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Hu be rt Whi t e Forum/The Substance of Style/Spring 2012

THE JACKET AN INDISPENSABLE FINISHING TOUCH

FASHION AND FANTASY

DESERT DREAMS


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welcome

SPRING 2012 It’s hard to believe that we’re entering our 12th year here in our “new” store in the IDS Crystal Court. The move brought a lot of changes to our company—an enhanced location with increased traffic, an updated store layout with improved merchandise presentation, our Zegna shop-in-shop, and even a new logo. But what did not change and will never change is our dedication to client service, personal relationships and quality. This has been the constant credo of Hubert White since my grandfather open the doors in the “old” St Paul store some 96 years ago, was carried on by my dad, and continues today. There are two very special articles within this book that need to be highlighted. The first is a pictorial of our Robert Graham party. We helped them celebrate their 10th anniversary with music from their unofficial band, The Coloursound, as well as singer/songwriter Kyle McDonald (who just happens to be Brad Sherman’s daughter). The other article continues the theme we started last issue of doing a close-up profile of two of our staff members. If you’ve always wanted to know more about Chuck Simpkins or Jim Michel, turn to page 6. Finally, a few vendor news items. Our “southern connection” continues to grow, as Billy Reid joins Southern Tide as our newest Dixie representative. Robert Valdes-Rodriguez of RVR neckwear has designed and is producing the official United States Water Polo tie. Eton has introduced neckwear to complement its market-busting shirts. The Luciano Barbera collection will again be in store after a very successful initial season last fall. James Warren, a collection of classic Italian golf apparel, is being added to our sportswear offerings. Maybe the biggest news of all is that our long-term partners, like Ermenegildo Zegna, Samuelsohn and Robert Talbott, just continue to get better and more innovative every season. I hope you enjoy this edition of our Forum magazine. See you in the store!


Hubert White 747 Nicollet Mall Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402-1719 612-339-9200 www.hubertwhite.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero, Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Peg Eadie

FEATURES 1

Welcome Letter

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A Celebration of Friends, Fashion and Song

DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

Hugh K. Stanton

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi

14 Meet the Hubert White Team Members

PRESIDENT AND CEO

34 Photography: Rock Star

CHAIRMAN AND COO

Britton Jones Mac Brighton CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

FASHION 8

Suiting: Tailored to Perfection

10 Profile: Samuelsohn 12 Designers: Robert Graham 16 A Walk in the Walled City 24 The Jacket

DEPARTMENTS 6

Ask Forum

30 CEO Style: Dinner With Friends 36 World Scene 40 Speed: Leaping Cat 42 Spirits: Roll Out the Barrel 44 End Page: Hitting the Right Notes

Christine Sullivan

APPAREL FORUM Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Mario’s PORTLAND, OR/SEATTLE, WA Mitchells/Marshs HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards WESTPORT/GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 12 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM COPYRIGHT 2012. PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212-6866821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, TRANSPARENCIES OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 15, ISSUE 1. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


A Celebration of Friends, Fashion and Song...

L

ast November we had a special evening with our friends at Robert Graham, Martin Dingman and Agave. The highlight of the night was when Kyle McDonald, our resident singer/songwriter, joined the RG house band, The Coloursound, for a few numbers. As you can see from the photos, it was both a fun and productive event!


The Coloursound Kyle McDonald


ASKFORUM

SPRING FASHION TIPS FOR HIM

Q:

I’ve had some of my suits for over a decade and they’re holding up pretty well. How do I know when it’s time to replace them?

Q:

What can I do to make my casual wardrobe current for spring/summer 2012?

Q:

My wife switches her closet every season, but I wear the same suits and slacks all year round. Am I doing something wrong?

Just because your old suits aren’t worn out doesn’t mean they’re still in style. Cuts are slimmer now, so if you haven’t bought a suit since the country had a balanced budget, your closet needs updating! Jackets are also slightly shorter, twobuttons are in and pleated pants are out! The trimmer a suit gets the more important fit becomes, so it’s a good idea to invest in well-made pieces. Ask us to show you how quality canvassing, construction and fabrics all come together to form the perfect fit, one that highlights your shape and moves with you without constraining you. We’ll bring you up to speed with updated models that suit your taste and budget. And don’t forget to pick up a few slimmed-down shirts and ties to complete the new you; nothing ruins the silhouette of a trim suit faster than wearing a large, lumpy shirt under it.

Yes! Suits in particular are often designed by season. Tropical-weight, at 6.5 to 8.5 ounces per linear yard, is comfortable for spring and summer weather. Midweight suits (9 to 10 ounces) can be worn 10 months out of the year, and regularweight suits (11 to 13 ounces) are suitable for fall and winter months. Some fabric types are also more appropriate for certain seasons: linen, cotton and seersucker in lighter colors help keep you cool in summer, while corduroy, tweed and flannel in darker seasonal tones are great layering pieces for the colder months.

CANALI

Warm weather sportswear can be casual, but never sloppy. One perfect way to update is with the season’s hottest bottoms: slim chinos. Available in bright colors and updated neutrals, the new chinos pair equally well with polos or soft coats. Make sure they hit just at the top of your shoe, or roll them up a few times for relaxed elegance. Don’t forget to ditch your socks or replace them with ones that can’t be seen, like the new styles from V.K. Nagrani. The boat shoe is also back in a big way this summer. We’re firm believers that deck shoes offer a perfect footwear option for casual style. Try them with colorful shorts for day, or dark jeans and a blazer for evening. Drivers and loafers are always safe bets, too.


SPRING 2012

S C OT T BA R B E R . C O M


suiting

TAILORED TO PERFECTION

100 YEARS LATER, OLD-WORLD CRAFTSMANSHIP MEETS MODERN TECHNOLOGY. BY WILLIAM KISSEL

RMENEGILDO ZEGNA’s new Milano suit for spring 2012 is an

Zegna suits in a range of colorful natural fabrics that appear to be bleached by the sun.

exquisitely detailed work of art that, one could say, took the Italian clothier a century to perfect. Just in time for the luxury menswear brand’s 100th anniversary, the Milano is a super-soft study in sartorial chic that combines a slim shape, gently fitted waist and natural, semi-constructed shoulders. Like all Zegna suits this season, the new Milano, available in both single and doublebreasted, is interpreted in a range of colorful natural fabrics that appear to be bleached by the sun, with an everso-slight sheen reminiscent of sharkskin clothing from the 1950s. But the Milano is tailored with a decidedly modern sensibility. The jacket is cut slightly shorter and features just a hint more interior canvas—as many as three layers— for structure, yet the finished garment remains remarkably lightweight. The defining element is the barchetta, or boat-shaped breast pocket, a sewing detail that can only be achieved by hand. Initially a cloth producer and later a suit and sportswear maker, Ermenegildo Zegna (pronounced zane-ya) has perfected the art of lighter-than-air suit making like no other designer label in history. The Trivero, Italy-based mega-brand not only constructs all of its own suits in factories around the world (prompting the company to introduce the slogan ‘Made in Zegna’), but the family-owned company

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has pioneered everything from the technically advanced fabrics used to make its suits to the su mesura, or made-to-measure, concept often employed to sell them.

W

HAT MAKES AN ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA SUIT SO SPECIAL—espe-

cially the made-to-measure variety—can only be answered by slipping into one. Each piece is a labor of love tailored to your exact specifications, in the fabric of your choice. You can select the number of pockets, the direction of the pleats on your trousers and even the buttons and whether or not they work. Moreover, it will be made with such attention to detail that your every physical anomaly— from sloping shoulders and a thrown back to a hollow chest or an enlarged abdomen—is actually masked by the finished garment. (Buying one of these suits is a far better option than going under the doctor’s knife.) You may never need to visit your tailor again. “By the time a made-to-measure suit is complete over 500 hands will have touched it and more than 7,000 hand stitches will have been used to create it,” explains image director Anna Zegna. Zegna workers have a hand in every step, from shearing the sheep through the processing of the fiber into yarn (and then fine fabrics), to the cutting and sewing of every jacket using a combination of modern machinery and hand finishing. “The perfect fit of a Zegna suit comes from constructing it with 100 pieces; the lining alone comprises 12 separate components,” adds Zegna. After each piece is precision cut, it passes through the hands of hundreds of tailors, whose singular purpose is to turn

THE SECRET of a Zegna suit isn’t just the meticulous way it’s put together, but the innovative cloth used to make it. The company’s founder and namesake, Ermenegildo Zegna, began as a fabric maker in 1910 with the creation of a natural wool weighing roughly 350 grams per square meter, considered featherweight by early 20th-century standards. Today, most Zegna fabrics weigh in at a fraction of that and include such technical advances as Trofeo, a worsted wool made of prestige Australian superfine merino wool with long fibers for added strength and resiliency, and the latest 13milmil13, a vicuna-like fabric made from

merino yarns measuring less than 13 microns. (To appreciate how exceptional this is, one need only reflect on the fact that a human hair measures roughly 50 to 60 microns.) The development of such fine micron wools is the result of Zegna’s 1963 initiative, the Vellus Aureum trophy, which motivates and awards Australia and New Zealand’s sheep farmers who produce these ultra-fine wools. Pioneering fabrics for spring include Zero Weight, a blend of superfine merino wool and silk with a yarn count of 600—the finest silk quality in the world. The company is also moving forward with last year’s Cool Effect, in which fine Australian

one-dimensional pieces of cloth into a three-dimensional garment worthy of the most discriminating clientele. The waistband, fly and belt loops on a pair of trousers can require more than 20 workers, and it takes the efforts of another 24 tailors to construct the sleeves of a jacket; nearly 190 sewers are involved in creating the body of a single jacket. Even the act of sewing a simple buttonhole “can take an eternity of careful cutting and stitching,” says Zegna. Once the fabric has been cut, corresponding pieces are carefully

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wool is finished to enable dark fabrics to reflect heat like lightcolored ones. The result: a cloth that keeps the wearer 10 degrees cooler than if he were wearing an untreated fabric. “Fabric represents Zegna’s heritage and it’s the primary focus of our innovation,” says Anna Zegna, noting that the brand offers more than 700 cloth options, including 200 new fabrics each season, as part of its made-to-measure suit service. Over the course of the company’s 100-year history, “Zegna has invented over 20 unique and innovative fabrics in various colors, patterns and textures, which have become staples of our collection.”

bundled and passed down to the tailors and sewers to construct the garment, which can take as long as four days to wind its way through the 110-step production cycle. Upon completion each suit undergoes an arduous pressing process performed by dozens of workers: six to press the slacks and another 22 to press and hand-iron the jacket before it receives its final inspection. If the finished garment meets the company’s lofty standards, it is literally given the Zegna seal of approval as the signature logo is sewn in place.


profile

SAMUELSOHN:

NEVER COMPROMISE OLD WORLD QUALITY, MODERN STYLE. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

ounded in 1923, Samuelsohn is a Montreal-based clothing company with a reputation for excellence based on fine tailoring, luxury fabrics, unusual attention to detail and modern style. For Samuelsohn, fine tailoring means fully-basted canvas construction: there is no glue in the interlinings of their suits, so that the garment maintains its shape, fit and comfort even after repeated cleanings. Their luxury fabrics are from the best mills in Italy and England, featuring cashmere, camel hair, superfine wools, Pima cotton, Italian silk and precious fibers like vicuna and yangir. Hand-tailored details include Bemberg linings, corozo or horn buttons, silk threads and labels, and Italian cotton pocketing. But perhaps Samuelsohn’s real secret weapon is its designer, Arnold Brant Silverstone, who grew up working for his family’s clothing company in Montreal before launching his own in the late 1990s. Respected as one of the most talented designers in the industry, he’s also known for his dapper per-

sonal style. Here, we speak with him about tailored clothing, and about what makes a well-dressed man.

What’s so special about a Samuelsohn suit? It’s about hand-craftsmanship: each suit takes six and a half hours of labor, more than many of the well-known designer brands that are almost twice the price.

Are they made totally by hand?

No. If we could automate it all, we would. But there are several processes a machine can’t duplicate: the handbasting, the handsewn armholes, the shoulder. Certain steps can be automated and you won’t see the difference, but others cannot. Most importantly, technol-

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Samuelsohn designer Arnold Brant Silverstone


ogy has not been able to duplicate a full canvas garment. Cheaper suits look okay on a hanger since the shape comes from pressing. But after dry cleaning, that shape is gone.

Your suits are known for a certain “expression”—what does this mean?

It means the garments are not flat: there’s a certain dimension, a softness, a sexiness. After all, the human body is not flat, so a welltailored suit should also have shape and dimension.

What should guys look for when buying a suit?

The most important thing is fit: when you put on the garment, it should make you look better. A well-tailored suit hides myriad imperfections and moves with you. The shoulders should be on you, not out to there. Today, men are wearing suits closer to the body, but that shouldn’t mean you lose comfort. It’s like driving a great sports car and really feeling the road. When you wear a quality suit, it moves with you.

How can guys look elegant when they’re not wearing suits?

The biggest problem is when men equate casual with not caring, with throwing on jeans and a T-shirt.

George Clooney… However casual the look, it was well thought-out, not thrown together, reflecting their personal style.

What are the key items a man should have for spring/summer 2012?

1) A great summer suit, maybe a tropical wool in British tan or dove gray. 2) A performance blazer or suit, either with high-twist yarns or some Lycra. Most guys these days are traveling or on the move but there’s no reason not to look crisp… 3) A cool outerwear piece: something reversible or with interior pockets or truly transitional and multi-functional. 4) A soft coat. We’re famous for ours: they look tailored but weigh next to nothing.

What’s the secret of success for a clothing manufacturer? Passion! I’ve been doing this for more than 20 years; I inherited the passion from my parents. But in addition to passion, one needs a spirit of innovation. We’re on top of the latest fabrics, fits, technologies. We’re always pushing the envelope, never satisfied with the status quo. We want the customer to say “WOW!” every time he puts on one of our garments. That’s my passion, and my mission.

How would you describe your own personal style?

CLOTHING THAT’S SPECIAL, WITH THE FOCUS ON FIT, QUALITY AND ELEGANCE. The best-dressed men put thought into dressing: casual might mean beautifully tailored cotton pants and a soft jacket or a lightweight knit cashmere sweater or a cool reversible outerwear piece. Think back to the best-dressed men over the decades: The Rat Pack, James Bond, the Kennedys, Cary Grant,

I like to look contemporary: not blending in with the crowd but not blatantly standing out. I like clothing that’s special, with the focus on fit, quality and elegance. That’s the way I like to dress and the kind of clothing I love to design!

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designers

secret is exceptional product. Ten years ago, they virtually invented the colorful contrast trim woven sportshirt that revolutionized men’s fashion. By juxtaposing patterns on collars, cuffs, and/or the actual body of the shirt, they created a whole new look for men’s casual dressing. Since then, the line has evolved to include tailored clothing, footwear, an extensive assortment of premium denim, and lots of whimsical accessories, from

ROBERT GRAHAM:

ECLECTIC STYLE CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF FASHION INNOVATION. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

nyone who’s ever thought that men’s fashion is boring can’t be familiar with Robert Graham apparel. Founded by award-winning designer Robert Stock 10 years ago, these exciting clothes are part of a total lifestyle concept, summed up by his trademarked mantra (Knowledge, Wisdom, Truth) that appears on every garment. In addition to the fabulous fashion and spiritual components, Robert Graham sportswear offers up a hefty dose of fun! The company does more than 150

events a year, including the prestigious Concours d’Elegance antique car rally in Carmel, California. Their strong celebrity following includes athletes (Albert Pujols, Mariano Rivera), actors (Alec Baldwin, Owen Wilson), musicians (The Beach Boys, 50 Cent) celebrity chefs, wedding planners and more. High profile fans notwithstanding, Robert Graham’s real success

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hats to socks. Although he’s been through similar brand-building journeys several times in his career, Stock (who started out working with Ralph Lauren) couldn’t be happier about this one. “What’s different here is that Robert Graham is not just about clothes; it’s about making people happy. Our customers are collectors: some of them own literally hundreds of our shirts. At a recent personal appearance in a store, I lent the DJ one of our shirts in a size 2XL. After the appearance, he confided how many people told him how great he looked. (So of course I gave him the shirt!) And that’s what drives me: seeing that kind of reaction…”

From top: Robert Stock; 50 Cent; Albert Pujols


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Meet the Hubert White team members... Currently reading: First Things, a periodical that surveys religion, culture and public life Besides my wardrobe, I am passionate about: My faith Favorite designer: Luciano Barbera I hate it when: I fail in perfection The most influential person(s) in my life: My parents Best shirt: Hamilton Best suit: Oxxford Best pair of shoes: Gravati I like spending my free time: Being of service to those in need I could have been: A lawyer (I did graduate from William Mitchell Law.) My favorite food is: A great hamburger! Hometown: St. Paul, and I still call it home Early retail experience: Sims, Ltd.

James Michel


My most valuable selling tool is: My passion for the product Best Minneapolis rock band: A three way tie: The Suburbs, The Replacements and Semisonic (Now you know how old I am!) Favorite restaurant: The Signature Café in Prospect Park I am currently listening to: For some reason I can’t get enough of Noel Gallagher these days. I am also listening to Fitz and the Tantrums. Favorite piece of clothing: My new Zegna wool/cotton/angora tweed double-breasted jacket How many pairs of shoes do you own? Over 40 pairs My “go to” boots are: My Alden Indie boots When I am at home I like to: Dance with my kids My “must-have” wardrobe piece for spring is: Double-breasted seersucker jacket My favorite sports: I love to run, play hockey and watch Gopher hoops.

Chuck Simpkins


HAIR & MAKEUP STYLING

SERGIO KURHAJEC CLAIRE BAYLEY WENDY MCNETT

ASBA

PHOTOGRAPHY

a walk in the walled city

The ancient Moroccan city of Aït Benhaddou – formerly a caravan route between the Sahara and Marrakesh, and location for the film Lawrence of Arabia – provides the perfect canvas for the bold, romantic and timeless looks of spring 2012...


citrus anD spice | strong solids | pops of pink


THIS PAGE

Dress by Lela Rose. OPPOSITE PAGE

Shirt by Isaia,


romantic prints | subtle checks | bold stripes


YOU’RE NEVER FULLY DRESSED WITHOUT...

The Jacket THE ULTIMATE FINISHING TOUCH AND THE KEY TO A WELL-DRESSED MAN

Spring may be springing, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to walk around without a jacket. A great-looking lightweight jacket or sportcoat is an essential finishing touch for a put-together casual look.

Whether a man walks into a meeting, a meal or a movie... without a jacket, no matter how great the shirt is, the look will be unfinished, lacking in style and sophistication. This spring, there has never been a more versatile selection of high-performance, lightweight jackets in so many fabrics and

styles. Whether in summer suede, seersucker or silk, cotton, denim or “techno-fiber” designed to beat the heat, a couple of great jackets can complete any look. And jackets are not just for slacks. Wear them with jeans, khakis—even your favorite shorts!


MEMORABLE!

JACKET 101: THE EASIEST WAY TO ADD STYLE AND ELEGANCE TO YOUR CASUAL EVERYDAY LOOK

FORGETTABLE


SUEDE OR SEERSUCKER, COTTON OR CASHMERE...A JACKET ADDS ELEGANCE AND TEXTURE TO ANY OUTFIT.


MEMORABLE!

DON’T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF THINKING THAT JUST BECAUSE IT'S WARM YOU DON’T NEED A JACKET!

FORGETTABLE


The Ermenegildo Zegna 10-Pocket Blazer

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THIS LIGHTWEIGHT MUST-HAVE TRAVELS LIKE A PRO AND TAKES A LOAD OFF YOUR PANTS POCKETS.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: SERGIO KURHAJEC. STYLING: WENDY MCNETT FOR AGENT OLIVER. GROOMING: TREVOR BOWDEN FOR BERNSTEIN & ANDRIULLI

JACKET NOT OPTIONAL: A MERE SHIRT AND TIE MAY BE SUITABLE FOR A STUDENT, BUT NOT FOR A MAN WHO MEANS BUSINESS.


ceo style

The Maccioni family in 1980, New York City

Dinner WITH FRIENDS FOR LE CIRQUE’S MARCO MACCIONI, IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

“I’M A JEANS AND WHITE SHIRT GUY,” says Marco Maccioni, director of operations and co-owner of Maccioni Group, a restaurant mini-empire that includes Le Cirque and Osteria del Circo restaurants in New York City, Las Vegas, the Dominican Republic and India, along with a half-dozen related ventures. At the moment, it’s a little difficult to believe Maccioni’s casualguy assertion. We’re seated at the wine bar in Le Cirque NY, the business’s Upper East Side flagship, and he’s dressed to the nines in

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custom Italian suiting, his stillyouthful feathered hair perfectly tousled. Martha Stewart and New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg walk past, heading to an event in the restaurant’s private dining room. Maccioni excuses himself only briefly to greet and make small talk. He returns quickly, skilled as he is at the art of immaculate hosting, ensuring each guest (including this author) feels like the only VIP in the room. “When I got married last year [to singer Sabrina Wender], we did it at the beach, because it was as opposite as possible to what I wear here every day,” he says. Marco Maccioni is the middle brother of three in this tight-knit family business, which also includes their mother, Egi, and father Sirio, founder of the original Le Cirque in 1974. “We each bring different characteristics,” says

Left: Marco Maccioni, posing outside Le Cirque, is the picture of effortless style.


Maccioni as we sip our Forest Breeze cocktails (muddled blackberries, white Fragoli, vodka and Chambord) crafted by Bill Ghodbane, Le Cirque’s bar manager of 15 years. “I’m more the wine and dining aficionado [he works closely with the chefs and sommeliers at Le Cirque NY and Circo]. My younger brother [Mauro] is the palate and my oldest [Mario] is the strategist and organizational cheerleader. And my father is omnipresent.” Le Cirque NY is in its third space in 37 years, this time in the sweeping Bloomberg Tower with a view onto the central courtyard. Maccioni dubs it “Le Cirque 3.0.”

a well-known Florentine designer and tie maker, is indeed an elegant fusion of contemporary and classic, with trim lines and an understated pinstripe pattern. “I guess my personal style is that... I’m Italian. My family is from Tuscany. In Italy, you go shopping with your mother. She teaches you to rub the fabric, feel the lapel, and learn to appreciate fine craftsmanship. I’m more relaxed and jovial, but at Circo, I’m in uniform. The good news is, I get to pick my uniform.” Osteria del Circo, with outposts in New York and Las Vegas, adorned with European circus themes, is the family’s other restaurant brand. It is classically,

best part.” He rises to greet Bill Cunningham, the bicycle-riding New York Times fashion photographer about whom a documentary was made last year. Out comes the next dish: a pairing of Chef Hopson’s lobster risotto and Ghodbane’s Champagne Royale cocktail, featuring a sugared rose petal. The concept of creative cocktails—beyond, say, a Martini or Old Fashioned—at white tablecloth restaurants is a new-again trend in Manhattan and a sign of the times. Le Cirque’s wine bar is also “new” with the six-year-old 3.0. “Le Cirque wasn’t the same in 1974, 1984 or 1994, and that’s not counting the moves,” says

“THERE’S A REASON A CLASSIC IS RESPECTED. THOUGH IT MIGHT NOT BE FUCHSIA OR WHATEVER TODAY’S COLOR IS, YOU STILL LOOK GOOD IN IT.”—MARCO MACCIONI Over the years, it has been a proving ground for many of the city’s best chefs/restaurateurs, including Daniel Boulud and Alain Allegretti, and is currently presided over by Olivier Reginensi, who took over in January for longtime head chef Craig Hopson. The food is French, but with Italian and contemporary flairs. Like the space itself, the cuisine and festive atmosphere have changed with each location, while the aura, the heart of the restaurant, remains unchanged. “I parallel it to a classic suit or shoe,” says Maccioni. “There’s a reason it’s a classic and respected. Though it might not be fuchsia or whatever today’s color is, you still look good in it. One of the reasons for Le Cirque’s long-term success is knowing how to do your thing, but not using everything in your playbook at once.” The suit he’s wearing, crafted by

unapologetically, Italian. A quote from Marco on the restaurant’s website explains it well: “When we opened Circo in 1996, our business plan was simple. Dad’s hospitality, Mom’s food, run by the sons.” Circo was Marco’s introduction to the business end of things, following stints working for bars and restaurants in Paris and the Champagne district. With the expansion of Le Cirque and Circo around the world (the New Delhi venture in the posh Leelah Palace is the brand’s latest), along with the placement of Le Cirque menus on 15 Holland America cruises, the Maccioni family seems to be everywhere these days. “My father started when he was 40, and grew with his customers. I started when I was 38, and I hope to do the same thing,” says Maccioni. “Every new venture has new friends to make, which is the

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Maccioni. “It was a very purposeful decision to make the restaurants different from each other. But it’s important to do what you know how to do within the changing times, without losing your identity.” Part of that identity is, it’s worth repeating, family. On another visit during lunch, all three brothers— Mauro, Marco and Mario—swing by to say hello. Unlike at, say, a Batali, Puck or Flay property, the odds are pretty good at the New York restaurants (and often in Las Vegas) that a Maccioni will wander past and ask after your meal. Marco lives within a couple of blocks of Circo. “My brothers are here, or I’m here,” he says. “We are doing other things, of course, but we still have the oversight at the restaurants. If that wasn’t important to us, we’d own a million restaurants. But it’s a tradition we follow and keep.”


Taking photos at rock concerts started out as a hobby for NYC teenager Neal Preston. But with his unique ability to capture not just the celebrity but the spirit and humanity within, Preston ultimately became one of the preeminent rock star photographers of our era, traveling around the world with famous musicians for the past four decades. His work has appeared on covers and features in major magazines (Time, People, Rolling Stone), newspapers, movies and on count-

less record and CD covers. We caught up with Preston at a recent photography exhibit at The Morrison Hotel Gallery in SoHo.

What life lessons have you learned from traveling around the world with rock stars? I’ve learned that music touches everyone in a very deep and spiritual place, as it does me. If you take someone’s music away—and it doesn’t matter if it’s rock, hip-hop, classical, whatever—you are ripping out his soul…

Top left: Stevie Nicks at home in Venice, California, 1981 Left: Freddie Mercury at London’s Wembley Stadium, 1986

ALL IMAGES BY NEAL PRESTON

photography

STAR

PHOTOGRAPHER NEAL PRESTON ON CAPTURING MOMENTS IN TIME. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN


I’ve also learned that the greatest luxury in life is to be able to take private rather than commercial flights!

How do you manage to get these very wired guys to relax? How do you capture them in ordinary moments?

Jimmy Page, onstage during Led Zeppelin’s 1977 U.S. tour

It’s all about being a fly on the wall. Mind you, that’s not something that can be taught; you just have to go by instinct. There is a real finesse involved with figuring out when to remain invisible and when not to. If you start to act like you’re the fifth member of Led Zeppelin, you’re gonna have a big fat problem…

What was the strangest moment you ever experienced at a rock concert?

There are many. But having Peter Grant (Led Zeppelin’s legendary manager) tell me to actually go onstage during a show and stand in front of the drummer (John Bonham) and shoot him was pretty bizarre.

What do you consider your greatest accomplishment?

Many people have told me that they can hear the music when they look at my photos.

Who do you most admire?

I’m not sure “admiration” would be the right description, but the two musicians who have influenced my life are Pete Townshend and John Lennon. Pete for the honesty in his writing, his creativity, his tortured genius, his ability to look at life from multiple points of view… I could go on and on. And John Lennon, for showing me what “cool” really is, for giving me the greatest soundtrack to life a teenager could have, and for allowing me to realize that music was, and always will be, in my DNA.

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world scene

THE ART OF STYLE

L

e Royal Monceau, Raffles in Paris is a very fashionable hotel. Between rushing out to glamorous appointments, modish guests dine in the restaurants, gather at Le Bar Long for cocktails, or indulge in the Spa My Blend by Clarins (which has the longest indoor pool in Paris). And it’s the ideal hotel for art lovers. Paintings, drawings and photography exhibitions are in the lobby, the rooms… everywhere. There’s even a contemporary fresco, A Garden in Paris, on the ceiling of La Cuisine. Le Royal Monceau is also home to the city’s first art concierge, who offers tours of the hotel’s treasures and organizes excursions, such as a visit to contemporary art galleries in the Marais and St. Germain areas, or a private viewing of the Henri Matisse exhibition in Pompidou. In Paris, home is where the art is.

BAYEUX TOURIST OFFICE

Experience life’s little luxuries. By Donald Charles Richardson

UN JOUR EN NORMANDIE

T

he lovely little town of Bayeux in Normandy, near the English Channel, is home to the celebrated 230-foot tapestry depicting the Norman invasion of Britain, not to mention extraordinary cheese, the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Bayeux and a landscape layered with centuries of history. A drive through the lush countryside offers glimpses of châteaus, apple orchards and the famous Normandy cows, arguably the most tranquil in the world. Naturally, you’ll want to visit the inspiring and poignant beaches and artifacts of the World War II invasion. (At Port en Bessin, right above a German bunker, notice the watchtower built by the soldiers of Louis XV.) Nearby is the 17th-century Château de Balleroy, the Forbes family home. So is Brécy, a manor house with restored Italianstyle gardens laid out over four terraces. The Château de Brouay, a mid-18th century château surrounded by farms, has been a family estate for six generations; you can arrange to lunch in the château or have a cocktail in the orchards. And don’t miss La Haizerie farm, where you might be invited to pet the cows before tasting the homemade lavender ice cream.

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ROB ERTGR AHAM .US

KNOWLEDGE 路 WISDOM 路 TRUTH


SUMMER READING

IMAGE BY GLENN SUOKKO

T

here’s a reason Twin Farms is a nice place to curl up with a good book. Set in Vermont, just north of Woodstock on 300 acres of meadows and woodlands, this quiet country hideaway was once the home of Sinclair Lewis and Dorothy Thompson. Here, many of the great names in literature gathered to talk (and probably argue) about their work and lives. Twin Farms retains its aura of simplicity and coziness. There are hand-painted murals, rich maple and pine woodwork, American folk art and rustically elegant accommodations, with king-size feather beds, wood-burning fireplaces and screened porches. If you need to stretch, there’s hiking, biking, tennis, pond swimming, fly fishing and canoeing. But why bother? Just relax and catch up on your reading.

PLUGGED IN

E

ven if you’re not a motorcycle enthusiast, chances are you’re going to want to tool around the countryside (or slip quickly through city traffic) this summer on the top-of-the-line bike from Evolve. The Titanium XR is all electric: no gas, no oil, no emissions. It can go up to 60 miles per hour, has a range of 100 miles on one charge and is almost completely silent. At your request, Evolve will even make coordinating accessories, such as a container sized perfectly to hold your picnic basket or bottle of bubbly.

FROM THE TOP

IMAGE BY GREG POWERS

O

n warm evenings, New Yorkers love to gather at rooftop lounges. Upstairs At The Kimberly is a favorite among celebrities and fashion insiders. The view is spectacular, the lounge is never uncomfortably crowded (there’s a strict rule about the number of people admitted), and the staff is charming. Together, sommeliers Branimir Kostic and Niko Mavreas have created an extensive list that boasts a collection of spirits and wines from all over the world, including an astonishing 26 different kinds of Champagne. There are wonderful savory and sweet things to munch on (try the truffled mac and cheese or lobster sliders), and either sommelier is happy to help guests choose a wine and food pairing. Reach for the stars.

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speed

LEAPING CAT A RACECAR DRIVER TESTS OUT THE NEW JAGUAR XJL. BY DAVID A. ROSE

s a motorsports enthusiast and driver, I’ve long been obsessed with the Jaguar marque. I’ve owned several over the years and love the look, smell and sound unique to the old Jags. Would the new XJL inspire the same passion? I was able to make the comparison at Motorcars Incorporated in Plainville, CT, where Dean Cusano sells primarily vintage Jags. Among his offerings: a 1958 Jaguar XK 150. It was easy to see why these old Jaguars became so popular in their day: dramatic sculpted lines, expressive headlights, a long hood line, a dignified grill, and one of the most powerful engines of its time. The new Jaguar XJL displays similar characteristics, with an

even more graceful stance. With a 5-liter overhead cam and 4 valves per cylinder V8 engine, this supercharged Jaguar produces an amazing 510 horsepower. Its 6-speed automatic transmission can also be shifted manually using the shifting paddles on the steering wheel, similar to those found in modern Formula 1 racecars. Connecticut and Jaguar have another connection: the town of Thompson is home to America’s original purpose-built race circuit. Thompson Raceway began operating in 1940 as a 5/8-mile paved oval track. In 1952, sports cars like the Jaguar XK 120 began racing on what had become a 1.5 mile proper road race circuit on land owned by John Hoenig. For years

40

Thompson Raceway was the home track of racers in the Sports Car Club of America’s northeast division, but the last race held on the course was in 1977. The track is still operated by the Hoenig family; John Hoenig’s great grandson Jonathan, now marketing manager, plans to one day reconstruct the course and bring road racing back to northeast Connecticut. Before my time with the car was up, I took the supercharged Jaguar around the time-honored oval track for a few hot laps. The Jaguar was at home on the playground of its ancestors. I was thrilled to feel this luxury road car instantly transform itself into a racecar, as I thought of the legendary drivers who preceded me at this iconic speedway.


T H E

U L T I M A T E

T R O U S E R


spirits

CASK-STRENGTH SPIRITS MOVE BEYOND WHISKY. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

atered down" liquor is a loaded term, implying a less-thanpremium product. The fact is, almost all hard spirits are watered down before you buy them. By U.S. law, most hard spirits must have a minimum ABV (alcohol by volume) of 40%, or 80 proof (liqueurs, sweetened, infused alcoholic beverages, can have a much lower ABV). Since booze usually comes off the still between 110 and 190 proof, water is added to bring it down to our acquired palate and maximize the base product. The concept of ‘cask-strength’ spirits—that is, bottling the product exactly as drawn from a maturing barrel—has only recently gained cachet, particularly among Scotch whisky drinkers. These days, there are cask-strength releases of Laphroig, The Glenlivet, The Macallan and so on, targeting the malt whisky aficionado. "Caskstrength whiskies generally have a much more intense flavor profile," says Michael J. Neff, co-owner of the whisky-driven Manhattan bar Ward III. "It allows a broader range of experience.” ‘Cask strength,’ by convention, is "the natural strength of the spirit, unadulterated by water, and is

dependent on maturation conditions," says Iain McCallum, master blender for The Bowmore, Auchentoshan and Glen Garioch whiskies. As a result, the final proof usually differs from bottling to bottling, so the latest release of Auchentoshan Valinch might have an ABV of 57.5%, while Bowmore's 10year Tempest Batch 2 is 56%. Whisky and bourbon aren't the only aged spirits drinkers are sipping straight from the barrel these days: • DeLeon Tequila, a relatively new luxury label, released its extra-aged expression last fall at cask strength. The $250 tequila, aged 51 months, comes in at 51 proof. Founder Brent Hocking is confident in the purity of his product. "At cask strength, you can taste flaws or additives," he says. • Because Cognac is generally a blend of dozens of barrels, and heavily regulated by French law, it's rare to find cask-strength expressions in America. So when Pierre Ferrand Cognac released its $600 limited edition 1972 Cask Strength a couple of years ago, it was a big deal. And

42

when it's gone, it's gone. • Pisco, a white, brandy-like grape spirit, is gaining popularity in North America. According to Johnny Schuler, founder of the new premium label Pisco Porton, "in Peru, pisco is distilled to strength, with no water, oak or anything else added." This produces a clean spirit at about 86 proof. "It's an honest drink," Schuler says.

DeLeon 51, a new extra-aged tequila, is one of the only modern tequilas bottled at its full cask strength. Expect other brands to follow.

IMAGE DELEON TEQUILA

“W

ROLL OUT THE BARREL


SPRING 2012 We made Bills better by not changing a thing.

Cut & Sewn in the U.S.A.

ROB ERTGR AHA M .US

KNOWLEDGE 路 WISDOM 路 TRUTH


end page

IN 1935, AT 10 YEARS OLD, my father lost his dad in a fire. The death left a Polish-speaking widow to raise her six children in the blue collar town of Sayreville, New Jersey. With no father at home, my dad adopted multiple father figures from his working class, Catholic town. They taught him how to smoke, sing, swear, tie a four-in-hand and handle his whiskey. By 14, Julius Anthony Richard Rarus was singing with these men—most twice his age—in a Sayreville glee club. After graduating from a Catholic high school, my dad joined the Army, serving as a payroll master on a base in America’s Bible Belt. The only action he saw during WWII was at the officer’s club, in his tailor’s shop, and in the beds of the local girls who’d fall for the handsome singer in the custom-made khaki uniform. After the war came college, the Cold War, and a possible new career. At the time, J. Edgar Hoover’s men were recruiting agents who could ferret out Communist infiltrators from post-war Eastern Europe. Aware of my dad’s Polish fluency, they pursued him, noting that his crisply tailored Ivy League suits, rakish fedoras and linen pocket squares would serve him well with The Director. But after months of interviews, background checks and tails from other agents to see where he drank, slept and prayed, he was passed over for being “too liberal.” He’d tell me these stories on Sunday nights, as he filed his nails, polished his Aldens and brushed his fur felt hats. He’d hum along to Stan Kenton, Benny Goodman and Frank Sinatra on the Hi-Fi, and reminisce about how he courted my mother in jazz clubs while being courted by the F.B.I. “I’d wear my best custom suits, hire a chauffeured car, pick up Mom over in Princeton, and we’d drive into the city to see Lenny Bruce, George Shearing, Maxine Sullivan, Tony Bennett…” Years after my dad’s passing, I found myself standing next to Tony Bennett in a Manhattan men’s store. We began a conversation about music. “Music is good or it’s not music,” Mr. Bennett told me with unabashed certainty. “We might call it music because it sounds like music, but it’s bad sound. It’s that simple and always has been.” He leaned forward, stared into my eyes with fatherly concern and asked, softly, “Understand?” I didn’t, to be honest. But I knew my dad would have understood perfectly.

HITTING THE RIGHT NOTES

LIKE GOOD MUSIC STYLE IS A MÉLANGE OF ECLECTIC ELEMENTS, THE WHOLE INEFFABLY GREATER THAN ITS PARTS. BY JAMES RARUS 44


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HUBERT WHITE FORUM SPRING 2012


HUBERT WHITE