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SPECIAL OFFERS AND INFORMATION FOR FARMLANDS SHAREHOLDERS

APRIL 2018 Valid from 1–30 April 2018

The FARMLANDER

NEW LEXUS OFFER PAGE 2

CELEBRATING SUCCESS

GROWING LEGACIES INSIDE FAMILY BUSINESSES PAGE 8

7802 1047 MAY EXP 0991 6005 ER LD RD HO AM CA RD HOLDER CA ANDY 780 911047

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GREAT CARD PARTNER DEALS INSIDE!

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EXPERIENCE AMAZING AWAY FROM THE FARM EXCLUSIVE SHAREHOLDER PRICING NOW AVAILABLE

Farmlands and Lexus are excited to announce the most luxurious partnership yet. From 1 April 2018 Farmlands shareholders will have access to exclusive pricing across the entire Lexus range. Experience amazing for yourself, explore the range and exclusive pricing today. www.farmlands.co.nz/lexus

2 | THE FARMLANDER

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THE FARMLANDER | 3


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

APRIL

INTEREST

PLAN 365

Celebrating success

Plan365 Nutrition

6

Farmlands 5 minutes with Julia Jones

31

Kiwi straight options just got better

8

Special Feature – It’s family business

33

Managing equine obesity

15

Future of rural governance drives To the Core

35

Choose supplements for pigs with care

16

Celebrating success – Farmlands award winners

22

Pauline, the book and the Cuddly Cook

WHAT’S ON

13

Plan365 Forage and Arable 37

Plan now for your spring-sown crops

39

Slug monitoring efforts must improve

41

APRIL

Europe’s best selling beet is one to beat

Co-operative News 5

Farmlands staff profile

Plan365 Animal Management

From the CEO

43

Body condition scoring ewes

25

Farmers lift health and safety performance

45

Improving dry cow management and fertility

26

Farmlands Cup a family affair for Fred

28

Out and about with Farmlands

30

Choices Rewards

51

Buying Power Promise

53

Delivering more than fuel

55

Aussie prepares to dine on fine Kiwi swine

59

Introducing Jason Wills, GM Farmlands Real Estate

60

Farmlands Real Estate

5

Plan365 Rural Infrastructure 48

Farmlands Pahiatua Golf Day Hosted this year at Pahiatua Golf Club, Farmlands Greytown, Masterton, Pahiatua and Dannevirke shareholders will dust off their clubs for a fun-filled day on the green.

Preventative action keeps rodent populations in check

13-14 APRIL

Farmlands AgFest

SPECIAL OFFERS AND INFORMATION FOR

FARMLANDS SHAREHOLDERS

Join the Farmlands team for the fastest growing field days in New Zealand at the Greymouth Aerodrome.

APRIL 2018 Valid from 1–30 April 2018

The FARMLANDER

NEW LEXUS OFFER PAGE 2

PAGE 16

GROWING LEGACIES INSIDE FAMILY BUSINESSES

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

ON THE COVER Henrietta and Graeme Purvis of Waianakarua created their lucerne chaff business because they wanted quality feed for their own horse.

7 MAY

PAGE 8

6005

0991

1047

7802 EXP

MAY

19

AT CARD PARTNER DEALS GREAT GR

Tux North Island Sheep Dog Trial Championships

INSIDE!

HOLDER HOLDER AM CARD CARD ANDY

911047780

Head to www.sheepdogtrials.co.nz for more information.

Special prices and offers apply from 1st to the 30 th of April 2018. Only while stocks last. Check your Farmlands store for product availability. All prices include GST unless otherwise stated. Savings based on Farmlands normal retail price. Note: The “Your Price” advertised in The Farmlander magazine is the price that a Farmlands shareholder will be charged if the advertised products are purchased during the promotional period. Farmlands stores also use a “net” price (discounted price without a rebate) to attract cash sale customers and potential shareholders. *Savings based on Farmlands normal retail price.

4 | THE FARMLANDER

Accounts are payable at Farmlands Head Office or any store by the 20th of each month. Failure to pay an Account by Due Date is a Default Event under the Terms and Conditions and Farmlands is then at its discretion entitled to: suspend or terminate the Account; charge interest at 2% per month; reverse discounts or credit rebates; debit other Shareholder Accounts; make demand on a Card Signatory; debit any default administration costs incurred; register a mortgage over land; terminate shareholding. Farmlands shareholders have the option to pay their Accounts either in part or in full by MasterCard or Visa Credit Card. Payment by any credit card will not entitle the shareholder to receive Bonus

Rebates for the month paid or part paid. Neither Farmlands nor any other person involved in the preparation of this document accepts any liability for any opinion or information (including the accuracy or completeness thereof) or for any consequences flowing from its use. The information contained in this document is given in good faith, has been derived from sources perceived to be reliable and accurate and is subject to Farmlands Terms and Conditions. Not all products are available at all Farmlands stores. Offers valid at Farmlands North Island stores only.

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FARMLANDS STAFF PROFILE Gary Geurts – Farmlands Technical Advisor of the Year Q: What is your current role at Farmlands? A: My current role with Farmlands is servicing the horticulture sector of the western Bay of Plenty as a Technical Advisor. Q: What do you enjoy about your job? A: As a career horticulturalist and third generation grower, plant husbandry is embedded in my culture. Assisting grower managers with technical advice and learning from them is what challenges me and keeps me stimulated in my role. Q: What do you like to do in your spare time? A: Fish, fish and fishing. When I can, I enjoy fishing with a family member or a good mate. I also find solitude in taking some time out on my own and going fishing. Q: What is the most interesting trip you have ever taken? A: I enjoy travelling through South East Asia. It’s a culture that keeps me grounded and appreciative of the lifestyles we very often take for granted here. Their agriculture is so vast, and in many cases very primitive, but yet we could learn so much from them. It’s like going back in a time machine.

FROM THE CEO Welcome to the April issue of The Farmlander. The theme for this month’s issue is success. Our very first shareholders teamed up to help bring more success to their businesses by driving prices down and bringing competition to the rural supplies market. The overall mood and performance of your co-operative this financial year has been positive and continues to improve. That can be considered a success for our staff but also to the ongoing strength of the co-operative model. Farmlands has a stated purpose “to re-invent the Farmlands Co-operative spirit, by ensuring our shareholders’ future success is at the centre of everything we do”. Therefore, it makes sense that we take the time to profile those that contribute to, and have achieved, success. We do not just celebrate the success of our shareholders – we also celebrate our people that have helped you succeed. You will read examples of their stories in this issue. Along with members of the Farmlands Leadership Team, I have finished visiting nearly every staff member over the past month through our Regional Muster series. The Regional Musters are a valuable exercise because I get to explain, in person, how Farmlands will help our shareholders now and into the future. I also get a chance to emphasise our commitment to our staff, who will help guide our co-operative on our journey from good to great. I also get to see, hear and feel how our people are. Our Leadership Team has made the most of the opportunity to see and talk with many of you at the various field days and A&P Shows around the country. From Southern Field Days at Waimumu to Northland Field Days just outside of Dargaville, it has been a great time to get out and talk to our team about our comprehensive offer.

Gary's Pineapple Cheesecake Ingredients • • • • •

2 cups crushed wine biscuits 115g melted butter 115g cream cheese 1 tablespoon sugar Juice of 1 lemon

• • • • •

½ teaspoon vanilla essence 450g crushed pineapple 3 teaspoons geletin ½ cup hot water 300ml whipped cream

We are committed to our local communities. These events are an opportunity to not only showcase our hospitality, but also how your co-operative can help you succeed. Kind regards,

Method 1. Mix the crushed biscuits and butter together then press into base of a spring tin. 2. Cream the sugar and cream cheese. Add lemon juice, vanilla essence and crushed pineapple. 3. Dissolve the gelatin in hot water. Add the mixture and fold in whipped cream. 4. Pour onto the base and put it in the fridge to set.

Peter Reidie Chief Executive Officer Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited

5. Decorate with whipped cream and pineapple if desired.

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THE FARMLANDER | 5


5 minutes with Julia Jones KPMG Farm Enterprise Specialist Julia Jones discusses progress and global trends in the primary sector. Where do you think New Zealand’s primary sector has made the most progress over the past 12 months? Mindsets have really started shifting from concern of change to curiosity, some producers are outpacing processes with their forward thinking. It takes a lot of courage to start investigating how to change without knowing what the ultimate end game might look like. I get a massive buzz talking to farmers who are curious, who want to understand what a new future might look like for them, their business and their families. Then there are those who call investigating different markets and uses for their land, who want to work out what their role might be and how they can seek opportunity amongst the disruption. They may not be excited about the concept of change but they want to understand more and ultimately curiosity gives them energy to be creative with new ideas. I think there has been great progress with producers re-capturing their pride in producing quality rather than quantity and valuing this craft (producing food is a craft). They are now really understanding that value begins behind their farm gate (it always has), they are producing beautiful, natural, high quality food and fibre for the world and that is something to be incredibly proud of.

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What are the global trends that could impact on our primary sector in the year to come? I could talk for hours about this – global trends will be driven from consumer demands/needs/expectations. Currently health and wellbeing remain high on the agenda with a strong focus on nurturing people capital within business. Let’s not forget the overarching theme of social license with food consumption. Social license is the desire to eat food when how it’s produced has a positive impact on the environment, animals and humans. So what does this mean to the New Zealand primary sector? Competing against alternative proteins and an accelerated need for digital traceability within our production process. Alternative proteins will continue to be a significant competitor so our environmental footprint from food production will remain under a microscope. We need to make sure our naturally produced foods have less of a footprint than alternative proteins. There will be plenty of new trends bubbling away, new disruptors to our industry will keep coming – there is no avoiding it – but with each new disruption will come some really cool new opportunities.

as much value as possible, so we need to show evidence that we produce in a way that allows us to charge top dollar. The discerning consumer willing to pay top dollar will expect to connect and have evidence of how their food was produced. To achieve this, our sector needs to make sure we have our digital tractability house in order. Our word is not our honour when it comes to food production but don’t take this to heart,

It takes a lot of courage to start investigating how to change without knowing what the ultimate end game might look like.

it’s just how it is globally now. Instead of thinking of all that monitoring you

With the growing consciousness around origin and production of what is appearing on consumers’ plates, do you think New Zealand is ahead of the curve or catching up?

need to do as ‘annoying compliance’,

At this stage, I believe we are only just catching up – we can do a lot better. We export the majority of what we produce, for economic sustainability we need to really create and capture

online all the time to help you with this. I

think of it as facilitating your ability to get your awesome products to the consumer and an important part of your business. New technology is coming was recently at the launch of Everycow, which I refer to as a ‘Fitbit’ for cows, it’s really cool – then there is FarmIQ too, all of this sort of monitoring and data

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FARMLANDS 5 MINUTES

capture technology is amazing and will significantly accelerate us to get ahead of and stay ahead of the curve. You have recently presented to Farmlands staff around the country. What are your key messages about our primary sector? It was such privilege to talk with the teams, they are so passionate about doing the very best by the shareholders and their communities. I really wanted

to excite everyone about the future of producing and remind them that everyone in the farmer ecosystem (rural professionals, suppliers etc.) is in this together – we need to be looking forward evolving how we operate to support, prepare and inspire the future of farming. For generations New Zealand farming communities have worked so hard for the industry. If we keep things the same and try to hold back time we are not honouring all

that hard work. The best way for us to honour the rich history of farming is to evolve and ensure its future relevance. This will mean that we need to do some things differently but regardless of the systems or processes that change, people at the heart of it and preparing the ‘agri world’ for the next generation remains the same. In your opinion, what are the ‘next steps’ for New Zealand agriculture? Next steps are keeping it real, keep that curiosity for the new but invest a lot of time in the parts of your business you can influence and control too. I personally spend a lot of time dreaming about the future of agri and get a bit over-excited about new things and encouraging others to do the same but, as was so eloquently pointed out to me by a colleague, the industry still has some work to do to get good, solid foundation to build these new dreams on. New Zealand agriculture needs to get sharper at the business side of farming and I know these are probably not the things you got into agriculture to do but we need them to help us prepare better for a strong future. We need to get loads sharper at measuring, understanding and reporting our physical, financial and now ‘social license’ performance. When I say reporting, it’s not reporting the stuff that you do because the taxman says you have too, this is about intimately understanding the holistic parts of your business that will drive a sustainable profitability, which will benefit the rural communities. The guts of it is New Zealand agriculture will continue to grow produce, exactly what that is I don’t know – whether we grow cows, sheep or yellow peas, you still need to focus on value, consumer needs and having an exceptionally strong business foundation to enable continuing evolutions.

| KPMG Farm Enterprise Specialist, Julia Jones.

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THE FARMLANDER | 7


IT’S FAMILY BUSINESS 8 | THE FARMLANDER

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Limited resources do not mean limited opportunities. The Farmlander talks to two families that have found success by focusing on quality over quantity. Sitting under trees on a Maniototo farm isn’t a common place to find a business opportunity – but that is exactly where Graeme and Henrietta Purvis found the first piece of the Purvis Feeds puzzle. Graeme had an unwell horse and had decided to feed it some quality lucerne chaff, the only problem being it was in short supply. Further enquiries led him to a farm in Maniototo, where there under the trees he found an old chaff cutter.

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THE FARMLANDER | 9


“It was a raw-boned sort of business,” Graeme explains. “Someone else saw it and asked to buy some and it went from there.” Before Purvis Feeds took off, Graeme was involved in various businesses including a contract tailing run, a half share in a conveyer belt sheep handler and an ultrasound scanning business for sheep, cattle and deer (which he still has). But it’s the feed business that has grown the most over the past decade and Graeme and Henrietta have created an in-demand product for a discerning market. Base of operations is their 40 hectare property at Waianakarua, North Otago, with another 30 hectares further south at Moeraki. In addition to growing lucerne the couple have calves through to yearlings. The on-site factory, with a manufacturing area, cutting room, packing room, storeroom, depot and “quite a few square metres of hay barn”, employs one additional person. Their 12 years strong marriage has seen a lot of teamwork making

the chaff, with Henrietta handling the administration, logistics and most of the marketing. As the volume of chaff increased, so too did the need for extra hands, especially with Henrietta originally doing the packing solo. Increased volumes have been complemented with investments in technology. If the chaff cutter under the trees in Maniototo was the first piece of the Purvis Feeds puzzle, a hay dryer sourced from Italy was by far the biggest. The dryer holds 24 round bales, drying them evenly to a desired moisture content and helping to retain colour, leaf and quality.

To make quality hay, it actually takes a lot of hard work and sometimes luck.

| Graeme has had many businesses, including a contract tailing run, a half share in a conveyer belt sheep handler and an ultrasound scanning business for sheep, cattle and deer.

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Elements and orders create capacity Graeme and Henrietta came up with the idea of running a lucerne chaff business due to their involvement with horses. Graeme team ropes and Henrietta barrel races at rodeos and the couple own three quarter-horses. They openly state if they were not comfortable feeding their lucerne chaff to their own horses, they would not be selling it to anyone else. “Oil is our point of difference – we’re the only people in New Zealand, I believe, that infuse cold-pressed rapeseed oil with our (lucerne chaff) product,” Graeme says. “That’s been a major turning point for us. The advantages of using cold-pressed rapeseed oil is it makes it dust free, softens the stem, deepens the colour and adds essential omegas 3, 6 and 9.” Henrietta says while their latest product started on the market last July, a combination of increased demand and environmental factors have them close to being fully booked out this autumn. “The weather has played a big part but the other thing is it (the lucerne) can’t have any stones or foreign matter in it,” she says. “Weeds are a big no-no so that’s before you even cut the hay. “To make quality hay, it actually takes a lot of hard work and sometimes luck. It needs to be made with love and to be baled when it’s ready, not when the contractor or baler driver is ready.” Graeme says they have a stable of quality growers, with a similar passion for making good hay.

“We bought the hay dryer because we’re on the east coast and since we only deal in quality hay, we wanted to supply hay from our own property, as well as brought in stuff (mainly from Central Otago),” Graeme says. “We bought it and while it was on the water, an engineer and I went over to see one working and how it was put together.

to point out that it’s “amazing what you can do on Google”. The Italian hay dryer is a unique piece of equipment in New Zealand and helps to provide a standard of quality that fits with Graeme and Henrietta’s motto – no shortcuts.

“It was a giant jigsaw puzzle – put Part A into Part B. It arrived in two 40ft containers and one 20ft one, with all the instructions written in Italian.”

“Our aim is not to feed every horse in the country but every horse that eats our product is eating a quality feed,” Graeme says. “Quality, not quantity.”

“Quality and consistency are very boring words but every one of our bags has to be as good as each other,” Henrietta says.

The hay dryer is now fully operational, with Graeme quick

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THE FARMLANDER | 11


Why lucerne? Lucerne, also known as alfalfa, is a perennial legume. Not only is it able to fix nitrogen, it also has a long tap root that enables it to access water and nutrients from deeper in the soil profile than many other forage species. It is a highly-nutritive feed – the leaf typically contains around 12 MJ ME/kg DM – though the overall value of the plant declines as the season progresses and the stem component of the plant becomes greater (the stem contains about 8.5 MJ ME/kg DM). Lucerne largely fell out of favour in the late 1970s as the cultivars then available were vulnerable to a variety of pests and diseases. Today, plantings are increasing. Although some believe it is a challenging crop to manage, by following some basic guidelines and using modern cultivars, you can grow a successful crop. Lucerne is very tolerant of dry conditions and supports excellent stock growth rates in spring and summer. Lucerne is also used for feeding trading cattle, cows, ewes and lambs; it is also interesting to note that lucerne was used extensively for grazing dairy cattle in the Central Plateau in the 1980s and is successfully used for this in South America today. There are a number of options for using lucerne: it can be conserved as hay or silage, rotationally grazed, or grown in combination with grass or a cover crop. Courtesy of Ballance Agri-Nutrients.

Buzzing over family venture Plenty of family businesses extend beyond generations, creating a legacy synonymous with the family name. For the Murray whanau in Awanui, north of Kaitaia, Farmlands shareholder Kai Ora Honey is the result of the passion and vision of their late grandmother and father.

Today, nine family members, including six siblings and their mother, Mata produce and manufacture Kai Ora’s range of manuka honey products via 2,000 hives. The six siblings – Blanche, Tae, Samson, Mabel, Walter and Sobieski Murray – work together in all facets of the business.

Saana Waitai Murray was a Ngati Kuri kuia and mother of 13. She and her son, Rapine Murray had a dream to utilise the natural resources of the Far North to create opportunities and jobs for their family.

“After many trials and errors, our family has over ten years of beekeeping experience in the honey industry” Mabel Murray says. “Our brothers and sisters were spread wide and far across the country. We came back together as a family in

| Kai Ora Honey is the result of the passion and vision of the late grandmother and father of the Murray whanau.

12 | THE FARMLANDER

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| The Murray whanau: Tae, Mabel and Samson Murrary, Blanche Morrogh, Sobieski Murray, Liam Morrogh and Walter Murray.

2014 with the intention of being self-employed and living at home, utilising the rural resources we have and hoping to not have to move to Australia to work to make a living.” Two additional beekeepers – a first cousin and brother in law – complete the Kai Ora team. Mabel says the mission of Kai Ora is to inspire and support whanau enterprise networks that demonstrate Kaitiakitanga (guardianship) for their whenua (land), while delivering positive economic outcomes for the people of Te Tai Tokerau. “Our vision is Whenua ora, wai ora, tangata ora – Our land and people flourishing together,” Mabel says. We must have courage to change to new ways, be bold in our thinking,

resources dedicated to education and conservation of these vital insects. The dedication to Kaitiakitanga has also seen Kai Ora feature on Country Calendar. Mabel says there is no ‘secret’ to the growing success of the family business. She jokes the success comes from “the desire to stay above board”. “Pure hard work from all of us and with success still comes learning curves,” she says. “We don’t just have our heads down – we see around corners! We are shaping our future, not reacting to it. We measure success by the number of people we enable along our journey. It’s not just personal gains.”

confident in our actions and disciplined with our values!” The influence of their grandmother, Saana, is evident across the Kai Ora business. The family explain that Saana served the role of mana wahine in every court of Maori society. “She had that much mana she was considered to be a living taonga (treasure) by everybody around her. She lived her life in a way which left no-one in any doubt about her pride in her people of Te Hiku o te Ika and in particular Ngati Kuri.” That pride extends to the land, with the Murray whanau proactive in conservation of the local bee population. Kai Ora fans can access a range of

We measure success by the number of people we enable along our journey. It’s not just personal gains.

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| Kai Ora has 2,000 hives at Awanui, just north of Kaitaia.

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THE FARMLANDER | 13


Save

12

per litre* with your Farmlands Card!*

*Savings appear as a rebate on your monthly Farmlands Account statement, not as a discount at the time of purchase.

Head into your local Challenge service station and get 12c off per litre with your Farmlands Card everyday! 14 4 | THE F FARMLANDER ARM AR MLANDER

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Future of rural governance drives To the Core A desire to safeguard the future of rural co-operatives – and provide opportunities to the next generation of rural governance – has seen Farmlands Co-operative and Silver Fern Farms team up for the To the Core programme. To the Core is a special course for shareholders wishing to build their knowledge of how their co-operatives operate and to whet their appetite to develop their rural leadership and governance skills. The three day course will cover a perspective on agribusiness co-operatives, the importance of sound strategy, developing a strong and capable Board table, a finance and risk skills session and Director skill development. Farmlands Director and Silver Fern Farms Chairman, Rob Hewett says the need to nurture governance opportunities for shareholders has been obvious for some time, as both the standard of governance required

| Farmlands Chairman Lachie Johnstone.

to execute the fiduciary duties required of the Board and governance best practice have increased.

to go in the governance space.

“We have a pool of shareholders that are very busy on their farm in their own businesses, but we (Farmlands and Silver Fern Farms) are a contributor to their profitability,” Rob says. “We asked ourselves how we can get shareholders engaged in the future governance of their companies that they own, and how do we introduce them to this governance process early in their careers.”

together. There are 66,000 Farmlands

Silver Fern Farms responded by creating To the Core, to bridge the gap for aspiring rural governance leaders. As a Director of Farmlands, Rob saw that there were similar needs for both companies. “All the co-operatives have this issue, where the talent pools for rural governance often overlap,” Rob says. “Irrespective of this, all companies need skilled candidates that are ready

“We have teamed up because some issues are better solved by working shareholders and 16,000 Silver Fern Farms shareholders. Many are shareholders with both co-operatives. “To the Core is a benefit to both companies and ultimately, to the wider rural communities in general.” Farmlands Chairman Lachie Johnstone says the Board of Directors has a responsibility to ensure that Farmlands is well governed into the future. “The opportunities for exposure in governance roles is a lot more limited than it was historically. There isn’t the breadth of roles that there were previously. We have to get involved and create pathways to nurture and build governance experience.” To learn more and apply for To the Core, please visit www.farmlands.co.nz

| Farmlands Director Rob Hewett.

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THE FARMLANDER | 15


Celebrating success – Farmlands award winners Farmlands held our staff awards earlier this year – an opportunity to pay tribute to the hard working staff that help our shareholders around the country. We are proud to celebrate some of our award winners from across your co-operative in this edition of The Farmlander. Additional comments on the awards and the winners are included from Farmlands Chief Executive, Peter Reidie.

Farmlands Rotorua Business Manager Dolly Halley.

CEO Leader of the Year Award: Dolly Halley Rotorua Business Manager Dolly Halley has been with the business for many years, yet treats every day with the same passion and enthusiasm. Dolly has been proactive in leading from the front when it comes to the Braveheart, the Farmlands change programme and epitomises the type of leadership that supports Farmlands and our shareholders. She has been actively involved in submitting requests/improvements for Braveheart system, a very humble individual who doesn’t feel the need to speak for the sake of it but when she talks people listen. In addition to her behaviours, her results deliver and a leader who brings passion and diligence to Health and Safety. Peter says: Leadership is not just about sitting at the leadership table, it’s about how we show up every day, meet the challenges we are confronted with and make situations better. Dolly, who is very humble, demonstrated that when she was challenged with hard situations, she was a true leader. She listened to what her fellow Farmlanders’ challenges were, addressed the issues, explained the why and had a positive impact. She never backed away from something because it fell into the too hard basket. She demonstrated true leadership and that is why she is CEO Leader of the Year.

16 | THE FARMLANDER

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Farmlander of the Year: Sue Smaill When the Taieri River burst its banks, the local Farmlands store was in the firing line. Business Manager Sue Smaill and her team worked into the night to move supplies out of the floodwaters. Overnight the situation worsened and by the morning the branch was completely cut off. Sue and her team were joined by other Farmlanders from around the region to help get the store back in business as quickly as possible, all the while helping shareholders in the area also affected by the flooding. Peter says: Sue is new to the Farmlands team, leading a new store in Otago. As if this was not a big enough challenge for Sue, she volunteered to lead the new uniform project. But Mother Nature dealt Sue and the team in Taieri a rough hand, flooding their new Farmlands Taieri Business Manager Sue Smaill with Peter Reidie. store and yard. Closing was not an option – getting the store open to service shareholders who needed help and support on their farms thought these adverse weather conditions was the order of the day. Sue, her team and the wider Farmlands team got the store operational again with the help of some shareholders. A real demonstration of Together Stronger. Sue lived the values of courage and unity. Sue also is a major contributor across the co-operative. Her energy, enthusiasm, hard work and preparedness to take on more is appreciated by all who get to work with her.

Health and Safety Excellence Award: Dunedin Seed Store The Farmlands Health and Safety team consider the Dunedin Seed store as ‘rock stars’ of the compliance programme. Led by Site Manager Roy Nimmo and site Health and Safety rep Greg Pollitt, the team are proactive in their Health and Safety, putting it at the forefront of everything they do. Greg proactively identifies potential hazards and risks at the site and develops controls to mitigate the risks, ensuring everyone on-site is healthy and safe. Peter says: To our co-operative, the Health and Safety Excellence Award is very important. It is given to the Farmlands branch or site that has demonstrated the highest level of health and safety engagement and compliance. We place a high premium on the wellbeing of our staff. This year the award was an incredibly close contest, with three sites finishing second equal. This is a great result because it means not only are our staff being safe, they are doing so across our network.

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Dunedin Seed Store Site Manager Roy Nimmo (centre) with Peter Reidie and Ruth Knewstubb.

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THE FARMLANDER | 17


Real Estate Branch of the Year: Oamaru The Oamaru team of Merv and Lianne Dalziel and Barry Kingan were the winners of the highly competitive Real Estate Branch of the Year award. With a diverse range of criteria, the victorious branch needs to work as a team to get across the line. Merv Dalziel has been with Farmlands Real Estate for nearly 10 years and is supported by his wife Lianne, who is his full time personal assistant and is also a qualified salesperson. Merv has lived in the North Otago area all his life and prides himself on his approachability and proven negotiation skills along with local knowledge and farming experience. Barry Kingan is ‘local and proud to be’, having previously farmed locally in the Five Forks area, inland from Oamaru. With almost 7 years of experience with Farmlands Real Estate, Barry enjoys the challenges of selling residential, lifestyle and rural properties – as well as supporting his beloved Maheno Rugby Club. Peter says: We have identified through our shareholders that there is a desire and a need for a real estate business within their cooperative. It makes sense – we want to be there with our shareholders through every stage of the farming cycle, from when they buy the farm to when they pass it on to the next generation or sell it. We are fortunate to have genuine leaders selling real estate for our shareholders. Oamaru takes home the prize but they are one cog in an awesome machine. We are committed to helping our shareholders with their real estate requirements.

Barry Kingan, and Lianne and Merv Dalziel.

Farmlands Fuel Territory Manager of the Year: Andrew Gowers Farmlands Fuel has three awards to give out at the Farmlands Awards and after close to 5 years with the co-operative, Andrew Gowers picked up the Territory Manager of the Year prize. Based in Southland, Andrew is responsible for commercial fuel and Gulf lubricants sales in the area. Fuel Territory Managers cover more than just bulk fuel and lubricants – they also provide advice and solutions on fuel storage, compliance and accessories. Andrew stepped up to also cover the large Otago area as well for a portion of the last year. Andrew embraced the challenge, showcasing Farmlands’ values, while also growing the Farmlands Fuel business in the area. Peter says: Our Fuel business is popular not only with shareholders but commercial customers as well. That is because we offer what our Fuel team like to call a ‘holistic solution’, with advice and service that covers when it’s in our tankers, your tank or your own vehicle. Our Territory Managers cover large areas and provide that technical expertise that you need in a very compliance-heavy industry. They are assets to the Farmlands team and you, as shareholders.

18 | THE FARMLANDER

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Farmlands Fuel Territory Manager Andrew Gowers (right) with General Manager – Fuel Mark McHardy.

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Farmlands Hokitika Business Manager Lisa Cargill.

Branch of the Year: Farmlands Hokitika It’s the award with the big trophy – and Hokitika Business Manager Lisa Cargill and her team were thrilled to take the trophy home. Making its way over to the West Coast, the Branch of the Year trophy has been proudly displayed on the front counter, as a way to acknowledge the role local shareholders played in the win. Peter says: The Branch of the Year Award is judged across a wide range of criteria. Everything from performance to the health and safety record is taken into account. Having the trophy is a big incentive and it is a hotly contested title. Branch of the Year is also an acknowledgement of the local shareholders that have supported their co-operative and their local team. Lisa and her team work hard to provide a great service across a vast geographic area – they are deserving winners.

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THE FARMLANDER | 19


Support Person of the Year: Lynda Speirs Farmlands HR Manager Lynda Speirs was the winner of the Support Person of the Year at the Farmlands Awards. While shareholders often interact with our staff in-store and in the field, support office staff pride themselves on their ability to help shareholders and staff behind the scenes. Lynda was chosen as the inaugural winner of Support Person of the Year for her diligence and dedication when providing expert support across the breadth of the co-operative. Her understanding of the business helps her to provide the best possible advice, no matter where staff are in New Zealand. Peter says: Our Support Person of the Year is an award that pays tribute to the people behind the scenes that the shareholders don’t always see or hear from but they are a key part of our cooperative. Lynda is a fitting winner because she is someone that our managers know will provide the support and results that help Farmlands on our journey. We had two awards to acknowledge our support team, with Christie McDonald also winning the award for Contact Centre Employee of the Year.

HR Manager Lynda Speirs.

HRINZ Talent Management and Development Award: Farmlands Co-operative Farmlands is not just giving out awards – it is winning them as well. The co-operative won a major national award in February for commitment to developing its people. The Talent Management and Development Award from the Human Resources Institute of New Zealand (HRINZ) saw Farmlands recognised ahead of a number of prominent New Zealand businesses. The Award is recommended for organisations that demonstrate excellence in initiatives and strategies Director – People and Safety Ruth Knewstubb and which support the development of Head of Organisational Development Sara Shea. talent and capability for specific employees of the organisation, such as graduates, leadership teams, specialist areas or organisation-wide e.g. values, cultural change etc. It also recognises the outstanding initiatives and strategies that lead to developing talent within an organisation. Farmlands Director of People and Safety Ruth Knewstubb was joined by Head of Organisational Development Sara Shea at the awards evening. Peter says: The Talent Management and Development Award from HRINZ is great recognition of how we are tracking on our journey from ‘good to great’. One of our key strategies is ensuring our people come first – and over the next 3 years, what do our leaders of the future need in terms of skills to support our vision for that future? We have a clear framework around how we are going to develop our people to deliver to the future and we’ve also incorporated it into our other people practices around talent development, and recruitment.

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THE FARMLANDER | 21


Pauline, the book and the Cuddly Cook The Farmlands Support Office in Christchurch is always laden with treats thanks to Senior Property and Asset Co-ordinator, Pauline Sullivan. But recently it was her turn to be treated. In 2016, Pauline won the 69th edition of the Edmonds Cookbook on Facebook. “2016 was also the year I found a lump and then was diagnosed with breast cancer. I underwent a mastectomy, removal of lymph nodes (resulting in the worst curse ever, lymphedema), chemotherapy and radiation,” she says. “To win anything was wonderful as it was a tough year.” Pauline decided to set herself a goal that by the end of 2017 she would make each of the 365 recipes in the cookbook, documenting her experiences along the way on her Facebook page “Pauline’s Pantry” (@paulinespage). “From living day by day during 2016, I wanted a goal for 2017. My life changed from day by day 2016 to year by year 2017. A focus and a challenge. It was my own little challenge that has

grown and grown,” Pauline says. Along the way she truly put the “cooking is love” ethos to practice, baking for various client meetings, family events and other occasions. Every spare wall in her house was covered in post-it notes, outlining the plan for when she was going to make each recipe, to coincide with certain dates. Providing unwavering love and support (and taste testing) along the way was her family, friends and colleagues – and on 31st December 2017 Pauline completed her challenge. Goodman Fielder Consumer Engagement Specialist, Kristin Mooney and the team heard about Pauline and her mission and wanted to do something special for her. “Togs, Goodman Fielder’s fantastic National Freight Manager, made us aware of Pauline,” she says. “Keriana Chivers, an employee at Fulton Hogan and vendor for Farmlands and Goodman Fielder, initially contacted Togs to see about borrowing the new Edmonds truck to surprise Pauline with a few goodies – but the moment Goodman Fielder’s Consumer Engagement and Category teams heard about her story, we said ‘let’s do something more’.” So the Goodman Fielder team made their way down to Christchurch with three hampers full of Edmonds products and baking accessories, so Pauline could continue her love of baking. “We arranged for a brand-new Edmonds truck to stop outside her house and brought along a very special guest – Chef Annabelle White. During

| Annabelle White and Pauline Sullivan.

the planning stages, we found out that Pauline is a very big fan of Annabelle – having attended various food shows and other events to coincide when she would be there – and she also owns all of her cookbooks,” Kristin says. “We’ll never forget seeing the look on Pauline’s face when she ran outside her house, having seen the Edmonds truck pull up outside! And when she saw the hampers of goodies and Annabelle pop out from the passenger side of the truck.” Annabelle and Pauline quickly got “stuck in” in Pauline’s kitchen. Annabelle taught her a quick and easy scone recipe, which was quickly devoured by the friends, family and colleagues who had helped with the surprise. “As Annabelle and Pauline chatted about her accomplishments in baking all of the Edmonds recipes,

| The Edmonds truck at Pauline’s house.

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS

Pauline’s Recipe Pick Edmonds Mock Whitebait Patties

it was apparent just how much love she pours into her cooking,” Kristin says. “Each person in the room that day had been personally touched by this woman and her generosity of spirit and love. Evidently, there was not a dry eye in the house.”

Asking about my favourite recipe is a little like asking me which of my children is my favourite (I have a son, Mark and daughter, Holly) but when Annabelle put me on the spot I said Mock Whitebait Patties. One reason is because I thought they sounded so silly but when I made them they were yummy. Excelle nt for breakfast or brunch. A lot of people have talked to me about them as they are childhood memories. They have gone out of favour like a lot of old recipes but people need to start trying these again. So many of the recipes I did brought back memories for people and that was really special. Ingredients • 1 egg, beaten • 2 ½ Tbsp Edmonds standard flour • 2 Tbsp milk • 3 Tbsp grated cheese • salt and pepper • 1 potato, peeled and grated • 1 tsp Edmonds baking powder • 3 Tbsp oil

Pauline’s family, friends and colleagues were all in on the surprise and did their part to ensure she was at home ready for the surprise. She was oblivious to the whole set-up, even when she saw the Edmonds truck drive past her kitchen window.

Method 1. Add the flour, milk, cheese and seasonings to the beaten egg and set aside for 10 minutes. 2. Add the grated potato to the batter with the baking powder just before you cook the patties. 3. Heat the oil in a heavy-based frying pan and drop in tablespoonfuls of the mixture. 4. Cook for 5 minutes on each side until golden , drain on paper towels and serve hot, or keep warm in the oven at 160°C for up to 20 minutes.

“I just thought it was driving past my house and desperately wanted a photo. By the time I got outside it had turned around and it was parking behind my daughter’s car. Then I saw across the road someone filming.” It wasn’t until she saw some of her

friends and colleagues on the driveway that she clicked to what was happening. “I am actually so touched by what people have done for me. I have had a ball doing what I did and never did it for anything else than I needed a challenge and something to focus on.” This year Pauline’s focus will be on fundraising, inspired by a close family friend whose young daughter is currently undergoing cancer treatment. “It has been so sad to see a beautiful young family going through this. As an adult having chemo was hard enough but for a tiny baby it is unimaginable. It breaks everyone’s heart that knows them but they are an amazing family and the strength they are all showing is amazing and humbling.” To watch the video of Pauline’s surprise, visit www.facebook.com/EdmondsCooking | Annabelle teaches Pauline a quick and easy scone recipe.

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THE FARMLANDER | 23


Let us know how we’re doing.

Visit www.farmlands.co.nz/feedback to answer a few quick questions and you will go in the monthly draw to win a $250 Farmlands voucher.

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HEALTH AND SAFETY

Farmers lift health and safety performance Changing attitudes to health and safety – and to WorkSafe inspectors – are contributing to fewer fatalities on farms. “Over the past 4 years we have seen a steady change in farmers’ attitudes,” Al McCone, agricultural sector lead for WorkSafe says. “When Safer Farms started out in 2014, there was apprehension and some reluctance from farmers about discussing health and safety. “Today, WorkSafe is finding many farmers are ready and willing to meet with our inspectors. The usual response they get from farmers now is, ‘right, what do we need to do’? “They understand that health and safety is part and parcel of running a good farm business. They’re on the way to giving health and safety the same priority as the choice of tractor or forage.” Organisations such as Farmlands, Beef + Lamb New Zealand and DairyNZ have played a key role in this shift, Al says. “Thousands of farmers have taken part in Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s Farm Safety Management System workshops, which are focused on exactly what farmers need to know about health and safety requirements. “Feedback has been excellent, with farmers reporting they may have approached workshops with some trepidation but left understanding their obligations and feeling confident enough to set up a health and safety plan. “DairyNZ has made managing health and safety and other risks a key plank of its FarmTune® dairy

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| Richard Loe, former All Black and Safer Farms ambassador.

farm specific programme, which is built on the principles of LEAN management and focuses on doing things easier, better, faster and safer.

fatality represents either a father, mother, brother, sister, child, partner, friend or workmate who went out on-farm and didn’t come home.”

“This has done much to establish health and safety as part of the bigger business picture on dairy farms and not just as compliance.

Al says evaluation of ACC data from the past 17 years has shown that 80 percent of fatalities on farms were related to use of vehicles or machinery.

“Farmlands has acted as an important conduit for advice to farmers, as well as making sure a good range of equipment is available that gives farmers a choice suited to their needs. Membership and support of the Agriculture Leaders Health and Safety Action Group shows commitment to developing long-term solutions to bringing down the harm rate.

“Over the past 3 years, this has become closer to 90 percent. We all need to do something about this. This year, we will be focusing strongly on identifying and managing critical risks around vehicles and machinery.

“We have come a long way but there is still much to be done. Every

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

“We’re looking forward to working with the sector on helping farmers understand what they need to do to stay safe when they’re using the quad bike, tractor or any farm equipment.” Article supplied by WorkSafe.

THE FARMLANDER | 25


Farmlands Cup a family affair for Fred As the dust settled on another Farmlands Cup battle, the man behind the ‘field of dreams’ had more than one reason to celebrate. Sure, Fred Booth’s beloved Highlanders won the third Farmlands Cup game 42-26 – the second to be played at Waimumu’s Fred Booth Park – but having most of his family there with him

played in 2016. This time however there were no shared spoils, after the inaugural game ended in a draw. “Everything just went to plan, with the Field Days running and the work Gore District Council had planned for the ground. It went very well – and it was a top game.” Fred puts the quality of the game

down to the quality of the players, with a number of All Blacks turning out for the pre-season game. As Fred puts it, “it was absolutely special to have that many All Blacks playing in front of you in a farm paddock”. With the ground in immaculate condition – “even the players reckoned it was as good as what you get in

made the victory that much sweeter. Family came from far and wide to watch the game, played in one of Fred’s paddocks. The game is played in the background of Southern Field Days, turning the traditionally quiet rural area just outside of Gore into a festival of farming and footy. “I had nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren at the game, with only one great-grandchild not there. It was like a family reunion.” Fred says he was told the secondever game at Fred Booth Park would have a similar format to the first, | The Crusaders and the Highlanders face off at Fred Booth Park.

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

Farmlands proud of community event “There was 7,500 people there and (an estimated) 90-95 percent of them would have been Farmlands shareholders.” Farmlands Sales Manager in Southland, Peter McRae is delighted that shareholders got to see their heroes in the flesh. “To a man, woman or child – whether it was watching the game or watching the kids from local clubs playing on the field at half time – everyone enjoyed themselves,” he says. The community flavour was evident throughout. The Eastern Southland Rugby Union marked out the ground and even supplied the goal posts. Gore District Council groundsman John Ave converted a paddock into a sports field worthy of international athletes. It’s part of a commitment to give back to the communities that created and continue to support their co-operative. “We want to create that great ‘Farmlands experience’ for our shareholders. And being from Southland, the final score wasn’t bad either!”

the city”, he says – a passionate crowd and having Highlandersclad great-grandchildren taking out the match ball, Fred admits the day was overwhelming at times. “When I was talking to Jamie Mackay, who was the announcer for the game, I said it shows that country people support rugby. That’s where rugby starts, not in the towns. Where else are you going to get a crowd like that for a practice match? “It was a great finish for the Field Days. I’m sure all of the crowd enjoyed the game, everyone I’ve talked to thought it was absolutely fabulous.” | Ash Dixon and Ben Smith with the Farmlands Cup.

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THE FARMLANDER | 27


OUT AND ABOUT with Farmlands SOUTHERN FIELD DAYS The Farmlands site was the place to be at Southern Field Days in Waimumu. This year the team were celebrating the Farmlands Cup being back at Waimumu and exclusive Farmlands rugby jerseys were given away to shareholders who qualified at the Farmlands site during the Field Days. More than 300 rugby jerseys were given away and 20 lucky shareholders won the chance to be part of the Farmlands Footy Squad – they each get to enjoy the Highlanders in action at Forsyth Barr Stadium a couple more times this season.

HORSE OF THE YEAR Hawke’s Bay was brimming with equine enthusiasts for the Horse of the Year event in March. The Farmlands team was onsite all week with feed at the ready for the hungry horses. The sites for our two feed brands, NRM and McMillan were both in full swing as well, with Jock Paget on the NRM site talking about NRM’s new feed Ultimate Sport. The team on the McMillan site were talking to customers about the Canterbury oil that is used in McMillan feeds. Our sponsored riders who competed during the week also produced some great results.

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

WANAKA A&P SHOW It was a busy couple of days for the Farmlands team at the Wanaka A&P Show. Shareholders basked in the sunshine in our hospitality area and enjoyed a fabulous lunch. Farmlands was also the place to be for all things retail – with so many shareholders visiting the Farmlands site, CEO Peter Reidie got stuck in to lend a hand behind the counter and sell a few shirts. We gave away a Wanaka Experience for two to one lucky shareholder, which included tickets to Warbirds over Wanaka, a Jabberwocky Brewing Company brewery tour and a dinner voucher for the Wanaka Speight’s Ale House.

NORTHLAND FIELD DAYS The Farmlands team had a great few days on-site at Northland Field Days in Dargaville. Shareholders had a go at guessing the weight of Pluto the Speckle Park/Friesian steer, raising more than $1,300 for the Northland Rescue Helicopter. Pluto’s official weight is 1,016kg and there were a few really close guesses! Plenty of prizes were picked up from the Fish ‘n’ Dip game, including an FMG gift hamper and a Weber BBQ from Genesis.

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS It was great to catch up with so many Farmlands shareholders at the Central Districts Field Days in Feilding. Shareholders had a go at fishing for prizes with the Fish ‘n’ Dip game – and the team are looking forward to taking the winners out on an all-inclusive fishing charter for some real fishing. Stock sticks were snapped up and raised funds for the Arohanui Hospice.

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THE FARMLANDER | 29


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Articles in the Plan 365 section allow Farmlands suppliers to share best practice and the latest advances in rural technology, NUTRITION to help shareholders with their farming needs all year round.

Kiwi straight options just got better It’s good to see that another internationally appreciated animal feed – corn gluten meal – has entered the New Zealand market and is now starting to trickle into regional ports. Importation has no doubt been encouraged by the Fat Evaluation Index (FEI) penalties that have been indicated by Fonterra to come into effect next season, which are likely to curb how much palm kernel expeller (PKE) is fed to the national dairy herd. I cut my teeth selling corn gluten meal in the UK in the 1990s, as TMR feeding became popular and it has been on my wish list of desirable by-products for years. If it can gain critical mass here, it could become a popular multi-purpose addition to the straights and blends Farmlands offer and as a constituent in the compound feeds we manufacture. A by-product from the wet milling of maize grain to extract starch, corn gluten meal is a mid-protein, mid-energy feed with relatively low residual fat levels, so it should not affect the FEI like PKE. The demand for starch as a staple ingredient in human food production is so great that huge volumes are available, its price reflects how it is valued by dairy

Typical analysis (DM basis) corn gluten meal Dry matter

90%

Crude protein

21%

Crude fat

3.5%

ME 12 MJ ME/kg DM

farmers globally. With only about 8 to 14 percent starch and typically 40 percent neutral detergent fibre (NDF), it should be safe for in-paddock trough feeding (provided all animals can get their fair share) but its fibre is more digestible than the fibre in PKE, so it is better suited to young stock and high producing cows. With over 20 percent crude protein, it could be useful for anyone who is winter milking or including low protein silage like maize or cereal silage in their milking cow diet, or simply as a supplement for calves on summer grass. I do not just celebrate choice simply because it is widely sought in this consumer age. The rumen is such a complex ecosystem, I am a fan of nutritional diversity whilst not trying to make things overly complicated. I have seen that, inevitably, simplicity can lead to compromises, e.g. wheat is a high energy grain that can help support high levels of milk production but when slug-fed at high levels in conjunction with highly acidic maize silage, it is not surprising that animal health and production can increase when some of the wheat is replaced with soya hulls – despite it delivering less energy. PKE has undoubtedly filled an energy gap for many cows but when consumed at higher levels affects milk composition in ways, which causes problems for milk processors. Increasingly we have a good spread of energy and protein feeds, which will allow better supplementation of pasture based systems – from grains rich in starch through to soy hulls rich in pectin and now corn

| Corn gluten meal is only about 8 to 14 percent starch.

gluten meal somewhere in between. Choice allows more opportunity for diets to be balanced according to the forages available and relative to the class of animal and their level of production and will help more farmers achieve their goals more of the time. For more information, contact your local Nutrition Specialist. Article supplied by Dr. Rob Derrick, Nutritionist, Farmlands.

(Specifications may vary)

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THE FARMLANDER | 31


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NUTRITION

Managing equine obesity Obesity is recognised to be a significant problem for people in many countries. However, studies have shown that this condition can be just as prevalent in horses and cause similar secondary health issues in our equine companions. While avoiding obesity in horses and ponies through dietary management is paramount, in cases where exceptionally slow metabolisms are in play the problem is often very difficult to prevent.

of adipose or visible sub-cutaneous

The primary effects of obesity in

of insulin resistance and laminitis.

equines are similar to the symptoms

Management of obese horses and

shown in people, including the

ponies involves restricting calories while

impact on joints and mobility issues

ensuring requirements for all essential

in extreme cases. However, the

nutrients are met and incorporating

more dangerous side effects of the

daily exercise into their routine. Easily

problem are the secondary conditions

digestible carbohydrates such as

that occur as a result of carrying

sugars and starch are best kept to

excess body condition. These include

a minimum, as these will contribute

insulin resistance, equine metabolic

to the risk of metabolic disease and

syndrome and the highly dangerous

insulin resistance. Considering grass

and often life threatening, laminitis.

is often high in sugars, pasture intake

Obese horses and ponies are classified

should be controlled by either using

as having body condition scores of 4

a grazing muzzle or confining the

to 5 on the 0-5 Body Condition Score

horse to a yard, stable, small paddock

(BCS) scale and will often have areas

or small area of the paddock.

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fat, which will vary among individuals. Some will have an absence of palpable ribs, large fatty deposits behind the shoulder and tail head and a large, firm crest. However, others may have palpable or even visible ribs making them look “lean”, although they retain a large cresty neck or perhaps other hidden fat deposits. The size of neck crests can be another way to define level of obesity and therefore the horse’s apparent risk

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To maintain digestive health, it is important to provide at least 1 percent of the horse’s body weight daily in alternate forage if the horse or pony is restricted from pasture. Mature, late cut hay is generally the lowest in calories and stalky grass hay or straw are ideal. It is recommended to avoid lucerne, clover or oaten due to the higher sugar and calorie levels. Soaking hay for 30 minutes in hot water or 60 minutes in cold water can reduce sugar and energy content significantly. Small amounts of food at frequent intervals is recommended to reduce digestive conditions and slow release hay nets are great for slowing down horses with healthy appetites. To meet trace mineral and vitamin requirements, a low calorie balancer pellet such as NRM Equine Balancer is ideal and should be the only supplementary feed provided. For assistance with feeding plans to reduce weight, manage condition and enhance overall health and performance, consult with an experienced equine nutrition advisor. Article supplied by Luisa Wood, Equine Nutrition Technical Advisor.

THE FARMLANDER | 33


Works for you NUTRITION

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NUTRITION

Choose supplements for pigs with care Keeping backyard pigs has been a common practice for centuries, as pigs will eat a wide range of different feedstuffs and can be efficient converters of waste foods or feed into high quality protein for human consumption. Supplementing your pigs’ diet with reject vegetables or waste milk on a dairy farm can be a good way of reducing waste and you may even consider feeding left over table scraps to your pigs. But, these feedstuffs pose a potential threat to the health of your pigs, as well as others and extra care must be taken when these supplements are feed. Waste vegetables can be a useful source of fibre, particularly for older animals and kunekune type pigs. However, pigs are single-stomached animals, like humans and so fibrous, high moisture feeds should only be fed in moderation. Feeds like potatoes,

turnips and swedes can be a good source of energy but are generally high in moisture and low in protein and essential minerals required for muscle growth and development and bone integrity respectively. High roughage feeds like pasture, cabbages and other vegetables are a good source of fibre but are low in dry matter and most pigs are unable to eat enough of these high moisture feeds to support good growth rates or high levels of milk production in sows. These feeds can be particularly useful for mature, non-lactating animals, which have lower nutrient requirements or kunekune type pigs, which have a greater ability to utilise high forage feeds. Feeding waste milk to pigs is a common practice and milk provides a good source of high quality protein. However, feeding large quantities of milk can lead to digestive upsets and feeding milk alone does not provide enough energy or essential trace elements for pigs. Milk fed pigs must be supplemented with a high energy density feed and trace minerals if pigs are to remain healthy and achieve good growth rates. Feeding milk that has not been heat treated can also help to support the spread of disease, particularly where milk is not produced on the same farm where pigs are kept. Although there are relatively few pig diseases present in New Zealand and border control measures are in place to help limit the possibility of a disease entering New Zealand, the risk of spreading disease is the main reason behind the strict laws controlling the feeding of food waste to pigs in

New Zealand. For example, feeding contaminated food waste to pigs is considered to have been the most likely cause of the Foot and Mouth disease outbreak in the UK in 2001. Under New Zealand law, any food waste that has come into contact with any meat, cooked or raw, must be heat treated to over 100oC for 1 hour to ensure that any bacteria or viruses present in the waste will be destroyed. These laws apply equally to commercially prepared and home-produced food. Properly treated food waste, reject vegetables and waste milk, can all be used to help reduce the cost of feeding pigs kept on small-holdings. To ensure optimum health and welfare of pigs and to support production in rapidly growing young animals or high producing sows, balanced feeds that provide appropriate levels of energy, high quality protein and essential minerals and vitamins should make up the vast majority of the animal’s diet. NRM Big Pig Nuts are ideal for feeding to growing pigs over 65kg and to dry sows and boars. Formulated to provide a balanced source of energy, protein and essential minerals, NRM Big Pig Nuts also contain a balanced level of fibre to support gut health in mature pigs. For rapidly growing animals or sows in milk, NRM Little Pig Tucker provides high energy and protein levels as well as minerals and vitamins to support weight gain and milk production. For more information, contact your local Nutrition Specialist. Article supplied by Natalie Chrystal, Nutritionist.

| Pigs will eat a wide range of different feedstuffs.

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THE FARMLANDER | 35


FORAGE AND ARABLE

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FORAGE AND ARABLE

Plan now for your spring-sown crops Paddock selection for a spring-sown crop depends on the purpose the crop is going to serve. Is it part of a re-grassing programme or will the area be regularly cropped?

away from waterways and drainage

If the former, then you will probably have chosen paddocks where pasture is not performing. If the latter, then consider ease of access for stock and/ or machinery. “If you intend to graze the crop in-situ, ensure stock have access to drinking water and can be kept

light stock, limit numbers on the break

channels,” Ballance Nutrient Dynamics Specialist, Jim Risk says. “Choose paddocks that are not prone to pugging or compaction or plan to graze with and use strategies such as back fencing and pre-placement of baleage to minimise damage to soil structure.” Whatever approach you choose, early soil testing is vital, particularly for pH, which takes time to adjust. Test to a

Table 1: Optimum pH and nutrient ranges for pasture growth according to soil type. Figures in brackets are the amount of nutrient required to lift levels by one unit, except for sulphur. There is no data on rates to raise S soil test levels. The amounts in brackets will overcome a deficiency*.

Soil type Soil test

Pumice

Allophanic

pH

5.8-6.0 (10t/ha)

5.8-6.0 (10t/ha)

5.0-5.5 (10t/ha)

5.8-6.0 (10t/ha)

Olsen P

35-45 (7kg/ha)

20-30 (11kg/ha)

35-45 (6-9kg/ha)

26-32 (5kg/ha)

Quick Test K

7-10 (45kg/ha)

7-10 (60kg/ha)

5-7 (30kg/ha)

7-10 (125kg/ha)1

15-20

15-20

15-20

10-12

10-12 (45kg/ha)*

10-12 (25kg/ha)*

10-12 (30kg/ha)*

10-12 (35kg/ha)*

8-10

8-10

8-10

8-10

Organic S Sulphate S (See note *) Quick Test Mg

Organic (peat) Sedimentary

depth of 150mm for crops if you are cultivating and to 75mm if direct drilling. It takes twice the amount of nutrient to shift levels to 150mm. Nutrient demands vary from crop to crop. On some soils it is difficult to shift levels into the crop’s optimum range, especially to 150mm. It may be better to apply what is needed to grow the crop, making adjustments for soil test results. Nutrient levels (including available nitrogen results) will influence crop yield and guide your nitrogen side-dressing approach. When coming out of a crop back into pasture, optimum pH and nutrient ranges are outlined in Table 1. “If you want to improve potassium levels in anticipation of pasture needs, it is best to do this after the crop has been grazed or harvested,” Jim says. “Crops can take up more potassium than they need if it is available and it will be removed from the paddock if the crop is harvested and fed out elsewhere, or only partially and unevenly returned via dung and urine if the crop is fed or grazed in-situ.” For more information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store.

* On yellow grey earths. Article supplied by Ballance Agri-Nutrients.

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THE FARMLANDER | 37


FORAGE AND ARABLE

Kills more slugs, more quickly.

No-one’s better placed than Lonza to formulate a slug pellet to make the most of META®. That pellet is AXCELA®. AXCELA® slug pellets are produced using a new wet-extruded production process. They are: FASTER acting

www.axcela.lonza.com

MORE palatable to slugs MORE robust AXCELA® slug pellets are better because they have an immediate effect on a slug’s ability to feed. Put simply, they kill more slugs, more quickly.

Available at your local Farmlands store!

0800 200 600 www.farmlands.co.nz 38 | THE FARMLANDER

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FORAGE AND ARABLE

Slug monitoring efforts must improve Crop farmers in New Zealand must put more effort into monitoring their crops for slug damage to avoid a repeat of the damage seen in 2017. Abie Horrocks, research manager (environment) at the Foundation for Arable Research (FAR), warns that while spring’s weather will ultimately dictate the impact of slugs on this year’s crops, the current trend embracing reduced tillage means slugs are now an increasingly troublesome pest. “Don’t wait until you can see slug damage in the crop, by then the slug population will likely be so high that you’ll be on the back foot with control,” she says. “Regardless of slug problems in the past, monitoring the in-crop populations – especially through the all-important establishment phase – is crucial. It’s so easy to get complacent and then you’ll get taken by surprise when the slug population erupts. It is not uncommon for slugs to outnumber baiting points, so managing before populations escalate can help.” Monitoring is particularly important in susceptible crops such as clover, seed grasses and brassicas but all other crops, including cereals, can also suffer damage. “Establishment is when crops

usually face slug problems, so warning bells should go off if the crop is being drilled in generally wet weather or if it is slow to emerge or to grow through the early vulnerable stages,” Abie says. “It’s important to think about incorporating a slug control strategy into your overall cropping plan, which involves much more than monitoring alone,” she says. “For example, pay attention to seedbed quality. Aim for good seed and soil contact and coverage, which prevents slugs from moving through crevices in the soil where they can readily access the seed.” Natural predators are worth encouraging. Carabid beetles – of which New Zealand has three native species that are commonly found in the paddock – are keen slug predators, especially at the immature stage. “Carabid beetles can make a valuable contribution to slug control, reducing the need for (and frequency of) pellet applications. But you’ll need to be careful with insecticide use to encourage populations,” Abie notes. “Carbamate-based products, for example, are not ‘beetle-friendly’.” Including the grey field slug, four species of slugs are agronomically significant in New Zealand agriculture – research carried out by FAR and Plant and Food Research suggests the two that are the most common are the grey field slug (Deroceras reticulatum) and the brown field slug (Deroceras panormitanum). “The grey field slug is the one to look out for,” Abie warns. “Lab trials suggest the

grey field slug responds most quickly to changes in moisture and causes up to four times more feeding damage.” While knowing which species are present in a crop won’t affect the overall strategy, Abie encourages farmers to identify species during monitoring so they can react accordingly. FAR’s recommendation on slug monitoring has been welcomed by crop protection company Lonza. “There’s been a big change in Europe over the last 10 years, with much greater emphasis on awareness and pre-emptive control strategies that involve population monitoring to stay ahead of the game and a move away from the ‘one size fits all’ approach to slug control,” Lonza Business Development Manager Mike Swift says. “There’s a growing realisation that slug control should be part of the same, modern precision-led approach to crop protection that we adopt with products such as fungicides,” he explains. “Where several factors contribute to an effective decision-support system.” Axcela® is the new slug and snail product manufactured via a unique wet-extrusion process by Lonza. It combines the advantages of the specific mode of action of Meta® metaldehyde with the latest formulation techniques to give these pellets the highest levels of control of slugs and snails under a wide range of conditions. For more information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Lonza.

| Axcela provides high level control of slugs and snails.

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THE FARMLANDER | 39


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FORAGE AND ARABLE

Europe’s best selling beet is one to beat After achieving disappointing fodder beet yields in recent years, Cameron Kerr was keen to try something different in his farming system. With advice from his local Farmlands Technical Field Officer, he decided to establish a different variety of fodder beet in a bid to increase total dry matter production. Cameron has been growing 40ha fodder beet on his 500ha beef finishing and dairy support property near Athol in northern Southland for the past 7 years. The need for a high yielding and high quality feed, which fodder beet offers, is important for finishing beef bulls and wintering his mixed aged dairy cows and heifers from his dairy farm near Woodlands, east of Invercargill.

Cameron wasn’t achieving the uniformity or yield expectations he required, so he decided to seek out some agronomic advice from his local Farmlands Technical Field Officer, Jim Beer. Jim noticed that there were a few factors that could be improved for the following season to help increase yields – better insect control, of nysius in particular, earlier sowing date and using a different cultivar that was known to be more uniform and higher yielding. Cameron decided to put one of his designated paddocks into Jamon fodder beet, to compare for himself what he had been traditionally growing. Four months post-sowing, as the beet was starting to bulb up, Cameron was noticing a big difference between

Jamon and the other variety of fodder beet he had been growing. “Everything was sown at the same time and while Jamon wasn’t the first out of the ground, it soon caught up and passed the other five varieties I had sown and has been ahead in yield ever since. It is looking quite impressive, particularly after the dry summer we’ve had.” He has also noticed there are more plants and less gaps up the rows because Jamon is a hybrid with a mono-germ seed. Jamon has been Europe’s best selling fodder beet for many years and has been a popular choice within New Zealand farming systems for some time. It has proven to be a uniform, consistent performer, both on-farm and within Agricom’s extensive national trialling programme. Jamon has a high leaf holding capacity coming into the winter (which is highly desirable as the fodder beet bulb is very low in protein) and is classified as a medium type fodder beet with average bulb dry matter percentages ranging between 16-18 percent. With an orange, elongated, tankard shaped bulb, it generally sits about 50 percent above the ground in normal growing conditions, providing excellent access and utilisation for all classes of grazing animals. To learn more about incorporating Jamon fodder beet into your farm system, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Agricom.

| Farmlands Technical Field Officer Jim Beer with a Jamon fodder beet from Cameron Kerr’s farm.

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THE FARMLANDER | 41


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ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Body condition scoring ewes Although many farmers are still getting last spring’s lambs off to the works, it is now time to start thinking about next year’s lamb production, in particular getting ewes in good body condition for mating. The single most important factor influencing the number of lambs weaned and kilograms of lamb weaned per hectare is the percentage of ewes in good body condition at mating. Studies have shown that it is not a matter of increasing the overall or average Body Condition Score (BCS) of the ewe flock but reducing the size of the “tail end” in the flock. These studies also showed that this critical BCS level varies by breed but is generally between 2.5/5 and 3/51. Increasing an individual ewe’s BCS above this critical level does not increase her fertility. While we talk about the power of body

condition scoring ewes at this time of year, it is interesting to note that industry figures have shown that a common trait in the top 20 percent of sheep farming businesses by profit per hectare is that they regularly BCS their ewes right through the year. By body condition scoring ewes, a farmer can identify the “tail end” ewes and run a split flock approach targeting feeding based on ewe BCS. This results in efficient use of feed and not over-feeding ewes already in good body condition that will not show increased fertility from increased nutrition. Farmers should be body condition scoring ewes a month before the ram goes out to give the ewes time to benefit from any extra feeding required and get on a rising plane of nutrition at joining. Another consideration for ewes in poor

body condition leading up to mating is a drench for control of gastrointestinal parasites. Autumn rains combined with low pasture residuals after a dry summer can really increase the challenge from parasites that your breeding ewes may face. Younger stock, two-tooths and hoggets in particular, are more prone to the impact of gastrointestinal parasites and are more likely to show an economic response to a drench before mating. Converge® or Alliance® are two ideal choices for controlling gastrointestinal parasites in the autumn. Both of these drenches are combination drenches aiding in the prevention of development of drench resistance. The risk of developing drench resistance can also be prevented by only drenching a proportion of the flock based on age and BCS. The undrenched, better conditioned and older ewes are an excellent source of sensitive parasites or “refugia” for the worm population on the farm if they are able to graze pasture after the mob that was drenched has grazed it. Both of these drenches are excellent drenches for use with your beef weaners as well. Using the same drench in both your sheep and cattle reduces wastage and keeps things simple in your drench shed on-farm. For more information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. ACVM No: A10119, A10249. ®Registered trademark. Schering-Plough Animal Health Ltd. NZ/CVG/0118/0001a. 1. P.R. Kenyon, S.K. Maloney and D. Blache. Review of sheep body condition score in relation to production characteristics. NZ Journal of Agricultural Research, 2014. Article supplied by MSD Coopers Animal Health.

| It is time to start thinking about getting ewes in good body condition for mating.

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THE FARMLANDER | 43


ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

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ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Improving dry cow management and fertility Milk fever (parturient hypocalcaemia) means a lowering of blood calcium levels around the time of calving. What is often not realised, is cows that have had milk fever have a reduced immunity and are therefore much more susceptible to a whole range of subsequent conditions such as retained placenta, mastitis, metritis and fatty liver syndrome – all of which can have negative effects on subsequent fertility. Milk fever is one of many livestock problems where “prevention is better than cure”. In the body, calcium is needed (amongst other things) to aid the release of the chemical messenger, which activates muscles. Lack of calcium results in a loss of muscle activity and it is no surprise therefore, that the clinical signs of milk fever are a lack of muscle function. Magnesium has an important influence on calcium homeostasis. During periods of low calcium intake, the body maintains normal blood calcium levels (homeostasis) by increasing the efficiency of calcium absorption from the gut. Mobilisation of calcium from skeletal reserves is also increased at the same time but this takes 10-14 days to be fully switched on. This increase in absorptive efficiency requires the presence of magnesium. Research has shown a tendency for low blood magnesium levels in dry cows. A cow need only be mildly hypomagnesaemic to greatly impair the efficiency of calcium absorption. A small reduction in blood magnesium levels can dramatically reduce the

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

efficiency of calcium absorption and the amount of calcium mobilised from the skeleton by up to 40 percent. DairyNZ data suggests that for every 2 percent of downer cows a further 5 percent will have clinical hypocalcaemia but don’t become downer and a further 33 percent of cows will have sub-clinical hypocalcaemia (DairyNZ Tech Series, June 2012). Crystalyx Dry Cow contains a unique blend of magnesium salts, which have been shown by research conducted at Glasgow Veterinary School to have a superior availability within the cow (so the magnesium is more efficiently absorbed) than any pure calcined magnesite source. Crystalyx Dry Cow also contains generous levels of all essential trace elements to replenish body reserves prior to calving and help support and maintain a strong healthy immune system within the cow – important for calf health and vigour and to reduce the risk of mastitis in early lactation. The high levels of vitamin E and selenium also help to reduce the risk of retained afterbirth post-calving. Three research studies have been undertaken on New Zealand dairy farms, overseen by Dr. Mark Oliver from

| Research has shown a tendency for low blood magnesium levels in dry cows.

the University of Auckland. “Crystalyx Dry Cow is a viable alternative to traditional magnesium supplementation on New Zealand dairy farms,” Dr.

consuming Crystalyx Dry Cow and this should help with an easier and faster transitioning and improved production.”

should support improved immunity

For more information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store.

and disease resistance. Cows like

Article supplied by Crystalyx.

Oliver says. “Additional essential minerals, trace elements and vitamins are also provided in the block, which

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 45


Works for you HORTICULTURE

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HORTICULTURE

GET YOUR AUTUMN HORTICULTURE INPUTS SORTED Soil nutrient management

Plan your soil testing now to measure the soil quality and nutrient levels to take the guesswork out of nutrient management. This will assist with identifying nutrient deficiency or toxicity. Do not sample within 3 months of applying fertiliser or lime.

Spraying out for maximum control of perennial weeds in autumn

Spraying out crop residue in the autumn with glyphosate is an ideal opportunity to achieve a high level of problem perennial weed control. In autumn there is improved glyphosate performance on weeds such as couch, mercer grass, kikuyu, convolvulus, Indian doab and Californian thistle due to their sap flow being downward to build root reserves for the following growing season. This enables glyphosate to be actively translocated into the root system for maximum knockdown and regrowth control.

Post-harvest management

Consult with your local Farmlands Technical Advisor on the options for your paddocks after the existing crops have been harvested. Farmlands can provide a wide range of vegetable seed, as well as beneficial ground cover such as mustard and lupin seed and forage grasses.

FAR_07711

For all the autumn solutions you need, talk to your local Technical Advisor today.

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THE FARMLANDER | 47


RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Preventative action keeps rodent populations in check Although rodents become more visible and annoying in autumn when their numbers are high and they are looking for new homes to escape the winter cold, sensible rodent control involves year-round preventative action to keep populations in check. Rodents spoil food, spread disease and cause damage by fouling and gnawing. Rodents will gnaw wood, wiring, pipe-work and food sources while mice urinate and defecate many times a day. Both rats and mice can cause extensive damage to property, as well as contaminating areas they reside in. Controlling rodent numbers with a proactive pest control programme helps to reduce numbers of predators on our farms, around

bush lines and other native areas. If rodents do not have access to alternative foods such as stock feed, garbage or human food scraps, bait is an effective way to ensure successful eradication. Before laying bait, look at the infested area to find the location of entry, nesting and feeding areas. Rodents are nocturnal and so are rarely seen during the day but look for signs that they are around, such as droppings, footprints, structural damage to buildings, damage to stored grain or other foods, tooth marks, burrows and holes. Rodents are habitual and tend to follow distinct paths or tracks between feeding, drinking and living areas. Inside buildings they have a tendency to move close to walls rather than along an open floor.

• Rodents are suspicious of human scent and may avoid baits that have been touched, so avoid handling bait with bare hands. • Maintain fresh baits by checking and replacing them every 2 to 3 days initially and later, every week or two. • Be particularly vigilant during autumn when the first cold and wet weather arrives, as this usually drives rodents indoors to find shelter and food. • To protect non-target animals from secondary poisoning, collect any dead rodent bodies and burn or bury them. • Spoiled or unwanted bait should be disposed of in a similar manner. • Rats and mice prefer fresh, highquality foods and will reject spoiled or low palatability foods when given a choice, so bait selection is important. A cereal based bait with brodifacoum as the active ingredient such as PestOff Rodent Block bait is a good option. PestOff bait is most effective when used in conjunction with the PestOff Dead Rat Café or Departure Lounge. The Dead Rat Café can be used either indoors or outside and the wire hoops provided will prevent rodents from removing any of the bait. The Departure Lounge is designed to be placed along a wall or building to take advantage of the typical hunting characteristics of rodents. It allows the rodent to feed inside without the fear of being discovered. For more information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997, No. V005099. Article supplied by Bell-Booth.

| Both rats and mice can cause extensive damage to property, as well as contaminating areas they reside in.

48 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Purchase 6kg or more of PestOff Rodent Blocks at any Farmlands store and go in the draw to WIN 1 of 40 Dead Rat Café bait stations!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwY7goPzWM or scan the QR Code to view a short video that shows how easy it is to bait a station with either PestOff rodent blocks or pellets.

*Terms and Conditions apply. Promotion runs from 1st April to 30th June 2018. Visit www.farmlands.co.nz for full Terms and Conditions. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997, No. V005099.

Available at your local Farmlands store!

0800 200 600 www.farmlands.co.nz WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 49


Works for you RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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MAXIMUM LIFE, MAXIMUM TRACTION N The new Firestone Maxi Traction 65 is BIGGER in all aspects p except p price p • Longer tyre life Outstanding tyre life and reliability for a lower cost per hour

• Excellent traction Covers more ground, faster and more economically

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0800 80 20 80 bridgestonetyres.co.nz

Find your nearest store at bridgestonetyres.co.nz/stores or contact your nearest dealer for more information.

50 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

PESTOFF RODENT BLOCK 3KG Earn 3 Choices Points | 119620

$

.95

59

INCL. GST

SAVE $10.08

OVER

50% OFF CRYSTALYX FORAGE PLUS 22.5KG Earn 3 Choices Points | 159518

$

.95

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GALLAGHER 730MM STANDARD PIGTAIL 10 PACK Earn 1 Choices Point | 131495

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HOT BUNDLE OFFER PROGIBB SG 250 AND FARMGRO N40 200L Earn 51 Choices Points | 141564, 208225

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.00

768

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www.farmlands.co.nz Terms and Conditions apply. Savings and Discounts based on normal retail price. While stocks last. Prices valid from 1st - 30th April 2018. WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 51


Works for you RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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52 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE FARMLANDS FUEL

Delivering more than fuel Farmlands Fuel and Lubricants is dedicated to providing the rural commercial, industrial and retail fuel sectors with a holistic service. As part of your co-operative, Farmlands Fuel is here to drive competition in the sector, helping shareholders save on what they need to run their businesses. Shareholders however need more than just bulk fuel. Farmlands Fuel also offers advice and supplies on storage, accessories and HSNO requirements, through to our fuel card offer and exclusive access to Gulf oils and lubricants. So, how can your co-operative help you with your fuel needs? It’s all about the delivery. Compliance • Health and Safety Plan specific to the delivery of fuel to your sites. • Risk Assessments for Hazardous Substances (petrol and diesel). • Hazard Register specific to the contract and safe operating procedures. • Tier 1 Oil Spill Contingency Plans for tanker to vessel refuelling. • Tier 1 Emergency Response Plan for fuel installations in a marine environment. • Site specific Environmental Management Plan. Gulf Farmlands Fuel and Lubricants owns the exclusive distribution rights for the Gulf brand of lubricants throughout New Zealand. As a shareholder, this means you are a part owner of Gulf in New Zealand. The Gulf lubricant range includes products suitable for

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

use in virtually every type of vehicle or machine, from latest specification and highest performance lubricants through to more economical and robust products for older equipment. Storage solutions – Kingspan Farmlands has partnered with Kingspan to provide the right storage solutions for our customers’ operations. A minimum annual volume needs to be quantified and if the shareholder qualifies then we’ll provide them a free Kingspan tank upon signing a 5 year supply agreement with Farmlands. We also have the Kingspan TruckMaster range that can provide a storage solution for our shareholders with smaller fuel usage, which can be found at your local Farmlands store.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

Fuel scheduling The benefits to the customer are: • A more timely and accurate service. Drivers have more time to deliver fuel rather than filling out paperwork. • Orders are automated – from the initial order, right through to the billing process. • Provides a real-time update on the progress of your delivery. • Printed delivery dockets showing litres delivered, time of delivery, and GPS location of delivery. For more information about Farmlands Fuel and Lubricants, call 0800 666 626.

THE FARMLANDER | 53


Works for you RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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Moving is easy with Meridian Energy and Farmlands +RZGRHVDWULSR΍WKHIDUPVRXQG" 6LJQXS\RXUGDLU\VKHGWR0HULGLDQDQGJHW

$400 Account Credit*

PPD

Prompt Payment Discount*

2%

Shareholder rebate*

A chance to WIN one of two

$5000 travel vouchers*

And you’ll earn ongoing Choices Rewards Points for paying through your Farmlands account. 'RQȇWKDYHDGDLU\VKHG":HȇYHJRWDJUHDWR΍HUIRU\RXWRR

'*΂

Signing up is easy, call 0800 496 444 or visit meridian.co.nz/movefarm

*Terms and condiditons apply. Visit meridian.co.nz/movefarm

54 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE INDUSTRY NEWS

Aussie prepares to dine on fine Kiwi swine New Zealand pork and pork products will soon be served up on dining tables in Australia, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced in March. Access and certification for New Zealand pork exports into Australia has been agreed by MPI and Australia’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. Department officials visited New Zealand to gain a good understanding of our systems, followed by a series of negotiations and close engagement by officials.

New Zealand Pork Chairman Ian Carter says access to Australia for New Zealand pork will provide a positive boost for New Zealand’s pork industry. “Commercial pig farmers in New Zealand are passionate about the care and expertise they invest in farming their pigs,” Ian says. “We see the granting of access to Australia as an important formative step to explore export markets that value the qualities associated with pork and pork

products produced from pigs born and raised in New Zealand and the sector’s world-leading high health status. “We are grateful for MPI’s support in facilitating this first step,” Ian says. “Australia is already a very important market for New Zealand’s primary products,” Jarred says. “We’re pleased to be able to add pork and pork products to the list.” Article supplied by MPI.

Access has been granted for uncooked New Zealand pork meat and products containing New Zealand pork. Uncooked pork meat will, however, require further processing once it arrives into Australia. Pork exports to Australia can start immediately. “New Zealand has a very strong meat regulatory system, which is held in high regard by our trading partners,” Jarred Mair, MPI’s deputy directorgeneral policy and trade, says. “These have helped towards enabling access to Australia for our pork and pork products. “We appreciate and would like to acknowledge the support of the New Zealand pork industry in reaching this milestone.” New Zealand’s pork exports are currently limited to a small number of markets, such as the Pacific Islands and Singapore. In the year to 30 June 2017, New Zealand exported about 173 tonnes of pork in total valued at around $1 million.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 55


RURAL RURA RAL INFRASTRUCTURE INFRAS ASTR T UCTURE

NEED GROCERIES?

FAR_07392

Use your Farmlands Card at New World today!

*Terms and Conditions apply. At participating New World stores excluding Broadway, Churton Park, Hutt City, Miramar, Newlands, Newtown, Railway Station, Silverstream, Stokes Valley, Whitby, Southmall, Khandallah.

Works for you

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56 | THE FARMLANDER

AM CARD HOLDER

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Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved. 6005 0991 1047 7802

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


Works for you RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

EXP MAY 19

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Fit your home’s colour scheme with the landscape Tips

from Resene

You may have gumboots at the back door, lots of cows to milk and chickens in the pen or a newly built country home with acres of pasture and lush gardens.

Enjoy special savings at Resene with your Farmlands Card

Either way, you may have decided that the exterior of your home may need to reflect the natural environment. And with the warm weather coming, it’s the perfect time to plan your exterior paint jobs.

30

% off

Here are some ideas to get you started to enhance your home and fit in with your surrounding landscape… If you have views of rock strewn mountain peaks etched against the bright blue skies above bleached crop fields – try Resene Quarter Craigieburn, Resene Half Merino and Resene New Denim Blue, or Resene Eighth Arrowtown, Resene Double Black White and Resene Groundbreaker.

Resene premium paint 500ml-4L, testpots, wallpapers and accessories

20

% off

Resene premium pails 10L If you have views of rolling hills and a soft merging of house and bush – try Resene Half Linen, Resene Quarter Rice Cake and Resene Karaka, or Resene Half Fossil, Resene Double Alabaster and Resene Canyon.

Quality, paint, colour, wallpaper and professional advice

Come in and experience the Resene difference today!

If you have views of grapevines marching to the horizon, orchards and traditional hedgerows – try Resene Villa White, Resene Quarter Villa White and Resene Scoria, or Resene Double Ash, Resene Helium and Resene Twizel.

If you need help to decide on the right products and colours for your project, use the free online Resene Colour and Technical Expert services – visit www.resene.co.nz/colourexpert or www.resene.co.nz/techexpert. Resene experts will provide tailor-made advice for your project direct to your inbox. Or visit your nearest Resene ColorShop for free helpful and friendly advice.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

0800 RESENE (737 363) www.resene.co.nz Discounts off normal retail price only with your Farmlands Card at Resene owned ColorShops.

THE FARMLANDER | 57


REAL ESTATE

$

20K RENOVATION PACKAGE

WHICH PRIZE WOULD YOU CHOOSE? Get an appraisal or list your property with us to enter the draw!*

20K TRAVEL PACKAGE $

$

20K HOMEWARE PACKAGE

Contact your Farmlands Real Estate Salesperson today!

$

20K SHED PACKAGE

FAR_07757

To enter, visit www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz 0800 200 600 | www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz *Terms and Conditions apply. Valid from 1st March – 11th May 2018. Web form must be completed to enter.

58 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

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REAL ESTATE

Introducing Jason Wills, GM Farmlands Real Estate Jason has been a major player in the New Zealand and international real estate industry for 20 years and he is excited about bringing that expertise and vision to Farmlands Real Estate. During his two decades in the industry, Jason specialised in bringing New Zealand real estate to the global market. He achieved this through an innovative approach and bringing real estate into the digital age, winning several national and international awards along the way. He is also adept in leading highperforming teams by fostering an inclusive team culture and facilitating regular comprehensive business planning sessions. Jason understands that it is the people who take a business from good to great. As an industry heavyweight, appointing Jason to the General Manager role is a major coup for Farmlands Real Estate. However, Jason says the Farmlands Real Estate team and their values, culture and vision for the future helped make it an easy decision.

| General Manager – Real Estate, Jason Wills.

fishing, diving and hunting on offer.

and technical expertise of the Real

“Getting back out into the country is

Estate team means shareholders will

something I’m really looking forward

get the best value for their property.

“I’ve always had a drive to innovate rather than follow – and the opportunity to really help our shareholders excites me,” Jason says. “I genuinely like the approach of the co-operative model and the chance to get back to dealing with rural New Zealand again – it’s of course, the backbone of the country.”

to – my first few months in the role

“Real Estate, as a service, is an obvious

are going to be spent travelling the

choice for our co-operative. It does not

country and meeting all of our Real

matter whether our shareholders are

Estate team,” Jason says. “I also

looking to buy or sell, because we know

want to meet our shareholders to

their business, their property and most

gain a better understanding of what

importantly, we know them,” he says.

is required for their unique part of

“It’s that unique Farmlands service

the country – I want to be interacting

you get for being a member of your

It’s a backbone Jason knows well. Growing up in Picton, Jason’s first job was spent doing the rural mail delivery to farmers throughout the Marlborough Sounds. In between mail runs, Jason spent his time making the most of the

with both sides of the coalface.”

co-operative that can help get a

With upcoming field days and A&P

better price for your property going

Shows around the country, Jason will

forward. Having a Real Estate team

have plenty of opportunities to get out

as experienced and skilled as ours

and about with the Real Estate team.

when it comes to rural real estate only

He is confident that the high calibre

makes the offer even more attractive.”

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 59


REAL ESTATE

Boundary indicative only

www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

More than milk A 190 hectare dairy unit and 65 hectare lease located at Tirau. Milking around 450 cows with all young stock, has produced up to 170,000kgMS. The property is very aesthetically appealing with the Waiomou stream meandering through the farm, as are the two very unique spring filled lakes, which have dynamic water qualities that may provide a commercial opportunity in the future. There are three dwellings, a 44 bail internal rotary cow shed and a great range of support buildings. Price by negotiation.

60 | THE FARMLANDER

Ian Morgan Lifestyle / Rural – Waikato 027 492 5878 ian.morgan@farmlands.co.nz Glen Murray Lifestyle / Rural – Waikato 027 488 6138 glen.murray@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

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REAL ESTATE

Property ID: PN1090

Location and versatility

www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Located in the farming district of Colyton is this highly developed, 90 hectare beef finishing or dairy support operation. Currently stock are grazing on the property. There is excellent fertility with a central race, appealing contour, good yards and an efficient stock water system. Well located just a 25 minute drive from Palmerston North and 15 minutes from Feilding with impressive grass quality. Deadline sale closing 4pm, Tuesday 27 March 2018 (unless sold prior).

Yvonne Forlong Lifestyle / Rural – Feilding 021 456 565 yvonne.forlong@farmlands.co.nz Bill Milham Lifestyle / Rural – Palmerston North 027 443 3324 bill.milham@farmlands.co.nz

Property ID: DU2599

Great location just 10km from Gore township Farmed as one unit but available separately, is this 273 hectare breeding and finishing farm of rolling ridges at Diamond Peak. Large four bedroom homestead, 4-stand woolshed/covered yards (900 night pens), good cattle yards, 4-bay truck shed and 5-bay tractor shed, three 3-bay haybarns and a 5-bay hay barn. The Kaiwera Road block (64 hectares) provides additional finishing country and includes a 3-stand woolshed/covered yards, cattle yards and an old 3-bay implement shed/workshop. Tender closing 12pm, Friday 23 March 2018 (unless sold by private treaty).

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Craig Bates Lifestyle / Rural – Dunedin 027 489 4361 craig.bates@farmlands.co.nz Dave Hardy Lifestyle / Rural – Dunedin 027 533 2770 dave.hardy@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © April 2018. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 61


REAL ESTATE

Terms and conditions apply. Offer only available until 30th April 2018 on new T6, T7, T8 and T9 series tractors. *All orders placed before the 30th of April will receive 1000 bonus Choices Rewards Points. All units will come with a 2-year service protection plus warranty. **$5,000 cash back only available on new T7 series tractors ordered before the 30th April 2018.

62 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š April 2018. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


18NH016 - Imported by C B Norwood Distributors Ltd

REAL ESTATE

newholland.co.nz WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

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THE FARMLANDER | 63


For all your equine biosecurity needs. One of the greatest disease threats to a horse is from another horse, whether through direct contact or through surfaces, equipment, vehicles or people contaminated by diseased animals. Virkon®TM can be used as a skin disinfectant. Washing your horse with Virkon®TM can reduce the skin challenge of the organisms that are responsible for Ringworm, Mud Fever and Strangles. There is a wide range of disinfection uses for Virkon®TM. It is the disinfectant of choice for: • Stable blocks • Feeders, drinkers, tack and other equipment • Horsebox disinfection • Aerial disinfection

For more information, visit www.nrm.co.nz/products/virkons/ Available from your local Farmlands store.

FAR_07694

©2016 LANXESS. Virkon™ and any associated logos are trademarks or copyrights of LANXESS Corporation. LANXESS™ and the LANXESS Logo are trademarks of LANXESS Deutschland GmbH. All trademarks are registered in many countries worldwide.

Profile for Farmlands

Farmlander April 2018 North  

Special offers and information for Farmlands shareholders.

Farmlander April 2018 North  

Special offers and information for Farmlands shareholders.

Profile for farmlands