall, what Barbera has produced is a trilogy of designs inspired by the years 1930, 1940 and 1971—three significant high periods in 20th century fashion. He hopes to entice more 30- and 40-somethings to classic style by creating hybrid products a man can wear in unexpected ways. (To wit, a tech-inspired down vest is faced in super 150s navy chalk stripe suit fabric to

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the hand-make of their garments, Barbera’s clothing reflects a perfect balance between man and machine. “You can have a very strong suit made entirely by hand that is ugly because the person who made it has no style or sense of proportions. So what is the appeal?” asks Barbera. “The key is to have the ability to generate harmony in the garment but to make your suit where they are used to making the best suits.” What makes the Luciano Barbera collection so distinctive is more than just the tailoring. “I really consider the fabric the root of my clothing,” says Barbera, who started out as a textile designer. Not only are his fabrics exclusive to his designs, they are all developed in house at the Lanificio Carlo Barbera mill. Another important attribute of the Barbera line is the attention to detail he lavishes on every object. “It’s important that every single piece in the collection offers something special,” adds the designer, unable to name a favorite design from his label. “It’s like asking a man which is your favorite child; it simply can’t be done,” he says. Among Barbera’s favorite expressions: sprezzatura, the Italian word for detachment, but he says a better way to think of it is quiet confidence or low-key style. “The most forceful statement is understatement,” he says. “It is the philosophy behind everything I do.”


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fine shirt maker since 1928


life is but a

Fall 2011 has us dreaming about texture... lush knits, comfy cashmeres, velvety cords. So many soft ways to stay warm this fall...

PHOTOGRAPHY: Sergio

Kurhajek |

STYLING:

Wendy McNett |

HAIR & MAKEUP:

Claire Bailey


DREAM A LITTLE DREAM OF...


design

Haute HOSPITALITY

IS IT SELF-EXPRESSION OR NARCISSISM? EITHER WAY, DESIGNER HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS ARE FASHION’S NEWEST HOT SPOTS. BY WILLIAM KISSEL In the 1970s fashion designers were satisfied to have their names scrawled on the back pockets of your jeans. Over the ensuing decade, they discovered a way to put their stamp on everything from fragrance, sunglasses and leather goods to furniture and bedding. Now they want you to experience their own lavish lifestyles by enveloping you in their signature luxury hotel suites and posh dining rooms.

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Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Bottega Veneta for the St. Regis in Rome; Dolce & Gabbana Gold restaurant in Milan; the bar at Gold Below, left: Cavalli Club, Florence Right: Ralph Lauren’s Ralph’s restaurant, Paris

The trend escalated this past year when nearly a dozen new hotels were autographed by top designers—from Giorgio Armani’s sleek, ambitious Armani Hotel Dubai and Bulgari’s bucolic Balinese retreat, to Missoni’s stylish Scottish hideaway and Christian Lacroix’s French boulangerie-turned-bed and breakfast. It’s not only the newest way to propagate their names: designers insist the evanescent hotel or dining experience acts as a kind of “live-in portfolio” of their work. Giorgio Armani features custommade furniture and decorative objects from his Armani/Casa home collection in his namesake hotels, the second of which is scheduled to open in Milan early next year. “I wanted to see how the collection would look when applied to real spaces,” says the designer, who adds that the idea gives hotel guests an opportunity to sample the furnishings in a living situation before investing in them for their own homes. Recognizable designer fabrics and furnishings also encourage guests to form an emotional connection with the hotel—and the brand. And while hotels offer the opportunity to live like Armani or Versace for days or even weeks,

restaurants can offer the same “lifestyle experience” in a matter of hours. Take Ralph Lauren, whose fashion forays range from the highbrow sartorial chic of London’s Savile Row to the Rocky Mountain highs of Colorado. Inside Ralph’s, located in the designer’s Paris store, Lauren brings his idealized world to life. The chic eatery is infused with his signature BritishAmericana stamp, from the vintage leather seating and equestrian-themed artwork right down to the menu, which includes beef raised on Lauren’s own RRL Ranch. “The story of the menu is like the classic film An American in Paris,” says Lauren. “The food is genuinely American, but set in a mood that is genuinely international.” In a more flashy setting, design duo Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana imbued their Milanese restaurant Gold with a mix of exotic materials—pink and gray arabesque-patterned marble, high gloss steel, gold leather—that they consider to be architectural equiv-

alents of their clothing. While today’s designers would like you to believe they invented the haute hospitality trend, that honor actually goes to Pierre Cardin, who bought the fashionable French bistro Maxims in 1981 and has subsequently turned it into an international brand. “I suspect if you look hard enough you could find Pierre Cardin’s name on a screwdriver,” jokes American designer Todd Oldham, whose own foray into the hospitality game started in 1999 with the opening of The Hotel and its adjoining Wish restaurant in Miami, and continued this year with the christening of 20 new suites. Oldham is now in negotiations to design a hotel in Chicago. “It’s very smart of developers to find tastemakers from other [creative] areas who can enhance the hotel experience,” says Oldham, who believes fashion designers are naturally more sensitive to aesthetics, form and function than typical hotel designers. “Because we tend to focus on making you look good, we can also make you look good in a room.”

DESIGNER FABRICS AND FURNISHINGS ENCOURAGE GUESTS TO FORM AN EMOTIONAL CONNECTION WITH THE HOTEL—AND THE BRAND.


spirits

CUTTING-EDGE COCKTAILS

THIS REVOLUTION IS ALSO AN EVOLUTION, FOR ‘ROUND THE CORNER, ANOTHER INTREPID BARTENDER IS CRAFTING THE NEXT BIG DRINK.

FASTER THAN YOU CAN ORDER A MANHATTAN, ANOTHER COCKTAIL TREND AWAITS YOU. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON e live in an exciting time when it comes to drinks. The so-called Cocktail Revolution, invoking premium spirits, fresh ingredients and careful measures, has evolved beyond trendy neo-

speakeasies to rooftop lounges and nightclubs. But this revolution is also an evolution, for ‘round the corner, another intrepid bartender is crafting the next big drink.

Organic Ingredients: Five years ago, only a handful of organic spirits existed. Today there are organic tequilas, vodkas, single malts, bit-

ters, even sake. “To get USDA certification is very hard,” says Henry Siedel of Chikurin, the only Japanese sake to hold that distinction. Not only does the rice need to be grown sans pesticides, but irrigation floodwaters from neighboring farms have to be gunk-free as well. In most cases, you’re doing more to protect the environment

This may seem like an ordinary gin and tonic, but it features ofthe-moment bar trends like hand-cracked Kold Draft ice, fresh small-bottle tonic, and trendy Copa glassware.

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Both complex punch bowls and obscure European digestifs take center stage in cocktails at many of the trendiest bars around the country.

Aged Cocktails: The hottest geek trend of 2011: mixing up batches of classic cocktails, dropping them into used whiskey barrels or other containers, and aging for several weeks. Jeffrey Morgenthaler, bar manager at Portland’s Clyde Common, is widely credited for kicking off the trend in the U.S. Aging a cocktail does the same thing as aging whiskey or tequila: “The edges are softened, but not in a way that makes the drink seem flabby,” says Morgenthaler. “Anything with vermouth or fortified wine will be lightly oxidized and gain earthy notes that lend a lot of depth.” A second- or third-use barrel, like a bourbon or sherry cask, will also influence the final drink. You’ll find aged cocktails in toptier bars around the country, including the Boxcar Bar (Austin),

Girl & The Goat (Chicago), Grant Hotel (San Diego, where guests can purchase aged cocktails by the bottle), and Summit Bar (Manhattan). London’s Artesian bar, meanwhile, is mashing two hot trends by offering barrel-aged Mai Tais featuring clarified lime juice. Act quickly if you hear of a new barrel being tapped at your favorite watering hole: Innovative batches can be drained in a single night by thirsty fans.

Farm-to-Bar: As in the restaurant world, bartenders are hot on local, farm-fresh ingredients. “Guests love a drink with a homegrown angle,” says Evan Powell, the mixologist for Fish restaurant in Charleston, SC. “I grow about a dozen herbs, including chocolate mint, lemon thyme and shiso.” At Idaho’s Shore Lodge in McCall, the staff picks wild huckleberries for mixologist John Wood’s huckleberry mojito. Meanwhile, in San Francisco, the Fairmont is raising its own honeybees and using the fresh honey in cocktails. And Murf Reeves at New Orleans’ Sylvain puts his 15 years as a cook

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to good use behind the bar, emphasizing regional food pairings with mixed drinks.

House-Made Mixers: “Bitters is one of the three major components of classic cocktails,” says James Lee of Boulder, CO’s Bitter Bar. The once-ubiquitous astringent infusions are now used mostly to enhance aromas in cocktails. “You can’t really substitute for Angostura or Peychaud’s where they’re called for, but otherwise, the sky’s the limit.” Lee and his team make their own bitters using ingredients like Japanese fivespice, grapefruit and (in season) Rainier cherry bitters. At the new Lexington Social House in L.A., you’ll find house-made yuzu, lavender and orange bitters, along with Thai chili-infused simple syrup and even their own version of Pop Rocks to rim glasses. For the new Theater Bar in New York City, owner/bartender Albert Trummer takes the house-made concept to new heights. The bar makes all its own liqueurs, tinctures, bitters and more, co-created with a doctor versed in homeopathic medicine. “Cordials that have artificial colorings and sweeteners sit on your liver, along with the alcohol,” says Theater bartender Duane Fernandez. “At the end of the day, even with cocktails, you want the most natural product you can have in your body.” What’s coming up next? We’re already witnessing single filtered vodkas that actually have flavor, craft distilleries in almost every state, and 18th-century punch bowls that seduce scenesters and drinkers alike. Drop in to your favorite bar to discover what your own Mad Mixologist is concocting.

IMAGES BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

than your own body. But still, who needs Monsanto in their Mojito? Says Paul Abercrombie, author of Organic, Shaken and Stirred (Harvard Common Press, 2009): “People [should] care about what’s in their glass, the same way they care about what’s on their plate.”


T H E

U L T I M A T E

T R O U S E R


style

FORMALWEAR RULES TO FOLLOW. BY CARL SLESINGER

THE FINER THINGS

When considering an investment, it’s wise to weigh the pros and cons. But when deciding whether to purchase a tuxedo, there is simply no plus side to renting. Formalwear is for life’s milestone events: do you really want to spend your important moments in some other guy’s tux? Whether at a wedding, charity gala or professional event, looking and feeling your best is priceless. Besides, the initial cost will be amortized after only a few wearings. Follow these simple pointers to ensure you make the right choice.

THE LIFE OF YOUR TUXEDO WILL ALWAYS BE LONGER THAN THAT OF YOUR WIFE’S GOWN.

tuxedo. ‘White tie’ or ‘full dress’ occasions call for tails paired with a white pique tie and matching vest. Full dress is only appropriate after 6 o’clock in the evening and is generally requested at weddings, balls or diplomatic events. COLOR: Black formalwear is classic and the most widely accepted, but navy can be worn at festive events, by those brave enough to pull it off with confidence. Historically, white dinner jackets are appropriate between Memorial Day and Labor Day, and are also generally acceptable on cruises. (If you’re traveling south of the equator, remember that summer runs from late-December through March.) STYLE: The tuxedo was originally designed with a peak lapel. The shawl (rounded) lapel, worn by waiters and the maitre d’, has recently grown in popularity and can be spotted on Hollywood’s red carpets. The notch lapel, styled like a suit, is also an option. Regardless of shape, tuxedo lapels should always have a satin or silk faille facing in the same color as the suiting fabric. CARE: If you’ve been wild and crazy and have soiled your tux, send it to the cleaner right away. If it’s only wrinkled and you aren’t using it again for at least a week, put it on a contoured hanger and let the wrinkles hang out. If you’re not planning to wear it again until “I don’t know when,” hang it, cover with a clothing storage bag that’s open at the bottom, and keep in a dry place. This should keep dust off the shoulders and protect it until your next wearing. As long as your tux fits, you should continue to wear it. Minor alterations can easily be made by a skilled tailor at our store. And when it finally becomes time again to invest in an updated model, this should reassure you: the life of your tuxedo will always be longer than that of your wife’s gown.

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IMAGE COURTESY OF ISAIA

ETIQUETTE: Events touted as ‘black tie’ require a


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IN-STORE SERVICES Mario’s Downtown Portland 503.227.3477 Mario’s Downtown Seattle 206.223.1461 Mario’s 3.10 at Bridgeport Village 503.601.7310

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Complimentary Tailoring

Find the latest information on designer fashions for both men and women as well as jewelry, apothecary, gifts, special events and personal appearances. In addition, see our recommendations for living in style, including our favorite restaurants, hotels, spas, salons and entertainment. Sign up for email today. Increase sustainability and reduce mail.

Our on-site tailors will work with you and your sales associate to create the perfect fit customized just for you.

Mario’s Gift Cards What’s fast, fabulous and always the perfect fit? Mario’s Gift Cards, of course. Available in any amount—tastefully presented and ready to give.

Personal Shopping Welcome to our store–we’ll happily take your coat and offer you a complimentary beverage. And if you like, one of our sales associates can pre-select garments that fit your style and notify you of their arrival. Call any of our stores to schedule a time that is best for you in a private fitting room.

Home Delivery & Shopping We can arrange to ship anywhere in the United States. Or, if you’re in town, we can also set up a courier service for you.

We Gladly Accept Made-2-Measure Select the fit, fabric and other details to complement your personal style. We offer a wide variety of models and fabrications, so you can be your own designer. Plus, we will keep your measurements on file and update them for you as needed.

Shoe Repair For your convenience, we will arrange the repair of any footwear purchased in our stores.

Jewelry Repair Complimentary Gift Wrap If you like, we will be happy to gift wrap your Mario’s purchases in our signature packaging, at no extra charge.

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Debit Cards, American Express, Diner’s Club, Discover, MasterCard, Visa as well as International Visa.

Store Hours Portland & Seattle Monday to Saturday Sunday Bridgeport Village Monday to Saturday Sunday

10 to 6 12 to 5 10 to 6:30 12 to 6

For pricing on specific items featured in our Fall 2011 edition, please visit us at MARIOS.COM

We can arrange for cleaning or expert repair service for any jewelry that has been purchased in our stores.

At Mario’s, we like nothing more than helping you find styles that really work for you. Because the fact is, we love fashion. It’s been our passion—and business—for more than 50 years. So stop in and visit us soon. See what’s new. We think you’ll like what’s in store—and have a lot of fun in the process.


www.canali.it

Marios  

Fall 2011 HUGO BOSS FASHIONS INC. Phone +1 212 940 0600 www.hugoboss.comBOSSBlack Passion for Life 15MilMil15 Suit

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