Page 1

New January 2015 | Vol. 36 | No.1

Earth

The Magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Fargo

To Inform, Educate, Inspire Diocesan publication evolved, but aim remained unchanged

PLUS

From Bishop Folda: The gift of consecrated life

Walking in the footsteps of St. Philip Neri

Seminarian Life


NEW

EARTH To Inform, Educate, In January 2015 Vol. 36 | No.1

Diocesan publication may evolve, but aim remains u

TABLE OF CONTENTS ON THE COVER 14 To Inform, Teach, Inspire : Diocesan Publication evolved over time, but aim remained unchanged

As New Earth reveals its new format, rediscover the many faces, editors, writers and stories the publication has featured during its more than 100 years in existence. Throughout the years, the need for a tangible publication rooted in Catholic teaching remains a constant way for fellow believers to draw together in one community.

FROM BISHOP FOLDA

4

The Gift of Consecrated Life

Bishop Folda calls us to give thanks for the blessings religious have brought to our diocese. While some interpret the consecrated religious as a loss of freedom, Bishop Folda reflects that their vows give them more freedom in their lives rather than less.

FOCUS ON FAITH

5

Pope Francis’ January Prayer Intention

8 9

“I was blind but now I see.” Miracle attributed to U.S. born woman religious, declared blessed Heaven, Hell and Purgatory: From Whence Come Such Beliefs?

14 PLUS

Father James Ermer tackles questions around heaven, hell and purgatory in this month’s “Ask a Priest” article.

AROUND THE DIOCESE

10 Seminarians best priests in annual basketball event 11 Walking in the footsteps of St. Philip Neri

NEXT GEN CATHOLICS

18 Catholic Schools Week celebrates unique mission of education in community 19 National SEEK 2015 Conference inspires renewal, conversion

Young adults across the nation started the New Year renewing their relationship with Christ in Nashville, Tenn. at the National SEEK 2015 conference. Sponsored by FOCUS, SEEK has inspired conversions and renewed enthusiasm for the faith for young adults and their families.

10

31

From Bishop Folda: The many works of the Spirit

Two ordained, prepare for

OUR CATHOLIC LIFE

20 Stories Of Faith

Father Bert Miller shares the story of Rosemary Dimmer Coleman and her ‘amber moment’ helping a dear friend.

21 Catholic Action

The 2015 North Dakota legislative session has begun. In this month’s “Catholic Action,” Christopher Dodson provides resources and tools to stay connected to the issues.

22 Stewardship

Are you leaving footprints? Steve Schon’s presents this question in his “Stewardship” column this month. Gifts to the church leave positive impressions for your loved ones to model.

23 Guest Columnist

Guest columnist, Denise Bossert, shares how epic life events remind us that family is our first earthly priority in her column, “Catholic by Grace.”


ON THE COVER: Over the past 125 years of the Fargo Diocese, the monthly news publication produced for area faithful has taken many forms. From the very first “The Bulletin” to the current “New Earth” magazine, the format has evolved but the purpose has remained the same. Here you can see how the cover design and layout changed over the years.

ucate, Inspire

but aim remains unchanged

un. In on the issues.

s this Gifts oved

life events n her

EARTH

Our mission is to serve Catholic parishes in Eastern N.D. as the official monthly publication of the Diocese of Fargo.

Publisher Most Rev. John T. Folda Bishop of Fargo

Editor Aliceyn Magelky

Staff Writer Kristina Lahr

Designer Stephanie Drietz - Drietz Designs

Subscriptions Parish contributions make it possible for each registered Catholic household in the diocese to receive 11 issues per year. For those living outside the Diocese wanting a subscription, an annual $9/year rate is requested.

Postmaster

24 Seminarian Life

Fargo Diocese seminarian, Ethan Kaste, contemplates on the heart of Mary and her never-ending devotion to the Lord.

WHAT’S HAPPENING ordained, prepare for priesthood Pope visits Holy Land

mmer friend.

NEW

25 Milestone Celebration Announcements 25 Events Calendar 26 Sponsored By The Diocese

As part of the diocesan Year of Mar­riage and Family, all are invited to take a pilgrimage to the eighth World Meeting of Fami­lies Sept. 22-27 in Philadelphia. This event will be Pope Francis’s first visit to the United States.

26 Glimpse Of The Past 27 Renowned ‘Catholic Answers’ speaker to headline luncheon, banquet

U.S/WORLD NEWS

30 New Year’s Eve is time for examination of conscience, pope says

Send address changes or subscription requests to: New Earth 5201 Bishops Blvd, Suite A Fargo, ND 58104

Contact Information Use the following contact information to contact the New Earth staff: news@fargodiocese.org (701) 356-7900 Deadline to submit articles, story ideas, advertisements and announcements for the February issue is Jan. 21, 2015. All submissions are subject to editing and placement. New Earth is published by the Catholic Diocese of Fargo, a nonprofit North Dakota corporation, 5201 Bishops Blvd, Ste. A, Fargo, ND 58104. (701) 356-7900. Periodical Postage Paid at Fargo, ND and additional cities. ISSN# 10676406 Member of the Catholic Press Association

LAST WORD

31 Year of Marriage and Family begins with Youth and Children

Year of marriage and family


FROM BISHOP FOLDA

The Gift of Consecrated Life

R

eligious life has been in the news during the past few weeks. Even reality TV is getting into the act and has broadcast a series on young women who are exploring religious life. In addition to presenting a final report on religious sisters in the United States, Pope Francis has also called the universal Church to celebrate a Year of Consecrated Life from November 2014 to Feb. 2, 2016. In fact, the Holy Father called for

“To use the words of St. Hildegard, herself a Benedictine nun, the religious can be ‘like a feather on the breath of God.’ The consecrated religious can also be a prophetic presence in the Church and in the world, calling all of us, by witness of their lives, to live more fully our own vocations to holiness.” - Bishop John Folda. this special observance very soon after we had announced our own Year of Marriage and the Family in the Diocese of Fargo, which began on the Feast of the Holy Family, Dec. 28. One might ask if these two special years will somehow be in conflict, but that notion hardly seems possible. All Christian vocations are part of the one universal call to holiness, and I doubt that we’ll have any trouble at all celebrating both here in the Diocese of Fargo. I have a very personal reverence for consecrated life. I had two aunts who were Franciscan Sisters, and I was taught by Sisters of Mercy and Sisters of St. Francis in grade school and high school. I was fortunate to study with the Dominican friars at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, and I served as Vicar for Religious in the Diocese of Lincoln. I was also very blessed to have the assistance of Franciscan Apostolic Sisters from the Philippines during my service as rector of St. Gregory the Great Seminary. So, like many of you, I have been extraordinarily blessed by the presence and influence of consecrated religious throughout my life. And now, as Bishop of Fargo, I am fortunate to have the assistance and witness of religious priests and sisters in various apostolates of the diocese. In fact, the Diocese of Fargo has been served by religious from the earliest days of our history. Religious priests served as missionaries before there even was a Diocese of Fargo, and religious sisters weren’t far behind. Among other works, the priests served as missionaries, pastors, chaplains and teachers. And, the sisters staffed schools and hospitals all over North Dakota. The available space doesn’t allow me to catalog all the religious communities and apostolates that have graced our diocese, but I can say that 4

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

our diocese would not have taken root and flourished as it did without their presence. Consecrated life has an even longer history in the universal Church, going back to the early days of persecution when men and women adopted a hidden life of prayer and penance in the desert. Many of these individuals banded together in communities and adopted a common way of prayer and daily life that sustained them in faith and charity. Some of those earliest communities, like the Benedictines, continue to serve the Church after many centuries, demonstrating the enduring fruitfulness of their call. Consecrated religious typically take vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, although some communities have variations on these vows. By their poverty and simplicity of life, they conform themselves to the poor Christ, and they demonstrate to the world that life is more than the possessions we amass for ourselves. Living lives of celibate chastity, the consecrated religious give their hearts entirely to God and manifest a single-minded love for Christ and his Church. And, by their vow of obedience, they imitate Jesus, who came to do the will of his Father in all things. Through obedience, they make themselves completely available to their communities and to the Church, serving wherever there is a need. Some commentators interpret the way of life of the

Hurley’s Religious Goods Inc

Serving our faith community Since 1951

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consecrated religious as a loss of freedom, but in my experience, their vows give them more freedom rather than less. The consecrated life allows a religious sister, brother or priest to live selflessly for Christ and for others, unencumbered by the weight of worldly affairs. To use the words of St. Hildegard, herself a Benedictine nun, the religious can be “like a feather on the breath of God.” The consecrated religious can also be a prophetic presence in the Church and in the world, calling all of us, by the witness of their lives, to live more fully our own vocations to holiness. Those who choose to live the consecrated life obviously make sacrifices to do so. They do indeed forsake personal possessions, families of their own, and some measure of personal autonomy. It would be naive to think that the consecrated life is always easy. Any religious sister, brother or priest will tell you that the life they have chosen has its own challenges and trials. By their consecration, the religious does not give up his or her humanity, and must strive for virtue just as we all must. But, with the challenges comes great joy, the joy of total commitment to God and freedom from obstacles to a deeper relationship with Christ. In a very real way, the consecrated religious anticipates here on earth the kind of intimate relationship with God that we all aspire to in heaven. It is no secret that the number of religious in the United States has declined in recent decades, including here in the Diocese of Fargo. We are all made poorer by the reduced number of religious in our diocese, so this year should be an occasion for fervent prayer and active promotion of religious vocations for both men and women. In our parishes, in our schools, and in our family homes, prayer for religious and priestly vocations should be a regular intention placed before the Lord. And, we all should make a point to encourage young people to consider the religious life. Many young religious and seminarians have told me that they first began to consider this vocation at the suggestion or encouragement of others. I have no doubt that God is still calling young people to this beautiful way of love, but we must do what we can to make sure his call is heard. Families, too, should make an effort to present the option of consecrated life to their children. Pope Francis reminds us that the family is where every vocation is formed, and if our children are indeed called by God to the consecrated life, we can be certain that he will give them the joy and happiness that we desire for them. Finally, this Year of Consecrated Life should be an occasion to give thanks. We must definitely give thanks to God for the consecrated religious who have contributed so profoundly to the life of the Church in our diocese. And, we should also be sure to thank the religious sisters, brothers, and priests who have touched our lives in a very personal way. Consecrated life is a beautiful gift of God to the Church and should be cherished. In the coming year, let us pray for our religious sisters, brothers and priests, and ask our Lord to renew the grace of their calling with joy and every grace.

Prayer Intentions of Pope Francis

|

January

Universal intention: Peace. That those from diverse religious traditions and all people of good will may work together for peace. Evangelization intention: Consecrated Life. That in this year dedicated to consecrated life, religious men and women may rediscover the joy of following Christ and strive to serve the poor with zeal. Provided by Apostleship of Prayer, www.apostleshipofprayer.org.

Mass, St. Maurice’s Catholic Church, Kindred

January 18

Mass and Dedication of Altar, St. Michael’s Catholic Church, St. Michael

January 19

Martin Luther King Day, Pastoral Center closed

January 20-22

March for Life, Washington, D.C.

January 25

1 p.m. Trinity Catholic Elementary School Open House, West Fargo

January 27

9 p.m. Mass for bisonCatholic Week, St. Paul’s Newman Center, Fargo

January 29

9:30 a.m. Mass for Catholic Schools Week, Shanley High School, Fargo 5:30 p.m. Legislative Mass with Bishop Kagan, Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, Bismarck

January 30

1 p.m. Mass for Catholic Schools Week, Sacred Heart Catholic High School, East Grand Forks

January 31- February 1

Pastoral Visit to St. Augustine’s Catholic Church, Fessenden; St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Hurdsfield and Holy Family Catholic Church, McClusky

February 2-4

National Catholic Bioethics Conference, Dallas, Texas

February 13

8:30 a.m. School Mass at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, Fargo

February 15

3 p.m. Catholic Collage Adult Education Session, Shanley High School, Fargo

February 18

12:10 p.m. Ash Wednesday Mass, Cathedral of St. Mary, Fargo

February 19

5:30 p.m. Real Presence Radio Banquet, Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

5


WELCOME

Welcome to New Earth: The Magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Fargo From the editor

F

or several months, we have been examining different options for publishing the diocese’s monthly news publication, “New Earth.” We reviewed a variety of factors to determine the direction to proceed including costs, reader opinions, industry trends and results from a pilot magazine released in June. Additionally, we conducted broad consultation from our priests and the Diocesan Pastoral Council members.

Why The New Format?

Like any news medium, New Earth needed to be evaluated and adjustments made to better serve its audience. This concept is not new, and was formally introduced to the Catholic Church some thirty years ago by St. John Paul II when he talked about “new evangelization.” As you well know, he was very clear to say the content of what is presented is the same, and the teachings of the Church always remains central in our message. But, the method of delivery must evolve as people and the world evolves. In other words, we need to go to the people and speak to them using their terms, on their level. “New Earth” is the only mechanism that reaches every Catholic household in the diocese. With no specific call to action, it’s a simple invitation, a gift to learn more. Of course, it’s not enough to put it into the hands of the faithful. We need them to open it, read it and most importantly take action. By design, magazines have a much longer shelf life than a newspaper. With full-color on every page, our hope is to draw readers into the publication. Our goal is to revitalize interest in the publication from all individuals while staying loyal to our ardent readers. Every group consulted on this change had an overwhelmingly positive response to the new format and encouraged transition to it. Fortunately, the cost to make the switch was budget-friendly.

Bishop’s Page

Following the “Table of Contents” on pages two and three, you will find each month the “Bishop’s Message.” This items gives Bishop Folda space each month to offer his thoughts, guidance and prayers to a broad audience. Also, on these first few pages, you will see the bishop’s monthly calendar and official appointments and announcements from the chancery.

Focus on Faith

These pages of “New Earth” will contain the new column “Ask A Priest,” where a rotating group of priests answers questions about Church teachings from the people of the diocese. Also, you will see Pope Francis’ monthly prayer intentions, catechesis, stories on saints and a variety of topics on our faith.

Around the Diocese

Local news about Catholic people and events has always been a focus of “New Earth.” This section will house those local, current news stories about the people, places and events of the diocese.

Next Gen

Short for “Next Generation,” this section will allow us to showcase the youth and young adults in our diocese.

Bishop Folda’s Calendar

FROM BISHOP FOLDA

January 11

The Gift of Consecrated Life

R

6

eligious life has been in the news during the past few weeks. Even reality TV is getting into the act and has broadcast a series on young women who are exploring religious life. In addition to presenting a final report on religious sisters in the United States, Pope Francis has also called the universal Church to celebrate a Year of Consecrated Life from November 2014 to Feb. 2, 2016. In fact, the Holy Father called for this special observance very soon after we had announced our own Year of Marriage and the Family in the Diocese of Fargo, which began on the Feast of the Holy Family, Dec. 28. One might ask if these two special years will somehow be in conflict, but that notion hardly seems possible. All Christian vocations are part of the one universal call to holiness, and I doubt that we’ll have any trouble at all celebrating both here in the Diocese of Fargo. I have a very personal reverence for consecrated life. I had two aunts who were Franciscan Sisters, and I was taught by Sisters of Mercy and Sisters of St. Francis in grade school and high school. I was fortunate to study with the Dominican friars at the University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, and I served as Vicar for Religious in the Diocese of Lincoln. I was also very blessed to have the assistance of Franciscan Apostolic Sisters from the Philippines during my service as rector of St. Gregory the Great Seminary. So, like many of you, I have been extraordinarily blessed by the presence and influence of consecrated religious throughout my life. And now, as Bishop of Fargo, I am fortunate to have the assistance and witness of religious priests and sisters in various apostolates of the diocese. In fact, the Diocese of Fargo has been served by religious from the earliest days of our history. Religious priests served as missionaries before there even was a Diocese of Fargo, and religious sisters weren’t far behind. Among

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

Mass, St. Maurice’s Catholic Church, Kindred

January 18

Mass and Dedication of Altar, St. Michael’s Catholic Church, St. Michael

January 19

Martin Luther King Day, Pastoral Center closed

January 20-22

March for Life, Washington, D.C.

January 25

1 p.m. Trinity Catholic Elementary School Open House, West Fargo

January 27

9 p.m. Mass for bison Catholic Week, St. Paul’s Newman Center, Fargo

January 29

9:30 a.m. Mass for Catholic Schools Week, Shanley High School, Fargo 5:30 p.m. Legislative Mass with Bishop Kagan, Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, Bismarck

January 30

1 p.m. Mass for Catholic Schools Week, Sacred Heart Catholic High School, East Grand Forks

January 31- February 1

Pastoral Visit to St. Augustine’s Catholic Church, Fessenden; St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Hurdsfield and Holy Family Catholic Church, McClusky

February 2-4

National Catholic Bioethics Conference, Dallas, Texas

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What To Expect

Not only do we have a new look, but we have adopted specific sections. Some of these sections have been part of the publication from the beginning, but some are new. To help you navigate this new format a bit, the following outlines those new sections. Moving forward, you should expect to see these items each month.

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Faith and Culture

Often art, music and literature are used as a form of expressing the faith. The books we read and the movies we watch can also impact our formation. In this section, we hope to feature stories of how people are using artist gifts to share FROM BISHOP FOLDA their faith obedience, imitate Jesus, who to do the will Also, of his Father this in all things. Through obedience, make themselves andtheywitness tocameothers. section willtheyfeature the new completely available to their communities and to the Church, serving wherever there is a need. Some commentators interpret the way of life of the “Tattered consecrated religious as a loss of freedom, but in my experience, their vows book review column, Pages.” give them more freedom rather than less. The consecrated life allows a religious sister, brother, or priest to live selflessly for Christ and for others, unencumbered by the weight of worldly affairs. To use the words of St. Hildegard, herself a Benedictine nun, the religious can be “like a feather on the breath of God.” The consecrated religious can also be a prophetic presence in the Church and in the world, calling all of us, by the witness of their lives, to live more fully our own vocations to holiness. Those who choose to live the consecrated life obviously make sacrifices to do so. They do indeed forsake personal possessions, families of their own, and some measure of personal autonomy. It would be naive to think that the consecrated life is always easy. Any religious sister, brother, or priest will tell you that the life they have chosen has its own challenges and trials. By their consecration, the religious does not give up his or her humanity, and must strive for virtue just as we all must. But, with the challenges comes great joy, the joy of total commitment to God and freedom from obstacles to a deeper relationship with Christ. In a very real way, the consecrated religious anticipates here on earth the kind of intimate relationship with God that we all aspire to in heaven. It is no secret that the number of religious in the United States has declined in recent decades, including here in the Diocese of Fargo. We are all made poorer by the reduced number of religious in our diocese, so this year should be an occasion for fervent prayer and active promotion of religious vocations for both men and women. In our parishes, in our schools, and in our family homes, prayer for religious and priestly vocations should be a regular intention placed before the Lord. And, we all should make Find have more told stories a point to encourage young people to consider the religious life. Many young religious and seminarians meand thatinformation they first began to consider this vocation at the suggestion or encouragement of others. I have no doubt that Godthe is still calling young about diocese at fargodiocese.org people to this beautiful way of love, but we must do what we can to make sure his call is heard. Families, too, should make an effort to present the option of consecrated life to their children. Pope Francis reminds us that the family is where every vocation is formed, and if our children are indeed called by God to the consecrated life, we can be certain that he will give them the joy and happiness that we desire for them. Finally, this Year of Consecrated Life should be an occasion to give thanks. We must definitely give thanks to God for the consecrated religious who have contributed so profoundly to the life of the Church in our diocese. And, we should also be sure to thank the religious sisters, brothers, and priests who have touched our lives in a very personal way. Consecrated life is a beautiful gift of God to the Church and should be cherished. In the coming year, let us pray for our religious sisters, brothers, and priests, and ask our Lord to renew the grace of their calling with joy and every grace.

TATTERED PAGES Prayer Intentions Of Pope Francis January

Universal intention: Peace. That those from diverse religious traditions and all people of good will may work together for peace.

Hurley’s Religious Goods Inc

Serving our faith community Since 1951

Lori. Throughout the session wrap-ups, and calls-to-acti programs. This North Da reaches across most of the stay informed.

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Perhaps the most broad and open section in “New Earth” is this one. “Our Catholic Life” will be used to highlight how we can apply our Catholic faith to all aspects of our lives. In this category, you will see Christopher Dodson’s “Catholic Action” column and Steve Schon’s “Stewardship” column. In addition, guest editorials by Father Tad Pacholczyk, George Weigel, Teresa Tomeo and other notable writers will appear here. Also, “Seminarian Life,” written each month by a current seminarOUR CATHOLIC LIFE ian will highlight the musings of these discerning men. Finally, the well-received “Stories of Faith” continue to be a SAINT’S HEALING PRAYERS KEEP will ON GIVING regular in this section “New Holy Water blessed byofSaint John PaulEarth.” II never ‘recedes’ By Father Bert Miller

international news as many worldwide Catholic events are covered by Catholic news outlets and made available in daily Catholic newspapers and online. However, many of these news items will continue to have relevance and be of interest to our readers, especially to individuals with limited access to other Catholic publications. In this section you will find news happening, as the name implies, in the United States and around the world. U.S. AND WORLD NEWS

POPE’S HOLY LAND TRIP RAISES HOPES, QUESTIONS By Francis X. Rocca - Catholic News Service

V

ATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Given the newly blessed water and Holy Land’s long and continued my daily blesscomplex history of military, ing, giving thanks for good religious and cultural conflict, health. Yes, the water level has the run-up to Pope Francis’ receded in the past year … May 24-26 pilgrimage was right back to where it was in inevitably marked by fears it June 2011, midway between would be marred by contro“Holy” and “Water.” versy -- or worse. Now at Easter 2014, Now that the pope’s secI am two years canond international trip is over, cer-free. Am I going to so are those fears. The sus“top it off ” again? No. pense is not, however. With a on Broadway in Fargo. There, befriended I’mIgoing to offer it a co-worker who number of surprising gestures for thepart-time blessing of the was going to college, working and planning and herremarks over three busy new Trinity Elementary wedding. days, the pope left Catholics School in the Saint John and others around the world The weekend before her wedding, the news came of a fatal Paul II Catholic School what comes next car accident in Cavalier that took theoflives of a mother and wondering her Network the Fargo on a range of important quesDiocese. 20-something daughter. I inhaled. tions. What will I do with After an extremely long weekend, Monday finally arrived THE POPE AND THE out my JPII Water? Not and so did my friend. I exhaled. PEACE PROCESS to worry. I’ve poured a Pope Francis made headcouple of drops in my and went on to She asked if I’d heard about the accident lines on the second day of where since my woman other Holy Watera bottle. relateit had thatbeen the older had part So,in her wedding his trip by inviting Palestinian husband died in 2008. I told as long as I never let it go reception. And the younger woman was be her soloist. Her President Mahmoud Abbas many of this occurrence, and empty, I can keep on to keeping and Israeli President Shinextwere statement “I didn’t askGod! you to sing at my wedding they also in awe.was, One of on. Yeah, mon Peres to join him at the my brothersIreplied, “Let meweren’t because knew you allowed. But, will you consider Father Bert Miller is a pastor at OUR CATHOLIC LIFE Vatican to pray together for know if it starts filling up.” Blessed Sacrament Church in West it?” Yes. peace. I truly believed that JPII Fargo. girl, I called the chancery and Being the obedient Catholic Most observers have set had a hand, or should I say low expectations for that explained the situation. “Not a relative?” No. Unbeknownst prayer, in my recovery. But, Editor’s note: This article is still-unscheduled event, as still there my was that bit ofcalled the to me, friend priest in Cavalier, who, of course, the ninth in this series: Stories Peres’ term expires in July. skepticism in me that kept of Faith. If you have a faith knowing everybody involved said yes. Conversely, Pope Francis thinking, “Really?” story to tell, contactmy Father I prayed andonagonized before calling mother to tell would her no doubt say pessiSo, last Easter, my first Bert Miller at bert.miller@ anniversary beingbe cancer-free, I wouldn’t home forfargodiocese.org. the weekend and why. Then, mists the underrate the power of prayer. Ilecture topped off the bottle with a protestant church was not permitted. came. Entering Dakota and how to reach your state and federal officials, Practical results aside, My first full-time paying job was with a department store to how Participating in a protestant service was verboten. the North Dakota Catholic Conference has two documents Listen Pope Francis’ bold initiatives have earned him the role of “But, Mom. God gave me this voice. I don’t believe I’m legislators ask quesavailable to the public. pre-eminent voice for peace and Gifts the in- better than my friend. I believe I must use this beautiful gift,” Anniversary The first item is a directory of all state and federalWedding officials.and tions in the Middle East. That disChristoper It comes in a brochure-size trifold to make it easy to take it teraction between I said. tinction could have more than HOLY FAMILY BOOKSTORE legislators and So, the following Saturday, in a Methodist church in with you. The second item is a larger guide explaining the symbolic importance for local Dodson mon-fri 10 am - 6 the pm satlobbyists 10 am to 4 pm and toward the Christian Cavalier, I sang The Lord’s Prayer by Albert Hay Malotteattitudes in legislative process, how you can testify before a legislative (701) 241-7842 toll free (888) 682-8033 minorities. To Know God . . . citizens who testify. E-flat to absolute perfection. committee, how to find your legislators’ To Lovevotes God . . . and other useDuring his trip, the pope 1336 25th Ave. S, Fargo 58103 (South of K-Mart) To Serve God . . . Phone: www.robertgibb.com ful information. Both of these documents are available online All committee meetHow do701-282-4400 I know it was perfect? The sanctuary glowed told Abbas and Peres that Walk door While is closed. at ndcatholic.org and are sent by regular mail to people who ings are open to the public. amber, as in, if even insideif the a halo. my body was physically Christians contribute to the “common good” in their Committee hearing performing, schedules formy themind weekwas usually come a message. “It is good. have joined the Conference’s Legislative Action Network. receiving Author’s note: When one of my brought gifts for the whole parishioners at Blessed Sacrament parish, all 39 families. OUR CATHOLIC LIFE in West Fargo got the April 2014 The gift was a small clamissue of the New Earth with the shell-shaped plastic bottle front page pictures of Popes John with “Holy Water” applied in XXIII and John Paul II and the gold. It had been blessed by caption “Declared ‘With God’ to Pope John Paul II. I had long become Saints April 27,” she said “Wow! Would I love to be there!”In her By Father Bertown Miller words, Rosemary Lee Bernadetta Maria Dimmer Coleman has written about her connection to Saint John Paul II. See, in June 2011, I was diagnosed with the Big “C”, cancer. I felt like I had been whacked with a baseball bat. After a couple of days in chaotic turmoil, I calmed Author’s Note: am experiencing a the drycontents spell of in downI enough to forge ahead a drought, since drained and take myto turn bat. Up Rosemary to my bottle, but my Coleman, husband’s writing. I mentioned this myatfriend, Dimmer time, I was in good shape half-full bottle was still setting who has helped that me at least twice last year. She offers this piece of for the shape I’m in. I’ve on the night stand. I started nostalgia for January. dealt with a couple of chronic using his JPII Water for my illnesses“Inside since childhood, but was daily blessing, along with After my story, a halo” published in the I was too busy living my life I asking for prayers John“ November 2014 issue of New Earth, was asked if from all my to leave time to feel sorry for Paul II. My father-in-law’s amber moments” No. myPaul, most myself.occurred in church. name was But, also John but astounding one did. When my late husband I just called him Poppy. and I were stillearly living 20s in a tiny andXXIII the cancer In the early 1960s, my - beforeAs St.time John threw missionSt. parish in the Deep treatments progressed, was John Paul II threw open the doorsImost and are where South, some friends took a blessing myself two or more RESOURCES open the windows, Pope Francis started out thetimes cobwebs, Iinhad trip to thesweeping Holy Landin and commutheand work ofbeen the To help you understand the legislative process North ofa day questioning what I was being taught about 10 John years. Vatican. Upon returning, they fornication with Pauldone. II. legislature is

I also offered a blessing to anyone around. Quite soon I noticed that the level of the water in the bottle was not receding. It maintained the same level between “Holy” and “Water”

the churches as a more realistic goal. VATICAN REFORM During an inflight news conference on the way back to Rome, the pope was asked about reports that Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, a former Vatican secretary of state, mishandled 15 million euros in funds held by the Institute for the Works of Religion, commonly known as the Vatican bank. Without naming the cardinal, the pope said the matter was “being studied, it’s not clear.” The results of the investigation, if it finds the cardinal at fault, would have implications beyond the case itself. Few actions by the pope could do as much to show his seriousness about reforming the Vatican bureaucracy as publicly disciplining or rebuking the man who, until just last October, served as the Vatican’s highest official.

‘Amber moments’ throughout life Woman uses God’s gift to serve Him, his people

STORIES OF FAITH

Last Word

North Dakota Legislative Session Started, So Should We Catholic Action

As we begin our “Year of Marriage and Family,” it is fitting to use “New Earth” as a vehicle to aid in celebrating this yearlong event. The “Last Word,” found on the last pages of each issue, will feature stories related to the theme designated to event did not yield any comcountries and deserve to be that month. parable breakthroughs, but treated as “full citizens.” PRIESTLY CELIBACY

Happenings

No speech could make that point more eloquently than news photos of Jewish and Muslim political leaders praying for peace, side by side in the Vatican.

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there were hints of progress to come. The pope told reporters on the flight back to Rome that he and Patriarch Bartholomew discussed possible collaborative efforts to protect the environment. They also talked about prospects for resolving differences in how the churches set the date of Easter every year. Pope Francis, with his characteristic frankness, called the latter a “ridiculous” problem. Yet reconciling the timing of Christianity’s most sacred feast could have a big impact on ordinary Catholics and Orthodox, leading many to view full communion between

The pope told reporters the door is open to allowing more married priests in the Catholic Church, in the Latin rite as well as the Eastern Catholic churches, where the practice is already established. “Celibacy is not a dogma of faith,” he said, which should not have surprised anyone familiar with the church’s discipline. But he added pointedly: “Not being a dogma of faith, the door is always open.” Given how controversial this issue already is in parts of the Catholic world, the pope’s comment is likely to prompt only more discussion.

Additionally, we invite you to visit the News and Events ECUMENISM section on the diocesan website. Because our space is limited, The original reason for Pope Francis’ Holy Land trip we are not able to print all submitted or stories written. was a meeting withitems Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, to However, the Newsmarkand the 50th Events anniversary of section will display all items a historic encounter between their well predecessors. earlier seen in New Earth as asThesome that did not make the issue. meeting led the Catholic and Orthodox churches to lift Also, the website allows us to show more event photos and mutual excommunications imposed in 1054 and opened the provide links to other moderninformation. period of ecumenical

out the preceding Friday. That deadline sometimes You have done well. Do not gives fret.” only a short notice to those who want to attend a Monday hearing. the Lord is with me. JUNE 2014 Since that day I’ve tried to remember, Members of the Legislative Action Network30 receive, in The North Dakota legislature moves fast. Information Sessions addition to the directory and legislative guide, regular Miller serves theifDiocese of Fargo as pastor at Blessed The chairman, whichFather is theBert proper term, even the person e-newsletters throughout the legislative session and action Nativity Sacrament Catholic Church in West Fargo. is a Trinity woman, determines how to run the committee meetings. Holy Spirit alerts. These action alerts are the best way to act quickly on Most chairmen will try to stick to the time scheduled for a January 27 January 25 January 29 Catholic Church. You legislative items of concern to the If a hearing runs long, the next scheduled hearing will pm at hearing. 12:00 - 4:00 pm 6:30 pm Editor’s note: Stories of Faith is a recurring feature in New Earth. can join the network through the conference 6:30 website follow. Just wait. If you have a faith story to tell, contact Father Bert Miller at bert. ndcatholic.org/registration. However, a few chairmen will take the agenda as a list. Parents and children are invited to learn about our miller@fargodiocese.org. Want to stay even more informed? To get the most up-toAs soon as one hearing is finished, the next will start, even if programs from 3 years old through Kindergarten date information subscribe to the conference’s RSS feed, Facethe next hearing is scheduled for later. You may arrive at the book and Twitter pages. These services provide more up-toscheduled time only to find that you are too late. This situaMORE OR PERSONAL TOUR the-minute information FOR than the INFORMATION e-newsletters. tion is frustrating, and complaints have been made, but some Lori Hager, Admissions Director REAL PRESENCE RADIO chairmen continue to operate in this manner. 701.893.3271 HOLY SPIRIT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Lori.Hager@jp2schools.org Throughout the session, I will give legislative updates, will usually begin with an introduction by 1441 8th Street North, A Fargo,hearing ND wrap-ups, and calls-to-action on various Real Presence701.232.4087 Radio the legislator who introduced the bill followed by NATIVITY SCHOOL programs. This North Dakota-based Catholic network nowELEMENTARY testimony in support of the bill. The committee will then hear 1825 11th Street South, Fargo, ND 701.232-7461 reaches across most of the state. Make an effort to listen and testimony against the bill. Most committees will not allow stay informed. neutralSCHOOL testimony. The committee will usually not vote on the TRINITY ELEMENTARY 2820 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo, ND 701.893-3271 bill until a later time, which usually is not scheduled. Find more stories and information VISIT THE CAPITOL jp2schools.org about the diocese at fargodiocese.org Anyone can testify. Legislators like hearing from “regular” Every North Dakotan should take some time to visit the Capitol during the legislative session. It is your Capitol. If you citizens. Keep your testimony short and try to discuss the legislation rather than the broader issue. For example, if a bill have never done so, take some time and schedule a tour. The is about a specific high school graduation requirement, talk building has some great storiesJANUARY to go with2015 it. 18 features NEWand EARTH about that requirement and not the state of public education While there, take some time to attend a committee hearing, even if it is about an issue that does not interest you. Committees in general.

STAY INFORMED

Pope Francis boards an airplane at Ben Gurion airport outside Tel Aviv on May 26. The pope ended a three-day Holy Land pilgrimage prevalent with calls for bridging divisions. (CNS photo/Oliver Weiken, EPA - May 27, 2014)

dialogue. Not surprisingly, this year’s

JUNE 2014

31

We will continue to announce birthdays and anniversaries in this section. Also, this area will house “Events Across the Diocese” to list parish and community events happening in your area. Finally, on these pages you will find “Glimpse,” the column that looks back at stories from the past.

Get

U.S. & World News

Connected One of the limitations of a monthly newspaper in today’s world is often the news printed is no longer timely when it reaches a home. This notion is especially true for national and

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FOCUS ON FAITH

“I was blind but now I see.”

Miracle attributed to U.S. born woman religious, declared blessed By Diane Rabiej / Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic

I

s there anyone more afraid Elizabeth Ann Seton. than a mother who is afraid Sister Miriam Teresa died on for her child? When unusuMay 8, 1927 at the age of 26. al symptoms start to appear, and Although she was allowed a mother makes the decision to to take her final vows just approach a physician, she hopes before she died, she never changed to be told that the problem is rites and died a Ruthenian Greek transitory or is easily cured. She Catholic. The people close to her tries not to show fear to her child, suspected that she was a saint and but in the back of her mind is a a mystic, a special intimate friend silent terror of the unknown. of Our Lord. In 1963, a mother in northern During her short time as a New Jersey began to observe in her religious, she wrote a series of son, Michael, behaviors which conspiritual conferences that were cerned her. A healthy eight-yearpresented without her name old, he began walking into trees, on them. Her authorship was and even crashed his bike into a revealed after her death, and, tree. He walked into a moving car. after their publication in 1928, they His mother described his escalating quickly became a bestseller in the symptoms as “bizarre.” Eventually, American church. he broke his front teeth in an acciA MIRACLE HAPPENS dent, refused to play ball with his Now, you may wonder how a older brother and the other children Ruthenian Byzantine Catholic nun Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich was beatified at the nicknamed him “butter fingers.” who died 40 years earlier might His central vision was degen- Cathedral of Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J. on Oct. 4, be involved in the blindness of 2014. She is credited for the miracle of a blind eight year erating. She took her son to an old boy regaining his sight. Credit: Raymond Mastroberte a young boy in the 1960s. The ophthalmologist who observed Roman Catholic Bishop of Paterson, black pigment in the area of the N. J. proposed Sister Miriam Teresa macula. As the black areas increased, he was diagnosed with for canonization in 1945, and the sisters at Michael’s school bilateral macular degeneration and declared legally blind were promoting devotion to her. in that same year. When Michael’s mother heard the news of her son’s The physician who declared him legally blind told the blindness, Michael’s third grade teacher, Sister Mary Augustine parents that eventually the entire macula would be blackened gave him a leaflet on Sister Miriam Teresa and a piece of her and the boy would be totally blind. The silent terror of a moth- hair, that is, a first-class relic. The mother recalled when he er was made flesh. gave her the leaflet and relic that she had a feeling that every-

SISTER MIRIAM TERESA DEMJANOVICH

At this point in the illness, a little known Ruthenian nun from the Byzantine Catholic Church enters the story. Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich was baptized at the Byzantine parish in Bayonne, N. J. at the beginning of the 20th century in 1901. As she herself said, “The real beginning of my life, the life of the spirit, occurred five days after my birth according to the flesh. I was baptized and confirmed in the Greek rite on the 31st of March, a Sunday, truly a day of resurrection.” After high school, she went to college and earned a bachelor’s degree in literature at College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station, N. J. At this point in history, a small percentage of people went to college, and even fewer women earned a degree. This highly intelligent woman then went on to dedicate her life completely to God by entering the Sisters of Charity in 1925, one of the communities founded by Saint 8

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

thing would be okay. Michael’s family moved to southern New Jersey about a month after the last visit to a physician, and two weeks later Michael was taken to Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. The examination showed his eyesight was normal, and he recalls that he could ride his bike again when they moved. There was no doubt; it was a miracle. Several doctors agreed that he was blind from macular degeneration, and four ophthalmologists testified that there was no known case of a cure such as this. Authorities in Rome acknowledge the return of Michael’s eyesight was a miracle unexplained by any natural phenomenon and worked by God through the intercession of his handmaid Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich. On Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 at 9:30 a.m., her beatification was solemnized at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N. J.

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FOCUS ON FAITH

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hen people discuss heaven, hell and purgatory their questions seem to be of two kinds: 1.) what is the origin of such beliefs? And, 2.) what do these beliefs mean? In this article I would like to address the first question all the while realizing the second question might be the more relevant one. Perhaps each of these three beliefs could be addressed as separate topics in subsequent editions of New Earth. But, first let us locate these beliefs within the life of our Catholic faith. The very first verse of Scripture speaks of “the heavens and the earth” (Gen. 1:1). Throughout all Scripture there are over 600 references to “heaven and the heavens.” For the people of the Old Testament the heaven existed above the earth and sky and is the abode where God dwells. From there, God would open “doors and windows” to pour forth rain, thunder and lightning. It was totally inaccessible to human beings. In the New Testament, Christ rises from the dead and ascends to the Father’s right hand. At the Last Supper he promises to go to “his Father’s house” and prepare a place for us and then return to take us with him (John 14:2-3). Now, heaven is accessible to human beings. Heaven is the destiny for those who live and die fully alive in the voice God speaks

Heaven, Hell and Purgatory: From Whence Come Such Beliefs? to the conscience of every human being. But, given the radical nature of human freedom, people can totally repudiate God. By such repudiation, people choose hell. Christ speaks of this reality as Gehenna (Matthew 5:22, 29, 30, 10:28, 18:9, 23:33; Mark 9:43-47; Luke 12:5), where there is fire and the worm dies not. In other passages, he speaks of darkness and the wailing and gnashing of teeth. In the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, (Luke 16:19-31) both die,

(Matthew 25:34, 41). It is from such biblical references that the Church teaches the existence of Ask a Priest hell as a moral/ Father James Ermer spiritual possibility for human existence. At death most people probably do not die fully alive in God nor in total repudia- prayers and sacrifices of the tion of God. Scripture speaks living. These slain soldiers of mercy/forgiveness at the are not damned but in need of time of judgment or in the being purified.  Over the age to come (Matthew 12:31- centuries, these Scripture 32; 2 Timothy 1:18), or of fire readings and reflections have that tests the quality of each led to the Church’s teaching on the existence of purgatory. The Church’s beliefs and teachings about heaven, The Church’s beliefs and teachings about heaven, hell and purgatory are grounded in God’s revelation hell and purgatory are to us as found in the words of Scripture. Through- grounded in God’s revelation out history, the lived experience of these words as to us as found in the words guided by the Holy Spirit has brought both light of Scripture. Throughout and insight to what lies beyond the veil of death history, the lived experience of these words as guided by the and the mystery of the afterlife. Holy Spirit has brought both but each finds himself in man’s works or faith of a fire- light and insight to what lies totally different circumstances.  tried gold (1 Corinthians 3:10- beyond the veil of death and the mystery of the afterlife. Lazarus lives in the bosom of 15; 1 Peter 1:6-7).

Abraham while the rich man lives in tormenting fires. Between each existence there is an unbridgeable chasm. Christ speaks in such ways so as to discourage people from becoming indifferent in their spiritual lives that eventually lead them to a waywardness that would exclude them from inheriting the “kingdom prepared for them from the creation of the world.” In contrast, they will find themselves in that “everlasting fire prepared for the devil and his angels”

These New Testament reflections build upon the Old Testament story told in 2 Maccabees 12:39-45 where slain Jewish soldiers were found wearing pagan amulets or charms that were forbidden by the law (Deuteronomy 7:25). In response, the Jewish military leader took up a collection for an offering at the Jerusalem temple so that these soldiers may be freed from their sins. The Scripture writer applauds this action of the dead being assisted by the

Father James Ermer serves as pastor at St. Leo’s Catholic Church in Casselton. He can be reached at: james.ermer@fargodiocese.org. Editor’s Note: If you have a question about the Catholic faith and would like to submit a question for consideration in a future column, please send to news@fargodiocese.org with “Ask a Priest” in the subject line or mail to New Earth, 5201 Bishops Blvd. S, Fargo, ND 58104, Attn: Ask a Priest.

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

9


AROUND THE DIOCESE

Seminarians best priests in annual basketball event By Aliceyn Magelky

T

Seminarian Jayson Miller goes up against Father Chris Markman during the second half of the annual Collar Classic. The seminarian team beat the priests with a final score of 37 to 29. Credit: Submitted Photo

hree times a charm for the Seminarian Cardinals as they beat the priests’ team, Team Padres for the third year in a row during the annual Collar Classic held Dec. 29 in Fargo. This win places a tie between the two teams in overall wins. At the half, the priests had a fair seven-point lead. Unfortunately, they couldn’t maintain the advantage, and the seminarians pulled ahead for the win. The final score was 37 to 29. “I’m just happy that no one got hurt this year,” commented Jayson Miller, Theology II student at

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St. Paul Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. “The win is nice, too.” Since 1991, priests and seminarians have come together each year to fight for bragging rights in a game of basketball. The game, started as a friendly match between Cardinal Muench Seminary alumni (priests) and current seminarians, has turned into a long-standing tradition of fun and rivalry. While many players wonder, “Does it look as bad as it feels?” they continue to draw a good crowd in support of vocations, basketball and fun. Typically, 300 to 400 spectators cheer on their favorite team. This year, Father Chris Markman, parochial vicar of St. John’s Catholic Church in Wahpeton, had his own cheering section. Students from that parish’s youth group drove to Fargo just for the game. The group had signs saying, “Go Father Chris” and “You the best!” to show their solidarity with “Team Markman.” Originally, the game was played in the Cardinal Muench Seminary gym in north Fargo with very few spectators and no one calling the game. After a year as vocations director serving at Cardinal Muench, Father Paul Duchschere thought it would be fun to add a bit more to the event to draw more crowds and bring awareness. Officials, game announcers and the national anthem were added. Later, the event moved to Shanley High School, Fargo, to accommodate more people and provide a better floor. Volunteers from around the diocese keep score, referee and provide commentary, including Father Paul Duchschere who has been calling the game live on Real Presence Radio for five years. “I really enjoy bringing the event to a wider audience, being able to excite the people who listen and make them more aware of our seminarians and priests,” commented Father Duchschere. A full recording of the broadcast can be found by visiting www.yourcatholicradiostation.com. More photos from the event may be found by visiting: www.fargodiocese.org/news-events.

Members of St. John’s parish, Wahpeton, youth group provide a solid cheering section for Father Chris Markman. Father Markman is serving as parochial vicar for the parish. Students and parents traveled to Fargo just to see him play.

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Walking in the footsteps of St. Philip Neri Napoleon seniors receive gift to experience Rome

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ften families take extended vacations during the school break between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Day. But, instead of an excursion to a tropical resort or ski lodge, the senior class from St. Philip Neri’s Catholic Church, Napoleon, embarked on a spiritual journey that likely altered their hearts forever. During the last week of 2014, these students, chaperoned by Father Ross LaFramboise, pastor of St. Philip Neri’s parish and Mary Hanbury, Evangelization and Catechesis Coordinator for the Fargo Diocese, were able to walk the same streets of Rome as their parish’s patron saint, St. Philip Neri. And, while there, the pilgrims attended Mass with the Holy Father on the solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, Jan. 1.

STARTED WITH A RETREAT

A close-knit group, these 15 students have been growing in their faith together since they were in kindergarten. But, it was a retreat held this past August that

By Aliceyn Magelky

“We ought to desire to do great things for the service of God, and not content ourselves with a moderate goodness, but wish; if it were possible, to surpass in sanctity and love even St. Peter and St. Paul.” - St. Philip Neri brought them a deeper bond and closeness in the Lord and became the catalyst for the Rome pilgrimage. “The retreat was a really enlightening experience and great bonding time,” commented Rachel Weigel, Napoleon senior. “It was a fairly intense retreat experience with the idea they would adhere to the goals that were set, to be what God called them to be,” added Father LaFramboise. “My bigger picture thought was if we can spend a fair amount of energy on the seniors, it would have a fair amount of impact on the underclassmen. “ While at the retreat, Father LaFramboise presented to the group the notion of embarking on some sort of physical and spiritual journey. He proposed the questions, “what if we could go somewhere, take a pilgrimage or mission trip?” Through a bit

We’re off!” Fifteen seniors from Napoleon were given an opportunity to pilgrimage to Rome during their holiday break. The students are pictured here with Father Ross LaFramboise, pastor of St. Philip Neri’s Catholic Church, prior to boarding their plane. Credit: Submitted Photo

of discussion, the group landed on the idea of Rome.

MUCH GRATITUDE

About six months before the pilgrimage, shortly before the August retreat, Father LaFramboise was approached with a tremendous gift. “I had an anonymous donor come forward and say, ‘if the money was there, would you be up for it [meaning a retreat or pilgrimage] while the students were still seniors?’” Because of the generosity of one or several donors, Father LaFramboise would not disclose that information to protect the anonymity, these students were able to take this trip at nearly no cost. “We don’t know who donated the money, but I would like to say a big thank you to whoever did. I’m still shocked,” said Weigel. “I want them to know I’m extremely grateful for this

Students from St. Philip Neri parish, Napoleon, begin their walking journey in the footsteps of St. Phili Neri in Rome. They visited the Basilicas of St. Mary Major, St. Lawrence, St. John Lateran and the Holy Cross of Jerusalem. Each of these parishes is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome. Credit: Submitted Photo

gift. I really think this is going to help me develop a stronger relationship with God,” added Justin Hoberg, Napoleon senior. “I can’t say thank you enough. It’s an amazing, amazing thing.”

THE JOURNEY

This trip was no all-expense paid, luxury vacation with no specific purpose. Instead, these students spent time together in prayer and reflection prior to departure. Father LaFramboise introduced them to the Liturgy of the Hours; daily prayers required of all ordained deacons and priests that are meant to sanctify the day and open “meditative dialogue on the mystery of Christ.” And, from the moment of take-off to the plane ride home, each person was asked to journal about their experience, reflecting on questions like, “What would you like God to give you on this pilgrimage?” “What spiritual movements did I feel today?” and “What did you think about walking to the different Churches?” During the pilgrimage, not only did the group celebrate Mass

During the pilgrimage, students were asked to give reports on the saints at various locations on the trip. Here, Nicolette Bitz, Napoleon, gives her report. Credit: Submitted Photo

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

11


AROUND THE DIOCESE each day, they engaged in a daily lectio or prayer guided by Scripture readings. “My own desire for them, personally, would be where they become enwrapped in prayer. At this age, the trip

with their own desire to grow in their relationship with God and deepen their knowledge of the faith. For one student, Justin Hoberg, this trip might never have been an option a few years ago. Hoberg is not

“A pilgrimage is a faith journey. Pilgrimage is deeply rooted in our tradition. People used to go by foot to Rome, the Holy Land, Santiago de Compostela or to visit the body of some saint. It’s kind of like a spiritual vacation or you could also think of it as a prayer and catechism class on the go.” – Father Ross LaFramboise could be a very influential experience for them, for their faith as they go on. It can give them a very strong, firm foundation for when they head off in the world,” said Father LaFramboise.

LIFE CHANGING

On this “walking catechism class,” each student was filled

a member of St. Philip Neri. But, for the past two years, he has been attending religion classes at the parish along with his friends and classmates. Much like St. Philip Neri, who often used his humor, friendship and simple questions to draw people to him, Hobert had a friend who

drew him into this group with a small request. “I guess it all started when I needed a ride home. My friend said he would give me a ride if I stayed for religion class,” said Hoberg. “It was really interesting. I learned really cool stuff.” Later, this friend invited him to a Steubenville conference. “Before then, I just kind of would go through the motions [at church],” commented Hoberg. “I really started my relationship with Him there [Steubenville]. I’ve been working on getting closer with Him after the retreat. Hopefully this trip will further my relationship with God.”

APOSTLE OF ROME

St. Philip Neri was born in Florence, Italy to a poor family. While young, he was sent to live with relatives as

an apprentice. Without a plan and trusting entirely in God, he abandoned an opportunity for wealth and security, left his family’s business and headed for Rome. When St. Philip Neri arrived in Rome, the religious fervor of the people was low. A city destroyed by enemy attack and people broken by abuses within the Church left many laity questioning their faith. Re-evangelizing the city and its people became St. Philip Neri’s life work. For that reason, he is often referred to as “Apostle of Rome.” He was known for his great charity, deep prayer life and marvelous humor. He had hoped to be a missionary in India. But, instead, St. Philip was called to stay in Rome to seek out and help the poor, abandoned and sick.

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Diocesan policy: Reporting child abuse The Diocese of Fargo is committed to the protection of youth. Please report any incidents or suspected incidents of child abuse, including sexual abuse, to civil authorities. If the situation involves a member of the clergy or a religious order, a seminarian or an employee of a Catholic school, parish, the diocesan offices or other Catholic entity within the diocese, we ask that you also report the incident or suspected incident to Monsignor Joseph P. Goering at (701) 356-7945 or Larry Bernhardt at (701) 356-7965 or VictimAssistance@fargodiocese.org. For additional information about victim assistance, visit www.fargodiocese.org/victimassistance. NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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14

By Aliceyn Magelky

Diocesan publication evolved, but aim remained unchanged

To inform, teach, inspire

COVER STORY

I

n February 1909, nearly 20 years after he became bishop of Fargo, Bishop John Shanley, returned to his journalist roots and established the first diocesan newspaper, “The Bulletin.” As former editor of The Northwestern Chronicle, the first Catholic paper in the St. Paul area, he likely comfortably took the reigns as editor and chief contributor. Unfortunately, his untimely death occurred in July of that same year, and the publication did not last long. His successor, Bishop James O’Reilly, was not necessarily as journalistically inclined and soon discontinued the monthly. He employed The Catholic Bulletin Publishing Company which was producing The Catholic Bulletin, a recently established weekly newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul. He requested the editorial team for “The Catholic Bulletin” include news of the Fargo Diocese. With the assistance of a diocesan correspondent, “The Catholic Bulletin” regularly ran news items for the Fargo Diocese as well as each diocese within Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota from 1911 through 1928. One of the most reliable Fargo diocesan news correspondents during much of this period was Father Vincent Ryan (later Bishop of Bismarck). After 1928 news about these other dioceses in the province appeared only occasionally. “Confraternity News” was published in the Fargo Diocese in 1937 and 1938 by Father William T. Mulloy while he was pastor at St. John the Evangelist in Grafton; this publication was printed in Edgeley by Father Victor Long. In January 1939, still under the direction of Father Mulloy, the name of the publication was changed,

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

at the suggestion of Bishop Aloisius Muench, to “Catholic Action News. “

A CATHOLIC PAPER IN EVERY HOME

As a means to deflect the misinformation and injustices appearing in secular media, the Holy See took action in 1939 by declaring February as Catholic Press Month in an effort to get more Catholic thought on public matters into the hands of Catholics. The editors of “Catholic Action News” followed suit with an article in the February issue declaring “A CATHOLIC PAPER IN EVERY CATHOLIC HOME.” That rally cry echoes in the mission of Catholic newspapers in the diocese for years to come, and continues today. For the next several years, “Catholic Action News” was written and edited by several well-known priests such as

Father George Mehok and Father William Durkin. In September 1965, the first layperson, Alf T. Olsen was promoted from associate editor to editor. He served until his sudden death in July 1970. Father A. Bernard (Ben) Bachmeier, associate pastor at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Fargo, was named editor in February 1971 by Bishop Justin A. Driscoll. He had been serving as acting editor since August 1970. Father Bachmeier held a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in journalism from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He later completed his philosophy and theology studies before ordination at St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minn. Like his predecessors, Father Bachmeier believed in the unique service and ministry a diocesan newspaper could provide. In his first editorial he noted, “We think that


COVER STORY

and Fa-

“Our new publication will marry items of general interest articles by distinguished writers and instructions on the Catholic faith,” Bishop Justin Driscoll said in a letter appearing in the October 1980 issue. “One of its real advantages, I believe, is that it will be mailed to every family in the diocese – approximately 30,000 homes.” In the letter, Bishop Driscoll continues to outline the goals for this new approach in a monthly diocesan news publication. His desire was to use New Earth as an “instrument of faith, source of knowledge and message to the home.” Lanz served as editor until February 1986. He continued to strive to fulfill the mission of “New Earth” – to evangelize, teach the Gospel and motivate others to follow Christ – and became a priest. Soon after Lanz’ resignation, Bishop James Sullivan

he first n was ate edd until y 1970. ) Bachat St. Fargo, Februstin A. n servce Auhmeier rts deom the Dakota, r comy and e ordiversity,

essors, ved in d minspaper rst edink that such a paper can serve as a real vehicle of communication among the people of the diocese. We feel that particularly today, in a changing and exciting Church, there is a great need for healthy exchange of ideas and opinions – not to create tension, although tension can be healthy, but rather to share the insights and frustrations, even, of brothers and sisters of the Church.” Further, he saw a need to adapt the vehicle in which the message was delivered. In the same editorial, he explains a desire to change format, include different features and altar the method of printing to save time and cost. And, he looked to the people of the diocese to share in creation of the publication. “We are deeply convinced that the diocese has within it a great many resources and talents in its people and we

announced a different approach to providing Catholic information and inspiration to the people of the diocese. His hope was to continue to reach every household with a Catholic newspaper while building on the current publication. Bishop Sullivan, re-enlisted the help of The Catholic Bulletin Publishing Co (which later became The Catholic Spirit Publishing Company) from St. Paul, Minn. With the assistance of the Catholic Bulletin staff, the Fargo diocese could produce an expanded version of “New Earth.” All the elements of the current New Earth were to remain. In addition, the people of the diocese would receive regular news and features of The Catholic Bulletin, the Archdiocese of St. Paul’s newspaper at that time. In an article that appeared in the November 1986 issue

would like to facilitate the sharing of those gifts.” he said in his column. Father Bachmeier served as editor of Catholic Action News for 14 months. He was succeeded by Sister Bertha Hill, PBVM of Sacred Heart Convent, Fargo. Later Sister Mary Ethel Paulus obtained editorship, and the publication was longer printed during the summer months.

NEW EARTH IS BORN

Following Sister Mary Ethel Paulus as editor was Deacon Mathias (Matt) Lanz (later Father Mathias Lanz). In October of 1980, under his editorship, “Catholic Action News” changed to “New Earth.” Instead of a 4-page paper published nine months of the year, the new New Earth became a more comprehensive 12-page document. NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

15


COVER STORY

of New Earth, it was noted much consultation and prayer on the part of Bishop Sullivan was integral in this decision. The input and endorsement of the priests and lay advisors played a large role in the decision. The consultation process included the deans of the Fargo Diocese, the diocesan Presbyteral Council and the Diocesan Pastoral Council, the bishop noted. The assembly of priests and parish pastoral councils were also consulted, he added, and, “at every level the proposal met with favorable support,” he pointed out. For nearly two decades, primary editorship remained with the Catholic Bulletin/ Catholic Spirit Publishing Company staff. Although the lead position was in St. Paul, several associate editors including Sara McGarvey, Joan Smithwick, Justin Gulleckson and 16

Charles Eldredge commandeered the work of the newspaper from Fargo.

A TRUE NEWSPAPER MAN

Charles Eldredge had been in the newspaper industry since the early 1980s. In 1983, he and his wife bought the Wells County Free Press and Harvey Herald, which later combined to form the Herald-Press. He was remembered as an educator. His children clearly recall how important New Earth was to him. “I think he was always eager to serve the Church in any capacity, to do something he really cared about,” commented Jennifer Eldredge, Charles’ youngest child. “It meant a lot to him to have that responsibility. He loved the people that he got to interact with in all different ways.” As an educator, Eldredge viewed “New Earth” as another tool to teach.

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

“He took his faith very seriously. I believe he liked to translate the teachings of the church in a way that was exciting and easier to understand for the lay person. “New Earth” gave him that opportunity,” added Anne Ehni, Eldredge’s second oldest child. It was his love of the newspaper and teaching others that perhaps inspired budding Catholic writers Roxane Salonen and Tanya Watterud. Both women, who wrote for Eldredge, would later serve as editors for “New Earth.” “When I think of “New Earth,” he’s the man. I started writing for “New Earth” with him. He was my way in,” said Salonen. “For me, he was a big part of my journey with “New Earth.” Also during his tenure, “New Earth” received a fresh look and new format. The change included a new logo and layout. The redesign was intended to make the paper easier to use. Eldredge left his post as associate editor in August 1999. In a heartfelt farewell letter, Eldredge professed his deep appreciation for the priests, writers and people of the diocese who “aided and enriched my efforts month by month.” Following Eldredge’s departure, staff from The Catholic Bulletin Publishing Company retained editorship, but diocesan communications coordinator, Stacy (Bakke) Majkrzak, took the associate editor role in Fargo. She held that position

from September 1999 until June 2003.

A RETURN TO NEWS

In July 2003, Tanya Watterud assumed the associate editor duties as well as coordinating public and media relations efforts for the diocese. Watterud had been writing for “New Earth” for a few years under Eldredge. She had worked as a reporter for the “Minot Daily,” but was not working in that capacity at the time the position opened. “I was excited to be getting back to the newspaper,” said Watterud. “My favorite thing was going out to the parishes, to the people and learning something about their life. Then, try to bring it back and communicate it to others so they would see the love the people had for God and the things they did to keep faith alive.” Under her direction, more editorial control was placed back into Fargo. However, she credits a great relationship with Bob Zyskowski and Pat Norby of The Catholic Bulletin/Catholic Spirit Publishing Company for

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her success. “They walked me through everything and mentored me on different things. I really appreciated that relationship,” she said. In September 2004, “New Earth” took on another new design. This redesign established prominent placement of messages from our pope and bishop. And, the publication placed more emphasis on youth activities and opportunities for them. Later, Watterud was promoted from associate editor to editor. Her co-workers and people of the diocese had a deep fondness for her. And, in a farewell column she penned for the May 2012 “New Earth,” it’s obvious of her love for them and the experiences she had. In particular, Watterud talks about an interview with a woman who kept up the church scrapbook. Because her eyesight was failing, she would read the “New Earth” with a magnifying glass. “To see someone love “New Earth” that much, I thought, ‘New Earth is important. People want to read what’s in here.’ That was a good inspiration to try to do my best to present things the best way possible,” Watterud noted. In July 2012, Watterud and her family moved to Minot to follow a career opportunity for her husband.

WITHOUT A SHEPHERD

Following Watterud, Salonen filled the editorship role. Soon after accepting the position, then Bishop Samuel Aquila announced his appointment as Archbishop of Denver. Salonen explained her reaction to the news in a “New Earth” July 2012 editorial.

“I was standing at the kitchen counter in my robe and slippers, listening to Catholic radio while cutting a waffle for my son, the morning of the announcement. Our bishop had just been named archbishop and would be moving on to the Denver Archdiocese soon. I imagine most area Catholics turned up the dial, eager to hear more. I stood frozen, my mouth agape, nearly dropping the fork in my hand,” she said. But, that world was not unfamiliar to Salonen. Prior to editorship of “New Earth,” Salonen has spent nearly 20 years writing, reporting and sharing stories. In fact, her first freelance assignment was for this publication. “We share an awesome faith, and I’m eager to grow in it with you in the coming year and beyond. Yes, there are unknowns in this unfolding story, but we will learn them together,” Salonen remarked in her editorial. “The next page looks to be incredibly exciting. After all, if the most riveting chapters end with a cliffhanger, how much better a chapter that begins with one?” Despite her passion for “New Earth,” she began experiencing an “inner tumult.” Her family, her children needed her. By the end of 2012, she made the tough decision to leave work outside of her home and return to freelance work from home. Salonen continues to freelance for “New Earth” as well as compose a blog, author a weekly column for “The Forum,” and she recently completed a book.

post as interim editor for “New Earth.” On April 8, 2014, Pope Francis appointed then Monsignor John Folda of the Diocese of Lincoln to become the eighth bishop of Fargo. He was ordained Bishop of Fargo on June 19, 2013. “It was really fun coming back on the scene when we were going to be getting our new bishop,” exclaimed Watterud. “When I first got to the diocese, Bishop Aquila was already there. I am so thankful to be part of that exciting time in the history of the Church.” After Bishop Folda’s installation and ordination, Watterud would once again say goodbye, and a permanent editor for New Earth would be found. In October 2013, Aliceyn Magelky was hired as the

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BACK AT THE HELM

With the editor’s desk empty and a diocese without a shepherd, Watterud temporarily returned to her

Director of Communications for the diocese. Currently, she oversees the production of “New Earth” along with managing the diocesan website and social media platforms. With a fresh perspective, Magelky led the research and consultative efforts to revamp “New Earth” once again. The diocese made the announcement in the November 2014 issue of “New Earth” that the publication would change format and design. The January 2015 issue marks the official release of “New Earth: The magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Fargo.” Full color, new sections and ease of use are highlights of this new format. Regardless of the new look, the intent remains the same: to inform, to teach, to inspire.

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NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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NEXT GEN

Na

Catholic Schools Week celebrates unique mission of education in community By Kristina Lahr

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his year’s National Catholic Schools Week, the annual celebration of Catholic education in the United States will be Jan. 2531. The theme for the week is “Catholic Schools: Communities of Faith, Knowledge and Service.” The theme encompasses several concepts that are at the heart of a Catholic education. Schools are first of all communities but also members of the The Catholic Schools Week logo features a swirl of colors inter- larger community of the fami acting around a cross, which is ly, church, city and nation. at the center of all Catholic education. The vibrancy of the Dr. Michael Smith, superintendent of St. John Paul II colors and the movement and schools, said that Catholic shadows in the logo portray the inner-connectivity and community schools are in the best position life that are present in our to bring the faith to young Catholic schools. Credit: National people and to the community. Catholic Educational Association. Rather than having a set time or hour to focus on faith like during Mass or religion class, the faith becomes a part of the child’s everyday life. “All lessons have the potential to be infused with the faith,” Smith said. “Each day starts with prayer, and we celebrate Mass regularly. The biggest part of our mission is in teaching the whole person, fostering that relationship with Christ. In teaching the total person, you are teaching the beatitudes, which is going to create great community members.” “Our school is a community on its own, but that education in our students expands out,” said Sherri Simon, executive administrative assistant at JPII schools. “It’s a ripple effect to our families and parishes which extends to the community.”

teaching the total person in faith formation, meaning helping that person get to heaven. Those are two different things. All of our decisions have to go back to that principle mission.” The mission of the JPII Catholic schools is to inspire exceptional student achievement by teaching the total person and fostering the following of Christ in an environment guided by the Gospel spirit, as taught by the Catholic Church. Because all the Catholic schools in the Fargo Diocese belong to the same school district, that district is ranked as the tenth largest in North Dakota. There are 244 school districts in the state. “We want everyone in the diocese to understand, we are a big system,” said Smith. “There are a lot of people getting a Catholic education which is only possible because people are supporting that. That’s why Catholic Schools Week is so important. Our children wouldn’t be in these schools today if we, our parents and grandparents didn’t make sacrifices for them.”

COST OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION

Oftentimes Catholic schools have a stigma of being expensive. Both Smith and Simon agree that Catholic schools aren’t meant to be elite private schools but opportunities for all families. “We’re fortunate that we have a competitive rate,” said Simon. “We don’t typically charge what it actually costs. We have a lot of generous donors and scholarships set up. The parishes are very generous.” “We have a lot of social economic backgrounds represented,” said Smith. “Financial aid and tuition assistance is available. We figure out a rate that people can actually afford. We haven’t turned anyone away because of finances. We don’t want to be a private school for rich families. Our mission is to serve all children who want to come.”

God’s Blessings to you during this month dedicated to the Most Holy Name of Jesus

GROWTH IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

“For schools across the nation, we are doing well,” continued Simon. “We are one of few across the nation that are adding a school. That doesn’t happen very often.” In the past year, there were 42 new Catholic schools in the nation and 133 being consolidated. Trinity Elementary school will open in West Fargo this fall. “The schools that really stick to their mission are starting to see resurgence,” said Smith. “The mission gets lost when Catholic schools try to act like public schools in that they focus on the development of a good person rather than

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NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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National SEEK 2015 Conference inspires renewal, conversion By Kristina Lahr

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o start off the New Year, 10,000 college students and young adults attended the national SEEK conference in Nashville, Tenn., Jan.1-5. The conference, sponsored by Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS), brought the nation’s most well known keynote speakers, evangelists and religious to inspire young adults to “ask, seek and knock” to discover who they are, where they’re going and what truly motivates them. “It’s a time students can escape the daily routine and be with students who are like-minded and seeking answers,” said Jonathon Spaid, FOCUS team director at NDSU. Tara Splonskowski, staff associate at St. Paul’s Newman Center said the community between the students is one of the most beneficial aspects of SEEK. The bus ride alone provides an opportunity for students to connect before the conference even begins. “Everyone who goes has a positive experience, so we put a lot of emphasis on it,” Splonskowski said. “We encourage everyone to just go. We’ll find a way. Funding shouldn’t be an excuse not to go. I don’t know how you can go to SEEK and not be affected.”

ATTENDANCE NEARLY DOUBLE

The first SEEK conference was in 2013 in Orlando, Fla. while last year FOCUS sponsored a Student Leadership

Summit Conference in Dallas, Texas. The SEEK conference and Leadership Summit are each likely to occur every other year. With FOCUS now located on 100 campuses nationwide, nearly 10,000 young adults registered for the conference, a significant jump from 6,000 in 2013.

as Jesus was processed out. It makes you proud to be Catholic and blessed to be a part of something that’s so much bigger than yourself.” Mass was celebrated daily and time set aside for personal prayer. With nearly 40 speakers, including: Dr. Edward Sri and Curtis Martin, founders of FOCUS;

SEEK 2015, a national conference for college students and young adults sponsored by FOCUS, took place at Nashville, Tenn. January 1-5. Nearly 10,000 young adults attended the conference from the 100 FOCUS campuses across the nation. SEEK has inspired conversions and renewed enthusiasm for the faith, especially for young adults entering the working world. Credit: SEEK2015.com.

Splonskowski remembers during her experience in 2013 of the power of having so many people her age worshiping God in one space. “What had a huge affect on me is there being 6,000 people about my age, all worshiping in a very traditional, Catholic way,” she said. “It left me in a feeling of awe at the wonder of the beauty of the faith. “Every time they celebrated Mass, they used the same conference room as the speakers. Whenever they moved Jesus from one place to another, there would be this sudden quiet over the students and a wave of people kneeling

Jason Evert, Jennifer Fulwiler, Father Michael Schmitz, Leah Darrow and Mark Hart, students had the opportunity to learn what pertains to them most from church teachings to how to evangelize to the relationship of science and faith. In the evening, entertainment was provided by musician Matt Maher and comedian Jim Gaffigan. And, a country music night, Nashville-style, was held complete with line and swing dancing.

CONVERSIONS

“A lot of fruit comes from

SEEK,” said Splonskowski. “We see a great influx of student involvement after SEEK retreats. We have more students going to bible studies, we have non-Catholics becoming Catholic and people just getting more involved with the Newman Center.” Spaid said he was first introduced to the Catholic faith through the Newman Center and FOCUS while he was a college student at the University of Minnesota, Duluth. “A FOCUS conference is where I had my conversation where God was calling me to be Catholic,” he said. “That’s not unusual at a conference. People go with all kinds of backgrounds. Some don’t know if they really believe in church teaching but being in that environment brings about a deep conversion. Some get engaged to their future spouse or have a deeper understanding of their vocation to the priesthood or religious life. Some leave with a deeper sense of God’s love for them and inspiration to change their lifestyle.” Since many colleges don’t begin the second semester until mid January, most students have returned home for a few weeks where they can immediately share their SEEK experience with their parents and parishes. “You’re casting a broad net with this conference,” said Spaid. “It’s very encouraging and exciting for parishioners. It brings hope seeing young people taking their faith seriously.”

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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OUR CATHOLIC LIFE

‘Amber moments’ throughout life Woman uses God’s gift to serve Him, his people

RESO

By Father Bert Miller

STORIES OF FAITH Author’s Note: I am experiencing a drought, a dry spell in writing. I mentioned this to my friend, Rosemary Dimmer Coleman, who has helped me at least twice last year. She offers this piece of nostalgia for January. After my story, “Inside a halo” was published in the November 2014 issue of “New Earth,” I was asked if all my “amber moments” occurred in church. No. But, my most astounding one did. In the early 1960s, my early 20s - before St. John XXIII threw open the windows, St. John Paul II threw open the doors and Pope Francis started sweeping out the cobwebs - I had been questioning what I was being taught for about 10 years. My first full-time paying job was with a department store

Information Sessions Holy Spirit January 29 6:30 pm

Nativity January 27 6:30 pm

Trinity January 25

12:00 - 4:00 pm

Parents and children are invited to learn about our programs from 3 years old through Kindergarten FOR MORE INFORMATION OR PERSONAL TOUR Lori Hager, Admissions Director 701.893.3271 Lori.Hager@jp2schools.org

HOLY SPIRIT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1441 8th Street North, Fargo, ND 701.232.4087

NATIVITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1825 11th Street South, Fargo, ND 701.232-7461

jp2schools.org

20

TRINITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2820 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo, ND 701.893-3271

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

No

on Broadway in Fargo. There, I befriended a co-worker who was going to college, working part-time and planning her wedding. The weekend before her wedding, the news came of a fatal car accident in Cavalier that took the lives of a mother and her 20-something daughter. I inhaled. After an extremely long weekend, Monday finally arrived and so did my friend. I exhaled. She asked if I’d heard about the accident and went on to say that the older woman had a part in her wedding reception. And the younger woman was to be her soloist. Her next statement was, “I didn’t ask you to sing at my wedding because I knew you weren’t allowed. But, will you consider it?” Yes. Being the obedient Catholic girl, I called the chancery and explained the situation. “Not a relative?” No. Unbeknownst to me, my friend called the priest in Cavalier, who, of course, knowing everybody involved said yes. I prayed and agonized before calling my mother to tell her I wouldn’t be home for the weekend and why. Then, the lecture came. Entering a protestant church was not permitted. Participating in a protestant service was verboten. “But, Mom. God gave me this voice. I don’t believe I’m better than my friend. I believe I must use this beautiful gift,” I said. So, the following Saturday, in a Methodist church in Cavalier, I sang “The Lord’s Prayer” by Albert Hay Malotte in E-flat to absolute perfection. How do I know it was perfect? The sanctuary glowed amber, as if inside a halo. While my body was physically performing, my mind was receiving a message. “It is good. You have done well. Do not fret.” Since that day I’ve tried to remember, the Lord is with me. Father Bert Miller serves the Diocese of Fargo as pastor at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in West Fargo. Editor’s note: Stories of Faith is a recurring feature in New Earth. If you have a faith story to tell, contact Father Bert Miller at bert. miller@fargodiocese.org.

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North Dakota Legislative Session Started, So Should We RESOURCES

To help you understand the legislative process in North Dakota and how to reach your state and federal officials, the North Dakota Catholic Conference has two documents available to the public. The first item is a directory of all state and federal officials. It comes in a brochure-size trifold to make it easy to take with you. The second item is a larger guide explaining the legislative process, how you can testify before a legislative committee, how to find your legislators’ votes and other useful information. Both of these documents are available online at ndcatholic.org and are sent by regular mail to people who have joined the Conference’s Legislative Action Network.

STAY INFORMED

Members of the Legislative Action Network receive, in addition to the directory and legislative guide, regular e-newsletters throughout the legislative session and action alerts. These action alerts are the best way to act quickly on legislative items of concern to the Catholic Church. You can join the network through the conference website at ndcatholic.org/registration. Want to stay even more informed? To get the most up-todate information, subscribe to the conference’s RSS feed, Facebook and Twitter pages. These services provide more up-tothe-minute information than the e-newsletters.

REAL PRESENCE RADIO

Throughout the session, I will give legislative updates, wrap-ups, and calls-to-action on various Real Presence Radio programs. This North Dakota-based Catholic network now reaches across most of the state. Make an effort to listen and stay informed.

VISIT THE CAPITOL

Every North Dakotan should take some time to visit the Capitol during the legislative session. It is your Capitol. If you have never done so, take some time and schedule a tour. The building has some great features and stories to go with it. While there, take some time to attend a committee hearing, even if it is about an issue that does not interest you. Committees

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are where most of the work of the legislature is done. Catholic Listen to how Action legislators ask questions and the interaction between Christoper legislators and Dodson the lobbyists and citizens who testify. All committee meetings are open to the public. Walk in, even if the door is closed. Committee hearing schedules for the week usually come out the preceding Friday. That deadline sometimes gives only a short notice to those who want to attend a Monday hearing. The North Dakota legislature moves fast. The chairman, which is the proper term even if the person is a woman, determines how to run the committee meetings. Most chairmen will try to stick to the time scheduled for a hearing. If a hearing runs long, the next scheduled hearing will follow. Just wait. However, a few chairmen will take the agenda as a list. As soon as one hearing is finished, the next will start, even if the next hearing is scheduled for later. You may arrive at the scheduled time only to find that you are too late. This situation is frustrating, and complaints have been made, but some chairmen continue to operate in this manner. A hearing will usually begin with an introduction by the legislator who introduced the bill followed by testimony in support of the bill. The committee will then hear testimony against the bill. Most committees will not allow neutral testimony. The committee will usually not vote on the bill until a later time, which usually is not scheduled. Anyone can testify. Legislators like hearing from “regular” citizens. Keep your testimony short and try to discuss the legislation rather than the broader issue. For example, if a bill is about a specific high school graduation requirement, talk about that requirement and not the state of public education in general.

WORSHIP AND CELEBRATE

Every session the North Dakota Catholic Conference shows their appreciation for our elected officials with a Mass followed by dinner. Everyone is invited to the liturgy. Please come join our elected officials for this special Eucharistic Celebration on Jan. 29 at Holy Spirit Cathedral in Bismarck at 5:30 p.m. Bishop David Kagan, Bismarck Diocese and Bishop John Folda, Fargo Diocese will concelebrate. Christopher Dodson is executive director of the North Dakota Catholic Conference. The NDCC acts on behalf of the Catholic bishops of North Dakota to respond to public policy issues of concern to the Catholic Church and to educate Catholics and the general public about Catholic social doctrine. The conference website is ndcatholic.org. NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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OUR CATHOLIC LIFE

Are You Leaving Footprints?

E

veryone l e a v e s footprints on the sands of time. Our prints Stewardship are made by the Steve Schons imprints of our lives on others. A person is remembered for the weight of his or her character. For marks of accomplishment. For shapes of kindness. For length of compassion. For values. When we leave positive impressions behind, we enhance the lives of our friends and families who we love so much. We give them footprints to follow. Thoughtful estate planning is one means we have to make our print in the sand. It helps others to know and understand what we deemed important in our lives. For example, consider the impact of a plan that includes provisions for family members, your parish or diocese and other worthy charitable organizations.

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Protect yours today. Contact:

AN ESTATE GIFT MAKES A POSITIVE STATEMENT.

When you include your local parish or the diocese in your final estate plans, you declare to your family and friends that you believe in and care about these things. Your parting gift becomes a clear declaration of your values.

“Remember that when you leave this earth, you can take with you nothing that you have received – only what you have given: a full heart enriched by honest service, love, sacrifice and courage.” - St. Francis of Assisi

AN ESTATE GIFT PROVIDES NEEDED FUNDING.

ESTATE GIFTS ARE especially valuable, not only because they tend to be larger than annual gifts, but they often come at critical times. Estate gifts can be designated for a specific purpose, or they can be unrestricted for use where they are needed most. For example, someone could choose to make an estate gift, specifically, to their local Catholic cemetery.

AN ESTATE GIFT ENCOURAGES IMITATION.

There’s something about a well-planned estate gift that influences and encourages others to do the same. As friends and family members plan their own estates, they may recall your generosity and thoughtfulness. Your gift may unlock resources for other worthy causes as well. Steve Schons is director of stewardship and development for the Diocese of Fargo and can be reached at steve.schons@fargodiocese. org or (701) 356-7926.

TO LEARN MORE Ryan Brunner

Jeff Reisenauer

Ryan Geigle

Grand Forks Fargo Jamestown (701) 757-0523 (701) 356-8889 (701) 251-9019 ryan.brunner@kofc.org jeffrey.reisenauer@kofc.org ryan.geigle@kofc.org

___ Please send me information about making a planned gift to the Catholic Development Foundation.

___ Please contact me (us) about a personal visit. The best time to call me (us) is: __________________ ___ I have provided for the church in my will or other estate planning document.

Pat Dolan General Agent, Fargo (701) 298-9922 patrick.dolan@kofc.org

Wayne Cherney

Joel Herman

Devils Lake Wahpeton (701) 662-4420 (701) 219-5847 800-906-6780 joel.herman@kofc.org wayne.cherney@kofc.org

State: ___________ Zip: _______________________ Phone: ________________________________________________

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LONG-TERM CARE

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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Address: _________________________________________________

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Please mail your completed form to: Steve Schons, Director of Stewardship and Development, 5201 Bishops Blvd., Suite A, Fargo, ND 58104-7605, email steve.schons@fargodiocese.org, or call (701) 356-7926.

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OUR CATHOLIC LIFE

Keeping Family First

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t was two years ago this month. Our unmarried daughter met us for dinner and announced that she was pregnant with her third child. I tossed and turned that night as I thought about this third grandson who would be born into my daughter’s single-parent family. Less than 24 hours later, my son called to say that his baby girl had arrived, but was being taken by life flight to Cardinal Glennon Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. They didn’t know if the baby would survive. The neurological team said she would have brain damage if she managed to make it through her first day of life. “We must help to meet their temporal needs, but we must also meet their spiritual needs. Corporal works of mercy and spiritual works of mercy begin at home. Our number one job is to get our family members to heaven.” -Denise Bossert In the moment my daughter told me she was pregnant again, I immediately began doing damage control. Instantly, I knew that I would not sign a teaching contract for the following year. Maybe my daughter could move back in with us. Maybe we could babysit, and she could work. Maybe these grandchildren would have some concept of family through grandparents and extended family. When my son called with the news about his baby girl less than a day later, I couldn’t think at all. I wasn’t planning. There was no strategy in my head. It was too big, the news too unexpected, too awful to analyze and process and mitigate. We took each day as it came. The first family crisis sent me into damage-control mode. The second family crisis left me adrift. No mother could wrap her arms around this.

MOM TAKES ACTION

I took the overnight shift at the hospital. My daughter-inlaw could barely walk in the days that followed that traumatic birth. She and my son seemed to be in post-traumatic stress. That’s how it is when a baby is born without life signs, when you

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are told she may not survive, when you watch her have two seizures in her first Catholic 24 hours of life, by Grace and the experts say that she will have Denise Bossert brain damage. Instinctively, I activated a social teaching of the Church that isn’t talked about very much. The Compendium on Social Doctrine of the Church says that there is to be a “social priority of the family” (252). It goes on to say there must be “the recognition on the part of civil society and the State of the priority of the family over every other community” (254). In short, family comes first. That night, my husband and I talked it over, I talked to my parish priest, I prayed a lot, and then I submitted a letter of resignation. We both knew what I had to do. It was time to be a mother and grandmother before anything else. I believe God honored our desire to put family first. Within months, my daughter and her three sons converted and entered the Catholic Church. The very next day, an MRI showed that my granddaughter had been miraculously spared brain damage. She has had two surgeries since her birth to address other complications stemming from the traumatic birth, and my son and his family stay with us often to be close to physical therapy sessions in St. Louis. But, the two-year old that was supposed to have brain damage has met or exceeded all mental development milestones. And, the physical therapy is helping in the areas affected by the nerve damage.

OUR FIRST EARTHLY PRIORITY

The eyes of the Church are on the World Meeting of Families in September 2015. It is an important time in the life of our Church. Now, more than ever, we are being called to put family above all earthly things, and that includes our employment. Family comes first. We must help to meet their temporal needs, but we must also meet their spiritual needs. Corporal works of mercy and spiritual works of mercy begin at home. Our number one job is to get our family members to heaven. Just as the Church helps us along our personal pilgrimage to heaven, the domestic church is a vehicle for the salvation of the family. Rarely is one called upon to set aside work for family. Typically, work is necessary for the financial viability of the family. But, we must never get our priorities out of whack. The family has priority over every other community on earth. Solidarity begins in the home. Denise Bossert is a convert and a syndicated columnist. Her column has been published in 63 diocesan newspapers. She attends Immaculate Heart of Mary parish in the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Missouri. NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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OUR CATHOLIC LIFE

I Hope You Had a ‘Mary’ Christmas

T

o echo the words of St. Paul, “Rejoice in the Lord always. Seminarian I shall say it again: Life Rejoice!” (Philippians 4:4). It is easy Ethan Kaste to say this during Christmas because the season has an air of joy to it. As some of you know, this is my first year in the seminary, and it was hard to know what to expect when entering. I am pleased to say that it has brought me a lot of peace, a contemplative peace that has led to joy. I feel that the joy of the Christmas season is the best way to describe it. The source of this peace has come from contemplating the disposition of Mary, especially within Advent leading to the Christmas season. Before I explain Mary’s contemplative disposition, I want to explain a bit more about Christmas. In the last seminarian article, Eric spoke about the secularization of Christmas which can lead us to forget the contemplative season of Advent. Similarly, we can also forget about how long the Christmas season actually lasts. The

“When we gaze upon the Eucharist, questions like this may come up: Why did you create me? How can you love me? I can only imagine how often Mary would crack a beautiful smile every time she heard an answer; no wonder why her soul proclaimed the greatness of the Lord in her magnificat.” - Ethan Kaste Christmas season does not end after Christmas Day (Dec. 25). Christmas Day is the beginning of a three-week celebration, which ends on the Baptism of The Lord (Jan. 12). One day is not enough; Catholic celebrations don’t usually last just a day. This tendency is one reason why we have seasons. Mary is the ultimate exemplification of the contemplative spirit within Advent. Advent is Latin for “coming” or “arrival.” Advent invokes anticipation; it is a time of contemplation upon the coming of our Lord. Mary entered into this anticipation quite literally; she was called to bear Christ for nine months. One could not help but think what was it like to have God inside of her? One could imagine that her prayer life changed dramatically. Just like Christ is veiled to us in the Eucharist, he was veiled within her womb. She was in constant adoration for nine months. Just because her contemplative disposition was intensified

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during her pregnancy does not mean that she did not have this disposition before. This perfect contemplative disposition was a product of her lack of original sin. Sin means “separation from God.” Original sin deprives us of our undisturbed communion with God. So without sin, we would be able to constantly be mindful of and enjoy God. One could imagine that as Mary was growing up, whatever she would be doing, whether it would be making bread or playing with children, she was thinking about and meditating upon God. When we gaze upon the Eucharist, questions like the following may come up: Why did you create me? How can you love me? I can only imagine how often Mary would crack a beautiful smile every time she heard an answer; no wonder why her soul proclaimed the greatness of the Lord in her Magnificat. Our creator limited himself and became something he created just because he wanted to teach us to understand him and in turn be able to love him more. One would think that something that was as powerful as God would never want to limit himself in order to stay above those whom he created. But instead, our God chose not to. This response implies a desire for a relationship. Mary understood this, especially as Jesus came into her. She was able to “ponder” (Luke 1:29, Luke 1:51) and contemplate on things like this her whole life. Everything she did, she did it for the Lord, and because of that, everything she did had no chance of being boring or pointless. She never experienced a “waste of time” in her life. As Jesus was born, she was fixed on Him; this contemplative lifestyle (her joy) was made flesh. These meditations were inspired by the movie “Mary of Nazareth.” I mention the film because this movie is a great way to put a face to these meditations. I pray that we all have a contemplative heart like Our Lady at the end of this Christmas season. God Bless! Kaste is a College II student studying at St. Gregory the Great Seminar, Seward, Neb. Originally from Grafton, he enjoys running, reading, spending time at the lake and Ultimate Frisbee. What he enjoys most about seminary is the disciplined lifestyle that allows him to take part in the 24/7 call of the priestly vocation. Editor’s Note: Seminarian Life is a monthly column written by current Diocese of Fargo seminarians. It gives New Earth readers a glimpse of what these discerning young men are experiencing. Let us know if there is something you would like to know about the life of a seminarian. Perhaps, it will inspire an article from one of them. And, please continue to pray for them.


WHAT’S HAPPENING

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Events Across The Diocese

Mark your calendar for events around the diocese

Life in the Spirit Seminar.

St. Cecilia’s, Harvey. Friday, Jan. 16 to Sunday, Jan. 18 at 6 p.m. Contact Rosalie Axtman at (701) 324-2144 or stcecilia@gondtc.com.

Knights of Columbus Free Throw Contest.

South Elementary gym, West Fargo. Friday, Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. Contact Chad Engels at hydro870@hotmail.com.

Soupapalooza.

St. William’s church, Argusville. Sunday, Jan. 18 at 11 a.m. Contact Mary Howatt at (701) 484-5095 or mary. howatt@northerncassschool. com.

National March for Life.

Washington D.C. Sunday, Jan. 18 to Friday, Jan. 23. Contact Rachelle Sauvageau at (701) 356-7910.

Retrouvaille.

Bismarck. Friday, Jan 23 to Sunday, Jan. 25. Contact Joyce Mcdowall at (877) 405-7435.

Catholic Collage.

Shanley High School, Fargo. Sundays, Feb. 8, 15 and 22. Contact Joan Schaefer at jschaefer@ideaone.net or visit catholiccollage.com.

Lunch with Tim Staples.

Sts. Anne and Joachim church, Fargo. Thursday, Feb. 19 at 11:30 a.m. Contact Rachelle Sauvageau at (701) 356-7910.

Lenten Fish Fry.

St. Michael’s church, Grand Forks. Friday, Feb. 20 at 5 p.m. Contact St. Michael’s church at (701) 772-2624.

Pilgrimage to Croatia, Slovenia and Venice.

Apr. 20-May 1. Father Damien Schill will lead a pilgrimage to Croatia, Slovenia and Venice. Cost is $4,094 per person. Full payment is due Feb. 20. Visit www.pilgrimages.com/ frschill for full itinerary.

New Evangelization Summit. Shanley High School, Fargo. April 23-24. See www.newevangelization.ca for general information.

To submit events for New Earth and the diocesan website, send information to: New Earth, 5201 Bishops Blvd. S., Suite A, Fargo, ND 58104-7605 or email news@fargodiocese.org. The deadline for the February New Earth is Jan. 21. The earliest that issue will reach homes is Feb. 8.

Mardi Gras.

Louis and Pauline Argenziano, former parishioner of St. Mary’s Cathedral and St. Anthony’s in Fargo will celebrate her 100th birthday on Jan. 19. Pauline resides in Luther Memorial Home in Mayville. She has one son, Frank, and daughter-in-law, Susanne, who reside in Reynolds. Pauline has seven grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

Hamels celebrate 61 years of marriage Louis and Theresa Hamel of Lakota celebrated 65 years of marriage Nov. 16. They were married at St. Andrew’s Catholic Church in Westhope and have been members of St. Mary’s parish in Lakota for 61 years. They have four children, 10 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. They lived on a farm since 1949 and have only lived in Lakota since September.

Share Life’s Milestones As a way to celebrate life and love, we encourage parishioners throughout the Diocese of Fargo to send photos of anniversaries of 60 or more years, or birthdays of 80 or more years to: New Earth, Diocese of Fargo, 5201 Bishops Blvd. S., Suite A, Fargo, ND 58104-7605 or news@fargodiocese.org.

NAPOLEON LIVESTOCK

St. John’s church, Wahpeton. Sunday, Feb. 8 at 10 a.m. Contact St. John’s church at (701) 642-6982.

Valentine Wine and Dine Fundraiser.

Holy Spirit church, Fargo. Friday, Feb. 13 at 6 p.m. Proceeds help students attend World Youth Day in summer 2016. Contact Jeff Benda at (701) 799-8299 or jeffinfargo@hotmail.com.

Argenziano celebrates 100 years

For more news and events, visit the “News and Events” section of the diocesan website: www.fargodiocese.org/ news-events.

1-800-932-8821 www.napoleonlivestock.com North Dakota’s Progressive Market NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Sponsored by the Diocese Diocese to host pilgrimage to World Meeting of Families

As part of the diocesan “Year of Marriage and Family,” the Office of Marriage and Family Life will host a pilgrimage to the eighth World Meeting of Families. This event, held Sept. 22-27, 2015 in Philadelphia, will feature daily Mass, devotions, keynote addresses and multiple breakout sessions. An extraordinary treat surrounding this event is the arrival of Pope Francis. It will be his first visit to the United States since his papacy began. In 1994, St. John Paul II started this conference by inviting families from around the world to come together every three years to pray and help strengthen marriages. This year’s theme is: Love is Our Mission: The Family Fully Alive. Package includes: round-trip airfare from Fargo, hotel for five nights, daily breakfast, two evening meals and transportation. Registration for the conference is not included. Cost per person is $1,695. For more information, contact Jennie Korsmo at (701) 356-7901 or jennie.korsmo@fargodiocese. org. To learn more about the World Meeting of Families visit www.worldmeeting2015.org.

‘Catholic Collage’ courses offered in February

Catholic Collage, a three-week series of adult religious and formational classes, will be held Feb. 8, 15 and 22 at Shanley High School in Fargo. Open to anyone interested in learning more about the Catholic faith, each day of the series is broken into two sessions offering six to seven courses or topics of discussion to choose. Participants may select one class from each session. Catholic Collage debuted last year with about 100 people attending each day. Similar to the inaugural year, a variety of class offerings make it easy for attendees to find topics that best suit their interests. Brochures will be available in metro-area parishes in early January. Also, visit catholiccollage.com for more information. Cost per session is $20.

Dorsett to headline University of Mary’s Annual Prayer Day event

Prolific author and popular speaker, Dr. Lyle Dorsett, is the guest speaker at University of Mary’s 37th annual Prayer Day, Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, 11 a.m., in the McDowell Activity Center. Dorsett, currently the Billy Graham Professor of Evangelism at the esteemed interdenominational Beeson Divinity School, Samford University in Birmingham, Ala. will provide messages of “Prayer and Evangelization.” “Dr. Dorsett, master preacher and teacher, knows both the dynamic role of evangelization in Christian history and the 26

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

secular city’s desperate need for good news today,” said Dr. Peter Huff, incoming director of Campus Ministry and professor of theology at the University of Mary. “Just as Pope Francis has rekindled interest in the missionary joy at the heart of the gospel, Dr. Dorsett’s timely message will encourage us to see how prayer and evangelization speak to the deepest questions of our age.” For more information and preregistration, visit umary.edu/ prayerday or call (701) 355-8102 or (800) 408-6279, ext. 8102.

A Glimpse of the Past

These news items, compiled by Dorothy Duchschere, were found in issues of the Diocese of Fargo newspaper, New Earth, and its predecessor, Catholic Action News.

50 Years Ago....1965

One priest and three lay missionaries from the Diocese of Fargo are now at work in Latin America. The priest is Father James Jeffrey, a native of Grand Forks and formerly assistant at St. John’s in Grafton. The lay missionaries are DiAnn Tintes of West Fargo and Beth Kormann of Westhope, both currently in Guatemala, and Paul Radde of Wahpeton. Despite our own local shortage of priests, Bishop Dworschak released Fr. James Jeffrey last September to serve in Peru. (February 1965 Catholic Action News)

20 Years Ago....1995

Time magazine described Pope John Paul II as “a moral compass for believers and non-believers alike,” forcefully reasserting a moral vision in a world where many see values declining. “For such rectitude - or recklessness as his detractors would have it - he is Time’s Man of the Year.” Pope John Paul is only the second pope to make Time’s end-of-year cover. Pope John XXIII made it in 1962, when he opened the Second Vatican Council. Time said that Pope John Paul has “the world’s bullyest pulpit.” “Few of his predecessors over the past 2,000 years have spoken from it as often and forcefully as he. He stands solidly against much that the secular world deems progressive the notion that humans share with God the right to determine who will and will not be born,” the magazine said. (January 1995 New Earth)

10 Years ago.....2005 The dedication and blessing of St. Anthony of Padua’s new facilities took place Jan. 11. It began with a joyful Mass. There were many to celebrate including Bishop Aquila, Fr. James Ermer, Fr. Wenceslaus Katanga, Fr. Joseph Goering, Fr. Dennis Skonseng and Deacon Stuart Longtin. After the Bishop’s homily, the blessing of the new facilities took place. The Bishop blessed the gathering space and a new life-sized statue of St. Anthony. Fr. Ermer blessed the offices and the upstairs religious education rooms and Fr. Katanga blessed the lower level religious education rooms and social hall. (February 2005 New Earth)

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Renowned ‘Catholic Answers’ speaker to headline luncheon, banquet

T

im Staples, Director of Apologetics and Evangelization for Catholic Answers, will speak at two notable Fargo Diocese events on Feb. 19. First, Staples will address the “five non-negotiables” facing Catholic voters during the annual Respect Life Luncheon held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Sts. Anne and Joachim parish, Fargo. In the evening, Staples will share his conversion story during the annual Real Presence Radio fundraising banquet held at the Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo. During the luncheon, Staples will explain how St. John Paul II taught, quoting St. Thomas Aquinas, that so called “laws” legalizing acts such as abortion, euthanasia and embryonic

stem cell research are not laws at all; rather, they are “acts of violence.” Catholics can never obey these acts and are obligated to oppose them using every licit and reasonable means at their disposal. Additionally, Staples will give attendees tools to respond to these issues while empowering Catholics to truly “act like Catholics” in every area of their lives, including the voting booth. Cost of the Annual Respect Life Luncheon is $15/person. Registration is required by Feb. 12. To register, visit www.fargodiocese.org/respectlife or call Rachelle at (701) 356-7910. Staples was raised Southern Baptist and later joined Assemblies of God communities. In 1988, Staples came into full communion with the Catholic Church. He entered the seminary to pursue the priesthood. In 1994, he left the seminary to work in Catholic apologetics and evangelization. Attendees of the annual Real Presence Radio fundraising banquet will hear the full story of Staples’ journey. For more information about the banquet call (877) 795-0122.

Augustine Randall was born on July 25th, 2014. His mother chose life! Saint Gianna’s Maternity Home offers a home and hope to mothers who find themselves pregnant and alone.

Help us help them CHOOSE LIFE! Saint Gianna’s has been chosen by Dakota Medical Foundation and Impact Foundation to participate in the 2015 Giving Hearts Day that will be held on February 12, 2015. Contributions of $10 or more will be matched. Please go to www.impactgiveback.org to participate.

LIFE TRULY IS THE BEAUTIFUL CHOICE! NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

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GOD’S GIFT

Thank you for your support of the 2014 God’s Gift Appeal

The goal for the 2014 God’s Gift Appeal was $2,818,751. As of Dec. 18, 2014, $3,015,228 was pledged. Thank you to all who helped support vocations, sick and elderly priests, evangelization efforts and the many other diocesan programs that serve parishes and people throughout the Diocese of Fargo. CITY Anamoose Aneta Argusville Ashley Balta Bechyne Belcourt-St. Ann Belcourt-St. Anthony Belcourt-St. Benedict Bisbee Bottineau Buchanan Buffalo Cando Carrington Casselton Cavalier Cayuga Cooperstown Crystal Dazey Devils Lake Dickey Drake Drayton Dunseith-St. Michael Edgeley Ellendale Enderlin Esmond Fairmount Fargo-Holy Spirit Fargo-Nativity Fargo-St. Anthony Fargo-St. Mary Fargo -Sts. A & J Fargo-Newman Fessenden Fingal Finley Forman Fort Totten Fullerton Geneseo Grafton GF-Holy Family GF-St. Mary GF-St. Michael GF-Newman Gwinner Hankinson Harvey Hillsboro Hope Hunter Hurdsfield Jamestown Jessie Karlsruhe Kensal Kindred Knox Lakota LaMoure Langdon Lankin Larimore Leeds Lidgerwood Lisbon Maddock Mantador Manvel Mayville

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Goal Amount Pledged $9,315 $8,980 $3,828 $3,615 $9,640 $8,380 $5,781$ $6,065 $5,484 $4,320 $5,896 $7,295 $11,000 $8,059 $2,700 $2,330 $1,650 $1,720 $4,047 $4,430 $29,898 $22,720 $2,412 $3,975 $7,670 $12,515 $16,195 $12,700 $27,879 $43,340 $38,386 $40,147 $19,869 $15,820 $5,036 $7,840 $9,080 $7,665 $6,387 $6,368 $5,071 $2,430 $103,570 $147,398 $2,967 $1,565 $8,225 $2,405 $10,151 $6,085 $6,500 $5,840 $18,399 $14,735 $13,219 $11,839 $8,376 $6,587 $7,206 $8,142 $7,949 $7,700 $111,473 $158,457 $115,521 $127,148 $82,711 $84,677 $65,062 $83,036 $182,488 $248,757 $15,057 $14,275 $7,240 $4,995 $7,072 $7,905 $4,618 $5,325 $9,730 $10,730 $4,400 $3,200 $6,379 $10,607 $4,026 $7,430 $74,992 $82,501 $142,609 $100,185 $49,354 $43,183 $153,798 $155,518 $21,249 $25,364 $5,741 $5,030 $21,190 $23,360 $28,485 $40,220 $19,492 $26,108 $7,491 $6,770 $4,698 $2,360 $2,436 $1,685 $111,605 $84,010 $6,528 $12,365 $6,369 $5,920 $3,849 $3,610 $13,129 $9,065 $4,600 $3,740 $9,321 $6,815 $15,692 $13,640 $28,914 $35,275 $4,792 $4,660 $23,608 $20,605 $4,411 $3,405 $24,150 $28,268 $25,843 $19,960 $6,029 $6,170 $12,328 $13,195 $17,822 $16,388 $14,108 $12,403

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

% Goal pledged Participation % Results 96% 52% ($335) 94% 48% ($213) 87% 43% ($1,260) 105% 67% $284 79% 52% ($1,164) 124% 85% $1,399 73% 17% ($2,941) 86% 31% ($370) 104% 16% $70 109% 61% $383 76% 44% ($7,178) 165% 45% $1,563 163% 51% $4,845 78% 52% ($3,495) 155% 49% $15,461 105% 44% $1,761 80% 53% ($4,049) 156% 76% $2,804 84% 53% ($1,415) 100% 80% ($19) 48% 45% ($2,641) 142% 44% $43,828 53% 46% ($1,402) 29% 42% ($5,820) 60% 41% ($4,066) 90% 22% ($660) 80% 46% ($3,664) 90% 42% ($1,380) 79% 49% ($1,789) 113% 60% $936 97% 52% ($249) 142% 52% $46,984 110% 28% $11,627 102% 37% $1,966 128% 43% $17,974 136% 40% $66,269 95% 75% ($782) 69% 52% ($2,245) 112% 48% $833 115% 52% $707 110% 61% $1,000 73% 20% ($1,200) 166% 62% $4,228 185% 51% $3,404 110% 40% $7,509 70% 35% ($42,424) 87% 35% ($6,171) 101% 37% $1,720 119% 78% $4,115 88% 41% ($711) 110% 49% $2,170 141% 51% $11,735 134% 52% $6,616 90% 52% ($721) 50% 38% ($2,338) 69% 44% ($751) 75% 34% ($27,595) 189% 82% $5,837 93% 49% ($449) 94% 48% ($239) 69% 36% ($4,064) 81% 44% ($860) 73% 48% ($2,506) 87% 48% ($2,052) 122% 39% $6,361 97% 59% ($132) 87% 34% ($3,003) 77% 49% ($1,006) 117% 57% $4,118 77% 50% ($5,883) 102% 49% $141 107% 53% $867 92% 46% ($1,434) 88% 50% ($1,705)

Top

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Parishes than A

Parishes than A


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CITY Goal Amount Pledged % Goal pledged Participation % Results McClusky $2,319 $2,820 122% 62% $501 McHenry $3,933 $3,690 94% 73% ($243) Medina $4,904 $4,875 99% 56% ($29) Michigan $5,804 $6,275 108% 43% $471 Milnor $9,797 $7,995 82% 46% ($1,802) Minto $23,585 $23,205 98% 53% ($380) Mooreton $9,578 $16,256 170% 63% $6,678 Munich $15,396 $31,585 205% 74% $16,189 Napoleon $33,947 $53,559 158% 69% $19,612 Neche $4,268 $3,100 73% 68% ($1,168) Nekoma $2,477 $1,860 75% 47% ($617) New Rockford $26,271 $20,580 78% 44% ($5,691) Nortonville $3,812 $6,105 160% 77% $2,293 Oakes $31,656 $34,065 108% 61% $2,409 Oakwood $8,119 $5,890 73% 68% ($2,229) Oriska $3,793 $4,220 111% 45% $427 Park River $25,755 $30,705 119% 63% $4,950 Pembina $9,784 $7,325 75% 47% ($2,459) Pingree $2,552 $4,225 166% 57% $1,673 Pisek $8,778 $12,435 142% 59% $4,657 Reynolds $15,902 $19,190 121% 63% $3,288 Rock Lake $4,113 $3,380 82% 50% ($733) Rolette $11,208 $10,955 98% 51% ($253) Rolla $13,576 $16,025 118% 45% $2,449 Rugby $50,312 $50,900 101% 46% $588 Sanborn $7,087 $6,305 89% 42% ($782) Selz $4,500 $6,775 151% 65% $2,275 Sheldon $6,323 $4,975 79% 42% ($1,348) Starkweather $3,991 $5,865 147% 39% $1,874 Steele $12,803 $12,190 95% 51% ($613) St. John $3,000 $2,301 77% 18% ($699) St. Michael $14,000 $16,165 115% 26% $2,165 St. Thomas $4,262 $3,656 86% 33% ($606) Sykeston $6,635 $3,605 54% 43% ($3,030) Tappen $4,792 $3,050 64% 50% ($1,742) Thompson $18,913 $20,512 108% 48% $1,599 Tokio $1,200 $1,430 119% 67% $230 Tolna $4,626 $7,615 165% 47% $2,989 Towner $16,846 $16,320 97% 61% ($526) Valley City $59,351 $66,745 112% 50% $7,394 Velva $18,749 $15,526 83% 42% ($3,223) Verona $4,068 $2,235 55% 44% ($1,833) Veseleyville $8,596 $19,380 225% 83% $10,784 Wahpeton $77,604 $81,362 105% 35% $3,758 Wales $2,277 $2,330 102% 25% $53 Walhalla $19,323 $14,042 73% 36% ($5,281) Warsaw $18,634 $14,519 78% 50% ($4,115) WF-Blessed Sacra. $70,437 $65,211 93% 51% ($5,226) WF-Holy Cross $104,350 $88,702 85% 32% ($15,648) Westhope $9,596 $8,292 86% 44% ($1,304) Wild Rice $40,436 $34,345 85% 53% ($6,091) Willow City $2,784 $3,185 114% 46% $401 Wimbledon $8,250 $7,590 92% 40% ($660) Windsor $5,456 $10,850 199% 53% $5,394 Wishek $8,920 $7,343 82% 48% ($1,577) Wyndmere $15,888 $14,735 93% 51% ($1,153) Zeeland $9,219 $11,895 129% 53% $2,676 Non-Parish $33,627 $33,627 Desig. $0 Anonymous $0 Dec. 18, 2014

2,818,751

50 families or less

Top Parishes A look at how parishes did in 2014 Parishes 100% or more than Appeal Goal

59

Parishes 75 – 99% more than Appeal Goal

53

Parishes 50 – 74% more than Appeal Goal

17

3,015,228

CITY % Goal Veseleyville 225% Windsor 199% Jessie 189% Fullerton 166% Pingree 166% Buchanan 165% Tolna 165% Nortonville 160% Cayuga 156% Selz 151% Starkweather 147% Bechyne 124% McClusky 122% Tokio 119% Finley 115% Willow City 114%

107%

Oriska 111% Bisbee 109% Ashley 105% St Ben/Belcourt 104% Maddock 102% Wales 102% Crystal 100%

51-100 families

CITY % Goal Munich 205% Geneseo 185% Mooreton 170% Buffalo 163% Pisek 142% Reynolds 121% St Thomas, GF 119% Esmond 113% Fingal 112%

43%

$196,477

Forman 110% Michigan 108% Mantador 107%

Langdon 122% Valley City 112% Casselton 105%

CITY % Goal Hillsboro 134% Park River 119% Rolla 118% Lidgerwood 117% St Michael Ind. Mission 115% Hankinson 110% Oakes 108% Thompson 108%

CITY % Goal Holy Spirit,Fgo 142% St Mary, Fgo 128% Grafton 110% Wahpeton 105% St Anthony,Fgo 102% Rugby 101%

101-250 families

251-500 families

CITY % Goal Napoleon 158% Carrington 155% Harvey 141%

501-1000 families

Over 1000 families

CITY % Goal Devils Lake 142% SS Anne & Joachim, Fgo 136% Nativity,Fgo 110% St. Michael, Grand Forks 101

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

29


U.S. AND WORLD NEWS

New Year’s Eve is time for examination of conscience, pope says

T

By Cindy Wooden / Catholic News Service

he end of one calendar year and the beginning of another is the perfect occasion to reflect on how well people have used the time and gifts God has given them, especially how well people have helped the poor, Pope Francis said. “While God is eternal, time is important even to Pope Francis gives the homily during him,” Pope Francis said a prayer service New Year’s Eve in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. during a prayer service Credit: CNS photo/Paul Haring New Year’s Eve in St. Peter’s Basilica. “He wanted to reveal himself and save us in history,” becoming human to demonstrate “his concrete love.” Pope Francis ended 2014 celebrating evening prayer with Eucharistic adoration and Benediction, and the solemn singing of the “Te Deum,” a hymn of praise for God’s blessings. At the end of a year, like at the end of life, he said, the church teaches its members to make an examination of conscience, “remembering all that happened, thanking the Lord for all the good we received and were able to do and, at the same time, remembering where we were lacking and our sins. Give thanks and ask forgiveness.” Speaking specifically as bishop of Rome to others who have the honor of living in the city and the responsibility of participating in its civic life, Pope Francis said Christians must have “the courage to proclaim in our city that the poor must be defended and that we do not need to defend ourselves from the poor, that the weak must be served and not used.” Pope Francis made specific mention of the Rome corruption scandal that became public in early December; investigators claim millions of dollars’ worth of public contracts were awarded for waste management, housing immigrants and other programs, but the services were never provided or were not at the levels called for by the contracts. “The serious incidents of corruption that recently emerged require a serious and conscious conversion of hearts for a spiritual and moral renewal,” the pope said, “as well as for a renewed commitment to building a city marked by justice and solidarity where the poor, the weak and the marginalized are at the center of our concern and our daily action.” While God created humanity to be his children, he said, original sin and its remnants continue to distance people from God, often making them slaves who follow “the voice of the Evil One.” God sent Jesus to ransom sinners from their slavery, the pope said, which gives rise to an essential question in one’s 30

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

examination of conscience: “Do we live as children (of God) or as slaves?” “Do we live as people baptized in Christ, anointed by the Spirit, ransomed and free?” he asked. “Or do we live according to worldly logic: corrupt, doing what the devil wants us to believe is in our best interest?” Pope Francis told those gathered in the basilica that all people, even Christians, have “a tendency to resist freedom; we fear freedom and, paradoxically, we prefer slavery” although often people are not aware that that is what they are doing. “Freedom frightens us because it places time before us and, with it, the responsibility to live it well,” he said. “A nostalgia for slavery nests in our hearts because it appears more reassuring than freedom, which is much riskier.” Slavery focuses just on the moment, he said, making people forget their past, but also robbing them of hope for the future. “Slavery makes us believe that we cannot dream, fly or hope,” the pope said. The end of a year, he said, is a reminder that there will be a “final hour” and all people will be judged, particularly on how they used their freedom and how they cared for the poor.

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Year of marriage and family begins with children and youth By Mary Hanbury

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he theme for January in this Year of Marriage and Family is “children and youth.” Children are God’s precious gift to us. When we cooperate with God’s loving plan for marriage, we image the life of the Trinity itself in our outpouring of self completely to one another. Part of God’s plan for the marital covenant is for couples to be open to life, trusting God and receiving children into their family. Parents, grandparents, godparents, aunts and uncles, all have a role in raising a child in the faith. Here are a few ideas for starting off the year that the whole family can enjoy. 1.) “Bake through the Bible.” This book contains 20 fun recipes to introduce children to the bible while also enjoying food. By Susi Bentley-Taylor and Bekah Moore, The Good Book Company, 2013. 2.) A Family Prayer Wall. This wall is a collection of photos or newspaper articles of family members and friends whom you want to pray for as a family. It can be as simple as a piece of paper or cork board hung on the wall. You could also add Scripture quotes or pictures of saints whom you ask to intercede for your family.

Bake through the Bible is a tool parents can use to explore the Bible with their children while making memories in the kitchen. The book includes 20 fun and easy recipes. Written by Susi Bentley- Taylor and Bekah Moore, from The Good Book Company, 2013.

3.) Family Movie Night. Make this night something special inside or outside in summer with showing a family favorite or by introducing your children to the classics. Children love the Narnia series or the Hobbit series even if they have seen these films many times. You may also want

to include the classics: Jesus of Nazareth, The Ten Commandments, The Sound of Music, Boys Town, The Bells of St. Mary’s, Song of Bernadette, Ben Hur and the many great Christmas movies like It’s a Wonderful Life.

4.) Saint of the Year. Collect stories and images of 10 or more saints. Place each image and story in a plain envelope and have family members pick one. The one they choose is their saint A family prayer wall is great way to focus for the year. Spend the on who the family wants to pray for. The year getting to know wall can also include scripture or photos your saint. Put their of saints. image on the Family Prayer Wall or other significant place in your house. When extended family or close friends visit, you can offer them a saint as well. 5.) Works of Charity. Think of how your family could offer help to others. Some ideas are: visiting the elderly in nursing homes, helping out at a food pantry, offering to help with gardening, raking leaves and snow removal for people in your parish. There are countless ways your family could help others in need. Editor’s Note: The Fargo Diocese’s Year of Marriage and Family kicked-off Dec. 28, 2014. Each month New Earth will feature an article related to a particular theme of the month during the yearlong celebration. The following lists each month’s theme.

January

February

March

April

Our Children and Youth

Spousal Love

Natural Family Planning

Vocations

May

June

July

August

The Blessed Virgin Mary

St. Joseph, Spouse and Father

Familial Love

“May I?” “Thank you” “I’m Sorry”

September

October

November

December

Parents: The First Teachers of Faith

Respect Life

Communion of Saints

Domestic Church

If you have a story idea related to these topics, please contact us at news@fargodiocese.org or (701) 356-7900 to let us know about it.

NEW EARTH JANUARY 2015

31


NEW

EARTH

Catholic Diocese of Fargo 5201 Bishops Blvd, Ste. A Fargo, ND 58104

New Earth January 2015  

Magazine for the Catholic Diocese of Fargo

New Earth January 2015  

Magazine for the Catholic Diocese of Fargo