Page 1

SPECIAL OFFERS AND INFORMATION FOR FARMLANDS SHAREHOLDERS

NOVEMBER 2019 Valid from 1 – 30 November 2019

A PYRAMID OF OPPORTUNITIES PAGES 8

CHOICES REWARDS IS BACK! PAGE 3

7802 1047 MAY EXP 0991 6005 LDER RD HO AM CA RD HOLDER CA ANDY 780 911047

25

NEW WAVE OF CO-OPS PAGE 24

GREAT CARD PARTNER DEALS INSIDE!

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The FARMLANDER


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

NOVEMBER

INTEREST

PLAN365

3. Farmlands Staff Profile

Plan365 Nutrition

3. From the CEO

31. Conditioning for the yearling sales

4. Choices launch

33. What’s the deal with ducks?

6. 5 Minutes with Roz Henry

35. Don’t kid yourself: goat diets differ

WHAT’S ON

5-7

8. Special Feature – Building The Pyramid Plan365 Forage and Arable

15. Chris Dennison re-elected to Farmlands Board

37. Replacing what you reap

16. Farmlands Darfield lauded in Environmental Awards

NOVEMBER

Ladies’ Nights

Plan365 Horticulture

18. Buying Power Promise

Join two of New Zealand’s most beloved personalities, Ben Hurley and Annabelle White at an event near you.

39. Controlling brown rot in stone fruit

19. From the beginning: stronger together 21. New standards for dairy cattle

Plan365 Animal Management

23. Thinking safe with Gurt and Pops

43. Ensure optimal lamb growth this spring

24. A new wave of co-operation

45. New law safeguards man’s best friend

27. Next-generation farmer focused on the future

47. Ewes facts to flesh out your bottom line 49. Looking to eliminate the use of poisons on your farm?

65. Century Farms – Taihape’s Slippery Hill

Plan365 Rural Infrastructure

Come and visit us at the Christchurch A&P Showgrounds for a range of hot deals, shareholder hospitality and expert advice!

51. The post footprint FARMLANDS SHAREHOLDERS

53. Swiss made knifes make the cut

NOVEMBER 2019 Valid from

1 – 30 November 2019

A PYRAMID OF OPPORTUNITIES PAGES XX

CHOICES IS BACK! PAGE XX

6005

0991

1047

7802 EXP

MAY

25

NEW WAVE OF CO-OPS PAGE XX

GREAT CARD PARTNER DEALS

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

The FARMLANDER

57. Are whiteboards crucial for accountability and profit?

ON THE COVER Chris and Julia Dawkins’ golden rule is to match land use to land capability on The Pyramid, a drylands farm nestled in Marlborough’s Avon Valley. They say growing opportunities is all part of their family’s succession plan.

58. Farm backflow prevention 61. Farm infrastructure development 63. Meticulous health and safety planning required for burn-offs

21

NOVEMBER Farmlands AGM You’re invited to the fifty-sixth Annual General Meeting of shareholders of Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited.

INSIDE!

HOLDER HOLDER AM CARD CARD ANDY

911047780

The information contained in this publication is given in good faith and has been derived from sources perceived to be reliable and accurate. Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and correctness of the information, Farmlands gives no warranties, express or implied, regarding the information nor does it accept any liability for any opinion or information (including the accuracy or completeness thereof) or for any consequences flowing from its use. The information and views expressed in this publication

2 | THE FARMLANDER

NOVEMBER

NZ Agricultural Show

69. Farmlands Real Estate

SPECIAL OFFERS AND INFORMATION FOR

13-15

are not necessarily the views or opinion of Farmlands, its editorial contributors, freelancers, associates or information providers. Independent advice is recommended before acting on information or suggestions contained herein. Readers who rely on this information do so at their own risk. Reference to any specific commercial product, process, or service whether by trade name, trademark, manufacture, or otherwise does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by Farmlands.

No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher. Prices and offers apply only in the month stated on the front cover of this publication and while stocks last. Not all products are available at all Farmlands stores. All prices include GST unless otherwise stated.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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FARMLANDS STAFF PROFILE Lexi Brady Salesperson, Amberley

Q: What do you enjoy most about your job? A: Providing what farmers need daily and helping them to achieve their goals.

FROM THE CEO

Q: How do you spend your spare time? A: I’m training up a young horse and we hunt for our own meat so I’m out doing that most weekends! Q: What is the strangest thing you’ve ever eaten? A: Fish eyes when I was a kid – Mum told me they were little grains of pepper! Q: What is your signature karaoke song? A: Hands down, it’s “Without Me” by Eminem. Q: What’s it like being a ‘Kilt’ (leader) during the Braveheart transformation? A: It’s been so cool working in the Christchurch Waterloo Road store and seeing the staff notch up small wins while getting to know the new system. Q: What’s the biggest benefit for shareholders with the new software in-store? A: The speed! Getting through a transaction is so fast now. Q: Where is your favourite New Zealand getaway? A: A place called Whananaki above Whangarei, I don’t get up there as much as I would like but the beaches are amazing.

Ingredients • Venison cut of your choice • Vegetables of your choice for roasting • Garlic • Rosemary

Method

Lexi’s Ven iso n Roas t

Welcome to the November issue of The Farmlander. In this month’s edition, we are shining a light on the co-operative movement and the enduring benefits of working Together. While questions have been raised in some quarters of the value of the co-operative business model in modern business, I am steadfast in my belief it is more relevant than ever. As we move forward in a world where scale and size provides a distinct advantage, our shareholder base provides us with the size. We need to build on our flexibility to adapt and evolve in this fastchanging landscape. How best to utilise the scale we have accumulated is part of our journey forward. The yardstick for this journey is our annual financial result, which will be available to view at www.farmlands.co.nz/annualreport from 31st October. We are measured on our success as a business and we therefore consider the result to be good – but not great. Our shareholders have faced challenging conditions and significant change over the past year – economic, environmental, political and social. Arguably the most pleasing thing about our result is it was a test of the steps we have taken to be a more flexible, resilient business during difficult times for our shareholders, which we have passed. The ability to adapt to change has been a central theme through our Braveheart transformation programme. Braveheart continues at pace and by the end of this month, all of our 82 stores will be on the new Microsoft D365 system. This new system is table stakes for how we do business today and into the future and I thank all of you for your patience and understanding during the roll-out of this new system. Spring has brought measures of success and challenge, depending on where you are in New Zealand. The busy season brings with it new opportunities and we are better placed than ever to provide you with both what you have always needed and introduce new ways of thinking for the future.

1. Cover meat and cook on a low-medium heat for three hours.

I wish you all the best for a successful end to spring.

2. Add vegetables and cook on low for another hour.

Kind regards,

3. Season with garlic and rosemary. 4. Enjoy the leftovers for the next few days!

Peter Reidie Chief Executive Officer Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 3


CHOICES REWARDS. THE ALL TOGETHER BETTER REWARDS PROGRAMME FOR SHAREHOLDERS. Be rewarded for more of what we do together with all-new Choices Rewards! Earn Points across virtually anything you buy through Farmlands — from fertiliser and on-farm fuel to Card Partner spend and culvert pipe, plus heaps more.* You can also now redeem Choices Points for Farmlands products in-store or online for a range of vouchers and merchandise. Check out the All Together Better Choices Rewards at www.choicesrewards.co.nz or call 0800 200 600 to learn more.

ON

FUEL

ON

FARM SUPPLIES

ON

ON

FENCING

SEED

FAR_09418

EARN DOUBLE POINTS IN-STORE!^

SPEND AT FARMLANDS STORES DURING NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER AND RECEIVE DOUBLE POINTS ON YOUR PURCHASES.

*Terms and Conditions apply. Visit www.farmlands.co.nz for the full list of exclusions and Terms and Conditions. ^Double points applies to purchases through Farmlands retail stores only. Promotional period 1st November – 31st December 2019. Visit www.farmlands.co.nz to learn more.

4 | THE FARMLANDER

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ON

FERTILISER

ON

TANKS

ON

REAL ESTATE

ON ALL

CARD PARTNER PURCHASES

NG

ON

CULVERT PIPE

ON

DOG TUCKER

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Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 5


5 minutes with Roz Henry Chief Executive Officer Cooperative Business New Zealand You’ve been in the job for a few months, how’s your induction been? I’m enjoying it, the people I’ve met are great – they’re really passionate. I was lucky to spend a month with outgoing CEO Craig Presland before he left. We went on a roadshow to Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland and I’ve since visited Waikato and Tauranga. So next up is Ashburton, Dunedin and Invercargill. What’s your most profound observation so far? I’ve noticed that our country’s formal education doesn’t discuss the cooperative model as part of a business or law degree. Aside from a few papers at Massey, it’s a massive gap.

We have an opportunity to drive a ‘new age’ of cooperation and this must start with education.

Our country is a hotbed of entrepreneurialism yet I don’t believe that graduates are being encouraged to consider the co-operative model when setting up a business. Collectively, co-ops contribute 16 percent of GDP, employ 50,000 staff and have 1.5 million members in New Zealand. We have an opportunity to

6 | THE FARMLANDER

drive a ‘new age’ of cooperation and this must start with education.

from each other. Whether that’s in a

Our structures are different from that of big corporates and this is something to celebrate.

conferences or at our annual awards.

In your role how can you help co-operatives like Farmlands? About 65 percent of Cooperative Business New Zealand’s membership is drawn from the farming or wider rural sector so it’s a big one for me. The role of CBNZ is to: 1. Provide governance and leadership training 2. Facilitate inter co-operative learning 3. Engage with decision makers and influence government policy

training environment, a topical roundtable, We’re already offering governance training for those who are on boards of directors, to make sure they have the skillset needed to govern co-operatives. Knowledge sharing is critical for this business model. Looking ahead, this cooperation between co-operatives could be pivotal to developing solutions to key issues we all face. These ideas are not new. Education and collaborating with other co-operatives are founding tenets of the International Cooperative Alliance which traces its roots back to the first modern co-operative founded in Rochdale, England in 1844.

4. Educate the next generation on the benefits of the co-operative model

What is new is the pace of change and

5. Advise start-ups

have to cut-through right now.

6. Showcase success

By working alongside other member

Alongside this, how can the agri sector make farming and growing seem like a viable career? Celebrating co-op successes and profiling new start-ups is one way we can help do this.

associations and similar business

How will you make your voice heard?

that’s where the relationships I build in

I’ve worked in economic development at Auckland Council which exposed me to government agency contacts. I was part of the international investment team there and I have a very good understanding of the economic and political environment in which New Zealand operates. I want to be a voice for our co-operatives and lobby change at governmental level. We’re already working on that in the co-operative housing space for example.

the noise that agricultural co-operatives

models (such as iwi and runanga) we can avoid competing for air time and ensure our combined voice is louder. I want to be here long-term as I think the next year or two will come to fruition. What signals do the Westland Milk and Fonterra scenarios send us? I think Westland and Fonterra were a wake-up call for all businesses, not just co-operatives. It shows no one is bullet proof, not even household names. I think other organisations need to make sure they are close to shareholders. We need to remember that many

What are you hoping to achieve as CEO in your first year or two?

rural shareholders are co-owners of

I want to add value and one way our association can do that is by bringing co-operatives together so they can learn

For example, this can have an amplified

multiple co-operatives in their region. impact regionally, if locals can’t reinvest any returns in their community. If profits

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FARMLANDS 5 MINUTES

are sent offshore, what next for that local economy? What is the long-term impact of that shift on New Zealand’s provinces? These are questions I want to raise with government so that they don’t just stand by and watch this sort of thing happen. These scenarios show the importance of identifying issues early and getting the right advice. We do need to make sure our organisations are managed in a sustainable fashion.

of ways organisations can keep capital investment on the agenda. Joint ventures are a good solution – as you can have up to 40 percent external investment while remaining a ‘co-operative’.

By nature, I think co-operatives are built to survive the hard times as they tend to come together. Do you think Kiwi co-operatives should be led by local talent? As a management consultant in a previous life, both here and abroad, I think the sector needs to be open to employing senior leaders from overseas if they are the right person for the role. New Zealand is a small player globally and it could be advantageous to bring in international leaders who understand the co-operative model and can shepherd our organisations. Internationally they’re facing the same issues. Ultimately it comes back to what I was saying earlier about having the right governance team, looking to the future and identifying the right skills required in leaders. Julia Jones at NZX asks how much shareholders are willing to allow their co-op to invest in the future. How do you respond to that? I agree with her. The question is how to maintain capital investment without losing the goodwill of shareholders. How do co-operatives stay close to shareholders so that both ends understand what’s required to keep flourishing? Fonterra has come full circle on this and their national roadshow discussing a new strategy is a step in the right direction. From what I’ve seen, there are plenty

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Cooperation between co-operatives could be pivotal in developing solutions to the key issues we all face.

Tech companies are another example of where we should be looking for inspiration. With advances in artificial milk and meat products, the ‘petrie dish revolution’ is here so we need to remain ahead of the bell curve. Why are you a fan of our ‘To the Core’ training programme? Those governing a co-operative may be highly regarded in their community and run their own business but they may not have the necessary governance skills – such as strategy or risk analysis. Boards need to be thinking of succession planning, coaching gaps and skillsets that will be needed five years from now. This is not to undermine shareholders being on boards, which is a fundamental part of the co-operative model but they need to have a real value-add proposition and be aware that the hat they wear in the boardroom is very different from their day-to-day one.

This has improved their practices hugely, by using data-based decision making. They also look to extend production when there is real demand, to be able to meet their growers’ packing requirements. They work closely with their kiwifruit growers to do that. This co-op is evolving to meet future demand which I am really impressed by. What advice do you have for agricultural shareholders? The sustainability question is hitting

To the Core is all about development and leadership and we are very supportive of getting in behind that.

the agri sector hard, as Farmlands

Are there any best-in-class models you have come across?

can’t afford to wait and see – we need

I recently visited EastPack, a kiwifruit post-harvest service provider in Tauranga. They have stayed ahead by investing in equipment to speed up their production. They’ve also spent money in the research and development space.

shareholders are reliant on climate, weather and international markets. You to ask the what-if questions now and respond. I look forward to holding a roundtable on that very question soon. Discover some emerging co-operatives on pages 24 and 25.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 7


Building Th

8 | THE FARMLANDER

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ON-FARM COOPERATION

he Pyramid

A sustainable future, be it environmental or generational, underpins the decision-making at Marlborough farm The Pyramid. The 640 hectare sheep and cattle farm is multi-faceted with forestry, a vineyard and beekeeping all part of the business. The diversification is driven by owners Chris and Julia Dawkins who want to create an opportunity for their four sons to have an involvement with the property in the future.

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THE FARMLANDER | 9


| Chris and Julia view growing business opportunities as part of the succession plan – this philosophy is something their sons have inherited.

Chris Dawkins has been landscape farming for most of his life. His golden rule has been to match land use to land capability which has resulted in a varied spread of industries across the drylands farm. He says growing opportunities is all part of the succession plan. Chris is a third-generation Marlborough farmer. His parents bought the drylands farm in 1954. Chris took over the family farm from his father, Jack (J.A.) Dawkins in 1978 after a three-year father/son partnership. The Pyramid sits in the Avon Valley alongside the Avon, Tummil and Waihopai rivers, 17km south-west of Renwick. It was in poor condition when Jack Dawkins purchased it but by the time Chris took over it had been turned around with the weeds tackled, new fences and healthy animals. With stone walls still visible, the property is one of the remaining stock farms in Marlborough as vineyards now cover much of the region. Chris married Julia (nee Maher), who grew up on a farm at Kaituna in Marlborough that had been tended by four previous generations, starting with Julia’s great-great-grandparents Michael and Nancy Maher in 1849.

Enterprise and experimentation Chris’s father was one of a group of enterprising farmers who were instrumental in establishing the Marlborough Farm Trading Society in the 1960s. This co-operative, following a series of mergers, developed into Farmlands. It is that experimental nature that led Chris, after witnessing Julia have an ultrasound when she was pregnant with one of their sons, to consider that ewes would benefit from the same procedure. In 1992, the Dawkins’ sheep were the first in Marlborough to have an ultrasound. It is now a regular practice. Ewes that are not in-lamb are sold off and any carrying multiple lambs are managed accordingly. The backbone of the farm is 1,400 composite ewes with a scanning rate of 190 percent and 163 percent lambing. The target is a 75 percent lamb clearance at weaning with a 19kg carcass weight.

With four sons – David, Tim, Patrick and Richard – as well as five grandchildren and one on the way, Chris and Julia have always had a focus on succession planning. While the two younger boys are back home, the couple want all their boys to have an involvement with the property in the future. Their oldest son David is a sporting goods wholesaler in the Waikato and Tim is dairy farming in Southland. “They are doing their own thing but have a strong attachment to the property, hence the need to get the succession planning right,” says Chris.

10 | THE FARMLANDER

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About 70 hectares of The Pyramid is retired for native and production forestry planted in pine, gums and poplars. Trees are a big part of the family farm, with stock often grazing among plantings. “For us, it’s about planting trees on the land that is better off out of grazing,” he says. The waste wood is utilised through Richard’s Flaming Firewood business, again maximising the availability. These activities saw the family labelled “leaders in farm forestry” by judges in the 2019 Cawthron Marlborough Environment Awards, which recognised the farm with the supreme award.

| In 1992, the Dawkins’ sheep were the first in Marlborough to have an ultrasound.

Chris and Richard are in year three of a Beef + Lamb New Zealand innovation project ‘Maximising Triplet Lamb Survival Through Indoor Lambing’. As part of this, they have set up an indoor lambing system in a covered sheep yard in a bid to realise the potential offered by triplet and quad-bearing ewes.

In 2016, the team developed 50ha of Sauvignon Blanc vineyard which is leased out to an independent party. A further 50ha is currently being developed. Profits from the vineyard allowed the family to purchase the 187ha neighbouring Tummil Hill property which has increased The Pyramid’s scope. A focus has been the extensive development of the new block which has involved clearing and fencing, setting up the water supply, planting trees and building access tracks.

The benefits have been far-reaching – the outdoor death rate of triplet lambs has halved and farm-wide lamb deaths have dropped from the long-term average of 24 percent to 15 percent. Spare orphans are fed cow’s milk and grass, prompting growth rates of up to 350gms/day. The lambs are weaned onto lucerne after approximately six weeks at liveweights of between 15–18kg.

Nurturing a natural fit The Dawkins family is a walking sales board for diversification and maximising every opportunity. Chris says his policy has been not to modify the environment but to work with what does best naturally, while factoring in the climate and topography. “It’s got to be a natural fit. Best land use for the land type,” he advocates. In line with the different classes of stock run on different

| Chris Dawkins’ golden rule is to match land use to land capability which has resulted in a varied spread of industries across the drylands farm.

land types, the Dawkin’s also farm cattle, based on a dairy support system. Chris says they carry around 100 R1 Friesian/Jersey bulls for the dairy industry along with 70 R2 bulls and 40 R3s. They also have about 100 carry-over cows where they buy in empty dairy cows, graze them for a year, get them in calf and sell them back to the dairy industry. The Pyramid receives around 780mm annual rainfall, evenly spread, with roughly seven months in a soil moisture deficit and a reticulated water system used. Around a quarter of the property is river flat planted in lucerne, half clay downs (ryegrass) and a quarter steep hill.

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Replicating the winning formula Richard and his wife Jess returned to The Pyramid around three years ago. He says he is very appreciative of the hard work by the previous two generations which has always focused on planning for the future while remaining profitable. “The firewood fits well. It started as a way of utilising the few hundred Old Man pines that were on the Tummil Hill block. We’ve been doing firewood for a couple of years and process around 750 tonnes each season, both from the farm and other waste wood logs we buy in,” says Richard.

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THE FARMLANDER | 11


| The family won an award for their environmental efforts this year, of which their forestry management and firewood business are great examples.

| Given the location and nature of The Pyramid, Laura and Patrick focus on queen rearing. With commercial experience, they use their skills to add value to the apiculture industry.

He is always open to new opportunities but says that with the

Diversification sees queens reign

continuing development at the Tummil block and the vineyard extension, right now it is about consolidation and ensuring they are upholding their livestock standards and the overall business performance. While the Tummil development is absorbing time and resources the results make it worthwhile. “Before we bought the block it had been extensively farmed with native pastures, big paddocks and no reticulated water. “We are trying to replicate what has been done over 60 years at The Pyramid to make the new block an extension of the existing farm. It is rewarding to watch the land go from head-high weeds and unproductive pasture to our new lamb finishing block,” he says. Richard, like his parents, is already thinking about the next generation. “We have an 18-month old daughter, Ellie and a baby due in January. Ellie is already involved in farming and loves jumping in the pens with the lambs, so planning for the future is always on our minds.”

12 | THE FARMLANDER

Beekeeping was introduced to The Pyramid in 2016 when Patrick and his wife Laura launched Pyramid Apiaries. They have between 300–400 hives, mainly on the family farm and neighbouring properties. As well as honey production, they provide commercial pollination services to local fruit and seed growers, while also selling mated queens, virgin queens, queen cells and nucleus hives to fellow beekeepers. Patrick and Laura both have commercial beekeeping experience. Laura was trained as a queen breeder and completed Lincoln University’s Certificate in Apiculture, while Patrick’s training concentrated on honey production. Queen rearing and pollination is a major focus of the business. Patrick describes it as diversification upon diversification. “All beekeepers make honey but the location of The Pyramid, and being an intensive sheep and dairy support farm, doesn’t lend itself to high-value honey. The beekeeping operation has to fit around the farm operation which lends itself to queen bee rearing, so we have tailored our business to suit the farm,” says Patrick.

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The pair started off buying four hives and, rather than purchasing additional hives, built their own business utilising Laura’s queen bee breeding skills. “Mum and Dad’s generosity meant we had plenty of sites to get started with so we were able to get the beekeeping business up and running quickly,” he says. While coming home was always at the back of Patrick’s mind, it was not until he got into the beekeeping industry that he saw the opportunity. “Dad has always had hives on the farm and has been receptive to what we have wanted to do.” Having worked as a sports reporter in a previous life, in true Dawkins-style Patrick has further diversified his beekeeping by producing the online beekeeping e-magazine – the Apiarist’s Advocate. The free, monthly publication enjoys a subscriber base of over 600 and growing. “I learnt from Mum and Dad to use your skills and what you’ve been given for your benefit– and your industry’s benefit. The e-magazine has allowed me to do that.” “Beekeepers are not renowned for working together, so the Apiarist’s Advocate is about informing and advocating for New Zealand beekeepers. It serves them by telling their stories, providing industry news as well as a platform in which opinions can be voiced and promotions disseminated.”

You can see the work that’s gone in for decades to get the farm to a point where we’re reaping the benefits... we want to maintain the principles, but really grow on them, to push new boundaries and achieve new milestones.”

Patrick says as one of four brothers on a farm that is a certain size, there is a need to diversify and ensure the property is economical for multiple family units.

The couple has a one-year-old daughter, Gemma, so while they are currently consolidating, there is always room in the future to expand. “Beekeeping is flexible, it’s not reliant on owning land and can be expanded through hive numbers to accommodate future generations.”

Farming to the conditions wins acclaim Farming sustainably has always been a family cornerstone. This year these actions were recognised when The Pyramid was named the 2019 Winner of the Supreme Award at the Cawthron Marlborough Environment Awards. The biennial regional environmental award is open to all industries; notably The Pyramid is only the second farm to win the award since its inception in 1997.

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Judges said the Dawkins’ family farm was a “great example” of apt land use. Initiatives that were recognised as part of the award included: creating a QEII covenant of native replantings along the Avon River, experimenting with pastures, planting trees for erosion control, drought-proofing, drainage and runoff, diligent stock management and the indoor lambing project.

Over his career, Chris has constantly looked at new ways to maintain profitability and has not been afraid to take risks. The Cawthron judges acknowledged the science trials the family have conducted over the years with trees, pasture and clover types. They also applauded the way Chris and the team seek out technical advice and put such expertise into practice. Their investment is paying off for the farm and the environment, the awards committee said. “You can see the work that’s gone in for decades to get the farm to a point where we’re reaping the benefits ... we want to maintain the principles but really grow on them to push new boundaries and achieve new milestones,” says Richard. Unsurprisingly given their collective philosophies, community involvement is high on the Dawkins’ agenda. Chris is currently Chairman of the Marlborough Farmer of the Year competition and Richard is part of the Marlborough Farming for Profit group. Julia is a breast cancer survivor and now competes with the Blenheim dragon boating team. It was clear to the award judges that the family’s next generation has inherited Chris and Julia’s strong values and will carry on the tradition of sound environmental and farming management. We hope that Ellie, Gemma and the other grandkids will continue building on The Pyramid’s foundations.

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THE FARMLANDER | 13


WE’LL SEE YOU AT THE SHOW! Visit us for a range of hot cash-andcarry offers, shareholder hospitality and expert advice from the whole co-operative. WHEN:

13th – 15th November 2019

WHERE:

Canterbury A&P Showgrounds, corner of MacFarlane Avenue and MacKenzie Drive

TICKETS: Beat the queues and get your tickets in-store* TICKET

GATE PRICE

SHAREHOLDER PRICE

Adult

$

28

$

20

Family (2 adults, 3 children)

$

62

$

45

Child (5-12 years old)

$

Senior/Student

$

10 18

$

6

10

$

PLUS, YOU COULD WIN A TRIP TO THE FARMLANDS CUP IN WANAKA! Visit us to find out how, and be in to WIN various on-the-spot prizes!

FAR_09182

* Terms and Conditions apply. Purchase your tickets early at selected Farmlands stores or at the gate with your Farmlands Card.

14 | THE FARMLANDER

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

Chris Dennison re-elected to Farmlands Board Shareholders will not need to vote on Farmlands Director Elections this year, following Chris Dennison’s re-election unopposed. A Director Election was initially planned for the South Island, however the withdrawal of candidates left Chris, who had retired by rotation and was seeking re-election, as the only candidate. Chris says he is “very pleased” to be re-appointed to the Board. “It is an exciting time to be on the Farmlands Board. With the recent launch of our Braveheart Programme, the co-operative will have access to new technology allowing us to serve our shareholders better and deliver stronger value offers,” he says.

It is an exciting time to be on the Farmlands Board. “The Farmlands Board is made up of a great bunch of people with diverse skills from different backgrounds. I look forward to working with them for another term to ensure the co-operative remains relevant to our 70,000 shareholders.” While Chris has been elected unopposed, two Directors – Southland’s Murray Donald and Farmlands Chairman Lachie Johnstone – are standing down from the Board of Directors.

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The announcements from both Murray

changes to strengthen the governance

and Lachie gives the co-operative the

capabilities of our Board,” he says. “With

opportunity to effect changes to the

Murray’s decision to stand down, we

Board’s structure, as approved by

have an opportunity to make the change

shareholders at the Annual General

seamless for our Shareholder Directors.”

Meeting in Hokitika last November.

With no Director Election required,

The changes to the structure of

Farmlands officially has the six

Farmlands’ Board of Directors include:

Shareholder Directors in place to

• Reducing the total number of

effect the new Board structure: Dawn

Directors from 10 to nine • Reducing the number of Shareholder Directors from eight to six (three in each Island) • Increasing the number of Independent Directors from two to three (from either Island) Lachie says with two Directors standing down – one from each Island – now is the right time to implement the changes. “Our shareholders agreed unanimously at the last AGM that we should make

Sangster, Chris Dennison and Rob Hewett (South Island) and Warren Parker, Nikki Davie-Colley and Gray Baldwin (North Island). Julie Bohnenn and John Journee will be joined by a third Independent Director, with an announcement expected by the end of the year. Shareholders are invited to join Society leaders for refreshments after the AGM on 21st November in Mystery Creek. See www.farmlands.co.nz/agm

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 15


Farmlands Darfield lauded in Environmental Awards Farmlands Darfield has been recognised as the Corteva Asia-Pacific Ambassador of Environmental Respect. For three decades, the Environmental Respect Awards have honoured rural retailers and distributors for their environmental stewardship. Sponsored by Corteva Agriscience, this year the global awards were broadened to include service providers, integrated producers and public agencies.

Farmlands’ Darfield store took out the Country Champion honour in August, before being named as one of three Asia-Pacific winners for their achievements in best practice – alongside organisations from India and China. In doing so, they beat national winners from Australia, Korea and Japan. On 3rd October, Farmlands Darfield was named the Asia-Pacific Ambassador of Environmental Respect, a top honour bestowed on only four organisations who had made it through the selection process. For Darfield locals, this award will come as no surprise as the store is a local community hub. It is lead by Business Manager Rod Oliver and ably supported by four Technical Field Officers: Paul Cooper, Luc Rodwell, Nick Jenkins and Emily Redmond. The store services 971 local farmers and supporting rural operations.

16 | THE FARMLANDER

As part of the entry process, Farmlands Darfield had to show how they help farmers and land managers to improve environmental performance in their systems. For evidence, they only had to look at its frequent on-farm field days run for shareholders, the AgRecovery unit which helps shareholders safely recycle their chemical containers and their encouragement of different winter crops, such as oats, to absorb excess nitrogen in the soils rather than leaving paddocks fallowed. “One of the challenges Farmlands must deal with is the misinformation that surrounds agricultural issues,” says Farmlands Sales Manager for Canterbury, Harriet Cameron. “For Farmlands, this award has given us the opportunity to take a step back and look at how we are currently performing. This will give us a platform to continually improve on in the future.”

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

| Left: Farmlands Darfield was named the Asia-Pacific Ambassador of Respect, a top honour bestowed on only four organisations in the global Environmental Respect Awards. | Above: Harriet Cameron, Sales Manager and Darryl Stretton, Category Manager received the award in person. Pictured: Bill Belzer (Corteva Agrisciences), Harriet, Darryl, John Smith (Corteva Agrisciences New Zealand) and Jenny Dowil (Corteva Agrisciences).

Locally, our Darfield team is thrilled to be recognised for their role in shaping the future of agriculture in their community. It validates their hard work and commitment to our shareholders.” “Our Technical Field Officers and branch staff help to educate the local community and reduce their concerns by providing technical

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

advice. Our local team attends all

“Locally, our Darfield team is thrilled

community events, including Kirwee

to be recognised for their role in

and Courtenay Agricultural and

shaping the future of agriculture in their

Pastoral shows, sports club days

community. It validates their hard work

and other events to educate the

and commitment to our shareholders,”

community on these issues,” she says.

he says.

Harriet and Farmlands Category

As part of the Washington D.C.

Manager Darryl Stretton were honoured

forum, Harriet and Darryl attended

to accept both awards, on behalf of the

the American Senate to discuss key

Darfield team.

global agricultural challenges, group

The award announcement has

think sessions and Chesapeake Farm,

encouraged further conversations

a Corteva-owned operation that

about the co-operative’s role in

integrates the latest environmental

promoting such practices says

practices. A highlight included Darryl

Farmlands Chief Executive Officer

speaking on New Zealand’s success

Peter Reidie.

via AgRecovery’s recycling of

“We are proud to play a pivotal role in

chemical containers.

the stewardship of our environment.

For more information on the awards,

For Farmlands, respect is about

including Farmlands’ entry video, visit

working in partnership with the

www.environmentalrespect.com

environment, people, and communities to leave our country in a better place for the next generation,” says Peter.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 17


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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

From the beginning: stronger together The early days of Farmlands was built on hard work and a nature of cooperation. Two of the people that were part of the Farmlands origin story are brothers William (Bill) and Allan Pile.

Bill’s brother Allan has since passed away but his wife Florence recalls the early days.

The Pile boys hailed from Moeraki and were born into the fishing industry. At the age of 16 Bill left Waitaki Boys’ High School and the brothers went straight onto a fishing boat built by their father. “After the day’s fishing was done, we went our separate ways and got on with the farming,” says Bill. Bill’s first farm was in Herbert, just off the motorway. It was 150 acres of sheep and netting wire when Bill got his hands on it. He quickly re-fenced it, introduced cattle and bought another 50 acres to run an extra 1,000 ewes. Allan meanwhile had married a local girl by the name of Florence Barnes and had purchased 150 acres at Moeraki where they farmed sheep and beef cattle. Bill recalls where their connection to Farmlands all began. “Allan was mates with Alastair McMillian who, along with Oscar Elliot, convinced him to join the Otago Rural Trading Society.” Alastair was a board member for the society and Deputy Chairman for a time. Having a commercial pilot’s license, he would sometimes fly into a meeting, occasionally having to land in a paddock when the fog rolled in. Oscar Elliot was both Deputy Chairman and Chairman for the society when all the South Island trading societies, plus one North Island society amalgamated into one corporate body, Combined Rural Traders.

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“When Allan came back home after the meeting he would explain it to me. The society would buy farming supplies in bulk and where possible we’d make our purchases through the society to help the organisation grow stronger,” she says. Growing up on a small Palmerston farm, Florence knew about making a living | Bill Pile and Florence Hellyer (previously Pile) outside the Farmlands Oamaru store. off the land. She marvels at Bill and Florence hold dear to their historic connections with the co-operative. the change she has seen as a shareholder, particularly and I said to Judith (Yates) in there that via the power of her Farmlands Card. I thought I was coming into a men’s “Today, I can go to New World and charge my groceries through Farmlands. The same goes for my power. It automatically comes out of my account once a month and the credit side of it is a real benefit – not having to pay interest.” Farmlands still runs in the family it seems, as Florence’s son Graeme Pile has a business, Fertigation Systems which supplies Farmlands and her niece Melissa Barnes works in the Dunedin Support Centre. Bill measures time’s changes by the progress he has seen in his local Farmlands store.

clothing department! It’s the only place to buy farm gumboots or jerseys in Oamaru,” he says. Bill is proud of what he has achieved over the years and will not let anyone say a bad word about the co-operative. “I’ve gone from a fisherman to a farmer with a turnover of $2 million annually and Farmlands has definitely played a part in that.” Bill may be 79 years old but through his pioneering attitude he is still milking 1,000 cows on the 200 hectares in Glenavy that he bought back in the 90s.

“There used to just be a boss and a couple of staff in the Oamaru store. Now there’s probably eight or nine team members there and you get great service. I take along smoko for them

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

Got a story to share with your co-operative? Please email content@farmlands.co.nz

THE FARMLANDER | 19


KEEP YOUR RURAL BUSINESS ONE STEP AHEAD. Just starting out with your rural business? Or looking for a strong foundation on which to grow? Join ASB and Dairy Women’s Network for our Take the wheel – Building financial confidence workshops, aiming to help you build greater knowledge, awareness and understanding of financial management, develop stronger budgeting skills, and connect you with tools that could help to keep your business one step ahead. Find out more about what you’ll learn, and the details of the workshops happening in your area at dwn.co.nz/events.

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ASB Bank Limited 56160 21000 0919 Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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1/10/19 2:43 PM


2:43 PM

INDUSTRY NEWS

New standards for dairy cattle The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) is pleased to announce that the Minister of Agriculture has agreed to issue an amendment to the code of welfare for dairy cattle to address behavioural needs and off-paddock systems. The new standards came into effect on 31st October 2019. The code amendment was developed by NAWAC and has been widely consulted. NAWAC Chairperson, Dr Gwyneth Verkerk, says that the amendment sets out new standards to ensure people working with dairy cattle meet their animals’ behavioural needs and adopt high levels of care when keeping dairy cattle in off-paddock facilities including

It is very important that dairy cattle can lie down and rest in all management systems...”

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feed-pads, stand-off pads and wintering pads as well as loose-housed and free-stall barns. “Meeting behavioural needs is essential for dairy cattle welfare. It is very important that dairy cattle can lie down and rest in all management systems, including on pasture, on crops, and in off-paddock facilities. Dairy cattle like to lie down where it is comfortable and dry. They refuse to lie down on hard, wet or muddy ground and can become stressed as a result,” says Gwyneth. Keeping cows off paddock, especially in the long term, can present risks to animal welfare and the new standards address this. Dairy cattle kept in offpaddock facilities beyond three days now have to be provided with a welldrained lying area with a compressible soft surface or bedding and shelter. NAWAC also wants dairy cattle that are housed long-term to have access to outdoors but affected farmers should be given time to comply.

The aim of the amendment is to encourage all those responsible for the welfare of dairy cattle to adopt the highest standards of husbandry, care and handling. It is expected that the amendment will be used as a guide for best practice. NAWAC is an independent committee formed to give advice on animal welfare to the Minister of Agriculture, Hon Damien O’Connor. Codes of welfare expand on the requirements in the Animal Welfare Act 1999, with minimum standards and recommended best practice designed to provide for animals’ overall physical, health and behavioural needs. For more details on animal welfare policy and practice visit www.agriculture.govt.nz/protectionand-response/animal-welfare Information supplied by the Ministry for Primary Industries.

“The minister has agreed to delayed provisions for outdoor access and his officials will be working with us to determine how to implement these,” she says.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 21


thank you For supPorting Blue

With your help, we donated

$68,000

Special thanks to our wonderful Suppliers and Card Partners for being part of Blue September! A Member of The Linde Group

to Prostate Cancer Foundation NZ We could not have achieved this without you!

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Blue September is the Prostate Cancer Foundation’s annual national awareness and fundraising campaign. Every little bit helps to provide support, campaign for greater awareness, and advocate for better diagnosis and treatment outcomes. For more information on where the donation goes visit www.prostate.org.nz 22 | THE FARMLANDER

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

Thinking safe with Gurt and Pops “We must use our ‘Think Safe Brains’!” said Poppy. “Our bright orange vests help us to look safe but to be really careful out there we also must think safe.” For author Harriet Bremner, being safe and being seen are critical messages parents and teachers should be getting through to their children. Growing up on the Banks Peninsula, Harriet or ‘Gurt’, moved into the Hakataramea Valley with her partner James and miniature dachshund Poppy in 2014. Despite dreams of writing a children’s book, it wasn’t always an option for Harriet. In between working as a teacher and helping on the farm, life became busy and writing was left by the wayside. When James passed away in a devastating farm accident in 2017, Harriet put her grief to paper and Bob ‘n’ Pops was realised. “I was sitting with my family and told them that I wanted to write a book… 10 minutes later and I had it written,” says Harriet. James, affectionately known as ‘Bob’ and Poppy (“Pops”) were best friends. The little dog spent most of her life up his jersey, helping around the farm. With attitude beyond her size she was a natural fit for the lead character in the ‘Gurt and Pops’ series. “I wanted to write stories with specific, deep and meaningful messages in them,” says Harriet.

| Harriet Bremner is committed to changing on-farm health and safety culture by taking her message to the public. Pictured on the Breakfast show promoting her new book.

Illustrated by Cantabrian Dana Johnstone, Bob ‘n’ Pops was Harriet’s first venture onto the page, exploring how surrounding yourself with good people is key to success. Her second has come in the form of Be Safe, Be Seen, a children’s book that addresses on-farm health and safety. “People assume that non-safety conscious people are the only ones dying in farm accidents but that’s not the case,” Harriet stresses. The ‘Be Safe, Be Seen’ message emphasises being safe before being seen and is not only targeted at children but teachers, parents and those reading the book to young ones. “Health and safety in its current form is not sexy, it feels like more paperwork and is being shoved to the side but there needs to be more conversation

about decision making. There are farmers doing great things but people get complacent… we need to change the culture and behaviour.” “From my experience, the safety message is not getting through to children. We can get adults having important conversations with kids in a fun way through a book with cool characters and a strong message.” Harriet says the ‘Think Safe Brain’ goes back to making practical decisions and using common sense. “Just because you have ticked off the paperwork and have put your high-vis vest on does not mean that accidents won’t happen… the standard you walk past is the standard you accept.” Harriet is now working with Safer Farms, speaking to groups at workshops, conferences and schools. With more books on the way, Harriet is committed to instilling Poppy’s message into the next generation of farmers. To purchase a Gurt and Pops book, visit your local Farmlands branch. To enquire about Harriet speaking to your group see harrietbremner.com

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 23


A new wave of cooperation New Zealand was voted one of the world’s most co-operative economies by the United Nations and 11 of the top 100 national companies are in this camp – contributing over $40 billion to our economy.

1

The co-operative business model has been around since the 19th century, originating in Rochdale, England over 170 years ago when weavers banded together and opened a shop. With almost three million such organisations operating worldwide, the principles have endured.2

The toast of Marlborough Describing itself as neither a traditional wine company or a grape growing contractor, the Marlborough Grape Growers Co-operative (MGGC) is one of the mainland’s finest examples of an organisation that demands its growers see the fruits of their labour. Founded seven years ago, the cooperative has adopted a unique way of doing business. The region in which their growers and shareholders live is worldrenowned for Sauvignon Blanc but they don’t just go out and sell it. Rather, they work closely with big international corporates in places like the United States of America, Australia and Europe, alongside smaller, more exclusive merchants to provide them with the wines they know they have a market for. General Manager, Craig Howard explains the philosophy behind their sales model. “The co-op works with buyers to make the wine that they define. We then use diagnostic flavour tools to help growers get a clear definition of what they’re

24 | THE FARMLANDER

Keith Woodford, former Professor of Farm Management and Agribusiness at Lincoln University highlights the value of shareholding for agricultural operators. “Co-operatives can help farmers maximise the selling price for their products and minimise the cost of specific inputs. They change the power balance between farmers and those who are further along the value chain,” says Kieth.3 Farmlands Director of Agri Products and Services, Andrew Horsbrugh believes the rise of smaller grower co-operatives reflects the diversification

of land use beginning to take place around New Zealand. “Many farmers want to know which alternative land uses are both profitable and environmentally sustainable. The growth in plantings of permanent tree crops like walnuts is just one way that many farmers around the country are successfully answering that question,” says Andrew. A new wave of grower-owned co-operatives is exemplified in the Marlborough Grape Growers and Walnuts NZ stories.

looking for. The finished product is a world-renowned Marlborough wine that we know is going to meet the needs of our customers,” he says. The quality of the product is a massive part of the MGGC’s success too. Members know grapes must meet co-operative quality profiles, before they come to the winery. If growers can ripen fruit that meets that standard, the entire crop will be taken. However, if the fruit does not meet the profile, it stays on the vines. It is these strict commercial practices that ensure profits are returned directly to shareholders, rather than being paid out to institutional or private investors. Accountability and technology is also key to the co-operative’s growing success. When the co-operative attend trade shows around the world, they use a mapping tool to show buyers exactly where the grapes in their wine were grown. This also means buyers have a better understanding of the soil and the landscapes of that specific region. Today, the co-operative is moving towards blockchain certification to ensure identity from vine to bottle.4

| MGGC’s Craig Howard says there is a clear philosophy behind their co-operative’s sales model.

“Five years ago, we started with about 30 growers producing 5,000 tonnes of fruit. We now have 78 growers and we’re on track to harvest 13,000 tonnes this vintage. “We run a very proactive viticulture programme with our membership, we’re partnering with Farmlands at our Innovation Vineyard in Blenheim and in the last six months we’ve run about 15 field days to further support our growers. The upshot is, quality is going through the roof – what we’re doing here in Marlborough is resonating worldwide,” says Craig.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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CO-OPERATIVE NEWS

New kids on the block New to the game is Walnuts NZ. The co-operative was established in 2015 but the original processing and marketing business was already on its way to brighter futures through the hard work of Jenny and Malcolm Lawrence. They began growing walnuts on their property in West Melton, Canterbury in the 1990s before building a processing facility and selling their produce at local farmers’ markets. Soon they were selling on behalf of other growers.

New shareholders have come on board to gain a path to market for their crops and because of our investment in technology.” With Jenny and Malcolm’s retirement came a new direction for the enterprise and the formation of the Walnuts New Zealand Co-operative Ltd. General Manager, Shane McKenzie was soon appointed to head it up.

| Walnuts NZ has already invested in technology and a new retail brand to meet its long-term processing goals.

“We were at a farmer’s market level when I took over, producing about 100 tonne of walnuts annually. As growers’ orchards have matured, their walnut supplies to the co-operative have increased and in turn their shareholdings too. New shareholders have come on board to gain a path to market for their crops and because of our investment in technology. Ultimately, we need the capability to be processing 650 to 800 tonne of walnuts annually,” says Shane.

One of the ways Walnuts NZ has invested in these long-term goals is through the purchase of a Smart Sorter, the first of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere. “We’re excited because this piece of technology gives Walnuts NZ the capability to process a greater amount of product on behalf of our shareholders and through collaboration we can use the machine to help other growers out there. It’s also a key part of us launching a new retail offering on behalf of our shareholders in the form of Trickett’s Grove,” he says.

Co-op characteristics In many ways, co-operatives operate like any other business but they do have several unique characteristics: • T hey are owned and democratically controlled by their members – not by outside investors. • T hey return surplus revenues to their members in proportion to their

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

use — not in proportion to their investment or ownership share. • T hey put members’ needs first by buying members’ produce at the best price or by providing them with affordable, high-quality goods and services (rather than maximising the co-operative’s profit).

1. Out of 145 nations in 2014, the UN rated NZ the highest as part of a Global Census on Co-operatives. 2. The seven principles which emerged in 1844 were ratified by the International Cooperative Alliance in the mid-20th century. Visit www.nz.coop/the-rochdalepioneers-and-their-seven-principles 3. Keith Woodford’s article in response to the Westland dairy co-operative experience is on www.interest.co.nz 4. Blockchain is an electronic ledger that can be openly shared over the internet and helps establish trust between merchants.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 25


NZ’S MOST VALUABLE CARD? YOU DECIDE.

WITH OVER 400 SERVICE STATIONS NATIONWIDE.

There’s a heap of travelling to be done between now and the end of summer, so make sure you fuel up and save 12 cents per litre* with your Farmlands Card at any Challenge, Z and Caltex service station. *Off the pump price.

26 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Next-generation farmer focused on the future

| Nelson-based sheep farmer Julie Webb-Brownlee out on her farm.

Julie Webb-Brownlee owns and runs Hanover Farm, a sheep milking and breeding operation in Upper Moutere, Nelson. At the age of 26, she is already a leader in her field — breeding high-quality East Friesian and Awassi sheep. Julie joined FMG and Farmlands as a Member at 21 after her and her partner bought the 20ha Hanover Farm. Their farming operation features in the 2020 FMG calendar. Julie is a shining example of the next generation of farmers — so it is fitting that FMG will also mark 115 years of supporting the rural sector in 2020. This milestone will be celebrated at the Mutual’s Annual General Meeting in August next year. “There’s really no one else I’d want to go with,” Julie says of choosing FMG. “It’s known as the best rural insurer. “My partner and I like having someone who comes to the farm that we can talk with face to face.” Julie thinks the same of Farmlands, which she says has helped her grow her farming operation. Julie’s love of farming was fostered at her grandparent’s sheep and beef farm in Havelock — however breeding sheep is where her focus lies.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

“I’ve got a huge passion for sheep, they’re really cool and they’ve got lots of great qualities — from sheep you can get three products: milk, meat and wool. I also really enjoy looking at how I can improve the genetics across the stock. I’m breeding for qualities like total milk volume, good feet, good udder quality and how they reproduce,” she says. You may recall some media buzz in September last year when one of Julie’s ewes gave birth to quintuplets – so she is definitely onto something. FMG Manager Lizzy Balls says that Julie is the epitome of what comes to mind when you think of a young Kiwi farmer. “Julie has gone from strength to strength and it’s a real privilege to support her as she continues to grow her farming business. Young farmers like Julie are the next generation in our industry and the future of the Mutual – with them on board we’re on track to be around for another 100 years supporting rural New Zealand,” says Lizzy.

we’re also focussing on improving our stock’s genetics. I’m excited to see how our new line of East Friesians will go in the future. They’re coming through this

lambing season,” Julie says.

I’m breeding for qualities like total milk volume, good feet, good udder quality and how they reproduce... I’m excited to see how our new line of East Friesians will go in the future.”

FMG and Farmlands have been looking after farmers across the country their whole lives and both membership organisations are looking forward to supporting Julie and others like her on

So what does Hanover Farm have planned for the future?

their farming journey.

“My partner and I are looking forward to developing our 50ha lease block and

Farmlands and FMG relationship

To find out more about the visit www.farmlands.co.nz/FMG

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 27


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MATE, IT’S A NO-BRAINER. The all new Hilux 2WD WorkMate has arrived, and it’s our most affordable ute yet. With a low body height for easier loading, Toyota Safety Sense technology and a tough 2.7L petrol engine, it’s bang for your hard-earned buck. And since Hilux is the first ute in New Zealand to achieve a 2019 5-star ANCAP Safety Rating, you know your mate’s safe as. Inside, there’s hard-wearing PVC vinyl flooring and a TFT Multi Information display plus a 6.1” touchscreen and reversing camera, to keep your back covered. With a price like this, it doesn’t take brains to see this is a winner. But it’d be smart to buy one, now.

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THE FARMLANDER | 29


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Articles in the Plan365 section allow Farmlands suppliers to share best practice and the latest advances in rural technology, NUTRITION to help shareholders with their farming needs all year round.

Conditioning for the yearling sales Preparing a yearling for sale is an important event in the stud calendar for both Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds and involves a carefully tailored balance between the correct nutrition, conditioning, growth and fitness. Properly prepared yearlings will be fit, sound and well-grown, with shiny coats and little body fat. When preparing a yearling for sale it is important to understand the nutrient requirements of the horse and the critical balance between feed intake and exercise as they impact on condition and soundness. Forage should always be the first consideration in any horse’s diet and some amount of pasture, along with a high-quality/high-energy hay, is important for yearlings. Higher energy hays such as lucerne and clover blends will contribute to energy requirements and work to decrease the amount of starch in the yearling’s diet.

Also, using a high-quality, early-cut hay minimises the appearance of gut-fill, which is often associated with a mature hay containing high amounts of lignin. Including additional fibre sources through chaff, ensiled forages and super fibres such as beet pulp and soy hulls is often highly beneficial for reducing the amount of hard feed or grain the horse requires. In turn, this can reduce the symptoms of starch overload including diarrhoea, colic, laminitis and behavioural problems.

weight gain and body condition score –

Yearlings do best on a 14–17 percent protein ration, balanced for macro and micro-minerals as well as fat and water-soluble vitamins. The feeding rate of hard feeds for yearlings is extremely variable depending on: choice of feed, growth history, skeletal size, individual metabolism, actual age, quantity and quality of forage. It is essential that all yearlings are fed as individuals, paying careful attention to body weight, weekly

feeds such as pelleted products or feeds

with feed intake adjusted appropriately. Selecting a muesli-style textured hard feed is often beneficial as it is highly palatable and encourages consistent intake through stressful times of increased workload, travel to sales complexes and new surroundings. To avoid hindgut disturbances and digestive conditions in yearlings it is also important to consider feeds that contain grains that have been processed to enhance digestion. Heat-processed containing steam-flaked grains ensure most of the digestion takes place in the small intestine, thus reducing the risk of unprocessed starch entering the hindgut and causing acidosis. McMillan Rapid Gain, NRM Assett or NRM Prepare are great options of well-balanced, textured feeds containing steam-flaked grains that are ideal for sales preparation. While there is an overwhelming array of supplements that claim to enhance coat quality and condition, including a fat source is always one of the best ways to achieve that sale-ring shine. Suitable fat sources include vegetable oils, sunflower seeds or a stabilised rice bran such as KER Equi-Jewel. Equi-Jewel is a high-fat, low-starch conditioning supplement that is highly beneficial for improving topline and coat quality. For more information and diet advice on preparing a yearling for sale, contact a reputable equine nutritionist. Article supplied by Luisa Wood, Equine Nutritionist.

| Fit and sound yearlings with shiny coats and little body fat will fetch a higher price at spring sales.

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Works for you NUTRITION

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No matter where you are in New Zealand, our nationwide consultants come to you. We visit you at your convenience for a free in-home consultation, bringing with us an incredible sample range to choose from and years of experience to help advise you on finding the perfect window furnishing solution. Plus, get 25% off* curtains and blinds, exclusive to Farmlands shareholders.

FREE in-home consultation 0800 808 300 russellscurtains.co.nz *Terms & conditions: Offer exclusive to Farmlands shareholders. Discount is applied off retail price and does not apply to curtain making or installation. Excludes shutters and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Discount on curtains applies to fabrics over RRP $29.95p/m and from selected leading fabric suppliers: James Dunlop Essential range, Charles Parsons and Maurice Kain fabrics only, Villa Textiles, Ken Bimler, Warwick and Nettex.

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NUTRITION

What’s the deal with ducks? All animal species need a balanced diet for health, welfare and productivity but what constitutes a balanced diet changes as an animal grows, matures and goes through different physiological stages. For example, young rapidly growing ducks require high levels of protein and energy however as their growth slows down with age, the amount of energy and protein they require decreases. Macro mineral requirements also vary with age and stage of production. Over or underfeeding these key nutrients can affect bone integrity and/or animal performance and overall health and wellbeing. The NRM Lifestyle range, which includes Meatbird Crumble, Pullet Grower and Peck‘n’Lay, can be combined or used individually to cover the needs of ducks at all stages of their life. Ducklings grow at a remarkable rate compared to chickens – although comparable in size at hatching, a duckling leaps ahead in growth in the first week and by 9 weeks the duckling will weigh more than 2kg, while an egg-type chicken would only weigh around 700g (depending on breed of course). For this reason, ducklings require feed with a higher protein level to support their rapid growth. NRM Meatbird Crumble is a great feed option for supporting the growth of ducklings. It is recommended that ducklings are not given a feed designed for hen chicks, not only because of the lower protein content but also because of the coccidiostats that are often included in chick starter feeds, which are not recommended for ducklings and can even be harmful for them.

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Meat-type ducklings destined for the table can be kept on the NRM Meatbird Crumble until slaughter, however for pets and/or laying ducks, once duckling growth starts to slow down at around 4–6 weeks of age, protein requirements reduce which means it is a good idea to move them to a lower protein feed. NRM Pullet Grower is the ideal next stage feed for ducklings as it provides essential nutrients but will not result in excessive weight gain. At 4 weeks of age gradually introduce NRM Pullet Grower into the diet so that the birds are consuming only Pullet Grower from 6 weeks onwards. For non-breeding mature ducks, NRM Pullet Grower is a suitable all-round maintenance feed, so mature ducks can be kept on the Pullet Grower indefinitely. Duck eggs are prized for their richness compared to hen’s eggs (they have higher fat and protein levels and are excellent used in baking). Egg laying for ducks begins at about 16 to 18 weeks of age. Laying ducks are extremely productive and generally lay more eggs over a season compared to heritage

breeds of chickens. Laying ducks do however require a diet higher in protein than laying chickens and still have high requirements for calcium (as egg shells are predominantly made of calcium carbonate). A combination of NRM Peck‘n’Lay and Meatbird Crumble provides a good balance between the calcium and protein requirements of these birds. These two feeds can be offered separately, allowing the birds to select the appropriate combination to meet their nutrient requirements. Laying ducks may also benefit from being offered oyster shell grit, as this can help with calcium supply and gizzard function. All the poultry feeds in the NRM Lifestyle range contain balanced energy and protein levels, as well as added macro minerals, trace minerals and vitamins to ensure optimum health and vitality of birds. For more information, contact your NRM Nutrition Specialist or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article provided by Stacey Cosnett, Nutritionist.

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Works for you NUTRITION

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NUTRITION

Don’t kid yourself: goat diets differ

Goats are ruminants, belonging to the same family as cows but as competition from herbivores increased they went down a different evolutionary path and developed an ability to browse rather than just graze.

and protein late-term and energy

Goats grazing alongside cattle will

milk production. Lactating goats

and treatment is possible by feeding Deccox® (containing Decoqionate) or Bovatec® (containing lasalocid sodium) which are found in most starter feeds. A calf starter feed is typically preferable to a lamb starter feed for kids because they require copper at a higher level than lambs.

consume tannin rich vegetation, woody

respond well to supplementary

Wethers

plants, weeds and brush not normally

feed like the NRM Dairy Goat

consumed by cows. Although they

Pellets which have been formulated

have a smaller digestive capacity,

from non-GMO ingredients.

they can eat up to 6 percent of their

Trace minerals

bodyweight in dry matter compared to nearer 4 percent for cows. Goats, like red deer, are considered intermediate between grass/roughage eating cows and concentrate selecting white-tailed deer. They are therefore blessed with an ability to deal with mature forages and are able to consume a more concentrated diet than cows so they can utilise grain-based starchy feeds well. They are driven to seek out a diet with more variety and their appetite can at times seem fickle. They are very sensitive to feed which has spoiled or even picked-over by other goats.

requirement may double maintenance requirements. Supplementary feeding may be necessary in late pregnancy if the condition of a doe is slipping. Energy requirements can increase to three times maintenance at peak

The National Research Council (NRC) puts the copper requirement of lactating goats at 15mg/kg and the maximum dietary tolerable level cautiously at 40mg/kg. NRC puts the iodine requirement of lactating goats at up to 0.8mg/kg DM, goats can tolerate much higher rates of iodine intake but there is a concern that too much iodine finding its way into the milk may not be ideal for people who consume the milk or milk products. It’s good to prevent deficiencies but care should be taken if feeding goats minerals and compound feeds designed for other species.

Entire billy goats can be smelly so pets are often castrated. Early castration can increase the risk of stones blocking the urethra pipe from the bladder, especially when water intake is low. Compound feed designed for milking animals contain added minerals which can form stones in the male’s water works, so for this reason it is best not to feed them regularly to castrated males. Feeding NRM MultiFeed with access to a multimineral salt block is a safe way to keep condition on wethers whilst encouraging water intake to help prevent stones. Goats are similar to cows in many ways but for optimum health and performance they should be fed to meet their specialist needs.

goats have been selected for milk

Coccidiosis

production for centuries and are very

Kids are vulnerable to the debilitating

productive for their size. Goats that

and even deadly coccidiosis caused by

For more information, contact your NRM Nutrition Specialist or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store.

are pregnant do need more energy

Eimeria species protozoa. Prevention

Dr. Rob Derrick, NRM Lead Nutritionist.

Like dairy cows, breeds of dairy-

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36 | THE FARMLANDER NUF0331 Crucial - Weeds Farmlander 210x275 FP_AW2.indd 1

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3/10/19 11:56 AM


1:56 AM

FORAGE AND ARABLE

Replacing what you reap Replacing the nutrients removed by hay or silage keeps soil fertile and productive. When hay or silage is harvested, large amounts of nutrients that are key for ongoing pasture quality and productivity are removed. “Replacing nutrients after the final cut of the season, as well as regular maintenance fertiliser, encourages desirable pasture species to grow and means the paddock can be returned to grazing sooner,” says Ballance AgriNutrients Science Extension Officer Josh Verhoek. Nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) are vital nutrients to replace, as they are removed in the greatest amounts by hay or silage harvesting, at average rates of 20 and 17 kg per tonne DM respectively. Phosphorus, sulphur and magnesium are also removed, but in lesser amounts.

Post harvest fertiliser... can be combined with maintenance fertiliser, ensuring a heavier rate goes on hay and silage paddocks.”

“If hay or silage is fed out on the paddock where it was grown some nutrients are unevenly distributed back into the soil via dung and urine, but if it’s fed out elsewhere all the nutrient value goes with it,” says Josh.

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| Replacing nutrients after harvest can help the paddock return to grazing sooner.

Applying N after a first cut of hay or silage improves growth for a second cut and replacing N after the second cut gets paddocks back in rotation sooner. K is especially important for postharvest clovers, which take some time to recover from being shaded out by grasses. If any nutrient is in short supply clovers suffer first, as grasses are better at scavenging nutrients from the soil. Lack of K can easily limit post-harvest clover growth, which in turn can affect longer term pasture quality and N needs. Post-harvest K applications can be split if large amounts of K are required to achieve the desired soil test range or if winter leaching is a risk. It is important to avoid over-applying K, as growing plants take up excess K without converting it into extra growth, reducing the return from fertiliser investment and potentially elevating K levels in conserved feed and/or re-growing pasture, thus contributing to metabolic issues in stock. SustaiN K is ideal for replacing nutrients post-harvest. It combines N with K,

ensuring new growth is not limited. The size of the pasture response will depend on growth conditions, with moisture often being the critical factor during summer. Other options to consider include a mix of DAP and MOP, which provides N and K, as well as rapidly available phosphate. It is typically applied at 200-400 kg/ha after hay or silage harvesting. Pasturemag 15K is a general purpose fertiliser which supplies N, K, slow-release phosphate, sulphur, magnesium and calcium. It is typically applied at 500-600 kg/ha. “It’s important to remember postharvest fertiliser just takes care of the nutrients removed by the harvest alone. It doesn’t replace normal maintenance fertiliser, but can be combined with maintenance fertiliser, ensuring a heavier rate goes on hay and silage paddocks,” says Josh. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Ballance Agri-Nutrients.

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HORTICULTURE

Controlling brown rot in stone fruit Brown rot can be an economically devastating disease for stone fruit growers. As it causes blossom blight, twig cankers, shoot dieback and the characteristic fruit rot symptoms at harvest or during post-harvest storage, brown rot control is critical to growers.

Luna Sensation is a liquid soluble concentrate formulation containing two active ingredients that provide multiple benefits. • Luna Sensation brings a new active ingredient to the stone fruit industry, fluopyram (an SDHI, group 7 fungicide) alongside trifloxystrobin (a strobulurin, Group 11 fungicide).

Cultural management techniques

• The properties of the two actives in Luna Sensation provide systemic and longlasting protectant activity.

include maintaining an open canopy, cutting out diseased wood and removing mummified fruits. However, if seasonal conditions are favourable to the development of brown rot, a seasonal fungicide spray programme is

required to prevent disease epidemics.

Providing excellent activity against brown rot [and] a new flexible option for growers to incorporate into their seasonal spray programmes.”

With a new label claim, the Bayer Crop Science fungicide Luna® Sensation is now available to stone fruit growers. “Providing excellent activity against brown rot, Luna Sensation brings a new flexible option for growers to incorporate into their seasonal spray programmes,” says Marc Fox, Bayer Territory Manager.

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• Products containing Luna demonstrate outstanding activity that reduce losses in the orchard at harvest but can also extend shelf life and storability in the post-harvest supply chain. Luna Sensation can be used either during the flowering period or prior to harvest. The recommended use rate is 25 mL/100 litres of water as a dilute spray to the point of run off. If concentrate spraying the dilution rate should be adjusted accordingly. Ensure a minimum of 7 days between applications and do not make more than 2 consecutive applications per season. Do not use more than 600 mL/ha. With a 1 day withholding period, Luna Sensation is a flexible option for preharvest applications. Maximum residue levels (MRLs) are set for New Zealand but if a crop is destined for export, Bayer advises to contact your exporter before using Luna Sensation. While Luna Sensation contains two active ingredients from different chemical groups, it is important it is used as part of a seasonal brown rot spray programme incorporating different modes of action.

| A new active ingredient can be sprayed during particular periods to counter brown rot in stone fruit.

“For best practice resistance management, it is important that growers follow label instructions, restrict Luna Sensation use to the flowering or pre-harvest window and ensure different mode-of-action products are used in the other window,” advises Marc. For further information contact your Farmlands Technical Advisor or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Luna® is a registered trademark of the Bayer Group. Article supplied by Bayer Crop Science.

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NZ’S MOST VALUABLE CARD? YOU DECIDE.

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Works for you ANIMAL MANAGEMENT 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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Discounts are off RRP and vary by product category. If the product is already on promotion, the customer will receive the lowest available price on the day. Not available in conjunction with any other offer. *Excludes Electronics, Gift Cards and Workshop Services. Offer can’t be redeemed on freight. Valid from 13/11/19-26/11/19.

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ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Ensure optimal lamb growth this spring A key driver of farm productivity is the weight of lambs at weaning. If lamb growth rates are good and more lambs are at killable weights at weaning, this can reduce the number of lambs that a farmer has to keep on into the summer. Gastrointestinal parasites however can have a negative effect on growth.

is impaired by stress. In spring the

The key points of an effective parasite

Where drenching is required all

management programme are to

farmers should be using an effective,

manage pastures to reduce challenge,

combination drench. Farmers can find

use effective drenches and utilise

out what drenches are working on their

refugia and combination drenches

farm by completing a Faecal Egg Count

to reduce the selection for drench

Reduction Test or FECRT. If a farmer

resistance for the future.

is unsure of their drench-resistance-

The key points of an effective parasite

status, they should use a triple combination such as Alliance®.

management programme are to: • Manage pastures to reduce challenge • Use effective drenches • Utilise refugia and combination

parasite larvae from these eggs are taken up by lambs and depress growth rates up until weaning. If the spring pasture growth is slow or pasture covers are low this negative effect can be increased. In situations such as this, a drench pre-weaning should be considered to maximise growth rates.

Combination drenches also have the benefit of reducing the selection pressure for drench resistance. The chance of a worm being resistant to all active ingredients in a combination

drenches to reduce the selection for

is low and the proportion of resistant

future drench resistance.

parasites surviving on farm compared

Around lambing, parasite eggs are

to sensitive parasites on pasture is less.

often produced onto low-pasture

Cattle and sheep do not share the same

covers when a ewe’s immune system

parasites. Pasture grazed with cattle

will have reduced numbers of infective larvae for sheep on it and vice versa. By rotating the grazing of sheep with cattle in the spring, the growth rates of both classes of stock can be improved. Refugia is another tool that farmers can use to reduce the selection for drench resistance. Refugia allows parasites from un-drenched animals to populate pasture, diluting any resistant parasites that may have survived drenching. This could mean leaving a proportion of the mob un-drenched, putting drenched animals onto pasture that has had un-drenched grazing on it or following drenched animals with a mob of un-drenched animals. As it takes most parasites 21 days to start producing eggs once ingested, using a short-acting drench at 28-day intervals ensures that some sensitive parasites, not exposed to drench, reproduce before another drench is used. These larvae are also a form of refugia and dilute any resistant parasites that have survived the previous drench. Reducing the numbers of young stock on farm is one way that farmers can reduce the impact of parasites on production, their reliance on drenching and the potential for developing drench resistance in the future. Ensuring optimal growth rates in spring and being able to send more lambs to the works early is one way that farmers can achieve this. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly staff at your local Farmlands store. ACVM No: A10249 ®Registered trademark. ScheringPlough Animal Health Ltd. Phone: 0800 800 543. www.coopersonline.co.nz NZ/ALCE/0918/0010 Article supplied by MSD Coopers.

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Works for you ANIMAL MANAGEMENT 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

New law safeguards man’s best friend It is a way of life and a scene that captures heartland New Zealand – dogs on the back of a ute on a dusty rural road. However, late last year the law changed what this scenario might look like.

or manage livestock along public roads, in which case they could jump on and off a vehicle. The penalty for anyone who fails to comply with the Animal Welfare Regulation is a fine of up to 900 dollars. Agree or disagree with the new rules; there are plenty in each camp. With the financial penalty, it makes sense to have the ability to tether your dogs to the ute.

Animal Welfare Regulations enforce care and procedures, the latest version of these may complicate moving man’s best friend between paddocks. The new legislation was added in October 2018 and states that dogs must be restrained when travelling on the back of utes on public roads.

To help you meet this new rule, Aerofast Tiedowns have designed a functional and easy-to-use solution, the ‘Safe Dog Ute Strap’. This ensures your dog(s) is safe on public roads while getting from A to B. Designed to be left attached to the headboard of your ute, the strap will always be there when needed. If attached near the centre of the headboard, the Safe Dog Ute Strap is short enough to ensure the dog cannot fall off the side and long enough to allow the dog some freedom to move.

The legislation says: The owner of, and every person in charge of, a dog transported on the open deck or open trailer of a moving motor vehicle (other than a moped, a motorcycle, or an all-terrain vehicle) on a public road must — (a) ensure that the dog is secured in a way that prevents it from falling off or hanging off the open deck or open trailer (for example, by using a tether or a cage); and (b) if the dog is secured by a tether, ensure that the tether is short enough to prevent the dog’s legs from reaching over the sides of the open deck of the vehicle or open trailer, but long enough to allow the dog to stand or lie down in a natural position. The only exception to the new rule is if farm dogs are actively helping to drive

has stood the test of time with their emphasis on quality and durability as well as being passionate supporters of our rural community. Like builders, Aerofast understands that farmers are tough on gear and expect products to be just as strong and reliable. For the month of November, Aerofast is giving away two Safe Dog Ute Straps with every pack of their 50mm Tradesman tiedowns. This is an exclusive offer at Farmlands stores. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Aerofast.

It is produced using the same European hi-tenacity polypropylene yarn as Aerofast uses for its heavyduty tiedowns. It also employs the same UV technology Kiwis have trusted for more than 35 years, ensuring the strap will stand up to all New Zealand weather conditions. The Aerofast story began in 1981 and their well-recognised products are still manufactured here in New Zealand, out of their Christchurch factory. Aerofast

| http://www.legislation.govt.nz/regulation/public/2018/0050/latest/whole.html#LMS22845

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ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Ewes facts to flesh out your bottom line Do you need an accurate picture of how your lambs are performing? One of the most efficient ways to ensure lambs are hitting target weights is regular weighing and monitoring throughout the season. By weighing your livestock, you can make sure your animals are consistently gaining weight so you continue to profit. Traditionally farmers have relied on their years of experience to know when animals are gaining weight and are ready to be sold or slaughtered. Weighing backs up that experience with facts. It is all about input verses output – the input cost of feed, staff wages, time, health treatments, pasture and equipment maintenance per day versus the weight your animals are putting on per day. In order to profit, your input costs need to be lower than your output gains. RFID Sheep Tags along with Weighing and EiD technology will identify your best and worst performers, giving you the opportunity to take advantage of the high performers and improve those poor performers before trading. If you are trading lambs, regular weighing and using that information to make decisions will lift your average price and you will spend less time finishing animals on your farm. Further to that, you can track where the top performers have come from using RFID Sheep Tags. If you use specialist forage crops for finishing your lambs, you can measure your return on that investment and use the information to make decisions about your cropping programme for the future. ZTags Tagfaster Sheep RFID tags along

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| Weighing using the latest technology allows you to measure, track and gain more return on investment.

with Tru-Test have the hardware and software solutions that make life easy for you when it comes to weighing and EID, adding value to your bottom line and ensuring you meet your compliance obligations too. Tracking growth using a Tru-Test weighing platform, weigh scales and EID stick reader, in conjunction with a software package like MiHub Livestock, Minda or FarmIQ helps you improve productivity within your farming operation. Regular weighing allows you to manage animals individually. Identify top performers, or those that may need extra attention to bring them up to weight, and make the decision to sell animals at the optimum time to achieve the best price. Using a ZTag and Tru-Test solution also gives total herd traceability and MiHub for Livestock Management helps record data, track weight growth and manage herd genetics.

MiHub is a cloud-based online software system that provides a tool to manage the data you collect. Free when you purchase a Tru-Test 5,000 series indicator, MiHub turns weigh session data into an easy-to-understand graphical snapshot of where your animals are at and helps identify trends. MiHub Livestock is the simple way to monitor animal weight gains and track performance to target weights. Gather accurate information using your Tru-Test EID reader and weigh scales, analyse it using MiHub Livestock, as well as use it to make timely decisions on-farm. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Datamars Livestock.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 47


Works for you ANIMAL MANAGEMENT 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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ATTENTION CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS! Smiths City Loyalty Event: 21st November, 9am - 9pm To say thank you, Smiths City is hosting a Farmlands shareholder event with exclusive deals, drinks and nibbles - as well as the incredible storewide discounts you enjoy everyday! Visit smithscity.co.nz/store-locations to find your nearest Smiths City store.

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$

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*Terms & Conditions apply. Payment must be made using Farmlands Card only. Cost is inclusive of GST and reflects the average invoiced purchase price of the product but does not include any volume related adjustments that may apply. Any freight or installation costs required will be charged at the normal rate. Colours and stock may differ at some locations. Valid 21st Nov 2019 from 9am - 9pm to Farmlands shareholders and secondary Account holders only. While stocks last.

48 | THE FARMLANDER

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

Looking to eliminate the use of poisons on your farm? Pest management can be challenging on the farm. There are plenty of competing food sources for pests like rats, plus the need to consider the risk of secondary poisoning if you are using baits as your control method. Rats are smart, adaptable creatures and will make their homes where there’s a regular source of food available. On farms this can be livestock feed, crops, waste and garden areas. If there is a free buffet for your rats, they are less likely to be interested in food sources in traps. To combat competing food sources, the following steps can help; 1. Identify what food sources on your property are easily accessible to rats. 2. Determine how you can cut off the rats’ access to that food source. Can it be contained, removed or relocated? 3. Can you temporarily move a food source? This will encourage rats to hunt out a new source. 4. Is the food source seasonal? Once it runs out, this is an ideal time to trap – when they are searching for a new food source.

Using poisons to manage rats can pose a threat to other animals through ‘secondary poisoning’. This is when a predator of rats — cats, dogs, hawks — eat pests killed by poison and if the level of toxicity in the pest animal is high, it will in turn harm the predator and can even cause its death.

smartphones — via Bluetooth™ and the Chirp App — letting you know every time your trap kills a pest.

To remove this risk, consider a non-toxic rat control solution. The Goodnature A24 Rat and Stoat Trap is non-toxic and safe to use around pets and livestock. The lure used inside the Goodnature trap is non-toxic and long-life, removing the risk of accidental secondary poisoning and reducing the need to check traps to just twice a year.

Chirp also notifies you when you need to replace your lure and gas canister, so your trap will always be ready for action.

The A24 Rat and Stoat Trap is also CO2 powered, enabling it to automatically reset 24 times, clearing itself and providing constant control against reinvading pests. Goodnature have now launched their latest trapping innovation – Chirp. Chirp combines with the A24 Rat and Stoat Trap to talk straight to

This data can help identify any patterns in when you are catching rats and whether this ties back to any specific on-farm activities that could be managed differently.

Each A24 Trap kit with Chirp comes with a trap, enough lure and CO2 to set you up for six months of trapping, rodent detector cards to help you find the best location for your trap and Chirp technology. Everything else you need to get started is in the Chirp App — available to download for free in the App Store (iPhone) and via Google Play (Android). For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Goodnature.

While rat poisons are effective on rats, it is important to consider flow-on effects through the food chain if this is the method you are using to manage rats on your property.

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THE FARMLANDER | 49


6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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AN AFFORDABLE, QUALITY HOME TO GO

Have a home in a location of your choice, at an affordable price Clever Living Co. homes are high-quality homes that can be built on-site by an approved Clever Living Co. builder or built off-site and transported directly to you. Whether you need two bedrooms or up to four, you’ll find a range of styles with spacious living areas and indoor/outdoor flow. The Highland, Angus, Dexter, Suffolk and Oxford designs come fully quantity surveyed and ready with MBIE MultiProof approval, streamlining the building process so it can start sooner. They’re a fast and cost-effective solution that can suit a range of site conditions, even if they’re challenging.

A Clever Living Co. home gives you the complete materials package, including: • COLORSTEEL® roofing • Mitsubishi heat pumps • Kaboodle kitchens • Robinhood kitchen appliances • Stein showers, vanities and toilet suites • Sengled security cameras and lighting

To find out your exclusive Farmlands shareholder price or for more information visit cleverlivingco.co.nz

BNTR01056 November Farmlands_192x227mm.indd 1

50 | THE FARMLANDER

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Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

The post footprint On a daily basis we are reminded of the impacts of climate change and the need to start taking action to combat this. This seems to be particularly relevant for rural New Zealand. Sustainability and posts may not be considered as being synonymous but you may be surprised at what is going on in this space. Timberlands, who are the most significant log supplier for PermaPine, is one of the largest forest managers in New Zealand. They manage a number of forests in the central North Island including Kaingaroa which is the largest plantation forest in New Zealand at approximately 190,000 ha in size.

| This large wood biomass boiler is the first of its kind in New Zealand. It burns wood peel and wood waste rather than burning coal.

Timberlands intensively manage their forests and have achieved impressive gains in yield and wood quality while managing their forests to the highest levels of sustainability. Timberlands forests are accredited by international agencies to ensure native flora and fauna are protected and the forests are harvested in a sustainable manner to ensure they are not overcut.

A secondary benefit is that there is

improvement process yields logs that are

no need to transport wood waste or

more consistent and allows PermaPine,

coal to the site for fuel, as they burn

its customers and end users to enjoy

their own waste.

Roundwood and timber products that

• A future project will determine the

perform better. For example, they may

feasibility of installing a power plant

be stronger with smaller knots, greater

to use surplus steam as an energy

stability and less tendency to twist (as

source for power generation.

timber rails are prone to do as they dry).

Through a focus on genetic improvement, higher tree stockings, better management, better forest nutrition and health, harvest yields have increased by over 50 percent. A transition towards clonal forestry has ensured tree breeding has focused on selecting for traits such as wood stiffness and strength, both of which have been improved. In short, clonal forestry involves selecting trees that exhibit these specific traits and replicating these desirable genetics across the trees used in forest planting. This is important for PermaPine, as it endeavours to manufacture and supply posts which are strong, straight and have smaller knots.

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Over time this focus on the genetic

• Converting their manufacturing

Sustainability and social responsibility

plant, such as peelers, product

It is important to PermaPine that they

diesel and hydraulic-powered to

transfer decks and motors, from electric motors – ensuring energy is

partner with responsible suppliers such

used as efficiently as possible.

as Timberlands. Some of the other environmental initiatives PermaPine are

• Introducing next generation diesel

pursuing include:

engines burning AdBlue that

• Installation of a large wood biomass

produce cleaner emmissions

boiler which will burn wood peel

These initiatives are just the start, but

and wood waste rather than burning

are making a positive difference to

coal, and wood fuel transported in

PermaPine’s environmental footprint.

from other sites. This boiler is the

are passed through a separate plant

For further information contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store.

which collects all particulates to

Article supplied by PermaPine, with Timberlands Ltd.

first of its type to be installed in New Zealand. All of the boiler emissions

ensure air emissions are clean.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 51


6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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For full terms and conditions and offer end date please refer to www.bridgestonetyres.co.nz/farmlands or see in-store. Buy 1 get 1 half price promotion valid from Friday, 1 November 2019 to Saturday, 30 November 2019. The offer applies to selected sizes within Bridgestone Turanza Serenity. This excludes all other patterns outside of this range and all commercial tyres. Offer applies to the purchase of two tyres fitted to one vehicle. Some additional size exclusions apply. Buy 3 get 1 free price promotion valid from Friday, 1 November 2019 to Saturday, 30 November 2019. The offer applies to selected sizes within the following Bridgestone and Firestone branded car tyre (MY02, B-Series, Firestone Passenger) selected sizes within Bridgestone and Firestone 4x4 tyre products (Bridgestone Ecopia EP850, H/L 001, Dueler D674, Firestone Destination AT) and selected sizes within van tyres (Ecopia Van). This excludes all other patterns outside of this range and all commercial tyres. Offer applies to the purchase of four tyres fitted to one vehicle. Some additional size exclusions apply. In all instances the lowest value tyre will be given half price. Offer applies to the purchase of two tyres fitted to one vehicle. Normal fitting and balancing charges apply. Savings are off current in-store regular point-of-sale price. All tyres must be fitted in-store at the time of purchase. Offers are available strictly while stocks last. Tyre offers cannot be used in conjunction with any other discount or offer. Offer does not apply to trade accounts. †For agricultural tyre pricing, please ask in store for details.

52 | THE FARMLANDER

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| A Swiss company has made knives for 135 years and is embracing sustainable processes while producing professional export-grade products.

RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Swiss made knives make the cut People the world over can attest to the versatility of the Original Swiss Army Knife, a multi-use pocket knife that was invented in the late 19th century for soldiers. The Victorinox company has been manufacturing quality knives of all sorts in the small village of Ibach in Switzerland ever since. When it comes to cutting, filleting and boning meat or slicing, dicing or garnishing vegetables, the right knife is needed for each job. From the biggest meat processing plants to the best restaurants, knives that provide quality and durability are sought out by professionals.

“As a chef, a knife becomes like your hands. I love how these knives stay sharp for a long time,” he says. John Sim, Director of Victorinox’s New Zealand Agent, C E Lawford, says that the Swiss-made products available to the home cook, have all the same qualities as those used by professionals around the world.

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Remaining true to its legendary roots today, Victorinox is an independent, fourth-generation, family-run company. Master cutlers are trained upon a platform of 135 years of experience in the traditional art of sharpening and finishing knives and produce a range of razor-sharp knives.

Unsurprisingly then, Victorinox has won national awards for its social responsibility, employee care and the Swiss Environmental Responsibility Award.

Get set for summer Closer to home for Farmlands shareholders, products such as the Swiss Classic Kitchen Knives and Knife Sets are ideal for the BBQ season, or preparing the Christmas dinner.

Victorinox is currently the largest knife manufacturer in Europe, employing over 1,200 people in Switzerland, and producing over 60,000 household and professional knives per day. The pioneering spirit and ingenuity that produced the Original Swiss Army Knife has also seen it evolve to develop green manufacturing initiatives.

Chef De Cuisine and co-owner of a three Michelin star restaurant in New York, Daniel Humm, says his first knife was a Victorinox and they stand the test of time.

“Their range includes over 700 different knives – many of which are suitable for households or butchers. The Victorinox brand is well known for its high quality, ergonomics and manageability. The ‘Swiss-made’ label makes it a popular export globally,” says John.

Tradition meets modern practice

Today’s manufacturing operation utilises many environmental protection and sustainability measures. For example, in the processing of steel 500 tonnes per annum of grinding sludge is produced as a by-product. This is recycled by removing the water from the sludge and pressing the steel particles into briquettes (in a process unique within the industry) which are then returned to the steel mill for further processing. During the cooler winter months, thanks to a closed loop cooling system, waste heat generated during manufacturing is utilised to heat the company’s premises and over 120 houses in the village.

“To coincide with the summer holidays, we are running a $20,000 nationwide knife set giveaway, exclusively for Farmlands shareholders,” says John. “All you need to do is purchase any of the qualifying products and you are in the draw. There is one set per store to be won and this comes just in time for Christmas.”

For further information contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Victorinox.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 53


FAR M LAN DS P R E S E NTS

THE

54 | THE FARMLANDER FAR0029 Farmlander DPSf.indd 1

OR

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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P RO U D LY N Z G ROW N AN D P RO D U C E D

when you spend $1,000 or more on selected products at Farmlands.

every $500 spent gives you an entry to WIN A MEGA HAMPER! One to be won in every Farmlands store!

Hurry, limited numbers available! *Terms and Conditions apply, see www.farmlands.co.nz for more information. Images shown are serving suggestions for illustration purposes only. Basket shown for illustration purposes only. Promotion runs from 1st November 2019 to 31st December 2019 and is while stocks last. Limited supplies of Hams and Hampers nationwide. Limit of four Hams or Hampers per customer. One Mega Hamper to give away per Farmlands store.

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THE FARMLANDER | 55 8/10/19 4:45 PM


6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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Cattlestops Approved for milk tankers One piece, fully assembled

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Contact your nearest Hynds branch for more information on our Underpass

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JUST $4,334 JUST $5,562

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For full address details please see our website www.hyndsrural.co.nz or phone us for your nearest store. Conditions: Exclusive Farmlands offers available, ask in store for details. Promotional pricing valid from 1st - 30th November 2019. Discounts are off Hynds normal retail price. Actual product supplied may be different to that pictured but identical in quality and price. Promotional items are strictly while stocks last. All prices include GST but exclude transport/delivery costs unless otherwise stated.

56 | THE FARMLANDER

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Are whiteboards crucial for accountability and profit? People that plan have higher productivity than those who do not. Indeed, it have been proved that planning equals profit.*

numb the minds of listeners. Whether

For instance:

it is a simple text presentation or a

Having a daily, weekly and monthly plan will help you and your staff to get scheduled tasks done on time. If planning is key to your organisation, how are you going to share the information? You may be doing lots of planning on your computer or even in your head but unless it is visible it can be hard to get real accountability.

presentation tactic – the whiteboard.

• Many farmers are proving the benefit of having their farm map on a whiteboard in the office or shed (not just on the computer or i-pads) as they are always there when you want them for group discussions. These maps are laser-etched onto the board which gives a permanent and durable surface to handle constant use. Maps can have paddock sizes, troughs, water lines, planting, ponds or whatever feature you want put on it.

graphically impressive PowerPoint, science supports a completely different Yes, the traditional, erasable marker on a board. Research shows that the most effective communications are in fact not the graphically stunning ones or even the printed diagrams or charts.* Des Thomas, Director of Alex Distributors says the most effective

planning meetings are the ones that get listeners engaged with the speaker and

The All Blacks would never win if they were not pulling together as a team!”

create a team spirit says. “The All Blacks would never win if they were not pulling together as a team!” he says. “The upcoming generation of the workforce has an attention span of about eight seconds – that is not even long enough to read a single slide and previous generations are not much

Whiteboards are a very effective way to communicate your plans and achieve accountability because they are always visible to everyone. Indeed, task responsibility is a positive motivator for the whole team. Staff meetings are more interesting and engaging when using a whiteboard to show tasks and brainstorm ideas where everyone can input. While technology brings a level of sophistication to the table, it can

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better. With information available within seconds of a Google search and thousands of posts rolling across social media feeds instantaneously – showing a traditional computer screen is not going to captivate the attention of listeners,” Des advises. Alex Distributors specialise in whiteboards and projector screens.

• Herd treatment boards are also an essential tool in the milking shed – you would do anything to prevent the milk from a cow on treatment getting into the vat. • Whiteboards can also have grid layouts for feed plans, rosters, AB and calving, job tasks, fertilising, planting, irrigating, production targets, effluent management and many other uses. The fallacy that all planning can be done digitally has seen staff accountability drop off. Incorporating some visual aids may be the key to your success. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store.

Whiteboards have become an essential

* Based on in-house studies of Alex Distributors’ employees.

planning tool in many areas of the farm.

Article supplied by Alex Distributors.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 57


Farm backflow prevention An ever-increasing focus on protecting the environment means farmers need up-to-date and relevant information on a wide range of issues. Backflow prevention is an important part of maintaining a positive environmental farming practice. When foreign contaminants are introduced into a drinking (potable) water supply due to back-pressure or backsiphonage, we call this occurrence backflow. Backpressure situations arise when the downstream (delivery side) of a water supply has a higher pressure than the upstream (supply side). This may be due to a downstream pump forcing water back upstream through the pipework. Backsiphonage occurs when the supply pressure drops to less than the atmospheric pressure, inducing a siphon through the pipes.

Scenario 1: mixing chemicals with water It is not just industrial manufacturing companies in big cities that are in danger of contaminating the water we drink. The danger farms face from unhealthy water can be greater than we think. Have you ever mixed chemicals with water? Probably used a hose to do it, right? That scenario is one of the most common and dangerous causes of backflow conditions around the world. In this scenario, if there is a drop in supply pressure (before the hose tap) then backsiphonage will occur, sucking the poisonous chemical out of the container and into the household water system. This could also travel into the

town supply water main and affect other homes. When it is that simple to potentially poison your family, staff and livestock, it makes sense to take a best-practice attitude towards eliminating the potential harm. In this case a few simple steps are all that is necessary. • Do not leave an open-ended hose inside chemical mixing containers. • Do install a hose tap vacuum breaker on the outlet of the hose tap, before the hose adapter or hose tail. These are low-cost, high-hazard protection devices that will create an air gap as soon as a backsiphonage situation arises, preventing the chemicals from entering the water supply.

Backflow prevention devices are classified as low hazard (nuisance by colour, odour or taste), medium hazard (potential to injure or endanger health) or high hazard (potential to cause death). The main objective of a backflow prevention device is to protect drinking water from being contaminated.

CHLORDANE

Recommend installation of hose bib vacuum breaker.

Recommended installation of hose bib vacuum breaker

58 | THE FARMLANDER

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Scenario 2: remember Havelock North?

Prevention is key

Some potential backflow situations are hard to foresee, such as the events that took place in Havelock North back in August 2016. People became very sick due to contaminated drinking water and there were scenes of families queuing beside water tankers with large plastic containers – something that we do not expect in our “100% Pure New Zealand”. In total, 5,500 people were struck down with campylobacteriosis, a nasty illness that ranges from stomach pain, cramps and nausea through to vomiting, muscle pain and bloody diarrhea. Approximately 45 people were sick enough to be hospitalized and health issues continued after the event. A government inquiry found that farm run-off containing sheep faeces was the likely source of contamination. Due to heavy rainfall, stormwater flowed to a neighbouring pond and from there entered the Te Mata Aquifer before flowing across to an active bore. Contaminated water was then likely pumped into the local reticulation system. Whilst the specific nature of this contamination was not due to backflow it easily could have been, and has important ramifications for farm water sources, in particular bore heads. Many farm water sources are storage tanks holding rain water, with no connection to the local reticulation, however bores draw water from an aquifer. There may be (and usually are) multiple bores connected to the same aquifer and therefore indirectly to each other, which provides for potential cross contamination. All it takes is one bore pump to fail, a farm hose to come in contact an effluent run-off or chemicals and a backsiphonage situation has been created that can contaminate the aquifer.

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The obvious place to stop this occurring is at the source, as close as possible to the likely contamination point. On farms with many variables this may be difficult but there are some things you can easily do. • Hose tap vacuum breakers on every tap is a good start. • Double check valves or reduced pressure zone devices (depending on hazard rating) at known locations where any sort of processing or manufacturing on the farm occurs. • The final back stop is a backflow prevention device on the supply line at the bore head. This is essential to protect the aquifer in case of failure or absence of any of the other devices. Current best practice guidelines for the design and operation of bores for small drinking water supplies recommend a check valve is used to prevent backflow however do not stipulate what kind, nor provide details on maintaining and testing the check valve. Current legislation for backflow devices connected to reticulated mains water supply requires testing every 12 months by an Independent Qualified Person (IQP) and all backflow devices need to meet AS2845. Given the potential for any backflow situation on a farm to cause sickness or even death, a high hazard backflow prevention device should be used at the bore head, rather than a simple check valve.

Plug

Check valve

Air vent, opening screened, facing downwards and 0.5m above the 100-year flood level

Concrete apron sloped to drain away from well

Air relief valve

Sample tap

Flow meter

To pressure tank or elevated reservoir Power supply and controls Sanitary bore sealed water tight or elevated 0.5m above the 100-year flood level

Cement grout seal Torque arrestors Bore casing Riser pipe Low water probe Stainless steel saftey cable Check valve

Submersible pump

Screen

Hydroflow distributes the Watts range of backflow prevention devices in New Zealand. Watts is an American company with a long history of supplying quality products to the plumbing industry. Hydroflow continues this approach with its breadth of products and depth of technical expertise, including a dedicated

Technical team to help you sort the best backflow solutions for your farm. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Hydroflow.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 59


ALL YOUR ON FARM WATER NEEDS IN ONE PLACE. TALK TO US TODAY. Reticulation, storage, stockwater and more. Every farmer knows that a reliable water supply is vital for the success of both livestock and crops. So, whether you need to fix your fittings, prime your pumps or replace your reticulation system, visit your local Farmlands store for the best products, biggest range and even better service. To find out more visit www.farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands are proud stockists of;

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RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Farm infrastructure development Kim and Janette Osborne farm Te Toko Station, near the Waitomo Caves. The property is 1,300ha of steep hill country where they run up to 6,000 stock units, depending on season. When scoping a new stock water scheme this year, the Osbornes and their chosen supplier had to factor in weather, a remote water source and steep contours.

some interesting obstacles to overcome so a visit to the property was arranged. Pete and local Iplex Rural Territory Manager, Craig Paterson caught up with Kim a couple of months later, to better understand his onfarm needs, including stock water requirements, viability of water source, systemtype options and to assess pipeline routes and tank and trough positions.

Much of the farm is retained in native vegetation (400ha) with further blocks set for remedial planting. The property receives 3-metres annual rainfall and experiences extreme winds at times. The Osbornes are a busy family, with Janette being a Director, Chair and Board member on several enterprises as well as managing her own business and daughter Hannah recently qualifying the New Zealand Rowing Women’s Quad for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

We’re just custodians of the land – if you look after the land it will look after you.”

The need to install a new stock water scheme saw Kim visit the Iplex Pipelines site at this year’s National Fieldays, on the recommendation of his local Farmlands Technical Field Officer. He talked to Pete Carswell, the Iplex Rural Projects Manager about his farm’s characteristics such as remoteness of the water source, steep contours and extremely high and damaging winds. These presented

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| Kim and Janette Osborne farm steep hill country so needed an expert to come

on-farm to discuss stock water system considerations. Pete and Craig then jumped into Kim’s 4-seater ATV and, to the ground, would be less affected taking care not to disturb by wind shear. The use of rectangular lambing ewes, surveyed the relevant troughs with a small footprint is points on the property using GPS. proposed in response to the steep “This technology has transformed rural contours on the property. surveying work and despite the cold, Kim and Janette are facing a major windy and wet conditions on the day very fencing plan along with associated stock accurate data was gathered,” says Pete. water systems and new farm tracks. As is the case with many scheme There will be huge financial decisions designs, options are being worked ahead which is leading to many thoughtful through to deliver the most effective conversations around the viability of system. A pumped-gravity scheme farming in this area. As Kim puts it: seems to be the best option, with an “We’re just custodians of the land extremely reliable spring identified as if you look after the land it will look the water source. From there, water after you. As I have said many times, would then be pumped to a higher point,

giving enough static-head to supply the mainlines serving the troughs.

you’ve still got to be able to afford

Providing energy to remote locations for pumping is one issue to overcome, with both solar power and positive-drive windmills under consideration. Another thing Kim is currently investigating, given the extreme wind conditions, is the use of polyethylene bladders instead of tanks for the water reservoir. The thinking being that these can carry large amounts of water and, lying closer

“Hopefully, the Osbornes’ stock

a beer at the end of the day!” water system concerns have now been clarified and other farm infrastructure development can progress alongside this,” says Pete. For further information, contact your Farmlands Technical Field Officer or the friendly team at your local Farmlands store. Article supplied by Iplex Pipelines.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 61


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With NZ farmers For NZ farmers Let the magic begin If you're a Genesis customer, the magic in Energy IQ can really begin. All your energy usage data from the last month has made its way into Energy IQ. It's been transformed into quick insights that help make the invisible visible and put the power in your hands. There are also useful tools that make it easy to manage your farm's energy. Sign up now to see what insights have appeared on your account! Visit www.genesisenergy.co.nz/energyiq to find out more.

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62 | THE FARMLANDER

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HEALTH AND SAFETY

Meticulous health and safety planning required for burn-offs At this time of the year, some farmers will be thinking about controlled burn-offs, which means careful and extensive advance risk planning. Whatever the planned size of the burn off and whether it is crop clearing or stubble burn, land clearing, pile burn or windrow burn – or, on occasions, disease control – variances need to be accounted for. “Any fire, particularly an openspace burn-off is very unpredictable and can pose a risk to life, property and environment,” says Al McCone, Agricultural Lead for WorkSafe New Zealand. “Tragically, people have died as a result of burn-offs. In 2014, there were two controlled burn fatalities on farms in the space of two months. One of these resulted in a prosecution of the company operating the farm, incurring a significant fine and payment of emotional harm reparation to the family.” The court was told that, in that case, preparations for the burn-off had not referenced LACES, the internationallyrecognised safety system used by firefighters at vegetation fires. LACES stands for Lookouts, Awareness or Anchor points, Communication, Escape routes and Safety zones. Farmers considering undertaking a burn-off should prepare an extensive safety plan including personal escape pathways. That means thinking about all the risks and how to manage those risks. Wind shifts and sudden increases in wind speed are particular dangers to be

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

| Farmers need to consider the risks in advance of a burn-off.

aware of and plan for. Communication systems which are still effective in the very noisy environment created by a fire, are also a vital safety tool. Farmers should consult their local fire authority for advice and guidance before beginning a burn-off. There may be a requirement for a burn plan, and depending on the fire season status, a permit to burn may also be required.

“There are a lot of factors to take into account and you cannot afford to cut any corners. That extends to your actions before, during and after the burn-off. The person lighting the fire is responsible for ensuring it remains safe, within the required boundaries and is completely extinguished.” See www.fireandemergency.nz for guidance on: • Safely using fire for land management

“If you are intending to carry out a burnoff, then seeking out good information your planning and action is imperative.

• Fire as a land management tool information (including LACES)

The National Rural Fire Authority and Fire

• Prescribed burn plan template

and Emergency New Zealand provide

• Working safely at vegetation fires

and advice and adhering closely to it in

free extensive advice and guidance to

• Crop residue or stubble burns

help landowners in their safety planning

Article supplied by WorkSafe

for controlled burns,” says Al.

.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 63


64 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


The New Zealand Century Farm and Station Awards aim to capture and preserve the history of our country’s farming families. Each month we will share stories from Farmlands shareholders who have worked their land for 100 years or more.

Taihape’s Slippery Hill When Hiwimania was first established, George Fannin could only have dreamed his legacy would triple in size.

The original whare is still standing today. Of the 435 acres, there were 50 acres of natural clearing on the north edge of Hiwi, which ran all the way to Moawhango. The rest of the farm was in heavy native bush and undergrowth but Arther was not daunted by the challenge ahead. He did not fell all the bush and left approximately one acre in most planted paddocks, which is still standing today and looks magnificent.

Arther was the son of George and Georgina Fannin, who arrived in New Zealand from Ireland in 1865.

Arther married Grace in 1902 and the next few years were spent fencing, felling bush and beekeeping to sell honey in the town. While building up sheep numbers he started a Romney Stud No. 93, which was very successful. He exported rams to East Africa and won the Levin Cup for Champion Ram at the Palmerston North Show in successive years.

On leaving school, Arther worked the land and in 1901 he purchased a block at Ohinewairua, three miles east of Taihape for £475, which he named “Hiwimania” (Slippery Hill). In 1901, the land was transferred to Grace Groves (Arther’s fiancé) in “Lease in Perpetuity” with final ownership not taking place until 1918. Arther built a whare in Taihape mounted on skis and bullocks and pulled it around the back of the farm through a small area of natural clearing, as the road to the farm was still only a riding track.

at Wainui, which was warmer country for growing oats for chaff. In 1918, he purchased further land across the road from Hiwi. Arther carried on farming until his death in 1957 when his son, Eric took over the reins. Eric farmed until his death in 1981 when his youngest son, Bruce took over. In 2000, Bruce purchased land next to Hiwi and farmed until 2010 when Bruce retired and passed the land onto Donald. The present acreage of Hiwimania is 1,266 acres involving sheep, beef and crops.

By 1906, the family had grown with the birth of two children. A substantial dwelling was built in 1907 and is still standing today but not lived in. In 1912, Arther purchased further land | First ewes purchased, whare behind.

| Arther on horse, whare beyond.

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| Arther with 2th ram.

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 65


BUILT FOR

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www.ironman4x4.co.nz Exclusive shareholder pricing. Prices include GST but do not include freight or fitting and are subject to change without notice.

66 | THE FARMLANDER

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OR YOUR FARM

$439

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Parts and accessories available for most makes and models of 4x4 utes. Check out our website to view the selection available for your vehicle.

From $817

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Products available from over 40 stores NZ Wide call 0508 IRONMAN for your nearest dealer

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE Australian FARMLANDER | 67 Family Owned Company Since 1958


CO-OPERATIVE NEWS Works for you 6005 0991 1047 7802 AM CARD HOLDER

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Karcher Hot Waterblaster HDS 8/18 4C • 2610 psi • 300-800 L/H flow • 3 phase 6.0kW • Hot/Cold/Steam operation SHAREHOLDER EXCLUSIVE

Farm Bike 149cc 4-Stroke • Engine type: single cylinder 4-stroke • Displacement: 149cc

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• Ideal for engineering/workshops • Get a FREE Karcher Wet & Dry Vacuum Cleaner NT27/1 worth $379 with purchase

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Crutch and Weigh Combo • Open access to feet and belly • Autocatch and three-way drafting • Remote control • Includes belly crutch and ramp clamp • Includes Gallagher load bars • Place your order in the month of November and get a free Bullmax Auger valued at $799 + GST

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• Low drive-over clearance for easy positioning of vehicles • Oversized platform allows a wide range of pickup points • Load bearing hinged ramps with polymer rollers allow additional access to perform wheel/brake work • Air operated: 85 – 110 psi • Full rise: 1,995mm, platform length: 1,498mm, platform width: 628mm

FAR_09151

To view these offers and more, check out the latest BCD catalogue at www.farmlands.co.nz/bigcarddeals *Free holiday for two to the Gold Coast with any Snapchill™ Ice Bank Unit. Holiday to be booked within 45 days of purchase. Pricing is exclusive to Farmlands shareholders when transacting on your Farmlands Card. All prices are GST exclusive and subject to stock availability. Pricing is inclusive of all rebates and discounts. Prices are valid until 30th November 2019. For full Terms and Conditions visit www.farmlands.co.nz/bigcarddeals

68 | THE FARMLANDER

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

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REAL ESTATE

Congratulations to our award-winning Real Estate Consultants Farmlands would like to acknowledge and congratulate our top ten 2018/2019 award winners.

1 Phil Badger

These Real Estate Consultants are true professionals and superb Farmlanders.

Rotorua

2

3

4

Kevin Wrenn Te Kuiti

Tom Hackett Northland

John Beaufill Invercargill

5

6

7

Yvonne Forlong and Bill Milham Manawatu

Marlene and Danielle Badger Rotorua

Julie-Anne Davidson Waimate

8

9

Sunia Marr Northland

Hamish Anderson and Maurice Newell North Canterbury

10 Christine Wallace Waimate

To get in touch with our top agents visit www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz/our-people

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 69


REAL ESTATE

Te Awamutu | Opportunity starts here Dairy unit milking around 430 cows with production historically around 172,000kgs of milk solids produced from a low-cost system. 40 aside herringbone dairy, 400 cow feed pad, two 300 tonne concrete sprayed feed bunkers, calf sheds, implement sheds and solid waste effluent separation system in place. Two, three-bedroom homes. Approximately 140 hectares of flat to gentle rolling contour with the balance rolling to steep. May suit a land use change to maize growing or enjoy the unique milk supply advantages with the Synlait Milk contract. Tender closing 2pm, Tuesday 19 November 2019 (unless sold prior).

70 | THE FARMLANDER

Property ID: RX2051825 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Ian Morgan Lifestyle / Rural – Matamata 027 492 5878 ian.morgan@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


REAL ESTATE

Boundary indicative only

Boundary indicative only

Boundary indicative only

Waharoa | Unique opportunity with this 4.9 hectare block

Property ID: RX2072516 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Outstanding road frontage to State Highway 27 with access off Wairere Road. Subdivision scheme plan is in place to create three lots being 1.5 hectare to 1.0 hectare and 2.9 hectares. An ideal high profile site with an ability to add immediate value. Price $840,000.00 plus GST (if any). Ian Morgan Lifestyle / Rural – Matamata 027 492 5878 ian.morgan@farmlands.co.nz

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 71


REAL ESTATE

Boundary indicative only

Boundary indicative only

Omanawa | Bay of Plenty beauty 171.6 hectare (more or less) dairy unit located at 848 Taumata Road, RD 3, Tauranga. The property has five titles, three being road frontage lifestyle lots comprising areas 1.0, 1.4 and 1.2 hectares. Typical stocking is 415 cows with a six year production average of 162,559kgMS. Feed inputs are 140 tonne maize silage and 180 tonne of palm kernel extract. Farm building structures are very good and include a modern 36 aside herringbone dairy with 450 cow yard, 5 bay gable implement shed, large 8-bay calf shed, 2 bay hayshed and a 4 bay 1/2 round workshop. Tender closing 2pm, Tuesday 26 November 2019 (unless sold prior).

72 | THE FARMLANDER

Property ID: RX2021878 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Ian Morgan Lifestyle / Rural – Matamata 027 492 5878 ian.morgan@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


REAL ESTATE

Boundary indicative only

Boundary indicative only

Te Aroha | Good sound business proposition 315 - 339 Old Te Aroha Road, Matamata is a 180 hectare dairy unit that is in a great location with consistent production history around 160,000kgMS from 480 cows. The property has a sound range of structures including a modern, no frills, 40 aside herringbone dairy, attached 340 cow feed pad, 5-bay half round hay shed and a calf shed with bobby calf road out. The main home is a nicely renovated four bedrooms plus office home with an internal access double garage. The other two homes are three bedroom brick clad homes with double carports. Price $7,200,000.00 or near offer.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Property ID: RX2066245 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Glen Murray Lifestyle / Rural – Matamata 027 488 6138 glen.murray@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | Š November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 73


REAL ESTATE

Arapohue | The best of Northlands premier properties An established dairy unit with superior fertility, layout and improvements. This 201 hectare property has consistent production levels of 190,000kgMS from 400 cows, fertile soils, strong pasture together with its flat contour allows prospective purchasers to budget with confidence. Improvements include two homes and a single man’s quarters, 38 ASHB, 2 x Aztec herd homes, 2 x 5-bay implement sheds, 2-bay concrete PKE bunker, 7-bay workshop, 1 x 3-bay implement shed, 1-bay implement shed and kumara sheds. One of the best dairy units to become available in Northland. Price $5,175,000.

74 | THE FARMLANDER

Property ID: RX2025447 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Tom Hackett Lifestyle / Rural – Northland 027 498 2908 tom.hackett@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


REAL ESTATE

Boundary indicative only

Morrinsville | Super location - 5 minutes to town 72 hectares of flat contour to gentle rolling in back paddock 20 aside herringbone cowshed 4-bay shed, 3-bay calf shed and haybarn Subdivided into approximately 40 paddocks Modern four bedroom, two bathroom brick home built in December 2016 • Older style three bedroom second dwelling in need of some TLC • Tender Closing 2pm, Thursday 7 November 2019 (unless sold prior by private treaty).

Property ID: RX2052742 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

• • • • •

Chelly Aitchison Lifestyle / Rural – Morrinsville 022 697 8779 chelly.aitchison@farmlands.co.nz

Reporoa | 499 Plateau Road

Property ID: RX2057209 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

This dairy unit is in 2 titles with 3 homes, plus an extra 4 hectares with a 4 bedroom home may be included in the sale. Currently milking 450 cows, with production over the previous three seasons averaging 190,000kgMS. The welllocated 36ASHB with an in-shed feeding system is supported with plenty of calf rearing and implement storage shedding. An excellent central race system connects all 67 paddocks. Internal fencing is mainly 3-4 wire electric with the boundary made of permanent materials. Price by negotiation.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

Phil Badger Lifestyle / Rural – Rotorua 027 357 5704 phil.badger@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

THE FARMLANDER | 75


REAL ESTATE

Hamurana | All deer fenced and ready to farm Farmlands is proud to bring this 60 hectare property in sort after Kaharoa to the market. Currently the main stocking policy is cattle finishing. The property is mostly deer fenced and running a small number of deer. A large percentage of the property is flat, with the remainder rolling contour. A recent addition is a robust set of stock yards and load out. A solid three-bedroom weatherboard home sits in an elevated position amongst mature trees. The property is in good heart and ready for you to make your next move. Tender closing 12.00pm, Thursday 7 November 2019.

Property ID: RX2035123 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Phil Badger Lifestyle / Rural – Rotorua 027 357 5704 phil.badger@farmlands.co.nz

Boundary indicative only

Whatawhata | This property will surely impress • 14.4 hectares • Modern four bedroom home, only 11 years old • 17 paddocks all troughed and central race • Good stock yards and load out • Five minutes to Dinsdale, ten minutes to CBD • Currently farming 40 cattle and 60 ewes If you love the quiet, want to be located five minutes from Hamilton whilst grazing a few animals, then please call Tim or Doug to view this great property. Price $1,950,000 plus GST (if any).

76 | THE FARMLANDER

Property ID: RX1924716 www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz

Tim Foy Lifestyle / Rural – Pukekohe 021 032 9494 tim.foy@farmlands.co.nz Douglas Boyde Lifestyle / Rural – Pukekohe 027 494 6714 douglas.boyde@farmlands.co.nz

Farmlands Co-operative Society Limited | © November 2019. All rights reserved.

WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ


REAL ESTATE

YOUR PROVINCIAL REAL ESTATE EXPERTS

Whether rural, residential or lifestyle, Farmlands' experienced team can turn your goals into reality. We offer coverage, capability and competitive pricing. List with us today.

Call 0800 200 600 or visit www.farmlandsrealestate.co.nz WWW.FARMLANDS.CO.NZ

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THE FARMLANDER | 77


Offer available to Farmlands shareholders only. Spend must be on one invoice. Shareholders can only redeem one double pass. In-store purchases must be made through the participating Southern Farmlands stores. Offer runs from 1 October 2019 until 30 November 2019, subject to availability of double passes. Limited number of double passes allocated to each Participating Store. List of eligible stores on www.farmlands.co.nz/cup

FAR_09329

*


RUGGED RIVALRY

-AT ITS ROOTS-

PULSE ENERGY HIGHLANDERS VS CRUSADERS FRIDAY 24TH JANUARY 2020, WANAKA A&P SHOWGROUNDS

GET A DOUBLE PASS * THIS OCTOBER Simply spend $3,000 on one invoice at participating Southland and Otago Farmlands stores.


ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED IS NOW AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

Grow. With an expansive database of primary farm inputs you’ll never be stuck for the latest information and expert recommendations for cropping, pasture or horticulture. Grow is the one-stop app for: • A comprehensive range of seed, fertiliser and crop protection products • Product labels, SDS and haznotes • Easy order enquiry straight from the app • Weed and pest identification and so much more

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Stay in the know and download Grow today.

Profile for Farmlands

Farmlander November 2019  

Special offers and information for South Island Farmlands shareholders

Farmlander November 2019  

Special offers and information for South Island Farmlands shareholders

Profile for farmlands