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JUNE-JULY 2019 ISSUE 111

FULL OF FLAVOUR KZN's national treasure

Distributed to the communities of Ballito, Durban North, Gateway, La Lucia, Mt Edgecombe, Prestondale, Somerset Park, uMdloti, uMhlali, uMhlanga Ridge, uMhlanga Rocks, Zimbali


MORE THAN SECURITY Marshall Security offers more than just security. We offer a genuine commitment to delivering unrivalled service to our customers and clients. From residential estates to retail centres and business parks, we are always on guard, so that you don’t have to be. Marshall Security is now offering comprehensive and compliant security services to the north Durban area.

GUARDING 086 133 3031 | www.marshallsecurity.co.za Marshall Security is a BEE compliant, level 1 rated company. Our industry accreditations include:


*ed's letter

LEFT: Making a difference and combating plastic pollution.

MID-YEAR ALREADY?

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here’s a distinct fresh nip in the air, a reminder that not only is winter fast approaching, but that we’re almost halfway through this year. With only weeks to go we’ll be on the downhill slide to the festive season once again. It seems like just the other day we started 2019 with renewed energy and great ideas. The energy is still there, the ideas keep me awake at night, but where has the time gone? This time of year is also significant for all matrics out there. With 12 years of hard work behind them the finish line is coming into focus. After many hours of late-night studying, matric trials are around the corner ... then the finals ... and then it’s all over. But, it’s now – halfway through the year – that Grade 11’s need to give some serious thought to what happens after matric. Tertiary education is a

way to combat plastic pollution. And if you’re wanting ideas to save our oceans and our planet, turn to page 56. Plastic pollution is our problem – and it’s time we did something about it. Of course, this time of year is also a big money-spinner for our city, and especially uMhlanga. There’s the Vodacom Durban July, the Ballito Pro, the ECR House & Garden Show, Charlotte’s Web and the Magical Ice Festival for the children during the school holidays, and the sardines that may pop in on the way up the coast. Don’t forget, there’s also lots of glorious sunshine, and when you need a hearty meal that’s warm and inviting, try our cover dish from Erica Platter’s latest book, Durban Curry Up2Date. Find more great recipes on page 18. Enjoy the holidays, and see you next time.

ABOVE: The Marks family on one of their adventures. More on page 14. must-have these days, but with limited career opportunities, it’s no surprise that school leavers don’t know what career path they want to follow. Guidance and advice differs for each child. For parents wanting a quick overview, turn to page 25. The Marks family from uMhlanga have adopted a very different stance on educating their children – one that many people could raise their eyebrows at – but they have their reasons and it’s certainly working well for them. Explore their nomadic

lifestyle on page 14. Plastic litter. Two words we hear often these days. After the recent heavy rains we experienced, our beaches looked a sorry sight – with litter (much of it plastic bottles) piled high as far as the eye could see. Fortunately, we have some dedicated people in Durban who are doing their bit to clean up beaches, rivers and our port. We salute you. Read more about them on page 40, followed by the women from the Magic Bean Foundation (page 44) who have found a creative

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TALK TO US

Elorna.king@famouspublishing.co.za www.theridgeonline.co.za WRidge Magazine 1


in this issue*

GROUP EDITOR Doody Adams EDITOR Lorna King DESIGNER Kyle Griffin SALES CONSULTANT Lynda Kapsimalis (082 379 9912) DISTRIBUTION Mphumzeni Thusi Enquiries: sumayia.khan@famouspublishing.co.za ACCOUNTS Sumayia Khan CONTRIBUTORS Doody Adams, Katrine Anker-Nilssen, Greg Ardé, Gareth Bailey, Candice Botha, Tony Carnie, Cathy Clark, Roger Collins, Lee Currie, Glynis Horning, Jeremy Nell, Debbie Reynolds, Stephen Smith Copyright: All material in this issue is subject to copyright and belongs to Famous Publishing unless otherwise indicated. No part of the material may be quoted, photocopied, reproduced or stored by an electronic system without prior written permission from Famous Publishing. Disclaimer: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publication, neither the authors nor the publisher will bear any responsibility for the consequences of any actions based on information contained herein. Neither do they endorse any products/services advertised herein. Material which appears under ‘Advertorial’ is paid for. *To the people of uMhlanga, La Lucia, Zimbali, Mount Edgecombe, Ballito, Gateway, La Lucia Mall, the Crescent, the office parks, the residential estates and, of course, all our advertisers, thank you for your continued support

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A PALACE LIKE NO OTHER

COMMUNITY MAKING LIFE HAPPEN

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SO MUCH OF FLAVOUR

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BIDDING FOR SOUTH AFRICA

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WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS

25

CLARITY IN GIVING BACK

28

The latest Durban curry book is hot! Springbok Bridge Team

Making the right choice in career

Helping companies donate to the needy

MORE THAN SKIN DEEP COASTAL PARADISE

36

Exclusive food choices on our doorstep

GRANADA SQUARE

38

Update on improvements

SAVE OUR BEACHES

40

Litter is our problem WE ALSO PUBLISH ...

THE MAGIC OF PLARN

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44

Local women combatting plastic pollution

MR JULY

46

62

What you need to know if investing

LIFESTYLE SHINE THIS JULY

48

Vodacom Durban July fashion

52

Making the most of a small space

58

The Oxpecker Trail Run

WORTH RAVING ABOUT 32

Sibaya Coastal Precinct – the future

A FOODIE EXPERIENCE

PROPERTY TRENDS

THIS IS THE LIFE 30

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Especially for lovers of gin

SMALL WONDER

Busi Gumede’s health and skin range

The ABC logo is a valued seal of trust, providing measurement, compliance and auditing services which protects the way advertising is traded. The Ridge is ABC audited and certified.

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32 A family who are making the most of life

Published by Famous Publishing, 52 Mahogany Road, Mahogany Ridge, Westmead, Durban, 3610. 031 714 4700 www.famouspublishing.co.za Printed by Novus Print KwaZulu-Natal Managed distribution by Vibrant Direct

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A car for the adventurous

REGULARS ED’S LETTER TAKE NOTE SEEN AROUND TRENDING LAST WORD

1 4 10 56 64

ADVERTORIALS MARIS STELLA 13 PEARSONS INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION 26

The man behind the Vodacom Durban July

* ON THE COVER: Curries galore from Durban Curry Up2Date. Picture: Clinton Friedman w w w . t h e r i d g e o n l i n e . c o . z a


P R I V A T E

E S T A T E

RAINMAKER 03|19

The depictions herein are for illustration purposes only and are subject to change without prior notice.

S I BAYA

cabanas and villas from R3.9 million Just 5 minutes north of Umhlanga, Balize Private Estate is the first luxury estate in the sought-after Sibaya Coastal Precinct with ocean views from every home. Offering smart-ready 2, 3 and 4-bedroom luxury freestanding Villas, Cabanas and Penthouses, Balize Private Estate is designed to inspire a resort-living feel with highest-quality finishes, generous outdoor living and an ocean-front lifestyle.

The depictions herein are for illustration purposes only and are subject to change without prior notice.

The depictions herein are for illustration purposes only and are subject to change without prior notice.

Contact our Development Consultants to set up your on-site appointment and experience the most exceptional views on the KwaZulu-Natal North Coast.

u m h l a ng a umdloti

John Robinson: 083 410 1536 | Charlene Anamourlis: 083 262 2200

087 095 2 7 4 4 The depictions herein are for illustration purposes only and are subject to change without prior notice.

b aliz e. co. z a

in f o@ b aliz e. co . z a


take note*

ou Keeping yp in the loo Congrats Pam Golding The Pam Golding North Durban Franchise recently scooped the National Franchise of the Year award at Pam Golding’s prestigious annual awards conference held in Istanbul, Turkey. Carol Reynolds and Gareth Bailey, who head up the franchise, were also awarded the National Franchisee of the Year Award. It is the first time in over a decade that this recognition has been awarded to a franchise located outside of the Western Cape and this bears testimony to both the performance of the franchise team as well as the growing confidence in the KZN North Durban property market.

ABOVE: Carol Reynolds, Andrew Golding, Chief Executive Pam Golding Property Group, and Gareth Bailey.

Mo‘t & Chandon Grand Day June 22, Beverly Hills Hotel: This global party sees 80 countries worldwide uniting in a champagne celebration bringing together over a million people from Hong Kong to Lagos and uMhlanga to Montreal, for 24 hours, one Grand Day. Friends and guests of the Champagne House gather around the globe to raise their champagne glasses in a toast to the memorable moments that bring joy to their lives.  031 561 2211

Charlotte's Web June 13-July 7, Elizabeth Sneddon Theatre: This charming children’s story comes to vivid life in Greg King’s enchanting stage adaptation. It tells the tale of Wilbur, a prize-winning piglet and his unique friendship with an extraordinary spider, named Charlotte. This is heart-warming family entertainment that is perfect for the July holidays. Tickets

Holiday Fun For The Kids Magical Ice Festival July 3-7, Durban ICC Arena: Get ready to enter a world of enchantment featuring the most magical moments from across the kingdom in Disney On Ice. Join a host of unforgettable Disney characters from Frozen, The Little Mermaid, Tangled, and Beauty and the Beast.  www.icc.co.za/event/

cost from R120-R180 for adults; R100-R160 for children, students and pensioners.

disney-on-ice-2019/

Know Your Numbers

HANDY PHONE NUMBERS FOR USEFUL SERVICES IN YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD 4

 NORTH DURBAN VICTIM SUPPORT SERVICES: (formerly Durban North/Umhlanga Crisis Team). Trauma debriefing: 066 483 8589  NO WATER? SIZA WATER: 032 946 7200

 POISON INFORMATION 24-HOUR HELPLINE: (includes medication, toxic substances snake and spider bites): 0861 555 777  POWER FAILURE: 032 437 5081

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*take note Two For Brides Getting married? If it’s wedding dress designs, caterers, venues, photographers or the many other finer details essential for planning the perfect wedding you're after, here are two events not to miss. The Wedding Expo August 3 & 4, Sibaya Sun Park: Find everything you need to plan your perfect wedding.  www.suninternational.com/sibaya/

events/the-wedding-expo-durban/ Exclusive Bridal Fair July 14, Makaranga, Kloof: SA Bridal Fair hosts a number of one-day bridal information events at exclusive wedding venues throughout SA.  www.sabridalfairs.co.za

BEST KEPT SECRET Making A Statement The La Conch jewellery and lifestyle brand was founded by Mount Edgecombe’s Mel Jerome out of her passion for creativity and love of the ocean. Inspired by exotic islands and the natural beauty of Africa,

 TO REPORT INJURED MONKEYS: Monkey Helpline: 082 659 4711/082 411 5444  CONCERNS ABOUT TREATMENT OF ANIMALS – SPCA: 031 579 6500

each piece embodies an elegant yet laid back island style. The collection is made up of pieces sourced from around the world as well as those created and designed by Mel.

@la_conchs

 TO REPORT POTHOLES AND BURST WATER PIPES: 080 131 3013  SNAKE CATCHERS: Jason Arnold 082 745 6375, Neville Wolmarans 082 561 4969

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 TO REMOVE BEES: Honey Bee Removals: 084 594 1122  WHALES AND DOLPHINS (beached and well as entangled in shark nets). Sharks Board: 031 566 0400

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take note*

ou Keeping yp in the loo Dreaming Big In Monaco

It was with great pride that the LIV Village (Lungisisa Indlela Village) U12 rugby team last month stepped into the Stade Louis Stadium – home of AS Monaco Football Club – to play their first game in the Monaco Sainte Devote Sevens Tournament. Earlier this year the team had been invited to participate in this prestigious tournament. With no funds available, Unitrade Management Services as well as long-term

ed's choice

partners, LIV Clean, sponsored the trip, while Corogains Sports ensured the team looked the part by sponsoring their jerseys. “Our boys were treated like royalty everywhere they went,” said LIV CEO Chester Koyana, who, together with coach Menzi Ngidi and LIV founder, Tich Smith, accompanied the boys on the trip. Their first match in the tournament was their second ever official match, and regardless of the results, the boys showed incredible maturity and sportsmanship. One of the highlights of the week for the boys was meeting Princess Charlene, who posed in a team photo with the boys. LIV exists to raise future leaders of our nation and aims to provide opportunities for all of the children in their care to shine. To find out more about the work that LIV Village does, go to  www.liv-village.com E contact info@liv-village.com.

Fancy A Glass Of Seaward? Spier has spent the last two years developing a unique duo of wines that pay homage to the benefits of growing grapes along the coast. The aptly titled Seaward range is comprised of a sophisticated, lightlywooded Chardonnay and a layered, spicy Shiraz. The Spier Seaward Chardonnay 2018: Made with grapes sourced from the Tygerberg Hills, this lightly-wooded wine has aromas of ruby grapefruit, mango, citrus with undertones of raw almonds. The creamy palate offers fresh citrus and nectarine notes with well-integrated vanilla on the finish. Enjoy with pork chops, roast chicken, creamy mushroom pasta – and, of course, seafood. The Spier Seaward Shiraz 2017: High-quality Shiraz grapes were selected from Darling, Durbanville and the southern side of Stellenbosch for this wine, which has beautifully layered aromas of mulberry, violets and plum supported by infused allspice. Enjoy with your favourite cut of grilled red meat and root vegetables or a vegetarian moussaka. The Seaward range will be available in stores from July.

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Ladies Lunch: Durban Curry Up2Date June 27, Beverly Hills Hotel: Enjoy a three-course lunch inspired from Erica Platter and Clinton Friedman’s second curry book, Durban Curry Up2Date. Costs R625.  031 561 2211

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*take note

JUNE IS AVO MONTH Awesome Avos As the World Avocado Organisation (WAO) celebrates World Avocado Month this June, South Africans are no strangers to this buttery delight. Avos have long been our go-to ingredient to zhoosh up salads, sarmies and savoury favourites like burgers and pizzas. Going into winter, there are still tons of ways to add an avo to your dish of the day. Try warm salads like roasted veggies, feta and avo; roast chicken, green leaves and avo; or grilled tomatoes, bacon and avo with salad greens and garlic croutons. Love your winter soups? Why not give warm avo soup a bash? But don’t forget ... add a dash of chipotle or chilli to bring out that avo deliciousness. Here’s one of our favourites this winter: Pasta With Avocado & Salmon Serves: 4 Ingredients: 350g dried pasta; avocado oil; 2 ripe avocados; lemon juice; fresh dill or basil, chopped; 400g smoked salmon ribbons; 200g crème fraiche or reduced fat cream. To prepare: Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. Add pasta, cook until al dente, about 7 minutes. Drain, toss with a few teaspoons of avo oil and set aside. Cut avos into small cubes, toss gently in a bowl with lemon juice and herbs. Cut salmon into bite-sized cubes. Gently stir the crème fraiche through the drained pasta. Carefully fold in the avo mixture and salmon. Serve in warmed bowls and garnish with sprigs of fresh herbs.  www.avocado.co.za for more awesome recipes Follow T @Iloveavos; @iloveavossa

The Durban SPAR Women's 10/5km Race June 23, Jonsson Kings Park: Celebrating its 30th birthday, South Africa's most beautiful race comes to Durban.  www.sparwomensrace.

co.za/durban/

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The Ballito Pro 2019 June 27-July 7, Willard Beach, Ballito: The world’s longest running professional surfing event will see the world’s top surfers compete at Willard Beach. Beach and extreme sports, culinary contests as well as quality retail and food stalls will captivate visitors to this coastal holiday highlight.  www.theballitopro.com

ECR House & Garden Show June 28-July 7, Durban Exhibition Centre: KZN’s premier home and garden show highlighting inspirational and innovative home decorating ideas for inside as well as outside your home.  www.housegardenshow.co.za

The Ultimate Food & Motor Show August 9-11, 10am-10pm, Durban Exhibition Centre: Whether you are a food fanatic or a car enthusiast, the Ultimate Food & Motor Show has something for you. Experience dining at Durban’s famous pop-up restaurants, indulge in the local street food and browse the latest vintage wheels and accessories available on the South African market. There’s fun, entertainment, activities and specials for the whole family. Tickets can be bought at the gate. n 074 656 0649  www.ufmshow.co.za

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take note*

ou Keeping yp in the loo

Jailed For The Love Of Dogs Last month saw the incarceration of Leigh Corbett, her “cellmate” Georgia Mackay and two of Leigh’s dogs. It was a cold winter’s night but they stayed put until they were able to raise bail. Leigh, who lives in uMhlanga, recalls the 24 hours she spent in a “dog box” as part of a fund-raising initiative for the Kloof and Highway SPCA. “The dog boxes in which the participants were ‘incarcerated’ are the socialisation kennels at the SPCA. There were over 40 participants occupying 24 kennels. My kennel partner was Georgia Mackay, my daughter’s friend, and as moggy about

nd 1 s a0 160 ff i tar 94 or 031 f s n ll u tio Ca rma o inf

dogs as I am. The kennels are slightly more spacious than the average kennel but kennels nevertheless – concrete floors with mesh wire walls and a small covered area with not much privacy.” Each participant decorated their own space, Leigh and Georgia having chosen Orange Is The New Black as the theme. “It was basically like camping. I didn’t really feel uncomfortable although my back was a little creakier than usual after sharing a narrow stretcher and equally narrow sleeping bag with two dogs. Being pinned in the same position all night didn’t help – and my nose was really, really cold. But if you’re doing

something you love, it’s easy. The ‘resident’ dogs barking in the adjacent kennels all night was distressing. Their anguish and anxiety at being locked up was tangible.” The participants were expected to raise R10 000 each to secure their release from “jail”, but at the time of going to press Leigh had raised an impressive R30 000 from sponsorships and donations which were still trickling in. Various Mutt Merchandise items were also sold at the event, and to date, funds raised collectively look like they will supersede the SPCA’s target of R240 000. “This may sound like a large sum of money, but when you consider that the running

ABOVE: Leigh, right, and cellmate Georgia. ABOVE LEFT: Georgia in her decorated cell – Orange Is The New Black. costs are more than a R1-million a month, it’s quite sobering.” Leigh’s message: “The work I am doing is nothing by comparison to the work of those on the coalface. They tirelessly help, bursting at the seams with animals despite limited funding. The SPCA and the many dog rescue organisations that are mushrooming throughout KZN need our support. Please adopt, don’t shop. Or if you can’t adopt there are other ways – foster, sponsor, educate or donate.”

– Lee Currie  www.facebook.com/ events/412325049502014/

Somerset Lodge CARE CENTRE

ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY OF EXCELLENCE, OFFERING DIGNITY-BASED AND INDIVIDUAL CARE FOR OUR RESIDENTS Somerset Valley Estate – in close proximity to excellent uMhlanga hospitals and shopping centres Somerset Lodge offers strict, but discreet, security arrangements, with well laid out gardens and lovely furnishings Short-term stays are welcome, subject to availability Visit our website for a virtual tour

www.somersetcarecentre.co.za


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PUBLISHING.CO.ZA

Employment Law Seminar The Employment Law Department of Garlicke & Bousfield Inc hosted a breakfast seminar where alternatives to retrenchment and decriminalising cannibis in the workplace were discussed.

 Awasti Maharaj, Cameron Wilson, Jessica Fisher-Moore and Sanelisiwe Nyasulu.  Chuma Vabaza and Advocate Menzi Mtshali.  Chuma Vabaza, Raymond Meneses and Bongani Mgaga.

Maris Stella Turns 120 Students, Old Girls, parents and teachers turned out to celebrate the 120th birthday of Maris Stella recently – a proud moment for all those involved.

 Bea Hopkinson, Joan Schmidt and Pauline Rosseau.  Joan Schmidt and Noxolo Mlambo.

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*take note

Ballito Pro 2019 Launch At a recent launch of the 2019 world-famous Ballito Pro taking place from June 27 to July 7, it was announced that American sports’ commentator, sportsman and musician, Sal Masekela – son of legendary jazz musician Hugh Masekela – will be this year’s event ambassador.

Paul Canning, Luellen and Graham Smith and Pierre Tostee. Mike Frew, Beyrick De Vries and Tom Hewitt. Dolly Govender, Colin Fitch, Beyrick De Vries and Bongani Xulu.


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PUBLISHING.CO.ZA

Renishaw Hills High Tea Renishaw Hills, the mature lifestyle estate on the KwaZulu-Natal South Coast, opened up its beautifully landscaped indigenous garden to the public for a high tea recently. Guests enjoyed the scenic ocean views, vibrant birdlife and butterflies while sipping on refreshing craft gins and listening to live musical performances. Pictures: Keran Jaap

Michelle Stent-Wardell, Portia Malunga-Rowling and Leith and Marcel Kwaan. Leonie Sansom, Jane Smith and Glenda Currie. Anthony and Sharmaine Ackermann.

Russel Peters Shines At The Globe Comedy superstar Russell Peters returned to South Africa as part of his brand new Deported World Tour, bringing with him his unique and sometimes controversial brand of humour.

Greg Anthony and Sasha Pillay. Avinaash Maharaj, Avesh Singh, Kajol Sewgobind and Araan Gosai. Marco Conte, Bianca Caldwell and Phillip Magua.

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*advertorial

As we celebrate Maris Stella’s 120th birthday this year, it’s clear that if Maris Stella girls are a reflection of what the future holds, then we can certainly look forward to some bright days ahead

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n May 22, 2019, Maris Stella celebrated their 120th birthday, commemorating the group of brave Sisters who had the vision and faith to travel from France to Durban to answer the need for the development of schools for girls in South Africa. In a beautiful birthday mass, Cardinal Napier reminded the girls, staff, parents, old girls and friends of Maris Stella, that they have so much to be grateful for as they celebrated the courage and grace of all those who have gone before them. Today, Maris Stella focuses on the holistic development of the girls from Grade 000 to Matric, educating academically, morally,

CELEBRATE THE SPIRIT spiritually, as well as physically. Their strong school spirit and family involvement makes it a caring, happy place for girls to grow and learn. They encourage service to the wider community which is evidenced in the many outreach projects they support. “At Maris Stella, we do not believe in moulding young minds,” says Principal Mrs Joan Schmidt. “That is not our job. We believe in empowering our girls with the right tools to find their own paths, to become the people they were meant to be. We get to witness this amazing transformation, and this makes teaching so rewarding. J U N E - J U L Y

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“The day-to-day acts of kindness and generosity we witness in the classrooms; the camaraderie and spirit they display on the sports’ fields; the poise, passion and intelligence with which they address the outside world – and that indelible spirit of determination that sees them take on every challenge with grace and maturity. They are an inspiration to us all,” continues Mrs Schmidt. Dana Osborn, former Head Girl, shared her thoughts when she addressed the school. “Why has Maris Stella continued to thrive through the years? To answer this, we have to understand the base on which the school was built. After the official opening in 1899, the Sisters worked to create not only a school, but a sanctuary, a home, supported by its strong family values and Catholic ethos, which are still evident today. This, I truly believe has, and will continue to, provide its students with faith and confidence for their future. “Look around you, at the girls sitting next to you … the future lawyers, politicians, chefs, teachers, accountants, the future artists of the world. With the base that Maris Stella has provided, my hope is that it will continue to grow for many more years, continuing to teach girls the power of love that they hold, and my hope for you is that you go out and become the beautiful strong women you are, that you continue to spread the values of Maris Stella through your words and through your actions. Because it would be a bright future if it was in the hands of Maris Stella girls.”

To arrange a school tour, please contact E ms@marisstella.co.za, or visit their website  www.marisstella.co.za

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profile*

MAKING LIFE HAPPEN

Believing that life doesn’t come with a manual, the Marks family have chosen to let whim determine their unconventional journey, writes Debbie Reynolds

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’d heard about a “nomadic” family who had recently settled in uMhlanga, but when I call Daniel Marks, he’s in Australia. “Sorry, I can’t talk now. We’re looking at the moon and catching fish on the Great Barrier Reef,” he says. “You can catch me back in South Africa next month.” I finally meet Daniel, his wife Samantha

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and sons Gal (11) and Kai (eight) at their apartment overlooking the uMhlanga lighthouse. While they all talk to me in English, they chat to each other in either Hebrew or Portuguese. “We’re not being rude, it’s just the way we communicate so the boys can learn our home languages,” says Daniel. Born in Joburg, Daniel grew up in Israel

before moving to London. It was here in 1999 that he met Brazilian Samantha, who had come to the city to study English. “I was only meant to be there for three months, but when I met Daniel everything changed,” she laughs. “We discovered we had the same interests and shared the travel bug.” Their first big trip was a year later to Africa. “We started in South Africa and

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LEFT: Gal, left, and Kai in Petra, Jordan. BELOW LEFT: The family with their faithful Landcruiser in Ovamboland, northern Namibia. BELOW: Daniel and Samantha Marks in their uMhlanga apartment with their sons Gal, left, and Kai. Picture: Debbie Reynolds

then drove to Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Zambia,” says Daniel. “We fell in love with Africa and knew we would be back some day.” They lived and worked in London for 10 years, taking every opportunity they could to travel around Europe, Asia and South America. Gal was born there and took his first trip

to Brazil at the tender age of two months. He was still a toddler when they decided to pack everyone – including their Labrador – into a camper van and drive through Europe to Israel. “We wanted to get away from the city life, but I also wanted to learn about my husband’s culture,” says Samantha. “Unfortunately, we were not allowed to enter Israel then, so we had to go back

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to London.” After selling their camper van to a castle in France, the family sorted out their papers and flew to Tel Aviv where they settled down, worked “really hard” and welcomed Kai into their life. It was here that they began forming their idea of what they call “unschooling”. “We bought into the concept that formal

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profile* RIGHT: Enjoying the beauty of the Fish River Canyon, Namibia. BELOW: The Marks family in Moremi, Botswana. BOTTOM: Daniel and the boys at a market in Tel Aviv, Israel.

education kills creativity,” says Daniel. “We believe more in education through travel and real-life experiences than learning from sterile textbooks.” Four years ago, when Gal was seven and Kai four, they decided being stuck in one place was not ideal. “We sold everything, and because we

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didn’t have a lot of money we chose to come to South Africa,” says Daniel. “It was easy because I had the passport and we loved it so much on our previous visit. With just four backpacks each we set off and landed in uMdloti in July 2015 – mostly because we wanted good weather, a surfing village and somewhere that was safe.” Two months later they were back in Israel, visited Brazil and then returned to SA, this time to uMhlanga where the boys could enjoy playing sports and interacting with other kids. “We found our little bubble in this seafront apartment in uMhlanga,” says Samantha. “We love the view, the village feel, the amazing people and how easy it is for our boys to do the things they love.” Gal is into lifesaving, swimming, surfing, boxing, waterpolo, running, chess and music, while Kai enjoys boxing, swimming, running, chess and hockey. Daniel baulks at defining the boys’ education as home schooling. “We believe education is about what makes a kid happy rather than turning them into what you want them to be. “Gal and Kai are different from Tom and Harry so how can they fit into the same system? Rather they should be educating themselves about the things that are significant in their lives.”

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LEFT: Daniel and Samantha skiing in Sierra Nevada, Spain.

While Kai has currently chosen to be at Ocean View Montessori school to get a “solid grounding”, Gal is enjoying Daniel’s “unschooling”. Their days have

“An example of how we work is if, for instance, Gal was interested in a particular surfer, we would find out more about where he’s from and its geography and history.”

We believe more in education through travel and real-life experiences than learning from sterile textbooks a flexible structure which usually starts at 5am with an activity like running, surfing or swimming (or just cuddling in bed if they feel like it) and then time at home studying, before afternoon extra-murals.

He says it’s about asking questions and finding the answers. Not negotiable is eventually being able to read and write in English, Hebrew and Portuguese. “We learn from reading books and online

stuff,” says Gal. “I also love maths and am currently doing Grade 10 exams, but I’m not very good at drawing.” Which is where Samantha steps in to teach the boys an appreciation of art, her home language of Portuguese, and cooking. “She also teaches them how to be kind,” smiles Daniel. “We want to grow up with our kids as opposed to bringing them up.” The boys tell me how much they love travelling, especially when their parents pack them into the Landcruiser for adventures across Africa, including recently Mozambique, Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. “This is one of the most beautiful countries in the world and we love the wildlife,” says Gal. The family is planning a trip to Rwanda soon and then will see where fancy takes them. “As long as we have internet we can work and therefore live anywhere,” says Daniel. “I work for a finance company and Samantha for a marketing company, but both our jobs are very flexible. “For us home is where we are together, so that could be anywhere in the world.”

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BRINGING YOU EVERY FLAVOUR OF THE WORLD IN THE CONVENIENCE OF ONE STORE Whether you’re a cooking expert or a first-timer, come see, smell and taste what the Gorima’s experience is all about. The journey to your table begins here. STORE NOW OPEN IN BALLITO GORIMA’S BALLITO, 032 586 2175 Shop 424, Middle Level, Ballito Junction Mall, Ballito


cover story*

SO MUCH OF

FLAVOUR

Durban Curry Up2Date screams flavour and features delicious winter-warming curries to satisfy all tastebuds, writes Katrine Anker-Nilssen

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chooled reporter, writer, editor and creator of mad book ideas, Erica Platter, together with photographer and designer, Clinton Friedman, have just released their second Durban curry book. “This is the fifth we have made together,” says Erica. “Except for My Kind of Wine with John Platter, all the books have been a collaboration with the cooks and chefs, farmers, fishermen and

food people of KZN; a celebration of local produce and dishes.” “The first book, East Coast Tables, was born when “retiring” to my home province and concerned friends from the Cape and Joburg promptly began to send food parcels, so worried were they at the absence of cuisine in these parts,” laughs Erica. “But the jewel in our crown is of course Durban Curry, So Much of Flavour. The sales, popular and critical success of this book led to three reprints.”

We are proud to publish this, our second homage to the people, places and no-longer-secret recipes which tell the Durban curry story 18

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SHEILA'S SUGAR BEAN AND AMADUMBE BUNNIES 500ml sugar beans soaked overnight in cold water; 60ml oil; 2ml each cumin, caraway and mustard seeds; 2 sticks cinnamon; 1 onion, chopped; 2 sprigs curry leaves; 7,5ml chilli powder; 2,5ml turmeric powder; 5ml coriander powder; 5ml cumin powder; 2 green chillies; 10ml ginger/garlic paste; 2 tomatoes, chopped; 4 medium amadumbe, peeled, diced; salt to taste; 60ml oil; 750ml water; chopped coriander

CURRY LAMBURGER WITH SIMPLE SPICY RED DURBAN SAUCE 750g lamb mince; ½ red onion, finely chopped; 2 red chillies, deveined, deseeded, chopped; 1 handful fresh dhania and/or mint, chopped; 1 fat clove garlic, grated; 1 thumb ginger, grated; 1 Tbsp tamarind paste; 1 tsp honey; 1 tsp mixed salt, pepper

• Mix all ingredients well.

Shape into patties. Put on a tray in the fridge for about 30 minutes to firm up. Heat and lightly oil braai or ridged pan. Cook patties on both sides until grill marks appear, but lamb remains slightly pink inside.

• Drain beans and boil in fresh water until finger soft. Drain. Heat oil in a heavy-based pot, add whole spices and cinnamon, fry for a few seconds. Add onion and curry leaves, fry until golden. Add ground spices, green chillies, ginger-garlic and tomatoes, cook for a minute. Add amadumbe. Stir and cook till half done. Add sugar beans and salt. Stir, cover, cook for 2 minutes. Add water, simmer until gravy is thick. Sprinkle with chopped coriander. Serve with a chopped cucumber and tomato sambal.

Simple Spicy Red Durban Sauce 3 Tbsp oil; 1 onion, chopped; 1 tsp each mustard and cumin seeds; 1 Tbsp grated garlic; ½ tsp turmeric; 1 tsp dhania-jeera powder; 1 tin (410g) Indian-style diced, peeled tomatoes; 1 Tbsp tamarind paste; 1 Tbsp honey; salt, pepper

• Braise onion, seeds and garlic in oil until seeds start popping. Add remaining ingredients. Stir well. Bring to a simmer. Cook for about 20 minutes over low heat. Adjust seasoning.

The food-story book approach Erica and Clinton take is much appreciated. “We don’t do recipe books, we are not chefs,” says Erica. “Though Clinton does fancy himself as a bit of a fish cook, and I’m OK at mayo,” she laughs. “The thing is, you don’t have to gloss up a Durban curry. It comes with its own glistening oil slick. You don’t have to pump up the colours, they’re naturally there. And you don’t struggle to get their makers to relax: they are proud of what they’ve

cooked, appreciate that we are interested and enjoy explaining. They and their stories are the distinguishing feature of our books.” With the first book long sold out came the decision to publish a sequel, entitled Durban Curry Up2Date, not only for the obvious reason, but because it’s a play on the official name of the potatoes sold by their millions to Durban curry cooks, namely UTD or Up To Date potatoes – which cook

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cover story* MALINDI'S FASTFOOD CHICKPEA & POTATO CURRY WITH CASHEW CREAM 2 Tbsp olive oil; 1 medium white onion, chopped; 1 Tbsp ground cumin; 1 Tbsp garlic, grated; 2 Tbsp ginger, minced; 2 green chillies, de-seeded, sliced; 1 Tbsp ground coriander; 1 Tbsp chilli powder; 1 tsp ground turmeric; 1 tin finely diced tomatoes; 2 potatoes, roughly chopped into 3cm cubes; 2 cups cooked chickpeas; 1 cup water; salt if needed; 2-3 tsp coconut sugar (or brown); 2 tsp garam masala

Cashew Cream 1 cup raw cashew nuts, soaked for at least 4 hours, drained; ½ cup water; ¼ teaspoon salt; 1 tsp freshlysqueezed lemon juice

• Place all ingredients in blender or food processor. Whizz until completely smooth, stopping to scrape down the bowl every now and then. Add extra water if needed to reach the consistency of thick cream. Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days. NANDU: SHAMEN'S CRAB CURRY 75ml oil; 2 tsp mustard seeds; 1 onion, chopped; 6-8 curry leaves; 3-4 green chillies, slit; 2 Tbsp grated ginger and garlic; ¼ tsp turmeric; 3 Tbsp fish masala; 6-8 jam tomatoes, crushed; 4 Tbsp tamarind paste; salt; 1 kg extra-large crab, cleaned, segmented; handful of dhania leaves, chopped

• Heat oil in a large pot over a medium heat. Add onion and cumin, cook gently. In a mortar and pestle or food processor grind the garlic, ginger and green chillies into a rough paste. Add paste to onion-cumin mixture. Add coriander, chilli powder and turmeric, stir to coat onions well. Add tomatoes, potatoes, chickpeas and water. Cook for about 20 minutes or until potatoes are perfectly tender and curry gravy has thickened. Season to taste with salt and coconut sugar. Remove from the heat, stir in garam masala. Serve with sweet potato roti.

• Heat oil in a pot. Add

mustard seeds, cook until they pop. Add onion and curry leaves. Braise until light gold in colour. Add chillies, gingergarlic, stir well. Add turmeric, masala and tomatoes, stir well. Add tamarind and taste for seasoning. You may want a pinch of salt. Braise for 5 minutes. Add crab pieces. Cook for 10-15 minutes. Scatter with dhania just before serving.

more meltingly than any other variety. “The Durban curry is a constantly evolving and changing dish – that is its essence and explains why it changed from an Indian to a thoroughly South African dish,” says Erica. Introducing modern influences, more plant-based ideas, quicker-easier tricks, and more cheffy inspirations, Durban Curry Up2Date goes fine dining.

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“The best part is not the awards or the sales, but how affectionately we have been welcomed into the Durban curry community. No one has ever refused us a recipe. The cooks and chefs are as proud of our national treasure of a dish as we are.” *Durban Curry Up2Date is available in stores, Gorima’s and other spice and gift shops from mid-June, or online at  durbancurry.co  

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*


TICKETS AVAILABLE ON

The Ridge Magazine Print Ready.indd 1

2019/06/05 16:53


advertorial*

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ales for 28 premium family homes, part of the Palm Swift development, have just opened. As one of the last sectional title developments in Brettenwood Coastal Estate, Palm Swift is an unmissable opportunity for those looking to be a part of the exclusive estate. Although strategically placed within a short distance of Ballito and uMhlanga, Brettenwood itself – situated within Sheffield Beach’s lush rolling hills – remains a coastal haven. Expansive sea and forest vistas along with stylish amenities and facilities makes Brettenwood a prestigious and modern lifestyle estate where families can grow and live in luxury and tranquillity. Palm Swift offers homes priced from R2,6-million for a two bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom; and R2,9-million for a three bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom. Homes are expertly designed to give homeowners a comfortable living space while making the most of the indigenous landscape. Set in the magnificent Falcon Crescent, the family-focused homes are pet-friendly – a rarity in estates – have an exclusive-use garden and are designed with modern amenities in mind. Outdoor living is at the centre of these stylish homes, each boasting a covered terrace. Other features include an open plan living space with a centre island, a double volume staircase and covered parking and storage. Located inside the luxury residential community of

INTRODUCING PALM SWIFT Affordable luxury family homes in the coastal haven of Brettenwood Brettenwood Coastal Estate, Palm Swift homeowners will have access to the estate’s facilities – including a clubhouse and restaurant, kids play area, gym, waterslides, bird and wildlife, and many wild spaces and walkways. Amenities have been built for families with children, nature lovers, individuals who enjoy an active lifestyle, and those searching for peace and calm. Residents’ safety and security are continuously prioritised, with a number of highly successful preventative measures implemented to ensure the estate remains safe. With only 28 stylish homes available, potential homeowners are urged to secure their next home timelessly. Chat to Brettenwood’s trusted on-site estate agents, Home & Country Property, to find out more. n 082 789 6340 E info@brettenwood.co.za  www.brettenwood.co.za/palm-swift

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community*

LEFT: Tanya Rawson and her bridge partner Vanessa Armstrong.

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t’s late in May and Mount Edgecombe resident Tanya Rawson and her bridge partner Vanessa Armstrong are preparing to leave for Morocco to represent South Africa as part of the Springbok Bridge Team. Tanya explained how it all unfolded. “Springbok trials take place at the beginning of every year and Vanessa and I decided to enter this year. The top four (two pairs) won the trials, but we received a surprise phone call to say we had been selected as the third pair to travel to Morocco and compete in the Africa Zonal Championships. Vanessa and I have competed in many tournaments around South Africa, but never internationally – this is something we had only dreamt about.” There are six players in the ladies team – with the other four living in Gauteng. The men’s team also has six members, and both have a non-playing captain. Tanya plays two to three times a week at various clubs. “You can actually play bridge any day in Durban in clubs throughout the city. We also play

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countries, and our teammates will play against their teammates. We score up at the end of the session and a result against that particular country is achieved. “We are both nervous, excited and enormously honoured to be a part of the team representing South Africa. We’ve been training strenuously for the past five months. The Springbok coach, Tim Cope, lives in Cape Town so our team lessons

BIDDING FOR SOUTH AFRICA The term Springbok championships is usually associated with a sport like rugby or cricket. In this story it’s a more cerebral activity, writes Lee Currie a lot online. This is invaluable time wise – although nothing beats playing at a live table. “Neither of us has ever been to Morocco. The tournament takes place in Casablanca from June 9 to 14, and the playing regime is very strenuous, with four sessions a day (four of us compete in each session) commencing at 9am and finishing around 9pm. It’s a team event – Vanessa and I will play against another pair from one of the participating w w w . t h e r i d g e o n l i n e . c o . z a

have all taken place online with him, and we’ve also flown to Johannesburg for training weekends with Craig Gower, an outstanding Springbok player. We can only hope that all the hard work we’ve put in will pay off and we can hold our heads up high during this adventure!” With such a gruelling schedule, sightseeing is presumably not high on the agenda though Tanya said the ladies team were leaving four days earlier to spend time in Marrakesh. “We have a tour of the Atlas Mountains planned and a full day’s cooking course. And I believe the beaches are stunning!” It’s quite clear that Tanya is passionate about the game. “As Warren Buffett famously said: I wouldn’t mind being in prison if I had three cellmates who were decent players and were willing to keep the game going for 24 hours a day. I feel much the same way.” The top two countries go through to the World Bridge Team Championships to be held in Wuhan, China from September 14 to 28, 2019. Watch this space …

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*tertiary education

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on Stewart, American comedian, writer, producer, director, political commentator, actor, and television host, once quipped that he wants to look back on his career and be proud of the work he did, proud that he tried everything. Stewart was adaptable and prepared to take advantage of all the opportunities life offered him. Our current societal narrative forces our children to feel that they must know what they are going to do with the rest of their lives – long before they leave school. In fact, the whole point of the journey – from choosing subjects in Grade 9 until completing matric finals – is about deciding what you are going to be when you grow up. It is an odd obsession. But here, I believe, is the rub – most of these youngsters don’t know what there is to do once they have finished school, and even those pursuits they do know, they have no clue as to what that choice really involves. The new reality is that the world our children are going to go out into, will be unrecognisable from the one we grew up in. Our children spend so much time obsessing over what particular path to choose, that they forget to explore … they forget to learn about the world. Years down the line, they discover that life and their careers are not the linear journey they thought they were … or that we sold to them. And the sad reality is that most of our children will end up going down a career path doing

WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS There are very few teens in high school who know what career they want to do for the rest of their lives. Roger Collins, principal at NewBridge, offers some guidance something they had never even contemplated doing. Perhaps the point of our education is not to decide what to do with the rest of our lives, but rather to explore our options and prepare for exciting opportunities – opportunities that enable us

to find where we can best make a difference. Perhaps we need to stop chasing that piece of paper we view as the Holy Grail. Maybe there are alternatives we can investigate which will better prepare us for the world that is coming. So, what should we be

encouraging our children to do at school? They should be exploring their options and finding out about possible career choices. They should be talking to people who think differently about education, breaking through the old narrative. They should be finding out about tertiary education that will benefit them the most, asking questions and identifying institutions that resonate with them – institutions that go above and beyond the status quo. The first step is this: as your child identifies various options, make an application. This ensures a place is booked for your child and that they are building a small basket from which to make the best choice when the time comes to decide. The application process is not a commitment to study, but rather a way of securing possibilities. Remember, a final decision is only made at the end of Grade 12, and by this stage your child not only has their final results, but, more importantly, they will also be better informed. Once they are ready to decide on the start of their journey, they will then complete the registration (or enrolment) process, committing to their choice. If your child is one of the many youngsters who do not know what they want to do, don’t stress and don’t pressurise them – that is absolutely fine. There are plenty of options which will give them time to prepare for the world that awaits them – places that provide a platform for them to find where they can best make a difference.

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advertorial*

A HEAD START

IN LIFE

Ready to prepare young people for the world of work, Pearson Institute of Higher Education – a British owned education and publishing powerhouse – has opened in the heart of uMhlanga

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re you familiar with the X-kit study guides? How about Platinum textbooks? These Pearson education products are probably in your child’s backpack or classroom because Pearson has been part of the South African primary and secondary education journey for many

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years. Now, Pearson is excited to showcase their 12 private higher education institutions in South Africa, including a campus in uMhlanga. In South Africa, Pearson is home to Maskew Miller Longman and Heinemann, two of the best-known names in South African publishing, and leaders June 29, 10am, in the provision of print uMhlanga materials and CAPS Campus (left), who brings approved textbooks. with her a wealth of As part of the company’s experience from across the organic growth in the direct education sector, including NGO, delivery of learning, Pearson Basic Education and Higher South Africa has acquired the Education proficiency. Andrea Pearson Institute of Higher was Deputy CEO at the Central Education (PIHE) – formerly Applications Office (CAO), and known as Midrand Graduate Chief Operations Officer at Institute – and CTI Education Star Schools. Group. Today this group has “My target is to provide 12 campuses, over 8 000 students with accessible and students, and 35 different quality education in order nationalities represented across to contribute towards the South Africa. realisation of the National On our doorstep, the Development Plan for South uMhlanga campus is led by Africa,” says Andrea who lives education doyen Andrea Pratten

NEXT OPEN DAY

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in Durban with her family. Heading the uMhlanga campus sales department is Bronwyn Holmes. Bronwyn, who has worked in London at Pearson’s headquarters as well as on special projects for Pearson in New York and San Francisco, has extensive knowledge in education technology and innovation. “I want to improve lives through two avenues – as a Pearson employee and through my passion as a yoga instructor,” says Bronwyn. The Pearson institute


is committed to building successful communities through partnerships across the educational landscape – with ministries of education, academic and industry professionals. The uMhlanga campus plays host to full-time and part-time lecturers all of whom boast multiple post-graduate qualifications and are industry savvy. It is their “Real World Ready” ethos that has allowed the institute to make accessible to students professional visits from DVT, Derivco, Mr Price and Bowline Security – where some of their alumni now work. PIHE is also linked to professional bodies such as ACCA, CIMA and ICB. Conveniently located north of Gateway in New Town Centre, the campus is situated next to major transport links, restaurants, shops, gyms and yoga studios, and is a mere six-minute drive from the beautiful coastline and beaches of uMhlanga. The campus shuttle runs daily from the Durban city centre, with various pick-up points en route to campus. The campus offers: •A new building with two floors

of large, freshly painted lecture rooms, with lots of natural light. •A new-year and mid-year intake. •IT labs equipped with resources ideal for the bourgeoning techie professional. •All examinations are written on campus and the access controlled facilities are monitored by 24/7 camera surveillance and foot patrol. •Recreational activities include an outdoor games and seating area aptly named by their students as “The Turf” which hosts their student experience events every Tuesday. •On-site canteen serving tasty food at student-friendly prices. •A resource centre housing a wealth of books and computer stations. •An employability centre, ensuring soon-to-be graduates are taught job interview skills and how to network with prospective employees making them “Real World Ready”. H uMhlanga Campus, 1D uMhlanga

Boulevard, New Town Centre  031 941 3800 E durban@pearson.com  www.pearsoninstitute.ac.za

COURSES INCLUDE Commerce & Law: BCOM (General); BCOM (Accounting); BCOM (Law); Higher Certificate in Business Management. Humanities: Bachelor of Arts (English & Psychology), for those interested in teaching, psychology, speech therapy and communication-specific careers. Applied Sciences: Bachelor of Science in Information Technology; Higher Certificate in Information Systems Engineering; Higher Certificate in Information Systems Network Engineering; Higher Certificate in Information Systems Internet Development; Higher Certificate in Information Systems Software Development; Higher Certificate in Information Systems Cyber Security; Higher Certificate in Information Data Analytics; Higher Certificate in Information Cloud Computing; Higher Certificate in Information Machine Learning; Higher Certificate in Information Robotics. Short learning programmes for professionals.

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profile*

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any businesses may feel that while they would like to give back through social responsibility initiatives, they are often at a loss as to which of the seemingly countless organisations are in genuine need. Enter uMhlanga businessman Adam Oldfield and founder of Elevate, a SARS registered PBO (Public Benefit Organisation). He explains how Elevate works: “The concept originated when I took a senior role at Cousins Steel International. Our company receives a number of requests for donations and I wondered how they were being spent – hoping of course they were being distributed to worthwhile causes! I wanted to create a channel where businesses and individuals could donate and receive regular, transparent communication from an independently audited organisation on how funds were distributed. “In 2013 I was invited to attend author and speaker Robin Sharma’s Titan Summit in Toronto, Canada. After explaining the concept to him over dinner and sharing ideas, Elevate was born.” Elevate currently has eight partners – Care for Wild Rhino Sanctuary, LIV Village, CHOC, CANSA, Surfers Not Street Children, African Wildlife Vets, I Care, and Feed a Child. “The organisations give us a ‘needs list’, and through the donations we receive we meet their current needs. A hundred percent of donations are allocated, and only goods and services our partners actually need at the time,” says Adam. “We don’t give monetary

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CLARITY IN GIVING BACK uMhlanga businessman, Adam Oldfield, has come up with an initiative to help companies donate to the needy, writes Lee Currie

ABOVE: Adam Oldfield.

donations so funds are never allocated without cause.” From veterinary supplies to African Wildlife Vets, to kitchen appliances for Surfers Not Street Children’s clubhouse (who facilitate Yoga and Surf Clinics on Durban’s beachfront) all donations are physically processed. Elevate are currently collecting clothing for street children. “Being a new organisation,

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the initial set up and projects were all self-funded. The aim is to accumulate recurring donations from SMEs who don’t have the time and resources to actively run corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes. Elevate carries out the work for them and companies enjoy the benefit of a section 18a tax deductible certificate for their generous donations,” explains Adam. Adam, who is a civil and structural engineer, says he does everything except the accounting and auditing which are outsourced. “My sister, Danielle, is logged into the social media feeds to assist with responses. It’s really just time and resource management which running numerous building operations has shaped. “I have always enjoyed giving back and when I realised I had been blessed with so much, and had the tools and motivation to chase this dream I had to go for it. Through contacts I’ve made with business and friendships I knew there was enough support to build something wonderful that could help so many. All the partners are people I’ve personally met and engaged with and witnessed the work they do. All are established NGOs with wonderful, dedicated teams.”

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E friends@elevatebrand.org  www.elevatebrand.org @elevate_donations W facebook.com/elevatebrand


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profile*

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tatuesque, stylish, and glowing with good health, Busi Gumede leads the way into the kitchen of her elegant Durban North home. It was here, five years ago, that a very different Busi repaired, ill and exhausted, suffering from chronic constipation and haemorrhoids after the birth of her second child. “I was desperate to find a solution – and I knew if I succeeded, I’d be able to help other women who face the same problems after having babies.” Busi had a distinct advantage – a degree in nutrition from the University of KwaZuluNatal – but had strayed from that field over the years. After graduating and a spell in the food processing industry in Cape Town, Busi became pregnant, and returned to Durban to help her mother and aunt run six small family shops in uMlazi and KwaMashu. “One night I’d just closed a shop when I found myself confronted by eight young guys with guns. They forced me to drive my car into the bush and strip-searched me, demanding money, and threatening to kill me. All that saved me was that one of them recognised me from school – and he persuaded the others to let me go. But they’d pistol-whipped me so badly that when I got home, my son – who was nearly two – couldn’t recognise me.” A traumatised Busi turned her back on shopkeeping and decided to try her hand at filling different township needs, by launching Global Pact Consulting, a small company providing energy solutions by building powerlines for Eskom. Eight arduous years later she found herself with a successful business, a second baby – and those agonising haemorrhoids. “I wanted a natural treatment, but nothing really worked,” she says. Then a friend suggested she try kefir, a cultured dairy product used for centuries in Asian and European traditional medicine. “Keif is Turkish for ‘good feeling’, is high in vitamins, minerals and enzymes, and is one of the best sources of probiotics.” Probiotics was just becoming a buzzword at the time, and relatively little was known

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MORE THAN SKIN DEEP Heath problems prompted Durban North businesswoman Busi Gumede to switch from providing energy solutions in townships, to seeking health ones – and starting natural health and beauty ranges, writes Glynis Horning

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about gut health. “The more I read, the more interested I became in the 100 trillion microbes each of us has in our intestinal tract, and their role in physical and mental health. Their well-being is essential not just for good digestion – my problem – but for immunity, healthy skin and bones, even mood. I couldn’t wait to try kefir!” Kefir is cultivated from starter grains of bacteria and yeast that interact with milk to form a fermented drink. “Taking it got me regular, my skin looked great and I had way more energy.” Busi shared her enthusiasm with family and friends, but not all appreciated the tangy taste of kefir, so she started experimenting in her kitchen after work, using fresh fruit and honey for flavour. So well were her

last year, when she landed a deal to supply Spar instead. Her yoghurts are now in 14 Spar stores around the province, with more in the pipeline. She is in the throes of opening a factory in the Midlands, converting the old Stonelees Dairy premises at Lions’ River. She hopes to begin her production of KePro there, along with a line of conventional maas, Goodlife Amasi, by Christmas. But the tireless businesswoman is already moving on to yet another project. “I’m now 42, and I want to help women to be beautiful both inside and out, so I’m launching a skin care range, working with a dermatologist. Your skin is your biggest organ, it absorbs whatever you put on it, so you need to take care of it.” The inskn range will use omega oils in

The more I read, the more interested I became in the 100 trillion microbes each of us has in our intestinal tract, and their role in physical and mental health

BELOW: Some of the products from Busi’s KePro range, as well as the inskn skin care range.

efforts received, that she decided to “go commercial”, and last year launched KePro (Kefir Probiotics), registering a company, Goodlife Foods, to market them. “I wanted mine to be the best kefir, and the Danes are leaders in dairy techniques, so I flew to Denmark and bought the finest culture I could find. Back home I blended it with fruit and pure honey, and registered the DNA of my culture. Then I found a good advertising agency to do the branding and packaging.” The KePro range now includes creamy yoghurts (without any actual cream) in flavours from strawberry and blueberry to pomegranate and plain, along with smoothies, ice-creams (strawberry, apple and lemon) and cream cheeses (chives and roast pepper). Busi was about to open the country’s first kefir bar on Chartwell Drive in uMhlanga

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formulations for face and body moisturisers and tissue oils that are 90% natural and from plants, she says – with none of the colourants, preservatives and other controversial chemicals found in many commercial cosmetics (parabens, sodium lauryl sulphate, petroleum). “I want to help South African women have better health naturally and affordably – and the bonus for me is to employ and empower local people along the way.” For more about KePro visit  www.goodlifefoods.co.za;

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for more about inskn cosmetics, visit  www.inskn.co.za when the site is loaded later this year, with store locators.

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property*

COASTAL PARADISE Imagine homes, schools, universities, retirement developments, corporate, retail, hospitality and more, all neatly packed and presented in one area? That’s exactly what Sibaya Coastal Precinct will be, writes Greg Ardé

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he property pundits will tell you Sibaya is going to be the best thing since sliced bread, and it probably will be if you go by early indicators. But what will it look like 10 years from now? Most people aren’t too comfortable crystal ball gazing, but we asked a few property pros, including former World Cup Rugby player Butch James to have a crack at describing the 1 000ha seaside precinct a decade from now. James is involved with Balize, an estate of two, three and four-bedroom villas, cabanas and penthouses being built in one of Sibaya’s precincts. They have been designed to inspire a resort-style living, with apartments being fitted with semi-framed glass stackable doors to maximise the indoor-outdoor feel and soak up the unparalleled ocean views. Sibaya Coastal Precinct consists of several nodes. When Tongaat Hulett released the land for development it was with the aim of delivering a new urban identity. The development framework dictated 60% of the area’s green space be retained. The long-term plan is for 9 000 residential dwellings, and 500 000m² of commercial use including schools, universities, retirement developments, corporate, retail, hospitality and more.

Tongaat Hulett is demanding robust sustainable design; with urban planning seeking to cluster development versus the historical “urban sprawl”. This means promoting multi-use zoning and encouraging a diversity of housing types within each neighbourhood. The landscape promotes indigenous planting and promotes planting on buildings.

RIGHT: Sibaya Coastal Precinct – showing Ocean Dune and Pebble Beach.

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TOP: Looking north from Sibaya circle showing the vast area known as Sibaya Coastal Precinct. ABOVE: Sibaya Saxony.

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A good example is the pioneering development handled by Charles Thompson and Durban headquartered ID Construction. They have built three spectacular sea-facing buildings that house 420 apartments in the Ocean Dune and Pebble Beach complexes, plus commercial components, and are doing a third component, Gold Coast, which will have 160 free-standing houses. Since 2016 they have done R1-billion in sales. James says Balize adds to the wider Sibaya offering and draws on it. “Being within Sibaya Coastal Precinct means Balize has access to a range of facilities on its doorstep; retail piazza, private school, sports complex and access to the beach road through the managed coastal forest belt. “What I am really excited about is the site itself,” says James, perhaps predictably saying Balize is the best site at Sibaya. There’s tough competition for that prize, but Balize says most of its 57 units in the first phase will have 180º sea views. They will be priced from R3,9-million and the estate will have 24-hour state-of-theart security, clubhouse kitchenette and braai areas, pool and play areas, firepits, catch-and-release fishing dam, landscaped gardens, and dedicated estate shuttle service to the beach. He says surrounding Sibaya amenities will include shops, sports complex, a private school and university, medical facilities, restaurants, and walkways to the beach. “Sibaya and uMdloti are being transformed into a coastal paradise. Imagine southern California mixed with Singapore. What was once sugarcane will now be home to thousands of families, world-class educational facilities and hotels.” James says this will create a hive of activity and thousands of jobs. “It will be the next step in forming South Africa’s first megalopolis (a super city) joining uMhlanga to Ballito with Sibaya being the catalyst for this growth right in the middle.”

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its proximity to the ocean and indigenous coastal dune forest. “It has afforded architects and developers the platform to push the envelope of design and integration with nature. It is set to evolve into one of South Africa’s most sought after residential nodes.” FWJK’s Coral Point offers 152 luxury apartments, with swimming pool and clubhouse facilities and private gym. Gareth Bailey from Pam Golding Properties is marketing Signature in Sibaya – a luxury estate comprising 45 plots of prime seafront land. Prices range upwards of R5,1-million per plot and to date they have sold 40 plots. Bailey says Signature Sibaya has a lower density than any other estate in the area. Pam Golding is also marketing Coral Point, a 152-apartment development at Sibaya, positioned on the edge of the coastal forest within walking distance of the beach. There are about 25 apartments for sale, ranging upwards of R1,6-million for a studio. Bailey says Sibaya Saxony has 100 units differentiated by their drive-up access and luxury finishes with SMEG appliances throughout and staff quarters. Prices range from R1,85-million for a one-bed to R12,5-million for a four-bed penthouse apartment with a private swimming pool.

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M7 TOP: Coral Point offers 152 luxury apartments, with swimming pool and clubhouse facilities and private gym. ABOVE: Free standing Sibaya gated estate house. People ask if it will be like uMhlanga or more like Ballito. James thinks it will be unique. “It is just outside of the city but close enough to the amazing amenities and job opportunities we have on offer on the coast. As a new node, it will have the latest technological advancements in security, entertainment and state-of-the-art shopping with drone drop-offs being the norm. “Credit must go to developers like Charles Thompson as he has been vital in the vision of what the Sibaya precinct

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will have unfolded into. Visionaries like him and Gap Prop have created selfcontained neighbourhoods to meet most daily needs within a 10-minute walk – and that convenience and progressive thinking is what the coastline needed to put the area on the international map for modern, sustainable living optimised on a magnificent piece of land.” FWJK’s director of developments Daniel Gardner, says Sibaya is unique in that it is essentially a new precinct unencumbered by existing infrastructure and architecture,

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Sibaya Precint M4

Umdloti


All information herein is for illustration purposes only and is subject to change without prior notice.

STANDS FROM R1.75 MILLION

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FINAL OPPORTUNITIES REMAIN

ithin the Sibaya Coastal Precinct, Gold Coast Estate is a luxury family estate on KZN’s North

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PURCHASE TODAY & START BUILDING JULY 2019 Bedroom All information herein is for illustration purposes only and is subject to change without prior notice.

2, 3 & 4-BEDROOM HOMES PRICED FROM R3.5 MILLION

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living stylishly fused with the elements of a freestanding home complete with its own garden and pet-friendly facilities. Discover 2, 3 and 4-bedroom double-level Villas expressed in contemporary interiors and stylish finishes, most with a double lock-up garage, exclusive-use gardens and optional splash pool.

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High altitude training room

Fibre to the home Wi-Fi to common areas Private gym 25m & lap pool Clubhouse & Restaurant Kids’ play zone All information herein is for illustration purposes only and is subject to change without prior notice.

Kids’ area with super tubes & fountains

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A FOODIE EXPERIENCE His cheffing experience includes high profile events at top hotels and restaurants in Europe, New Zealand and more recently executive chef at Hartford House in the Midlands. With such a culinary portfolio Constantijn Hahndiek certainly knows his truffles, writes Lee Currie

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Capetonian who “fell in love with KZN”, Constantijn Hahndiek recently established a sister company to Sagra Foods, a Cape Town based distributor of premium food products, opening premises in Cornubia. It’s an ambitious move given our economic climate, not to mention the fierce competition in the food industry. Nevertheless, he feels the company has growth potential in the KZN market: “Sagra Food and Wine (more commonly known as Sagra Foods) was established 25 years ago in Cape Town and has since grown to be South Africa’s leading importer and distributor of premium food products to the restaurant and hotel industry. We’ve spent a while now establishing a strong foundation in KZN. What differentiates us from our competitors is our passion and desire to uplift the culinary scene as opposed to simply selling commodities for the kitchen. We take it further by not only showcasing our products to the chefs, we also work with them on their dishes, providing advice where needed. All our people in the sales departments of Sagra Foods have formal kitchen experience with the majority having worked overseas. “We import from France, Italy and Spain as well as sourcing quality foods from local, smaller enterprises. We’ll be stocking around 150 lines at our Cornubia warehouse but can also offer about 750 products via our head office in Cape

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ABOVE: Some of the products Sagra Foods import from France, Italy and Spain to meet the needs of local restaurants.

Town. We have an exceptionally strong procurement team, able to source many additional products for our clients.” With Cape Town being known for its vibrant culinary industry, we asked Constantijn how he felt Durban was going to rate in the demand for high-end food products. “Unfortunately, Durban is often perceived as Cape Town’s ‘ugly step-sister’ but what I’ve seen in the last year has really been inspirational and I believe that in the next few years we should see more KZN based restaurants being appreciated

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LEFT: Constantijn Hahndiek fell in love with KZN and recently opened Sagra Foods, a Cape Town based distributor of premium food products, in Cornubia. Picture: Michael Stewart BELOW: Artisanal cheeses; picture perfect food – the end result of products from Sagra Foods.

nationally. We’ll maintain our core business fundamentals but we have the ability to tweak as required being a smaller operation than Cape Town (for now!). “We have much more flexibility plus the ability to open up our warehouse for chefs which can be used as an upmarket ‘Cash and Carry’. Our chefs in KZN are receiving more experience, and the desire to be more adventurous, and this has filtered down to the customers which is fantastic for our industry.” Think rare truffles, 20-year aged balsamic

vinegar, frogs legs, quails, quail’s eggs, fresh live scallops from Norway, molecular flavoured pearls, drizzles, seasonings – it seems there is no limit to what the company can source. “We’re excited that we are now able to offer the world famous Cacao Barry Chocolate – very popular with pastry chefs,” says Constantijn. “Locally sourced foods include artisanal cheeses, olive oil, smoked trout, charcuterie, preserves and spreads among many others. From a local perspective we try to partner with smaller artisan manufacturers. We

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have managed to grow some of these producers into serious businesses that now predominately produce for Sagra Foods.” While their market is primarily geared towards hotels and restaurants, the warehouse is also open to the public. “We are currently available mornings only and/or by appointment. We want the home chef to feel welcome in our space. We are also happy to email a comprehensive list of our products and prices on request.”  031 944 8333 E tijn@sagrafoods.com  www.sagrafoods.com

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NEW LOOK FOR GRANADA SQUARE

complementary to the centre and the vibrant uMhlanga Village in general.” Undertaken in a phased approach, the initial work began in August 2018 and focused on general maintenance elements – replacing the waterproofing and repainting – and giving the centre a general facelift and more appealing exterior. The second phase of the upgrade, which is currently underway, will see a complete reconfiguration of the centre court area, which has been redesigned to create a more modern, piazza feel. The tiles will be replaced, and will include feature tile areas. In addition, the lower level retail area façade will be enhanced with roof canopies, allowing restaurant tenants to spill out into the courtyard area and give shoppers a weatherproof, covered walkway. A mixture of wood and steel finishes will soften the overall aesthetics, and create seamless synergies. Emira has crafted the upgrade of Granada Square to enhance its ambience and offering, ensuring it remains well positioned for its market and the future.

Having been a landmark in uMhlanga for the past 30 years, Granada Square is both a well-known and well-loved community shopping centre, attracting holidaymakers and locals alike

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ought in April 2007 by the leading JSE-listed real estate investment trust (REIT) Emira Property Fund, Granada Square was first upgraded in 2008, which saw changes being made to the ground floor retail level, as well as the addition of a third floor to the centre and the exterior of the building being plastered and painted. In 2015, Woolworths Food was

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expanded, and the long-standing Italian restaurant, Angelo’s, relocated. According to Emira asset manager, Sandra Kruger, “In ensuring that the centre remains relevant and in line with current design trends, in early 2018 we decided to consult with design architects to upgrade the building with an investment of R10-million. We worked tirelessly with the various teams to ensure the overall look and feel was

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I.N.O.X. PROFESSIONAL DIVER TITANIUM PICOT & MOSS 011.669.0500

MAKERS OF THE ORIGINAL SWISS ARMY KNIFE | ESTABLISHED 1884


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SAVE OUR

BEACHES

Durban – famous for being the busiest port in the country and a major centre of tourism because of our beautiful beaches – is plagued by the litter monster. Tony Carnie chats with a handful of people who are doing their bit to clean up our beaches, rivers and port

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urban’s coastline looked very much like a war zone when the flood waters receded after the recent torrential rain storms. It was as if a giant plastic-eating monster had been on a binge and then vomited over the beaches. In the harbour, there was so much floating litter and storm debris that several large ships and smaller vessels were unable to sail or berth. But it was the beaches where much of the junk came to rest, fouling one of the city’s most popular recreation assets. And while most residents despaired or

ABOVE: Glen Hills businessman and triathlete Dale Johnson hosts a monthly clean-up at the Beachwood Mangroves and adjacent beach. looked on aghast, there were several local heroes ready to get stuck in behind the scenes, get their hands dirty and clear up the mess. This spectacle of discarded plastic, metal or glass has become so frequent that Glen Hills businessman and triathlete Dale Johnson hosts a monthly clean-up at the Beachwood Mangroves and adjacent beach. “I used to drive past the mess thinking it

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was someone else’s problem. But I just hate litter and realised I had to do something.” That was two years ago. Since then (one Saturday every month from 8 to 11am) Dale and fellow members of Clean Blue Lagoon meet at the Beachwood Mangroves car park and then fan out with sacks or plastic bags to scoop up the latest load of river-borne rubbish. “We know that families are busy over weekends, so we’re very flexible. If you can only come for half an hour that’s fine. But if you can manage an hour or the full three hours that’s even better.”

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Cameron Service has started a project to trap and recycle litter from five Durban river catchments.

Bart Fokkens has spent seven years trying to catch river-borne litter before it reaches Durban’s beaches.

Though it often seems a thankless, neverending task, Dale remains undeterred. “It’s easy to get cynical and give up. But we have to keep going because it will take time to modify behaviour. I have been to Rwanda, where there are regular monthly clean-ups. Now the streets are clean because the culture of littering is changing.” Further north along the coast, former Danville student Clare SwithenbankBowman started an innovative litterreduction scheme at Shakas Head nearly

Clare SwithenbankBowman set up a scheme to encourage schoolkids to collect plastic litter and swop it for food tokens.

three years ago. Known as Litter4tokens, the project encourages schoolchildren to collect plastic litter and swop this for dry food parcels, clothes and other goods. Clare, who now lives in California, is still very active raising funds to support the scheme, which includes 12 schools across the country. She says students are collecting more than 2 400 bags of plastic litter a week. Veteran river guardian Bart Fokkens reckons that, from a litter perspective, the

ABOVE: Some of the first floating booms in the uMngeni River catchment. which intercept the litter so that it can be recycled.

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ALL PICTURES supplied by Robyn Chesler, Lisa Guastella, Sophie Ardé, Johnny Vassilaros, and The Litterboom Project. uMngeni River is one of the most polluted in Africa. To stop this tide of litter reaching the ocean, he installed some of the first floating booms in the uMngeni River catchment. The idea is simple: tie a floating boom from one side of the river bank to the other and intercept the litter so that it can be recycled. Bart recalls removing 1 300 bags of litter in just four days from a boom he installed near Springfield Park. Unfortunately, the booms only work when the river is flowing slowly. When floods arrive, they often snap from the sheer weight of litter, water hyacinth and other floating vegetation. Bart doubts the litter problem will end soon. But, he believes, the city could make a big difference by passing new by-laws to ban the use of throw-away polystyrene food packaging.

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“What we need is a strong leader in the city who can stand up to the plastics and packaging industry. If we had tougher by-laws, industry would have to come up with biodegradable alternatives such as cardboard or bagasse,” he argues. He thinks manufacturers should be pressured to introduce a deposit system for plastic “buddy” bottles, thereby helping to change mindsets and behaviour in an increasingly throw-away society. Sanral and the city should also install grids on stormwater outlets to intercept litter tossed out of windows on public roads. Cameron Service, a Durban mountain biker and founder of The Litterboom Project, got involved in beach clean-ups about two years ago. “But after spending hours picking up junk from the beaches, I ended up even more despondent and demoralised than when I started. I realised we had to find ways of tackling the problem right at the source – before it gets to the sea.” Building on Bart’s work, Cameron installed a new prototype litter boom on the uMngeni River and collected 15 tonnes of litter in the first year, with the help of two part-time staff. More recently, Cameron has teamed up with WildOceans and other groups to extend the Litterboom Project to cover five local rivers – the Ohlanga, uMngeni, Umhlatuzana, Umbilo and Umlazi. Cameron often hears people talking about the need for educational projects to stop littering. “I can understand that folks leading a comfortable lifestyle will want everyone to take responsibility for litter – but if you live in a shack, the sad truth is there is virtually no refuse removal service from the municipality and so it gets dumped next to the river. “You also have to keep in mind that if you are living in poverty and wondering where your next meal will come from, littering and care for the environment is right at the bottom of your list.”

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pictures tyron mackenzie

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ne would have to be living under a rock not to be aware of the fact that discarded plastic is choking our oceans and our land, with grocery bags and plastic bread wrappers taking a large portion of the blame. Unfortunately there are still many retailers worldwide that have yet to switch to alternative packaging. South Africa is no exception. A crafting medium called plarn – plastic yarn – is slowly helping to save the planet. Plarn is made from discarded supermarket bags, bread wrappers and other plastic packaging. The bags are cut into strips and rolled into balls (much like knitting wool), then crocheted or knitted, creating a wide range of attractive, functional articles. Apart from the ecological benefits, the craft provides a means for people to earn an

THE MAGIC OF PLARN

Using good old-fashioned crafting skills, local women have found a creative way to help combat plastic pollution, writes Lee Currie LEFT: Magic Bean Foundation members Ntombi Ndlovo and Nomusa Nzila promoting their goods in a local shopping centre. income by making and selling the items. Pot plant holders, shoppers, laundry bins, throws ... just about anything that can be crocheted, knitted or macraméd can be crafted from plarn. Here in Durban there’s a team of busy crafters doing just that. Ilumbo – which means magic in Zulu – is one of the initiatives of the Magic Bean Foundation headed by Glenashley residents Lorraine Evans and Shelley Stievenart. “Our main aim is to empower people though skills development,” says Lorraine. “We also focus on sustainability and having

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FACT According to research conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency, somewhere between five hundred billion and one trillion disposable bags are used each year around the world. The plastic remains in landfills, oceans and other places as little impact on the for thousands of years. planet as possible. We enjoy handcrafting and creating, and wanted to pass this on to enable unemployed people to earn an income. “We hold workshops within communities with a trainer who has been taught the skills and can translate. We demonstrate the art of cutting the plarn followed by a basic crochet stitch. It’s interesting in that we’ve found that

many of the older members have been taught the skill but haven’t practised it for several years. For the Ilumbo project we work closely with six women from Umlazi G Section which has become known as G Magic.” G Magic team members Nozipho Mbatha and Zotha Mkhize shared some facts: “It takes about 12 hours to make a handbag and one day for a sun hat. A laundry basket takes about two to three days. Cutting and rolling the plarn takes a lot of time, especially when cutting 40 to 50 bags needed to make the laundry basket. My son helps by cutting the strips,” smiles Nozipho. Many of the crafters pass the skill on to their families. The team also create ecofriendly products as promotional gifts for companies, and are happy for the public to get involved by collecting plastic packets and bread bags.

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Find out more about this and Magic Bean Foundation’s other initiatives: W m.facebook.com/magicbeanfoundation


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JULY Ken Tweddell, aka Mr July, has lived and breathed Africa’s greatest horseracing event for 25 years, and there’s no sign he’s letting anyone beat him to the finish post, writes Debbie Reynolds

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ith just three weeks to go before Greyville Racecourse turns into the talk of the town, it’s not easy convincing Ken Tweddell to spend time talking about himself. He hates it, but ask him anything about the big day which happens annually on the first Saturday in July, and you’re in for a treat. “I’m boring,” laughs Ken. “My biggest passion is my job which is largely marketing the Vodacom Durban July.” It’s a job he pours himself into 24/7 – whether it be dreaming up the campaign theme, writing the “inspiration poem”, editing the

July Fever booklet, populating the July website, orchestrating the fashion experiences, involvement in the race day entertainment, creating television and print advertisements, and making sure that 50 000 plus people descend on Greyville on July 6. Durban born and bred, Ken said his memories of the July go back to 1960 when he was just seven and Left Wing won the race. He also remembers winning the family sweep the next year with Kerason, not to mention all the Saturdays spent with his grandmother listening to horseracing results on the radio. “She was a nutter for racing and used to take a three and seven first double every Saturday no matter the horses.” Then his favourite aunt got involved with horseracing and the young Ken was in his element. “I’d hang around with the trainers and owners and listen to the stories, the passion and the intrigue and I was hooked.” After matriculating from Beachwood Boys’ High, Ken started off as an articled clerk before studying marketing at Unisa but kept

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“I’m still so passionate about the July that I sometimes step out of line and irritate people because I want things done my way.” His staff agree that he can be a right royal pain, but only because he’s such a perfectionist and “really, really loves” what he does. It is Ken who dreams up the July themes every year and this year he’s chosen Stars of Africa, inspired by last year’s fashion which he described as “extraordinary, bright and homegrown”. “One year I made the fatal mistake of writing a poem around the theme and now it’s become a tradition.” Over the years he’s seen some changes to the country’s premier horse race, not least of which was losing Rothmans as a sponsor in 2001. “It was a challenge, but we still had one of our best ever July days, and since Vodacom came on board in 2002 the event has gone from strength to strength.” The fashion component is also Ken’s baby and this year he’s excited about the partnership with Gateway, which will host the VDJ Fashion Experience show on June 29. This year the show includes the Young Designer competition, which is now part of the curriculum of various KZN fashion institutions, the Invited Designer Showcase, and the Amazing Africa Collection. “The Young Designer winner

his hand in the racing world working as a pay-out clerk at Greyville and Scottsville. A move to Joburg saw him climbing the corporate ladder to national marketing manager for a top milling company, but when his son Luke was born, Ken decided it was home time. “As luck would have it my dream job was being advertised – marketing manager for the then Durban Turf Club,” says Ken. His credentials and love for horseracing won him the position and to this day, he counts his blessings. “Just look at the view from my office – such a magnificent expanse of green in the middle of the city, with horses galloping past. I never get tired of it.” Which explains why Ken is still here after retiring last year. “I’m officially a consultant now, but nothing has changed,” he laughs.

LEFT: The exciting finish of the Vodacom Durban July 2018. Picture: Anthony Grote/Gameplan Media INSET: “Mr July” Ken Tweddell at Greyville Racecourse, home of the Vodacom Durban July. Picture: Debbie Reynolds and on-course fashion competitions will take place on a giant stage on the golf course, along with music and deejays, adding to the festivities of Tent Town,” says Ken. From the installation of floodlights, a giant screen and a Polytrack, to the success of night racing and the industry’s own TV station, Ken has seen it all and more. “Every July is a great moment for me, but another was when HRH Queen Elizabeth II visited Greyville on March 25, 1995,” he says. Still living in his childhood Durban North home, which he bought from his parents, Ken is an avid gardener and loves DIY and wildlife photography – but not nearly as much as he loves horseracing.

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SHINE THIS JULY In Durban, July is all about style, and a new generation of African stars is emerging to show off their designer looks

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ou know style when you see it. Style commands a unique kind of respect – it starts with confidence; it’s about owning your look and being proud of it; being 100% comfortable with who you are and what you’re wearing. And confidence begins when you find the look that makes you feel “like a million bucks”. Just Japs Combination is a boutique designer clothing store specialising in the art of opulence. New African stars emerge from

BELOW: Cavalli Class Black Jacket, R11 899. Cavalli Class Tee, R3 399.

ABOVE: Just Cavalli Dress, R16 999. Just Japs stores every day, once they’ve found the look that speaks to them. You’ll be spoilt for choice with Just Japs’ carefully curated mix of the world’s most coveted designer brands – brands that are constantly being updated to match the latest fashion industry trends from the style capitals of the world. You can mix and match brands, try on, touch and experience the real premium multi-brand designer treatment that’s worthy of style and stars. From designer suits and dresses to casual looks, from

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BELOW: Giza Coat, R13 599. Just Cavalli Dress, R12 999. BOTTOM: Bacci Suit, R9 998. Ted Lapidus Shirt, R1 399. Duke Tie, R499.

ABOVE: Just Cavalli Dress, R17 999. Versace Jeans Sandals, R4 999. opulence to classy, find your inner African star at Just Japs where you can allow yourself to shine your brightest wearing international designer brands like Moreschi, Trussardi, Versace Jeans Couture, Roberto Cavalli, Just Cavalli, and many more. Just Japs dresses the new generation of African style icons in KZN from head-to-toe, with branches in Ballito Junction, Gateway Theatre of Shopping, Hilton Hotel in Durban, and Liberty Midlands Mall. ďƒź justjaps.co.za

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it is an institution dedicated to exploration and discovery where Hendrick’s master distiller, Lesley Gracie, has the creative freedom to experiment and conceive new Hendrick’s variants. It is also the distilling home for the brand that turned the gin world on its head. The Hendrick’s Gin Palace features a mysterious and enchanting walled garden which leads to a magnificent and imposing Victorian inspired palm house. This is flanked by two botanical hot houses used to cultivate a plethora of unusual botanicals and flora from around the world. There is the inner sanctum that is Lesley’s laboratory which features a curious flavour library, a lecture theatre that encourages scholarly learnings, and a suitably stylish bar. And of course there are two

A PALACE LIKE NO OTHER If Hendrick’s gin is your thing, then this story is especially for you. And even if gin is not your thing, then read, enjoy and savour every mouthful

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he Hendrick’s Gin Palace and distillery in Scotland – a playground for experimentation, invention and curiosity – has been artfully and magnificently expanded to meet the voracious global demand for Hendrick’s, which is unusually infused with essences of cucumber and rose. As an engine of innovation,

stunning new still houses. The Hendrick’s family of stills now stands at a proud six: four Bennett stills including the original antique copper pot hailing from 1860 and three precise replicas; and two Carter Heads including one original constructed in 1948 and one exact reproduction. William Grant & Sons – the family owned independent global spirits company – invested £13-million in the glorious expansion, a reflection of the confidence and excitement it has in the future of Hendrick’s. Innovation has always been in the brand’s DNA. It spearheaded the global gin boom, and it created and continues to lead the superpremium gin category. “I’ve been distilling Hendrick’s for almost twenty years, and during that time my team and I have had the opportunity to explore and experiment on a small scale. However, I’m thrilled and excited to take full advantage of our wonderful new distillery and begin working on a line of experimental liquids, some of which will hopefully blossom into future releases and potential new expressions of Hendrick’s,” says Lesley Gracie, the master distiller for Hendrick’s. Pamela Selby, the global brand director for Hendrick’s added: “The Hendrick’s Gin Palace in its design and experience, is intended to inspire curiosity, open minds and serve as a platform for invention. It pulls back the curtain on the wondrous production method and showcases the many layers of Hendrick’s that it has become celebrated for, some humorous, others curiously intellectual, detailed and deeply meaningful.”

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SMALL WONDER A bold colour scheme and smart storage solutions ensure that what this cottage lacks in size it makes up in style, writes Candice Botha pictures michelle reynolds

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he minimalism, simplicity and functionality of Scandinavian design were key elements for the team from Designs by Day as they tackled this guest cottage. “The most challenging part of this project was creating the illusion of space within the tight confines of the cottage,” says Kaylin Cameron who was the primary interior designer on the project. Although small, the building had high ceilings with exposed trusses that created an illusion of space. Kaylin emphasised this by painting feature walls in Plascon’s Night Moss to draw the eye upward and exaggerate the height. Installing sliding doors and shutters at the main entrance ensured that the veranda became a functional extension of the living space, effectively giving the

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Plascon Night Moss has become our signature colour and is our favourite wall colour to scheme with owners an extra room with the simple addition of new doors. “Using screeded floors throughout also emphasises space,” notes Kaylin. Keeping clutter to a minimum in designing the fittings and fixtures was essential and Kaylin focused on clean lines and multi-functional elements. “We maximised countertop space in the kitchen by adding a small dual-purpose island, which also incorporates an informal eating area. In the bedroom we added a quirky, ladderstyle side pedestal beside the bed, adding more storage space in the narrow area. The limited wall space required us to be smart

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decor*

with our customised pieces so that we could still maximise their functionality, such as the corner TV unit in the living room, and corner swivel mirror in the bathroom.” Being inspired by a Scandi aesthetic did not mean sticking to the light, neutral palette of the style, however, and bold colour abounds in the space. “We are never shy to decorate with dark colours as they can really add to the mood and create a warm, inviting environment,” notes Kaylin. “Plascon Night Moss has become our signature colour and is our favourite wall colour to scheme with. We decided to be bold with it and paint the entire kitchen and living room feature wall in this rich, moody shade of green, which contrasts perfectly with the white herringbone splashback and countertops and complements the natural tones of the oak and brass in the shelving.” Oak and brass details repeat throughout the cottage, bringing warmth and pairing well with leather finishes, modern furniture pieces and textured fabrics. “We were also not shy to add plants and greenery to give a fresh look,” notes Kaylin. The judicious use of pattern was also essential to creating a layered look and

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Kaylin chose these carefully to complement one another and ensure the overall look is coherent rather than busy. Storage space is a must in a small home, and Designs by Day planned some smart shelving. “The custom brass shelves in the kitchen soften the space and create a focal point with the addition of accessories and greenery, breaking the structure of the kitchen perfectly. The built-in oak shelving on the edge of the kitchen cabinetry provides space for storing books, accessories, plants and wine bottles in what could

We used the bathroom vanity to create a special feature in the tight space by tiling the top with some monochrome patterned tiles have been a wasted space,” says Kaylin. Adding a shelf for picture frames above the sofa enables the owners to change up the accessories on display quickly and easily and a subtle wallpaper below adds a pop of pattern without being overwhelming in the small area. “We used the bathroom vanity to create a special feature in the tight space by tiling the top with some monochrome patterned tiles, and customising a corner swivel mirror with shelving, creating a functional addition to the otherwise unused corner,” Kaylin adds. It’s this attention to detail which makes this small space big on both style and practicality. Designs by Day:  designsbyday.co.za

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on trend*

FOR A BETTER PLANET Plastic pollution is one of the greatest threats to ocean health worldwide – but you can play your part to help save our planet

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ut of the top 20 offenders, South Africa is the 11th worst offender in the world when it comes to releasing plastic waste into the sea; 94% of all beach litter in South Africa is made from plastic, of which 77% is packaging. Every day about eight million pieces of plastic pollution find their way into our oceans, with two-thirds of it coming from land-based sources, such as litter being left on beaches or washed down rivers. With one in three fish caught for human consumption

Reduce Your Use Of Single-use Plastics Fifty percent of consumer plastics are single use, but with RECUP – South Africa’s first cup exchange programme – you can now return, reuse, recycle. Simply order a take-away coffee; pay a R20 deposit for a cup of your choice in three sizes; return the RECUP at any partner cafe for a refund, or get your cup washed and refilled. Find your nearest RECUP partner using their App.  www.recup.co.za

One of the reasons why plastic pollution is such a problem is because plastic is forever now containing plastic, the question is no longer are we eating plastic, but how bad is it for us? In seawater, plastic absorbs chemicals like PCB’s and DDT’s which have been linked to endocrine disruption and even some cancers, becoming more powerful as they work their way up the food chain. Even if we don’t eat fish, or go to the beach, we have to breathe – and with 70% of oxygen being produced by marine plants, we seriously need to take care of our oceans. One of the reasons why plastic pollution is such a problem is because plastic is forever – plastic debris simply breaks down into ever-smaller particles, known as microplastics. Here are some ideas to reduce plastic pollution.

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Avoid Products Containing Micro-beads Tiny plastic particles, called micro-beads, have become a growing source of ocean plastic pollution. Micro-beads are found in some face scrubs, toothpastes, and body washes, and enter our oceans through our sewer systems, affecting hundreds of marine species. Avoid products containing plastic micro-beads – look for polyethylene and polypropylene on the ingredient labels of your cosmetic products.


Without oceans life on earth can not exist Use Pet To Make Products PET plastic – used for making plastic bottles – is 100% recyclable, and can be recycled into fabric and felt. PET bottles are collected, washed and chopped into chips or flakes. These chips are used in food grade application to make new bottles made out of rPET (recycled PET bottles), or are converted into small pellets which are extruded through machines to produce fibre. This fibre, in turn, is used in the manufacture of non-woven felt,

as well as many other fibres such as duvet and pillow inners, and even knitted into T-shirt fabric. There are roughly 15 recycled bottles per square metre of PET fabric or felt. T-shirts: Made in collaboration with the Holmes Bros and Its Not Made In China, using 65% recycled plastic bottles and 35% cotton, which is sourced from South Africa. it-s-notmade-in-china.myshopify.com Uzwelo bags: A gorgeous range of felt bags ranging from laptop bags, tablet bags to totes and backpacks. www.uzwelo. co.za/rp-e-t-felt-bags

Adidas Parley shoes: Adidas Parley is the official collaboration product line between Adidas and Parley for the Oceans – an environmental organisation that addresses environmental threats towards the oceans. Parley Ocean Plastic™, used as a replacement for virgin plastic in the making of Adidas x Parley products, is a catalyst innovation created from upcycled plastic waste (mainly PET bottles) intercepted from beaches before it reaches the ocean. By producing one pair of Parley shoes, about 11 plastic bottles are prevented from entering our oceans. shop.adidas.co.za

The Joinery: They create local sustainable products made from recycled plastic bottles, hemp and responsible fabrics. Ranging from travel accessories, laptop accessories, apparel and stationery to surf board covers.  thejoinery.co.za/sustainableproducts

Recycle Properly Currently only nine percent of plastic is recycled. Two options are: Either find places to recycle plastic near you: go to petco.co.za/find-a-recyclingdrop-off-site; or download a list of plastic recycling buy-back centres:  petco.co.za/wp-content/ uploads/2018/02/PETCO-List-ofBuy-Back-Centres-January -2018-v2.xlsx

Made From Recycled Tyre Tread GRRiTT Unisex Flip Flops: One recycled passenger tyre makes 10 flip flop treads. Illustrated by local artists and hand made out of 100% recycled tyre, these flip flops come with a two-year guarantee. GRRiTT also make a range of accessories (wallets, vanity cases and cycling pouches) out of recycled tyre tread and PET plastic bottles. grritt.com

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weekend escapes*

THIS IS THE LIFE The Oxpecker Trail Run is a two-day stage trail run over 16km and 21km covering some of KZN’s most beautiful scenery. If you haven’t done it yet, then don’t miss out on the next one, writes Doody Adams pictures anthony churchyard

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omething extraordinary happens once a year in the Central Drakensberg outside Winterton, when hundreds of trail runners gather to participate in the annual Oxpecker Trail Stage Race. The Green family host the event and certainly make every effort to create a relaxed atmosphere coupled with traditional farm hospitality – including the most delicious and well thought-out meals. An easy drive from Durban or Johannesburg, arriving as the sun sets over Spioenkop Dam, the excitement is tangible at Em’seni campsite where neat rows of hundreds of tents await the runners. The tractor and trailer shuttle service is a welcome sight to transfer luggage and bedding to the tents. A variety of camping options are available – including a self-camping option and a snoring camping area. The Kudu accommodation is comfortable and ideal with two single beds and shared ablutions, while the Kingfisher accommodation offers something a little extra. After registration on the Friday evening, a wholesome and delicious dinner is served in the central runner’s village. The area is scattered with hay bales and wooden tables and benches, a craft beer stand, gin and tonic on tap, and for caffeine addicts a 24-hour hot box offering tea and coffee. The Oxpecker shop is a highlight with a variety of branded goodies to take home. The atmosphere is festive and relaxed as runners are briefed on the Friday evening for the day ahead, a 21km trail run through some of South Africa’s most beautiful terrain. The race starts at 8.30 on Saturday morning, and within the first 10km runners are challenged with a steep climb winding up Spioenkop Mountain. The sound of singing ladies calling you to the first water station at the highest point of the race is encouraging – and welcoming. At this vantage point the views of the dam and far into the distance are

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The poplar trees formed a narrow path that led us across the finish line, to an awaiting ice bath and cold beverage spectacular and breath-taking – and well worth a quick stop before starting the decline home. Along the route runners gather, chat, take selfies and share the struggle of the climb. The final stretch is along the banks of the powerful Tugela River and through the “Garden of Eden” – a narrow path formed by poplar trees. The finish line is a welcome site, where runners gather to cheer each other over the line and enjoy a cold beverage or ice bath. The Saturday afternoon trip to Spioenkop Dam to watch the sun gracefully disappear across the horizon, followed by the stiff-legged party on the river’s edge under the light of the full moon, added to the festivities and fun of the weekend. It was a chilly start on Sunday morning, but the fires and hot coffee at the start keep the runners warm ahead of another challenging run. This 16km leg of the trail is completely different – large fields of aloes, a corridor through maize fields, a cotton plantation, and a bridge across the river then back through the “Garden of Eden”. The elevation is much less than the first day, but the route is technical. As usual, the camaraderie along the way is memorable. What a great way to spend a weekend – out in the fresh air with like-minded people, enjoying our magnificent scenery we so often take for granted, warm hospitality, and feeling energised. This is the life!

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motoring*

For adventurous weekends away there are few better options than the new Toyota RAV4, writes Stephen Smith

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here the 1994 RAV4 was the first compact car that promised to make your life wilder and more adventurous, the 2019 RAV4 feels as though it can actually deliver on that promise. So what do you want from a car for weekend adventures?  Space: For weekends away you need a spacious vehicle, and the 2019 RAV4 is so spacious it’s heading out of the mid-size SUV class and towards the full-size SUV segment. It will comfortably seat five adults, and the boot has a capacity of 580 litres, which is big. And if you put the rear seats down (there’s a 60:40 split) you can even fit a 29-inch mountain bike in there – with the wheels still on.

WORTH RAVING ABOUT Another nifty feature is that the floor of the boot can be adjusted for height, or flipped over to show a rubberised surface when you’ve got dirty items you need to throw in there. In the cabin there are also a fair number of storage compartments scattered around.  Comfort: The problem with older SUVs is that while they were good for going offroad, you never wanted to take them far from home because they were uncomfortable. Today,

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the RAV4 is more car-like than ever, and one thing that stood out on our road trip to Zululand was the suspension, which is firm enough without being hard, so even on a dirt road that was falling apart at the seems there was no jarring or unpleasant noises. There are now three spec levels in the RAV4 range – GX (the best value for money), the GX-R (for the more adventurous), and the VX (the larney option). Even the GX is fairly well endowed with features like a 7-inch touchscreen display, cruise control, manual air-conditioning, Bluetooth connectivity and park distance control. As you proceed up the grades more and more features are added as standard. The GX-R grade also gets bolder, more adventurous styling with a bigger grille and chunky black bumpers. This is the sweet spot in the range, although


the VX comes with even more opulence.  All-wheel-drive: The standard RAV4 is front-wheeldrive only, but you can opt for the GX-R or VX model with all-wheel-drive, which I think

is worth the money. It’s a mechanical system that sends torque to the wheel that needs it the most, but you can select a mode (Mud & Sand or Rock & Dirt) to suit conditions, for better traction in adverse conditions.

 Efficient power: There are just two engine options: a 2-litre petrol (127kW and 203Nm) that is in four of the five models, and a 2,5-litre petrol (152kW and 243Nm) that can only be had with the

8-speed automatic gearbox and all-wheel-drive in the top of the range VX. The 2-litre comes either with a six-speed manual gearbox (only in the entry-level model) or with a CVT transmission that has 10 pre-programmed “gears”. Fuel consumption is good too, at a claimed 6,5-litres/100km and 7,3-litres/100km for the 2-litre and 2,5-litre respectively.  Safety: A full suite of airbags – including knee and curtain types – are fitted to all models, with electronic driver aids in the form of ABS, EBD, Brake Assist, Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Hill Assist Control (HAC) and Trailer Sway Control all catered for. The final word? The new RAV4 is very hard to fault, whether your adventures are urban or rural. Added to all of the above is Toyota’s great service network and reputation for reliability, and you can also expect phenomenal resale value when the time comes to move on.

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property*

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hile the residential property market has been subdued leading up to elections, the good news is that over the past five general elections held since 1994, the SA housing market has traditionally experienced a rebound of varying degrees during the subsequent 12 months. So, if history does indeed repeat itself, and given that much of the uncertainty which has been hanging over the market is finally removed, activity and price growth are likely to recover – more noticeably after the seasonally quiet winter months – and the residential market should soon begin to strengthen on a broader scale. Notably, and as reported by FNB’s May Property Barometer, the uptake of homes by first-time buyers continues to gather momentum, now an estimated 22,7% in Q1 2019 compared with 17,6% in Q1 2018. With affordability and value key factors among the swelling ranks of first-time buyers in particular, promising news is that first-time buyers are returning to the market in KZN, prompted by the recent price adjustments, as well as the compelling desire to gain a foothold in the market, with the latter trend also evident in Cape Town. The generally market-friendly election outcome will, in all likelihood, create a degree of certainty and stability and go some way towards addressing the issues currently affecting confidence in the South

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African economy – and as a consequence have a positive effect on the South African residential property market. According to Dr Andrew Golding, chief executive of the Pam Golding Property group, “While it is anticipated that, in the wake of the favourable election outcome, the residential property market will rebound, in reality, any significant recovery is only likely to materialise in the later stages of the year after the seasonally quiet winter months. “It is also worth noting that casting a general market view over the entire market is often not necessarily advisable or accurate – as different provinces, regions, cities and

PROPERTY TRENDS With elections behind us, Gareth Bailey looks at property trends investors should take note of sectors perform differently. For example, there is a shortage of accommodation for students and retirement developments in different parts of the country. As a result, activity is likely to be brisk in these market sectors despite the subdued conditions in the broader national housing market.” Interestingly, coastal property values nationally have grown at a faster rate than inland properties by about 1,5%

over the past year which is significant given that national house price growth is currently 3,7%. This means that coastal properties have outperformed inland properties by over 40% in growth terms. We are also noticing a consolidating trend towards estate and sectional title living and, accordingly, price growth of these types of property is outperforming freehold properties. In our North Durban

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property belt, a large number of new-build residential development units have been brought to market over the past five years. These units tend to let quickly, in preference to the older stock in the various target or high-demand areas, with their traction based on being new and modern, and part of a “lifestyle” development with good security, and with the older units adding to the pool of available stock. Investors should be mindful, however, that these new developments bring large swathes of stock to market simultaneously, which can cause an oversupply and subsequently suppress maximum return potential in


S I B AYA

GARETH BAILEY

Pam Golding Properties, North Durban area. the short-term. However, this should be anticipated, and the glut is usually mopped up within a year or two after which these properties outperform older stock in the market. In addition, if investors pay attention to value in relation to what’s available on the market, their investment will

continue to perform even as newer developments are brought to market given that land and building input prices invariably rise translating into higher entry costs which force new investors in the area to be less competitive with their rentals and selling prices. In determining value, investors should not only consider the price, but also the unique attributes of the development as well as those of their specific unit within the development. Making good value decisions and seeking differentiation upfront will make it easier to sell and realise profit on disposal. We are fortunate to live in a “rising tide” market along our North Durban coastal property belt – from Durban North to uMhlanga, Sibaya and beyond – and buying opportunities abound in the current market including the opportunity to capitalise on the medium and long-term benefits offered through buying in a new development. Some benefits include features such as excellent security, lifestyle, energy-saving and “green” features such as grey water recycling, heat pumps, modern design and the ability to buy now and pay later, as well as prices which are VAT inclusive with no transfer duty payable. While many people feel uncertain about purchasing property in the current market conditions, others will embody the spirit of Warren Buffet’s words when he said that he is “fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.”

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The Saxony, Sibaya Situated within the Sibaya Coastal Precinct, only a few km’s from Umhlanga and King Shaka International Airport. Distinguished by its exclusive drive-up access, expansive sea views. Dawn Harding 072 171 8465

Resort-like facilities: Direct drive-up access to each unit, clubhouse, fully equipped gym, staff quarters, 3-level cascading pool and lap pool, his and hers steam room, sauna, recreational areas with braai facilities, kids play areas and function room. Geoff Austin 060 926 9238

Unsurpassed finishes: Every unit features its own private outdoor living space. The terraces have been created with spacious living in mind with expansive use of glass and stack doors and superior finishes and fixtures. Drea Densham 071 107 4664

Expansive sea views: Visit our on site sales office daily from 09h30 - 4.30pm. Access via the Sibaya Circle M4. 1 beds priced from R1,850m, 2 beds from R3,950m and 3 beds from R4,995m. Nicky Steele 072 825 6844


last word*

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he broadcast a big, toothy, lipstick grin. Her friendly freckled face sat beneath a wild mop of blue hair. “Helloooooo,” she chirruped from behind the counter. It was homely and kind, but all my crabbiness afforded her was a feeble smile. I hate that. When someone gives me a thinlipped, mildly upturned mouth that masquerades as a smile, I want to punch it. My mean-spiritedness washed over her. Before I had a chance to growl my grumpy cappuccino order the waitress transmitted a disarming “How are you?” Only the “ou” morphed into a cheerful yodel: “How are yooooooo?” It was iridescent and I shrunk back and mumbled for caffeine. I’d like to say it was just one of those days or I just needed the coffee. I had every reason to be a grumble-guts. I woke up late, tripped over the cat, got stuck in traffic on the way to the dentist, and made small talk while he had both hands in my mouth. But it wasn’t all that. I’m becoming more of a curmudgeon by the day. The pearler – minutes before my encounter with Miss Happy Blue Hair – was a charming engagement with Vodacom about the rapacious gremlin bastard inside my cellphone who is looting my data. I should never have called them, I know, but I was amped for a fight. And boy, did I get my sorry ass whipped. It happens every time, I should have learnt by now.

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SMILE!

Why are some people so damn happy, writes Greg Ardé, ’cause the older I get, the grumpier I get! illustration jeremy nel They employ legions of woebegone, disconsolate and doleful people. Their splendidly monotone voice is violently passive aggressive. And, after you’ve repeated your ID, cellphone number and bank account details 57 times, they’ve landed you, hook line and sinker. You are a seething, rampaging beast, frothing at the mouth. Call centre agents each have big red buttons on their desks. I know they do. When a customer gets unhinged they push the button and the call goes on a loudspeaker – and all the bored agents smile as your outrage spirals out of control. The smiles widen to brazen rows of gnashers. As your fury

reaches a frenzy they slap their thighs, clutch their sides and guffaw hilariously. Their pièce de résistance is when your agent mimics a yawn and says, “Hold, I’m connecting you to customer complaints.” I would prefer it if cellphone companies employed a hideous Genghis Khan giant to handle customer queries. He could pop over in an Uber and be with you in minutes. He would listen to 15 seconds of your yabbying then just swoosh out an enormous paw and give you a snotklap, a mighty flattie across the chops and thunder: “SHUT UP PHILISTINE!” And then it would be all over. That would be better than the call centre.

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I tapped the counter impatiently, waiting for my coffee. I glanced at the newspaper but was distracted by ghastly satisfying images of torturing telecom bosses. Blue Hair Big Smiles reappeared gleefully in a right blossom of joy. “Here’s your cappuccino,” she twittered, delivering the coffee with a flourish, an actual merry twirl of feet, hips, happy hands and smile. I lowered my eyes, peering peevishly over my glasses. Was this woman for real? And she looked back, exhaled deeply, and BEAMED! This was no garden variety grin. It was a neutron bomb blast of bliss, a radiance so powerful it simply eradicated Mr HuffyTetchy-Scratchy-Sulky. It nuked the ill-tempered bastard. I grinned back. I couldn’t help it. I even giggled involuntarily and became molten, middleaged goo, gibbering gratefully about her cheerfulness. It was so powerful she stretched out her hand and pressed two fingers to my forehead as I left, “Channelling the cheer,” she said. I stumbled gleefully back to my office like a silly teenager and Googled “men become grumpier as they get older”. It rendered 27 million hits. By comparison, the Google box only gave Ode to Joy 21 million and “how to change a lightbulb” 13 million. It must be true. So cheers to all the jolly, bright, bubbly, frolicsome, peppy, chipper sorts who make the world go round. The crusty buggers are deeply grateful. Thank you.

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Ridge 111  

Exclusive community magazine distributed to the communities of Ballito, Durban North, Gateway, La Lucia, Mt Edgecombe, Prestondale, Somerset...

Ridge 111  

Exclusive community magazine distributed to the communities of Ballito, Durban North, Gateway, La Lucia, Mt Edgecombe, Prestondale, Somerset...