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KZN SPRING 2021

INVEST CONNECT COMMUNICATE COLLABORATE

ISSUE 14

Unrest response

Corporate titan

Workspaces

Fungi Fantastic

Business and civil society take a hard look at the future

Meet the man who runs Illovo

Wonderful ways to inspire work productivity

Midlands magic made from mushroom sheds

Multi Billion Bonanza Residential property special


ith the South African and global economy showing early signs of some recovery following 2020’s devastating economic slump, eThekwini Metro’s Team at Invest Durban has ramped up their vigorous drive to improve Durban’s positioning as one of Africa’s prime business destinations and to improve investor confidence in the City. This being an addition to the “Buy Local – Invest Local” myriad support being given to Durban’s existing businesses. Durban enjoys many investment opportunities, and via eThekwini’s Economic Recovery Plan, the Economic Development & Planning Cluster has doubled down on their efforts to engage and support business in the

Durban’s expanded investment marketing initiative, most recently at the main airports, eThekwini Municipality Mayor, Cllr Mxolisi Kaunda, said: “As one of the major Metropolitan Cities in South Africa, we knew we had to react quickly, decisively, and impactfully to support our businesses, the economy, and our people. Over one year into this pandemic, I am proud to confirm we have been doing just that. I therefore applaud all efforts by my teams, and those in business plus community structures whom have all pulled together to make the differences we now see.” The thrust of Invest Durban in this particular campaign is to improve investor confidence

eThekwini Economic RECOVERY PLAN I N V EST D U R BA N & “ B U Y LO CA L – I N V EST LO CA L” City, across South Africa, and across the world. Invest Durban is a unit within that cluster of the eThekwini Municipality, and works in partnership between the public and private sectors to stimulate, plus facilitate investment within the Durban metropolis. It is geared to delivering world-class investor support services, inclusive of investment promotion and marketing, foreign investment identification, attraction and facilitation, existing investment after-care and expansion, plus investment advocacy to improve the business environment. Commenting on Invest

in the City, position the City as a pro-active business destination, one with a great work-life balance, plus access to a host of identified catalytic projects across multiple sectors, in turn leading to additional prospects regarding the expansion of formal industrial clusters and the development of value chains, from the townships to the “high streets”. The eThekwini Municipality Mayor further commented that Durban has been working hard on a number of largescale projects which have the potential to make a significant regional impact. “Our catalytic projects

have been selected and accelerated for their scale in terms of employment creation, investment value and potential for revenue generation.” He cited the Point Waterfront as a catalytic project example, indicating that projections point to a potential investment value of R40-billion and the number of permanent employment opportunities to be created as close to 6 750. “This is an ambitious plan, with development to date linking the city’s beach promenade and Durban harbour. The 55ha site – which has already attracted significant investment – offers

a property use mix of office space, retail shops, residential dwellings and leisure options and is located immediately adjacent to the development of the new cruise line terminal in the harbour, backing on to the Waterfront, dovetailing well with the Waterfront precinct.” He further stressed that work was being undertaken to optimise the growth and operations of not just particular economic sectors and catalytic projects, but also in key nodes such as CBD urban renewal and building upgrades, tourism attractions and events, beachfront maintenance, and


township nodal upgrades. These were confirmed to be done according to a sustainable Town Planning & Environmental Framework package of approved plans. As the economy begins to reopen, Invest Durban’s goal is to robustly bring new levels of investment to Durban from across South Africa and the world. As Durban’s “First Stop Shop”, they are ideally positioned to introduce, support and facilitate investment into the City and its surrounds. Invest Durban collaborates closely with fellow eThekwini Units and other like-minded organisations, such as the Department of Trade & Industry – including Invest SA, TIKZN, the various Chamber of Commerce organisations, the KZN Growth Coalition and several State-owned enterprises, such as Dube TradePort, Transnet, and others. Mayor Kaunda further confirmed: “Collectively, we have one single-minded mission, which is to put Durban, KwaZulu-Natal firmly on the national and international investment agendas, and to vigorously

promote our region and her projects as premium investment destinations, ripe with opportunity.” Other flagship projects include the GO!Durban Transport Oriented Development system, regarded as a great enabler of transport and trade. This includes the CBD’s Centrum

partnership between Tongaat Hulett Developments and various spheres of Government. On Cornubia’s northern border there is also the Dube TradePort Special Economic Zone, a large-scale multi-modal business platform adjacent to King Shaka International Airport and in the heart of an

Precinct, which aims to expand business in the node between the Durban International Convention Centre, a related hotel, library, Council Chambers and the re-development of nearby Gugu Dlamini Park. Further major investment opportunities vest in the massive 1 300ha Cornubia mixed-use development north of Durban, a

emergent aerotropolis. Underpinning these property investments, there is further co-operation between the public and private sectors via formalised development of industrial cluster initiatives, and township business support. These all aim to draw together experience and expertise from commerce and industry, community and labour organisations,

Government and academia. Exciting new opportunities may be found within these innovative business and investment approaches. Current industrial cluster programmes include the KZN Clothing and Textile Cluster, Durban Automotive Cluster, Durban Chemical Cluster, eThekwini Maritime Cluster, KZN Furniture Incubator, plus the expanding Agri-business development programme. “The wealth of KwaZuluNatal is often consumed or exported in its raw or intermediate state. However, much more could be done to add value through further localised investment and processing. That is what our various industrial and project partnerships are focusing on,” Mayor Kaunda observed. Durban’s priority investment sectors include automotive and allied industries, logistics and logistics management, ICT and BPS, agri-processing, life sciences – inclusive of pharmaceuticals, medical device manufacturing and health facilities, as well as further tourism asset development. eThekwini Municipality Mayor, Cllr Mxolisi Kaunda confirmed: “The prospects for investment in these priority sectors is truly vast and encompasses tourism business opportunities and, crucially, the emergent oceans’ economy as well. In essence, Durban – with its strategic coastal location, excellent climate, ample land availability, the busiest seaport in southern Africa and an enviable lifestyle – is an exceptional travel, trade and investment destination. A destination we are taking to the rest of South Africa, Africa and the world, via this new airport marketing campaign.”

031 311 4227 invest@durban.gov.za www.invest.durban


Issue 14

SPRING 2021

COVER IMAGE: Sappi Saiccor Mill at Umkomaas. Picture: JON IVINS

W H AT ’ S I N S I D E

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INVEST

KZN

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EDITOR Greg ArdŽ PRODUCTION EDITOR Lorna King DESIGNER Kyle Griffin ADVERTISING Jenni McCallum 082 411 6401 GENERAL MANAGER Doody Adams CONTRIBUTORS Shirley le Guern Matthew Hattingh Anne Schauffer Beth Stols Antoinette McDonald Copyright: All material in this issue is subject to copyright and belongs to Famous Publishing unless otherwise indicated. No part of the material may be quoted, photocopied, reproduced or stored by an electronic system without prior written permission from Famous Publishing. Disclaimer: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publication, neither the authors nor the publisher will bear any responsibility for the consequences of any actions based on information contained herein. Neither do they endorse any products/services advertised herein. Material which appears under ‘Advertorial’ is paid for.

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Published by Famous Publishing www.famouspublishing.co.za Printed by Novus Print (Pty)

- 06 Guest column

Mervyn Abrahams: Programme Co-ordinator of the Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group

- 08 -

Leading a winning team

Dr Beverley Sukhdeo, GM of Sappi Saiccor Mill

- 12 Man with a purpose

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- 22 -

Africa’s key transport system on the ropes

Meet Gavin Dalgleish, Illovo Sugar Africa

KZN’S logistics dilemma

Spring of hope

New workspaces

- 14 -

KZN business leaders share their views on rebuilding KZN

- 28 Workspace trends in KZN

In compliance with the Protection of Personal Information Act 4, if you do not want to receive KZN Invest magazine for free, please email sarah.mackintosh@ famouspublishing.co.za For more information visit: www.famouspublishing.co.za

- 36 -

- 42 -

Residential property experts weigh in on the future

Developing Africa’s manufacturing leaders

Buoyant, battered or bruised?

- 40 Best of both worlds

Crowhurst Manor: home of TWIMS

Boosting manufacture

- 44 -

Artisanl hot house The Old Mushroom Farm

- 48 -

Making waves

Durban’s new passenger terminal


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SPRING 2021

ED’S LETTER

I

can be a woolly-headed idealist, often refusing to see reality for what it is. That reality being the fear that swirled around us during unrest and the prospect of it returning or shaping KZN’s future. And then I met Blessing Nyoni in the Bhambayi shack settlement where Gandhi lived in Durban. By the time I spoke to her the Phoenix flames had been doused and she was trying to unite viciously divided communities. She walked up to the Gandhi statue near her home and gently adjusted the icon’s broken spectacles as if she were tending to her living kin. She sighed wearily, “Ja, mkhulu (grandfather). I’m back again.” Her exhalation was loaded with pathos, as though the release was collective, on behalf of all peace-loving people struggling to get to grips with the turmoil unleashed on the province after Jacob Zuma was jailed. I don’t want to dwell on the villainy, suffice to say producing a magazine whose title is an exhortation to invest has been harder since July. Nyoni runs a self-help charity and deals with poverty, inequality and

Give peace a CHANCE

racism that weave together in the dire daily challenges some people face. She represents an ideal that brings people together and attempts to fill our leadership void and address service delivery failures. The ideal is seen against the reality of the mountain we have to climb in overcoming a host of challenges around accountability, poverty, inequality and opportunity. Nyoni’s fledgling peace committee poetically meets at the Gandhi

LEFT: DR ALBERTINA LUTHULI AT THE HOME IN GROUTVILLE WHERE SHE WAS RAISED BY HER FAMOUS FATHER, CHIEF ALBERT LUTHULI.

settlement. She says Gandhi’s story is about transformation. He overcame anger and racism to become a better person. “When I come here I ask Gandhi for wisdom ... what the peace committee is doing is an ideal, it is a dream when you consider the anger in our history. But I am part of that dream.”


ED’S LETTER

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ABOVE: BLESSING NYONI IN THE BHAMBAYI SHACK SETTLEMENT WHERE GANDHI LIVED IN DURBAN.

BE PART OF KZN INVEST Showcase our province. Showcase your business. Be part of our winning team as we reach business leaders and decision makers – people with the power to make a difference. Contact me to book your space. Jenni McCallum: 082 411 6401

And then I met Dr Albertina Luthuli at the home in Groutville where she was raised by her famous father, Africa’s first Nobel prize winner, Chief Albert Luthuli. It was beyond a privilege to walk on hallowed ground with her. A sprightly 89-years-old, she is delightful company. We were introduced by Cobus Oelofse, the energetic and charming CEO of the Ilembe Chamber of Commerce who is helping her raise the profile of the Luthuli Museum. I was entranced listening to Dr Luthuli’s account of her father’s selfless work and how he helped poor people. In the hours we spent together it morphed from a nostalgic bubble to something immensely hopeful. My meetings on the sites where Luthuli and Gandhi worked have supercharged me. I’m not mainlining on jet fuel just yet, but if we give space to the stories (past and present) about extraordinary

advocates for peace, we change the narrative. We shine a light where there is fear and darkness. Gandhi and Luthuli were extremely practical, hands-on development workers. “My father worked hard. He worked diligently. He was highly productive,” Dr Luthuli said. In this edition there are a host of stories seized with the unrest and our response to the evil that it represents. It is about good people doing practical things to help others, to improve and grow. It is about hope and I trust you find this thought provoking. I’m not sure if there are more reasons to despair. Maybe if doe-eyed optimists like me give more space in our heads and hearts to the likes of Blessing Nyoni and the Luthuli legacy, we’ll give peace a chance. gregarde@gmail.com


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G U E ST CO LU M N

Let’s just go SIMPLE Mervyn Abrahams is Programme Co-ordinator of the Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group. KZN INVEST spoke to him after the unrest

Q

Your Household Affordability Index tracks food price data from supermarkets and butcheries around South Africa, and in July this year (before the unrest) put the average cost of a poor family food basket at R4 137. Why is this index important? The average cost of the household food basket was R4 241,11 in August 2021 – it increased by 2,5% (R103,69) month-on-month, and 10% (R384,78) over the past year. The index is designed specifically to track and reflect the cost of foods and other critical expenses as purchased by most low-income households and workers in South Africa. It can accurately reflect inflation as experienced by low-paid workers, as well as its consequences. Families on low incomes spend differently and experience inflation differently to those families who are better off. Poorer families spend more money on fewer things – specifically food, electricity, and transport. It is these goods and services that have seen massive hikes in prices, while wage levels, even the National Minimum Wage, has seen below real inflationary increases. The PMBEJD HAI attempts to fill a gap in South Africa’s statistics which are skewed by inequality by being biased specifically to those who are excluded by their low expenditures. In a sense, the index reveals a more realistic picture of the conditions and experiences of black South Africans earning low wages,

A

ABOVE: MERVYN ABRAHAMS – PROGRAMME CO-ORDINATOR OF THE PIETERMARITZBURG ECONOMIC JUSTICE AND DIGNITY GROUP: STATS SHOW THAT 10,7 MILLION OR 48,7% OF BLACK SOUTH AFRICANS ARE UNEMPLOYED.

most of whom earn low wages. Your communication with stakeholders delves into Statistics South Africa’s unemployment data which says 10,2 million people are unemployed and a worker’s wage supports 4,3 people. This obviously deepens our instability? No country in the world can support this level of unemployment without massive social unrest, and yet many of us wake up and the surface of our lives seems smooth. Beneath this surface we have a situation that is untenable. The

Q

A

urgency to address both the historical economic injustices and the current precipitation of horrifyingly deepening unemployment, poverty, exclusion, marginalisation, and misery does not appear to be the front and centre of absolutely everything the government does right now. The anger at the government is escalating every day. People are enormously frustrated, asking where are we going? What does the future look like for my family? Why do you advocate for an extension of social grants? Do grants not create an unhealthy dependency on the State? How do you frame the discussion around this? We are in an emergency and any long-term economic restructuring will take time to gain traction. In the intermediate period – to keep people alive and maintain a level of demand for goods and services amongst the low-income sector which benefits the larger economy – we need crisis intervention. Welfare is expanded in times of crises. We either extend social grants or we watch as millions of our people starve; millions of our children become cognitively and physically stunted. We support the

Q

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G U E ST CO LU M N

extension of social grants because there is no other way right now to prevent hunger or to thwart off the dystopia that will come if we condemn millions of our children to yet another cycle of ever-deepening poverty. We support the extension of social grants because without them no one has a future. There will be no wealth, no economy, no civil state. Poverty is unhealthy. Black South Africans, two-thirds of whom live in poverty right now, are not the cause of their own poverty. Apartheid is the cause of poverty. Injustice is the cause of poverty. Wealth is the cause of poverty. Inequality is the cause of poverty. Exploitation, racism, marginalisation, exclusion are the causes of poverty. The recent unrest in KZN and Gauteng has shown that we must now all make space at the table because the walls can be ripped down. Higher walls and more spending on security cannot always keep us safe where millions are starving and crime is a means to survive. The unrest might have offered us yet another lesson that we must all change and all sacrifice for this beautiful country.

Q

You speak about the inability of people to rise above survival. How would you explain that? People often posit entrepreneurship as a solution: if you have enough grit and determination, you can make it. While entrepreneurship is part of the answer, it cannot be the only solution. Young people with good ideas in communities tell us they are not able to sell what they create because no one has money. We must therefore start by

A

We just need to recognise that what is good for my family is also good for yours. We all want a better future for our kids. Let’s start there supporting people to expand what they are already doing to survive. Take the next step up from survival. Therefore, we encourage the idea of livelihoods. Our problems are not supply side but demand side. Give people money and the market will respond. Jobs will be created. We must look at the economic

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system upside down. We need to start with money in our pockets in the frontend first. SA is regarded as the biggest welfare state in Africa with corruption and inefficiency levels sky high. Taxpayers are angry money is squandered when it could be used to bridge the social divide. How do you think we should frame the debate in light of this? We have some of the lowest wages in the world relative to the costs of goods and services, some of the highest unemployment rates in the world, and the highest inequity in the world. For a country also with astonishing wealth, if we do not share, then it is expected that welfare be used as a strategy to keep people in their place. All people in South Africa pay tax. VAT is levied on all goods and services. We are all taxpayers and we are all angry when our money is squandered, especially people who have less money to spend. We need proper governance. It is unlikely that our current leaders can lead us out of the mess we are in. We need new leaders, new ideas, new energy, passion and vision to assure those who pay tax that our taxes are used to invest in long-term positive outcomes for the country. How do we go about creating a caring state? What does that mean? How do we get business and civil society to engage considering the government trust deficit? We need a just state. We need economic justice, transformation, equity. We need to first recognise who we are, and where we are. We don’t have a choice anymore. People can no longer opt out of thinking and working through the future. We either find a way soon or we don’t. We could start with at least not doing any more harm. Not doing anything that deepens inequality, that deepens poverty and injustice. We just need to recognise that what is good for my family is also good for yours. We all want a better future for our kids. Let’s start there. Make sure everyone can eat proper nutritious food. Make sure every child gets an excellent education and the best healthcare. Make sure everyone can meet their basic needs so homes can be safe and functional and a place to grow and think and thrive. Let’s just go simple.

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BUSINESS

LEADING a winning team

H

eading up Sappi Saiccor Mill is the diminutive but powerful general manager, Dr Beverley Sukhdeo, an understated dynamo. She and her colleagues run the biggest of its kind wood pulp dissolving plant in the world, and its expansion – though

largely untrumpeted – is a boon to the local economy. The expansion project, dubbed Project Vulindlela (one who opens the way), was spurred by global demand for dissolving pulp, particularly from garment manufacturers who use it in the production of viscose. Project Vulindlela has involved about 2 000

At Sappi I have had the opportunity to work across manufacturing, technical, and marketing areas of our business

The R7,7-billion expansion at the Sappi Saiccor Mill in Umkomaas has been a monumental effort and is almost complete, a move that will boost foreign exchange reserves

construction jobs for over a year and has used over 30 000 tons of concrete. About half as much steel as was used to build the Eiffel Tower in Paris went into the upgrade, and the new structure was bolted on to the existing plant which continued operating. Vulindlela will boost the annual capacity of Saiccor


BUSINESS

ABOVE: ”I CHOSE THIS CAREER BECAUSE I ENJOY THE ENERGY,” SAYS DR BEVERLEY SUKHDEO, GM OF SAPPI SAICCOR MILL.

by 110 000 tons of dissolving wood pulp to 890 000 tons, increasing Sappi’s economic impact considerably. More than 1 300 people are employed at Saiccor on the KwaZulu-Natal South Coast and the business represents annual foreign currency earnings of R1,3-billion for South Africa. Sukhdeo’s work would

be regarded as foreign to many people, but she says running a massive business like Saiccor involves regular challenges and opportunities. To those unfamiliar with Saiccor, it produces dissolving pulp – a process where cellulose is extracted from tree fibre and sold to converters for use in products as diverse as textiles, clothing, cellophane wrap, pharmaceuticals and beauty and household products.

Viscose for the clothing industry is key and most of Saiccor’s product services the company’s largest customers, namely Birla and Lenzing in India and Europe. “Sappi Saiccor has consistently been recognised as a large earner of foreign revenue for South Africa (0,8% of total foreign revenue in 2020 despite Covid),” Sukhdeo says. Sappi’s direct valueadded contribution to KZN’s economy is R6,4-billion (including salaries, raw materials, maintenance and more). Sukhdeo says being at the helm of Saiccor during

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the Vulindlela upgrade has been a job characterised by challenge, Covid chief among them. “The project had to be delayed until it was safe to resume. This came at significant effort. We were fortunate to have a committed and competent team able to manage unprecedented events so effectively.” The Vulindlela project is being managed by a team under the leadership of Director: Projects, Wayne Weston, an engineer who has been involved at the mill for the better part of his working life. They have planned and overseen everything to do with the upgrade and expansion, working hand in glove with Sukhdeo, who prizes collaboration. “I am team oriented. Everyone has a role to play in the success. I try to lead by example, to be honest and trustworthy and to equip and support teams so that we achieve things we never thought were possible.” Sukhdeo tries to remain grounded and consistent while running a massive enterprise that employs a host of people from general labourers to scientists. “It is an extensive enterprise with complexity and magnitude, a value chain that must deliver on multiple platforms. That involves constant upskilling. We exist to build a thriving world and we do this by unlocking a natural resource. We do it to benefit our customers, our staff and our communities. We do that by unlocking the value of the whole tree, sustainably and efficiently, safely and with as little environmental impact as possible.” Sukhdeo has been Saiccor GM for over a year. Before that she was GM at Sappi’s Tugela Mill. She


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has a doctorate in business administration and an undergraduate degree in science. “In each position I have held I have just focused on doing my best, enjoying what I do and growing with my team. At Sappi I have had the opportunity to work across manufacturing, technical, and marketing areas of our business. Being a global company has given me the chance to work with many colleagues on different continents.” Sukhdeo draws inspiration from her Christian based beliefs. “My personal motto is that all things are possible. My mum is my inspiration – at 80 she lives life to the fullest. Her determination, care of others and willingness to try new things is extraordinary. She is a social media junkie

BUSINESS

and her arrival is usually announced by the loud music playing in her car.” Sukhdeo has been married to Daya for 30 years and they are parents to daughter Tevin, 26, and son Bryce, 18. When she is not working she loves family holidays, home and garden projects, and long walks. “I dislike complainers and have little tolerance for inconsiderate people. “No one is immune to bad decisions so we learn and move on. Mistakes must build us not break us.” Looking back on her career, Sukhdeo says she would give her 18-year-old self this advice: “Always be true to who you are. You will never please everyone. Take responsibility for your growth and development, invest in yourself. Life is short so make wise choices

that positively impact the quality of your life and those around you.” Sukhdeo reflects on her role as a woman in the traditionally male-oriented manufacturing industry. “Women in the business environment introduce

Vulindlela will boost the annual capacity of Saiccor by 110 000 tons of dissolving wood pulp to 890 000 tons diversity that promotes a more holistic perspective, thus allowing for more robust strategies and solutions. Generally, we value relationships, and this should help with building teams, encouraging participation,

recognising staff efforts, demonstrating concern for the well-being of others and improving employee/ stakeholder engagement.” Would she encourage women to pursue careers in engineering and science? “Science, engineering and technology are not gender-specific fields, yet stereotypes and cultural norms often discourage girls from considering careers in these fields. No longer do scientists have to be socially awkward men wearing glasses. The world needs more scientists to develop new technologies, solve practical problems, and make informed decisions – both individually and collectively. I chose this career because I enjoy the energy, the constant changes and opportunity to make a difference.”

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PROFILE

Man with a PURPOSE In boardroom parlance Gavin Dalgleish would be described as a corporate titan, but the man at the helm of Africa’s biggest sugar company is completely sans swagger

D

algleish is a 55-year-old Durbanite who loves pedalling along the promenade, fiddling around the house with DIY projects and cooking for his family and friends. He’s kind, clever and easy-going. He is also group managing director of Illovo Sugar Africa, an African company headquartered in Durban that employs 31 000 people in six countries. Illovo is Africa’s biggest sugar producer (1,7-million tons a year) and is 100% owned by international conglomerate Associated British Foods. Dalgleish’s father was an instrument artisan who sent his son to George Campbell Technical High School. After school young Dalgleish earned a master’s degree in chemical engineering and his first job was at Illovo’s Sezela mill on the KZN South Coast. He spent 20 years with the company before being appointed head of an Australian yeast company, but returned to Illovo in Durban in 2010 and was appointed Illovo group managing director in 2013. For the last eight years Dalgleish has been at the helm of a business empire that has spent billions expanding operations in South Africa, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania. For someone commanding a company as big as Illovo, Dalgleish is thoroughly understated and shuns the limelight. “I try not to take myself too seriously,” he said in a recent interview. “I poke fun and try to find common ground, hopefully to lead folk to a place they wouldn’t otherwise go. Early in my career I learnt the joy of being part of a team. I got people to do things by cajoling and being nice, rather than using rank. It proved

effective – and if I reflect on my career I will remember the people rather than the outcomes.” Massive capex and big engineering have contributed to a healthy bottom line, but Dalgleish relishes the symphony of people and is able to harness this by staying approachable. “I take the responsibility of what I do seriously. It is an honour and privilege. If I were to succeed, I would define that around issues of custodianship, authenticity, sincerity and legacy. I never pretend to be the complete leader. There’s nothing special about me. I try to get the best

“There’s a lot to learn and understand so you can be effective. Being predisposed to learning allows you to be more effective” from people and leave the worst. Dalgleish says friends from his teen years keep him grounded and while he’s modest, he’s no shrinking violet. With a keen intellect and a lifetime in agri-processing, he makes for erudite conversation with a revealing emphasis on purpose. Illovo’s size underscores its responsibility to stakeholders. “It is an economic spine around which many people determine their lives. I feel humbled and grateful to be part of a capable team that delivers to stakeholders.” Illovo’s goal is to be part of a thriving “pan-African, consumer-centric agribusiness”, which Dalgleish says is about

engaged partnerships rather than a paternalistic approach to business. He cringes at the sight of arrogant South Africans strutting across Africa. “A balanced relationship between equals, that is the true north of our business. We want a healthy relationship between all the stakeholders.” Treating Africa as one country is a mistake many make. “Our perspectives are richer through being in six countries. South Africans need to learn a bit of humility. We can be a bit forceful and charge hard. There’s a lot to learn and understand so you can be effective. Being predisposed to learning allows you to be more effective.” So, should we read anything into the fact that Illovo is spending vast amounts elsewhere in Africa and not in South Africa? The answer, in short, is that while the company’s head office is historically associated with Durban, its business elsewhere is much bigger. Illovo owns more sugar farms in Zambia, Tanzania and Malawi and its sugar brands there are in strong demand. All this is not to say Illovo’s local operations are without significant impact. The subject enlivens Dalgleish, especially when he talks about a project Illovo is involved in with the SA Treasury to grow more cane on the KZN South Coast. His colleague, Illovo SA managing director Mamongae Mahlare, announced earlier this year that R126-million had been invested in a project that has resulted in 350 tons of sugar entering the local supply chain and generating annual income of R80-million. The project was a role model for co-operation between the public and private sector in agriculture


Issue 14

PROFILE

BELOW: GAVIN DALGLEISH, GROUP MANAGING DIRECTOR OF ILLOVO SUGAR AFRICA: “I TAKE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF WHAT I DO SERIOUSLY.”

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The benefits of being based in Durban Q: What does Durban need to do to shine its light brighter on the world stage, without being grandiose? A: “The city is almost like a member of the family. We all grew up together. Illovo is over 100 years old and our heritage has deep roots in Durban. If you are going to be critical you have to ask what you’ve done to improve things. When I lived in Australia I thought it could be better at certain things rather than look to be validated by outsiders. Durban has a lot to offer. We should be the best Durban. We have a great quality of life with fantastic outdoor activities. We have great schools. Our service delivery is much better than it was. Durban is part of us and we are content to be here.”

Hardest Lesson

Q: It’s often easy to talk about success but it is the mistakes we grow most from. Tell us about one of your biggest blunders and why you are better off for it? A: “Because I don’t take myself too seriously, I’ve made incremental blunders. I try to consult incrementally too. I have made some bad choices in respect of some people but I’m quite intuitive and on the whole I think I have got it more right than wrong.”

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that leveraged concession funding, industry investment and loans to seed jobs. In short, a project to develop 3 000 hectares of small-scale grower cane land in KZN, creating 860 sustainable jobs. “The administration of this money (by the Treasury) has been exemplary. This was last done about 30 years ago and was marked by big business arrogance. Now the community is involved and the stories are wonderful,” Dalgleish says. It is led by women immersed in the community rather than tenderpreneurs, and their money circulates in the local economy. Among much more, it creates sustainable rural businesses, buys uniforms and builds and paints houses. It was an

example of social mobilisation and catalytic funding in a project with good prospects of longevity. “We are proud of this. Tongaat Hulett has done something similar in Zululand and it talks to the value of rural jobs and the significant role that agri-processing can play in the economy.” This is a vital antidote to ghastly unemployment statistics that everyone has a responsibility to address. “People need to feel they are part of society, not on the margins. We will not have a workable social model if we have high levels of unemployment – and projects like this are making farming cool again. They enable you to run a business in the sugar supply chain, to be part of a thriving model in rural areas.”

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Q: What are you reading at the moment? A: A Promised Land by Barack Obama. Obama is great and if I had the chance I’d like to thank him for bringing dignity to Madiba’s memorial. I was at the airport during the memorial and I remember when Obama started talking, people went quiet and were drawn to the TV screens. He had the right gravitas.

Downtime

Q: What do you do when you aren’t working? A: I try building resilience by spending quality time riding my mountain bike or with family and friends. I like to cook (ala Heston Blumenthal) and do DIY on things that have an easy sense of completion and are a world away from Powerpoint.


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SPRING 2021

KZN REBUILD

Spring of HOPE

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f July’s events have taught us any lessons it’s this: business, civil society, communities and ordinary lawabiding citizens cannot “depend on the government to secure property and lives”, yet we daren’t let things lie, leaving politicians and officials to dither. We must band together and insist that those appointed to leadership in different levels of government are up to the job. And we must find ways to help poor people become self-sufficient and entrepreneurial. That’s the strong medicine prescribed by Solly Suleman, a pharmacist by profession and president of the Minara Chamber of Commerce. He had no quarrel with black economic empowerment, but warned: “If you put people who are not competent in a strategic position, you are going to have a situation where the masses suffer. The ground was very fertile in terms of poverty – people need food, shelter, jobs. We have had enough of incompetent people put into positions. There has to be a move now.” Suleman, whose organisation represents 1 000 mostly Muslim members, said for too long business people had “sat back” in the face of incompetence, corruption and state capture. “How do we ensure our leadership is competent and accountable?” It is a difficult question, but one society dodged at its peril. “These kinds of things (unprecedented rioting) can come back.” The 67-year-old’s own

It is time to rebuild KwaZulu-Natal’s shattered economy and if our season of darkness is to give way to a spring of hope, we must first look to ourselves, writes Matthew Hattingh business interests were among the many that took a knock in the mayhem – though he got off lightly. Sparkport pharmacy in Durban’s CBD, suffered less than R1-million in damage, lost stock and equipment, but reopened a week after criminals bust in. Amid the pandemonium, the group’s Overport branch kept trading, providing an essential service to the long queues of people who came from far for their scripts. South Africans had shown their resilience, but for thousands of businesses, harder hit or with fewer resources, bouncing back is hard to do. They would need a mix of grants and loans, said Suleman, who welcomed support initiatives being put in place. These included eThekwini’s proposed rates holiday for affected businesses; a waiving of rentals for traders using municipal sites; and Unemployment Insurance Fund assistance for workers left jobless. “But it needs to be done quickly and fairly,” he said, suggesting the government rope in a professional entity to handle relief grants in order to speed up the process and avoid abuses. Insurance payouts were vital for businesses battling to find their feet and here the state-owned South African Special Risk

Insurance Association (Sasria), would play a central role as the only insurer that covers claims caused by riots. Sasria had agreed to comment on measures it was putting in place to deal with a flood of claims. But Rowan Jones, chief executive of Compendium Insurance Brokers praised the insurer. “To date Sasria has responded extremely positively and the insurance industry as a whole has rolled up its sleeves to assist in this crisis,” he said.

He felt some concern as to whether his clients would have the energy to rebuild their businesses and livelihoods, particularly while “poverty and anger” remained a threat. But, he was buoyed by the knowledge that the “Rainbow Nation resilience is still out there and will fight back and rebuild our country”. The extent of the destruction and losses from looting were difficult to quantify, with some estimates putting it at more than R20-billion for the KwaZulu-Natal economy alone. Nor does this take into account the fallout on future earnings. At the time of publication, the South African Property Owners Association – representing commercial and industrial owners – was


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still tallying up so could not say what percentage of its members had suffered losses, nor put a price to it. “Overall, we believe about 3 000 stores were looted and damaged,” said chief executive Neil Gopal. Many of these were in malls which proved a magnet for looters, but what relief is there for tenants who may have lost everything? Gopal said landlords were on the rack themselves. “Property owners (gave) over R3-billion worth of rental relief during Covid and continue to do so. This is not a sustainable situation, especially with the ongoing effects of the lockdowns, restrictions on trading, no economic growth, high unemployment and the effects of the looting spree,” he said. The association was lobbying the government for relief for its members, “particularly at local level with rates rebates”. It was also engaging with the state on the security of malls. “We believe there should be more visible policing as private mall security is not adequate to handle such volatile situations,” said Gopal. Getting security right was vital for the recovery and long-term health of the KwaZulu-Natal economy, said economist Mike Schussler. “Look at the burning points and address these with law and order.” This must go beyond snuffing out the embers of insurrection and jailing instigators (vital though this was, he noted, for discouraging other troublemakers). The free flow of goods must be secured, particularly on the N3 and N2 and to the province’s ports. More highway patrols were needed and security perimeters around bridges.

Like others, including KwaZulu-Natal Agricultural Union chief executive Sandy La Marque, Schussler identified the Mooi River Toll Plaza as a severe risk to the economy. Its relocation or replacement with smart tolling would reduce attacks on trucks. He predicted a “little bit of a shift away” from KZN

The free flow of goods must be secured, particularly on the N3 and N2 and to the province’s ports and Durban as more road hauliers – particularly international operators – routed cargo through ports in other provinces and neighbouring countries, notably Maputo and Beira, in Mozambique, and Nambia’s Walvis Bay. He warned of pain for the property market; more marginal businesses folding or electing not to reopen after insurance payouts; and rising costs of doing

business, particularly to meet security bills. If a wand could be waved and the economist was made the province’s potentate with wide powers, how would he fix things? It would be a long-term process, said Schussler, but he offered the following remedies: Look after existing businesses before chasing after new investment; Quit spending to secure BEE investment and prize anyone willing to invest; Help as many people as possible into work (he was critical of the reintroduction of the R350 social distress grant and the cost of having so many people on welfare); Uncork bureaucratic bottlenecks; Encourage independent power producers; Sort out KZN’s big service delivery problems like the South Coast water supply; Rout the construction mafia; and Order the KZN ANC to sort out and arrest crooks in its ranks regardless of faction. The last on the wishlist would be a difficult pill to get down, but these were

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“drastic times”. Windfalls of the let-nocrisis-go-to-waste variety aside, were there any silver linings? Stores and warehouses will have to be restocked, torched trucks replaced, goods and equipment imported to replace those stolen or destroyed, all which created opportunities. “We are just super busy with all this nonsense going on. We have a mountain of work at the moment,” an independent surveyor for the marine and insurance industries told KZN Invest, adding his surveyor colleagues at other companies were “swamped”. Then there was the repair and reconstruction work. “It is anticipated that in the short term, there will be some work for smaller to medium-sized contractors,” said Vikashnee Harbhajan, executive director of Master Builders KwaZulu-Natal. However, she cautioned that continuing work depended on continued reinvestment by owners and investors and the value of insurance cover in place. Harbhajan was also concerned about the effect of the rioting on investor confidence and noted that growth in KZN’s construction industry had been on the decline in the past few years and its contribution to gross domestic product had fallen. “Business and government need to work together to build resilience and restore trust to attract investors to the industry. There needs to be a clear demonstration that the matter has been investigated and measures put in place to mitigate a recurrence of similar incidents. Security measures need to be increased and appropriate business relief implemented,” she said.

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KZN REBUILD

Keketso Motšoene MANAGING EXECUTIVE OF ABSA KZN AND MPUMALANGA

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How does business and civil society respond to the unrest? Businesses exist to respond to the needs of people and equally are directed by people. We need to aid the project of rebuilding both infrastructure and the confidence in KZN. We are all concerned about the impact of the unrest on the attractiveness of living and doing business in our province. The role of business should be in partnering with civil society and dealing with both the immediate needs of the destitute and the long-term commitment of rebuilding.

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In this process what must business leadership do to extend the partnership so more people on the fringes of society feel they have a stake in the enterprise we call KZN? At times different segments of the community believe they can do it alone. As the business community we need to guard against this blindspot and truly integrate our efforts, and solve this as a collective leadership cohort encompassing all sectors and role players. How do we resuscitate the economy? What are our priority areas? Assist as many businesses and consumers as possible to remain participants in the economy. We need to kick start the economy given the dire challenges of the pandemic.

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proposed a programme, but Suleman said perennial issues remain unresolved. The burning of trucks has been happening for a few years, as have mafia business forums. “The lack of action from the government means the private sector pays the price and ultimately the fiscus will receive far lower taxes.” “We need to ensure that

Solly Suleman MINARA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESIDENT Solly Suleman has been strident in his criticism of the government and called on business to formulate a private sector security plan to protect itself, and believes that business and civil society had to co-operate and demand the government deliver on its mandate. “Civil society mobilised

very quickly and effectively to protect our suburbs and some businesses and hence we are still standing today.” But, Suleman says businesses should invest in intelligence capacity to anticipate threats. Another important task, he said, was for a joint operating committee of business, civil society and government to caucus the way forward. The eThekwini Economic Council had met and

Hungry people are angry people – and although the government has a plan, the proof of the pudding is in the eating” promises are delivered upon or we hold back our rates and taxes and decide how to disburse. Civil servants do not seem to understand that the money that comes into the coffers of the government is the hardearned money of the private sector that has to be spent efficiently and effectively.” Suleman said it was a radical proposal, but

business was entitled to have a say in how its taxes were spent, in order to bypass corrupt and inefficient governments, as well as to rather spend money uplifting people. People suffered the lack of service delivery “while many incompetent politicians and civil servants enjoy the fruits of our taxes without seeing the need to work for their income”. Suleman said society has to address inequality and racism and work out how to empower people when state funds intended for this purpose have been wasted. “If we don’t address this as a matter of urgency then we have to understand that hungry people are angry people – and although the government has a plan, the proof of the pudding is in the eating.” Resuscitating the economy means cutting red tape; providing urgent loan funding to rebuild, restock and restaff businesses. The government should consider outsourcing more services to better equipped private sector operators.


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Dale Tomlinson THE HARDY BOYS This is somewhat difficult to write, the topic being a little foreign to me. Normally when I write it is informed by fact or at the very least rooted in something I am currently witnessing or have a meaningful knowledge of and affinity with. But when asked for my sense on the state of the business sentiment in KZN post the ravages of the recent turbulence, the incarceration of a very polarising public figure and a heavy coating of Covid thrown in for good measure, I find myself a little out of my depth. That doesn’t mean I don’t have an opinion so here goes. My own business journey has been a very entrepreneurial one, peppered with many potholes and hurdles. What this journey has afforded me is the opportunity to get a meaningful look into a plethora of diverse businesses and to probe some exceptional minds on their views, motivations and ideologies. My views are based on my own strong opinions and clearly informed by those businesses and leaders as they navigate these turbulent times. These are no longer potholes or hurdles we are facing – when we take a hard look at our ability to discern hope through the metaphorical quagmire of uncertainty. Building a sustainable business in a healthy and functioning economic landscape is difficult enough but when the very foundation you are building on turns to porridge the questions you ask take on a whole new

complexion and intensity. Firstly, you need a modicum of economic stability and an infrastructure that functions – everyday. But when it becomes abundantly apparent that this is not the case, that is when your strategy of revival, survival and growth has to be subjected to a newfound scrutiny. In the absence of a

So yes, there is hope and positivity, but with provisos and a heavy dose of accountability functioning government and competent leadership, of which we have neither, the role of business becomes pivotal to the wellbeing of the country and the millions of South Africans depending on it for their very existence. In mature, evolved economies the contract between government and business should be strategically and intellectually symbiotic. Very simplistically, one

creates stability and a fertile environment for growth and investment while the other generates employment opportunities and the tax base that feeds the furnace of human and fiscal enterprise. In South Africa, sadly, there is no such contract. We have a government that has an avaricious obsession with its own myopic wellbeing and its own selfserving durability. Business sadly is largely seen as the enemy, a threat to our delusional governments debilitating “autocracy” and not the very life force that could emerge as the panacea to our current malaise. In truth it is business that is the functioning life force that keeps this malnourished shadow of its former self still upright, albeit on a zimmer frame. The business leaders I have interacted with are still remarkably hopeful that this fiercely resilient country will prevail. This has been bolstered by the coming together of those “good” South Africans when recent events threatened their families and livelihoods. This is the spirit that gives us hope and the motivation

to continue to invest and build. What is very evident is that the trust between business and government is all but broken. Business, whether it be local, global, multi-national giants or local entrepreneurs, needs to forge a new covenant with the government. Not one where it is subservient but one where it takes the lead, holds the government accountable and withholds the fruits of its endeavours if the government does not put the people of this inspirational land before itself. Business needs its own intellectual and inspirational “insurrection” where it attracts the much needed investment, creates livelihoods, owns and maintains vital infrastructure and equally switches the “power” off when the government does not deliver on its mandate. So yes, there is hope and positivity, but with provisos and a heavy dose of accountability. Understandably, more than ever people are looking at a plan B should this fragile trust between those that “should” and those that “do” breaks down completely. Hopefully plan B will never be actioned.


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What should business and civil society do to help articulate the way forward? The starting point would be to acknowledge some of the contributing factors that inflamed the devastating unrest. The economy was struggling for a few years which was suddenly exacerbated by the pandemic and its long-drawn impact thus worsening unemployment and poverty. The way forward is a journey that starts with rebuilding trust and confidence, followed by more actions than words and a shared responsibility to continue to do the right thing and hold others accountable for the same. We will all need to be committed to economic and social reforms with an emphasis of sustainable community building as the foundation. What should business leadership do to extend the partnership so more people feel they have a stake in the enterprise we call KZN? More businesses will likely have to adopt shared value as part of their strategy and operations. Leaders should promote that their workforces remain a part of and invested in the various communities we serve. We will need to continue to commit to an inclusive economy with social cohesion. FNB remains committed to uplifting the educational and health needs of our society. We have provided significant support to the early childhood centres and their families, old age homes and frail care centres as well as support to public health care facilities. We are committed to increasing our footprint within the township economies, stimulating entrepreneurship and employment with the cost effective and business coaching tools available. How do we resuscitate the economy? If you could identify three key priority areas, what would they be? The KZN economy will strongly rebound if trust and confidence levels improve. Three focus areas to accelerate the bounce back in the economy would be the following: Promote and support small business development. Public private partnerships to unlock the potential of the province’s key strategic assets.

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Continued private-private partnerships as this was one of the positive outcomes of leveraging off each other during the crisis. The bank is providing relief to clients by starting with personalised calls to customers offering empathy and support. Various finance relief measures are offered to directly impacted clients and would be similar in some respects to the relief offered to good standing clients arising from the pandemic. FNB have instituted mobile ATM’s and have mobile

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the N3 at Mooi River, for example, where the entire economy is choked by a blockade? Our province has four main corridors which could be a serious advantage more than a threat: Air: King Shaka and Dube Tradeport have massive potential. Sea: Our two ports, Durban and Richards Bay, could be globally competitive. Road: Our N3 corridor through Gauteng can connect us through Africa. Rail: There is significant potential given the scale of transport of various goods and people let alone the carbon footprint resulting. What have been the big losses in key sectors that you are aware of? Apparently citrus and dairy losses alone were huge. The wholesale and retail sector will likely bounce back following the insurance and rebuild process. Agriculture will also strengthen as the economy strengthens. Industries such as tourism and hospitality are likely to be the most severely impacted until sufficient action and awareness is created to increase confidence levels. The manufacturing sector may also have to face challenges of volatility in exchange rates and electricity supply. Entrepreneurs are resilient and many have survived one crisis after another and we hopefully will adapt and respond to the environment. Sector focused solutions and partnerships are critical in ensuring an accelerated recovery. We will promote thought leadership discussions to connect like-minded people, consider customised finance solutions and restore the KZN economy. What is your estimate of the damage and loss to the KZN economy as a result of the July unrest? Tricky question. At face value it seems that first estimates publicly available suggest a R20-billion direct impact. The indirect impact of cost to supply chains is yet to be determined. We are hopeful that large multi-nationals remain invested and resident in our province and that businesses that were damaged/ destroyed commit to the rebuild. Confidence levels are probably the most noteworthy fix and this is invaluable as it would then allow us all to unlock the full potential of our beautiful province together.

Asheen Magjee PROVINCIAL HEAD OF FNB BUSINESS branches available to accelerate access to banking, in particular for the SASSA grant recipients. We continue to encourage customers to use our digital channels for most needs, including the FNB App, online banking and cellphone banking. Many South African businesses have adapted from one crisis to another and we will continue to support our clients rebuild their businesses and restore their dreams. How do we learn from the mistakes of the riots; how do we create alternative strategies to strengthen our vulnerabilities like on

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The heart of help beats in us all That’s why we’ve supported affected communities, individual clients, and businesses in KZN and Gauteng with over R21 million worth of help. As our Social Impact (Care) team continues to collaborate with non-profit organisations, community volunteers and forums to raise funds and provide humanitarian support, we invite you to join us by donating cash or eBucks to help those in need. You can donate cash and/or eBucks to Care, a welfare and humanitarian cause initiative that provides emergency relief via nav>>Care on the FNB App. Let’s be the change. FNB App

Bank of #TheChangeables Terms and conditions apply. A division of FirstRand Bank Limited. An Authorised Financial Services and Credit Provider (NCRCP20).


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Thami Sitole PRESIDENT OF THE ZULULAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

This era requires extraordinary, selfless leadership, characterised by a keen interest in uniting South Africans towards a common goal, with the objective of not only sustaining the economy, but ensuring it grows and benefits all. Leadership in both business and civil society must have that objective. Our economy has not performed as we envisaged, and the recent vandalism and destruction of infrastructure will further increase

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the burden. We have to rebuild in an inclusive manner where a community participation framework is required that ensures business and communities take ownership of the instruments that drive the economy. Civil society needs to focus our communities on things that unite us and cultivate an environment for the youth to work together in rebuilding our economy. Government and business leaders must come up with a different framework, one that creates an environment where both business and local communities benefit in real terms on investments made in their communities. Consultations with local communities on what will be developed is required from leadership. This will enable communities to organise participation in the proposed development. They should be encouraged to form partnerships to participate in the economy. The conversation should go beyond creating local jobs – it must be about creating job creators in townships and rural areas. An ownership framework is required. Inclusive rebuild programmes must ensure communities participate in the economy. For example, people must be encouraged to be part of the supply chain where they produce and supply to malls and shopping centres. People will not only support these businesses, but will also feel as though they partly own the businesses. We should have three priorities in resuscitating the economy:

Entrepreneurship and SMME participation in rebuilding key infrastructure affected by the protest action. The government and business sector should prioritise training and development of the skills required by the industry to create sustainable jobs and economic growth. The funding model or framework to sustain operations/start-up capital should be part of a package to support small businesses in real terms. The government needs to improve safety and security to enable businesses to operate in a predictable and stable environment. Increasing investor confidence will attract large investments to create sustainable jobs and stimulate economic growth. Encourage the established smallscale retail within townships and rural areas, and couple this with skills development – particularly for local manufacturing and services that come from local communities. We have to increase the safety and security of supply chains. We have to look at infrastructure development focusing on new routes and increasing the use of rail. The retail sector has been mostly affected, which tampers with food security. There are potentially massive job losses which will have a major impact on communities that depend on these jobs. There is an opportunity to create new jobs through an infrastructure rebuild programme that uses local; and lastly, the government and business should do a skills audit around the necessary skills.


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Renzo Scribante ENTREPRENEUR Maybe this had to happen for the government to wake up and realise what big and small businesses contribute to the economy. Without business our nation starves. We are resilient and we will bounce back to a degree.

Some businesses were able to weather the unrest but some with limited cash flow and looted or destroyed stocks and tools, have struggled to restart their enterprises. Will they be covered by insurance? Some lost everything, some don’t have the energy, let alone the finances, to rebuild. You need passion to rebuild, but leadership

Adding to the social and economic fallout of the Covid-19 pandemic, the unrest and looting that took place in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July was a major wake-up call for South Africa. Although the destruction of property and livelihoods was devastating and has set the country’s economic recovery back significantly, I believe it is a watershed moment that has the potential to set us on a more sustainable path. I am referring specifically to the new level of focus and collaboration between government and business post the unrest that resulted in a clear, action-based response. Business has worked with the government in various ways for years, and is currently collaborating on issues ranging from local industry development to land reform initiatives and social and economic development, including supporting South Africans during Covid-19. But the riots brought business and government together with a new urgency to stabilise and secure the country, provide relief, support rebuilding, and accelerate inclusive economic recovery. Government opened the door for us to help and we did all we could to jointly ensure that food supplies were secured, people were fed, the army was housed and

CEO RCL catered for, and routes were reopened. Being called together to share information and work out a common action strategy was, in my view, a significant affirmation by the government of business’ role in supporting the economy and driving

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on what we need to grow. If we take too long to do this, we lose people who can help rebuild this country. It is going to take some drastic changes. Take for example municipal rates in Durban. They are among the highest in the country. It takes months to get development approvals. We restrict foreign investment and skills in an attempt to redress the ills of the past. All governments have a tough job. They’re never perfect. Corruption is a worldwide phenomenon. I just wish our government would look to the future and invest in maintenance and growth. Create a climate where business can grow. Businesses create jobs.

is critical, it gives support and confidence. We have difficult days ahead. I doubt our government will ever make a contract and keep to it. But this is the time for real change. Not just talk. If we don’t change the narrative of South Africa now, especially in Durban, we will starve ourselves. Questions around black economic empowerment, certainty around basics like electricity, water and municipal services, need to be drastically improved. If the government doesn’t allow businesses to continue investing with confidence and for positive change, we have a big problem. We need to put colour, racial tensions and the past of our country behind us and really focus

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strategic execution. When we work together with a common vision, we get things done. This brings me to the question of where to from here? While the causes of the unrest are complex, they were certainly fuelled by high levels of social frustration driven by rising unemployment, poor living conditions and the slow pace of change. A prerequisite for recovery is an environment where people’s basic needs are met, leadership is held accountable, and business is able to operate securely and provide jobs. If the government lays the foundations for this decisively and transparently, the business sector can provide actionbased support and help bring the social stability we need. There is no doubt that recent events have battered business confidence and dented our image as a country. But teetering on the edge of the proverbial cliff has definitely sparked a new unity among South Africans. It showed how business, civil society and government can each play their part in a more sustainable future. Let’s not miss this opportunity to see and do things differently. We’ve seen what we can do together – now let’s do more.

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LO G I ST I CS

Africa’s key transport system ON THE ROPES Logistics – at the heart of KZN’s economy – has been hit by Covid, civil unrest and a debilitating cyber-attack on the ports. Supply chains need special protection and nurturing, writes Shirley le Guern

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cting quickly, a few corporates secured short-term gap facilities while waiting to rebuild, leaving others to contemplate trading out of Johannesburg. Logistics experts fear that in some instances this will mean “double shipping” goods. Containers ordinarily unpacked for redistribution from Durban would now go directly to Johannesburg. Goods would then return to KZN, pushing up costs and elevating the prices of essential goods. A crucial local warehousing/distribution centre link in the supply chain has been damaged in addition to the devastation in areas like Cornubia, Springfield Park, Riverhorse Valley and Westmead. The impact of the devastation on smaller KZN towns from Bulwer to Babanango to Bergville has yet to be counted. According to a KZN

Agricultural Union (Kwanalu) survey, 55% of rural towns have been hard hit and food security threatened. Fractured supply chains will affect cities and towns. The destruction of massive logistics facilities such as Sequence Logistics in Hammarsdale,

“The cyber-attack on Transnet, which resulted in a virtual standstill for 12 days, is the latest in a series of severe supply chain shocks” Ayoba Cold Storage in Chesterville, Value Logistics in Cato Ridge and RTT in Riverhorse Valley as well as wholesalers in Briardene, will have the worst impact on the province’s poorest. Scarcity drives up prices: maize meal from local spaza shops doubled within

a week of the riots. Food insecurity was also compounded by the cyberattack that brought ports to a standstill. The South African Meat Processors Association (Sampa) and the South African Association of Meat Importers & Exporters (AMIE SA), appealed to government to help move about 8 000 temperature-controlled “reefer” containers that were stacking up in the port inland where goods could be tested, cleared and distributed instead of rotting. Processing in Durban was impossible as at least 55% – or 40 000m³ of cold storage – as well as laboratory facilities were severely damaged. Ordinarily, AMIE moves between 45 and 50 containers a day through the Durban port. When permission to begin transporting the backlog inland to City Deep came through, transport by rail at just 98 containers a week was permitted. Each train

takes four days. The resulting food shortages would be felt most by the poor who rely on chicken and processed meat as a primary protein source, said Paul Matthew, CEO of AMIE SA. Although one of the six cold storage facilities was reopened, it could take anything from three to 18 months to restore capacity and resume operations in Durban. All of this has exposed the fragility of KZN’s logistics sector and South Africa’s supply chains. The South African Association of Freight Forwarders (SAAFF) reacted by establishing the Supply Chain Security Working Group which it co-chairs together with the Department of Trade and Industry. This aims to put in place contingency and longterm plans.


LO G I ST I CS

Said SAAFF chairperson, Juanita Maree: “Loss of trust, reputational damage, decreasing investor confidence, companies choosing to avoid using South Africa’s ports resulting in the loss of jobs and slow economic growth. These are just some of the consequences of massive disruptions to South Africa’s supply chains in recent months. The cyber-attack on

Transnet, which resulted in a virtual standstill for 12 days, is the latest in a series of severe supply chain shocks.” All businesses, government departments and state-owned entities needed to have contingency plans in place to not only restore daily operations as quickly as possible but also to ensure much-needed predictability into the supply chain, SAAFF said.

“We need to rebuild trust with importers and exporters (the cargo owners) to ensure that logistics networks can support their brand promises to their end customers, the public at large. While some stability

BELOW: VALUE LOGISTICS IN CATO RIDGE WAS BADLY AFFECTED BY THE RECENT RIOTS WHICH WILL IMPACT ON THE PROVINCE’S POOREST.

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has now been restored at Transnet, SAAFF calls on all stakeholders – from the private and public sectors – to work as a collective structure to ensure that these disruptions do not happen again. The transport nodes need to be developed and reinforced in the correct balance. Waterside, terminals, road and rail need to function together with a strong supportive and escalation structure in the centre that will ensure sustainability and predictability in order to support regional and international trade,” she said. Master mariner and director at legal firm Norton Rose Fulbright, Malcolm Hartwell, believes Durban’s supply chain woes might even go deeper. “In the short term, businesses, insurers and the


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poor will feel the immediate effect of the civil unrest that seized KZN, Gauteng and the N3 umbilical cord joining these provinces. In the medium to long term, the riots will have a severe negative impact on KZN and the massive recent investments by private, regional and state investors in the region and the logistics industry,” he explained. Hartwell said the looting added insult to the recent injuries after the government’s announcement that it intended developing Gqeberha as the main container hub for South Africa, denying Durban the economic benefits of being the continent’s gateway. The vulnerability of the N3 corridor, already exposed by the sporadic violent incidents allegedly relating to employment of foreign truck drivers, was thrown into sharp relief by the riots. “Companies will be questioning the security of

LO G I ST I CS

all the facilities that have mushroomed along the N3 particularly in the Cato Ridge area over the last few years. These have been built in response to government’s assurances that the Durban port would continue to develop as southern Africa’s premier container hub. Comfort was found in the

the growth of the Richards Bay and Dube TradePort Special Economic Zones which are predicated on efficient logistics. “It was anticipated that further specialist terminals such as the gas terminal in Richards Bay, passenger terminal in Durban and the ever-growing container

“KZN industries will, hopefully, commit to rebuilding what has been damaged as well as investing in the expansion of what is still Africa’s most sophisticated transport system considerable investment made by the Port Authority, eThekwini and KZN in improving port efficiencies and developing the ports and N3 corridor.” It is well documented that investment in transport infrastructure generates the greatest return for the economy. This is evident in

terminal in Durban, would continue to add to the local coffers and employment base,” Hartwell said. Instead, there is now a very real possibility that goods that were entering via Durban could be rerouted to harbours in neighbouring countries. “Unless (we find) a long-

ABOVE: DUBE TRADEPORT SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONE – PREDICATED ON EFFICIENT LOGISTICS.

term sustainable solution to the rage, inequality and political/criminal causes of the unrest, our neighbours will continue to capitalise on the fractures exposed.” Geographically, Gauteng will probably continue to export and import through KZN, but the Maputo corridor may look increasingly attractive to the likes of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and the DRC. But, because KZN’s logistics industry is highly developed and sophisticated, Hartwell remains optimistic that there is a solution. “KZN industries will, hopefully, commit to rebuilding what has been damaged as well as investing in the expansion of what is still Africa’s most sophisticated transport system.”

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CONNECT CONNECT GLOBALLY GLOBALLY

2 SECTORS: SECTORS: SECTORS: AGRICULTURE/ AGRICULTURE/ AGRICULTURE/ BUSINESS SERVICES/ BUSINESS SERVICES/ BUSINESS SERVICES/ MANUFACTURING/ MANUFACTURING/ MANUFACTURING/ ENERGY AND WATER/ ENERGY AND WATER/ ENERGY ANDBENEFICIATION/ WATER/ MINING AND MINING AND BENEFICIATION/ MINING AND BENEFICIATION/ TOURISM AND PROPERTY TOURISM AND TOURISM AND PROPERTY DEVELOPMENTPROPERTY DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT

Trade & Investment KwaZuluTrade & KwaZuluTrade is & aInvestment Investment KwaZuluNatal South African Natal is a South African Natal is a South African trade and inward investment trade trade and and inward inward investment promotion agencyinvestment (IPA), promotion (IPA), promotion agency agency (IPA),the established to promote established to promote the established to promote the as province of KwaZulu-Natal province of KwaZulu-Natal as province of KwaZulu-Natal as an investment destination and an investment destination and an investment destination and to facilitate trade by assisting to trade by assisting to facilitate facilitate tradeto byaccess assisting local companies local companies to access local companies to access international markets. international international markets. markets.

20 20 21 21


Absa participating in the Rebuild journey in KwaZulu-Natal The past couple of months have been some of the most challenging in our province – not only did we have to contend with the debilitating impact of the COVID-19 lockdowns on our economy, but we also experienced unrest and the looting of businesses that placed an even heavier burden on our economy. During this time, we saw businesses being burnt to the ground, people left stranded for basic food and necessities, and sadly, some losing their lives both in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng. In the midst of all this chaos, what was encouraging was the amazing spirit of Ubuntu where we saw communities standing together in their respective neighbourhoods to provide food and supplies and ultimately cater for each other’s needs, as well as a collective attempt at ensuring the safety and security of each other. Many invested their time to help clean up after the devastating events and at the time of this article, the journey of rebuilding communities and trust across the province is well underway with business and government leading the charge. Having experienced this both at a personal level and also as someone who is charged with the responsibility of leading our many colleagues in the province, we had no other choice but to get up and get involved in leading the charge. I vividly remember the efforts of our collective leadership and colleagues where we took delivery of supplies one Sunday afternoon – our basement parking at the regional office was stacked with food and toiletries to distribute to our colleagues. As the saying goes, charity begins at home and we ensured that over the next few days each and every one of our colleagues in the province as well as their relatives who work outside of the province received what we called a “Care Pack” to respond to the plight of the ensuing food scarcity that we saw unfolding.

We have also signed a memorandum of agreement with the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Provincial Government, securing a R500 million fund to support SMEs in KZN who receive a contract or purchase order from any of the local government departments. Access to finance is one of the biggest challenges that entrepreneurs face, and with this initiative, we seek to assist businesses with capital to ensure that they are able to deliver on what they are contracted for. As part of our role in society, we have also partnered with Woolworths on the Fill a Bag initiative. Absa has donated R1 million towards this initiative, which will see over 4 000 care packs donated to communities most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and recent unrest. The effects of what we have gone through as a country and a province will still be felt for a few months to come, however, I would like to reassure every reader that as a bank, we are here for you. Our ultimate goal is to help you rebuild and achieve your growth ambitions, and we continue to explore avenues of ensuring that we participate meaningfully in the rebuild work that is taking place in the province. To start the conversation, please visit us online at absa.co.za.

A number of our branches and ATMs were also damaged, and I could not help but wonder how our clients and customers in those affected areas will manage without banking services. Our hearts went out particularly to the elderly who have to receive their grants as we know that a delay for many of them means that their daily needs and of those that they care for will be negatively affected. As a result, we deployed our Bank on Wheels to service these areas while we rebuild what has been lost and continue our responsibility as a bank that cares deeply for our customers and colleagues. Due to the high number of businesses and individuals being affected, we have also relaunched our Payment Relief programme. The programme aims to give our customers credit relief that is specifically tailored to their individual needs to ensure that we can step in and lend a hand when it is needed the most. We have a range of short- and long-term solutions, each designed to help you meet your credit repayment obligations, bearing in mind your financial situation at the time. I always say this to customers: “Please reach out to us before your account is in arrears. In that way, it will make it easier for us to assist you and provide a diverse set of solutions.”

Keketso Motsoene Absa Managing Executive: Relationship Banking KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga


I can partner with a bank that is as dynamic as my business Absa’s Business Evolve Accounts offer a range of flexible options aimed at businesses of different sizes. Each package offers free access to Online Banking, a savings pocket and Cashflow Manager – an integrated accounting tool that helps with keeping track of finances, automated payroll, tax requirements as well as generating quotes and invoices. It’s a solution that evolves as my business grows.

Open your Business Evolve Account online today. To find out more, visit absa.co.za.

We do more so you can. That’s Africanacity.

Terms and conditions apply Authorised Financial Services Provider Registered Credit Provider Reg No NCRCP7


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H

aving recently relocated from Johannesburg to Notties, there’s a growing list of things I can’t seem to get here easily. Good coffee is gratefully not one of those. For a small town with a limited retail offering, the speciality cafe scene is impressive and coffee seems to be blazing a trail in new work space scenarios. In Notties, as in Durban or a growing number of small towns, there’s no shortage of coffee shops cum evolving workspaces. For example, tucked behind the wellknown Spar complex in Notties, next to a commanding oak tree is Lineage Coffee. If you’ve gone down the N3 towards Durban and into Hillcrest – you’ll have seen their headquarters and probably heard of their awardwinning barista and founder Craig Charity who teamed up with Midlands local Dom Marot in Notties. They wanted to create a beautiful space for great coffee and for friends and business associates to catch up. Their Monday to Friday establishment has a cosy fireplace for winter, double glazed windows and

NEW workspaces

What constitutes a great place to work in? In a world upended by Covid and then unrest, more people are rethinking what a safe and efficient workspace looks like, writes Beth Stols

well insulated walls. I was defrosting with a Cortado after dropping my kids at school and watched a farmer park his bakkie and make his way into the store. His order (a big cappuccino with macadamia nut milk – hmmm, it’s not just a Joburg thing) was on the counter by the time he had barrelled in and greeted the barista like a long-lost cousin. Modern and minimalist in design and decor, the space manages to combine a raw, industrial feel with warmth and beauty. There’s ambient lighting, high ceilings, huge glass doors and views of the trees. There’s an uncomplicated menu, fantastic service,

the Ferrari of espresso machines and some serious grinders. Coffee shops like Lineage have raised the bar and are contributing to a movement of comfortable, convenient work spots where a growing number of locals and outsiders pop in for a caffeine fix, a catch up and (increasingly) a work session. Among the other offerings is Flamme Rouge near Gowrie Village or The Village at Yard 41 in Howick, the Station Stop and Steampunk Coffee. Marot says food and coffee are revolutionising how many people are changing their view of where and when to work. Another knock-out

venue to work from is Blueberry Cafe on Netherwood farm on the road into Nottingham Road. It has majestic views of the mountains, great Wi-Fi, working hot spots and breakaway rooms. – Antoinette McDonald

Keeping the workspace SANE KZN based Paul Bushell is a psychologist and author and regular commentator on meaningful living in a constantly changing world, with a client base that includes students, large corporations and individuals.


W O R K S PA C E S

As a result of this mix, his movements and workspace is fluid and he tries to adapt his professional environment to suit his clients. When Covid hit, Bushell moved his office to his garden at home. “It has been an amazing experience. Not only has it been beneficial to my work and the people I work with, but also for my own work satisfaction. What started out as an attempt at better social distancing, has resulted in a refreshing, gentle and calm working experience.” Bushell says the consensus from his clients is that there is something special about being able to engage (especially around healing and growth work) under a tree. The Covid-19 pandemic has been a vivid example of how constant change can and will affect the way we live and work. Bushell says while all of us have different work values, most people struggle (some longer and harder than others) with the workplace shifts and adjustments. People take comfort in consistency and predictability, and although clearly not impossible, the process of change is generally

uncomfortable. However, with all challenges, there have been some amazing opportunities to rethink the way we do our work, and how we can make it not only more efficient, but also healthier. “Employers have had the opportunity to reflect on what does and doesn’t work for their employees. While some have found working at home possible and even optimal, others have realised that being together works better. An interesting observation of many teams has been that working from home has been disconnecting and sometimes lonely. It is often the incidental moments (around a coffee machine and in the passages) that employees get to connect and feel connected. These unscheduled moments are often ways of sharing ideas, being inspired and catching up. I don’t think online meetings always make time for these kinds of moments.” Bushell hopes that there will be BELOW: PAUL BUSHELL IS A PSYCHOLOGIST AND AUTHOR AND REGULAR COMMENTATOR ON MEANINGFUL LIVING.

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a greater move towards providing employees with more opportunities and facilities to address their well-being and mental health in workspaces. People continually adjusting require better emotional intelligence and support. This could include professionals, spaces, activities and content, which equips people to deal with change. “I would imagine that this would need to be carefully planned. It can’t just be left to happen by itself, or simply to tick a box once every now and then. In-house counselling and coaching services will become essential, and employers will need to provide training and content that is more personal and supportive. In an age of disinformation and online fatigue, the way that information is sourced and packaged will need to be carefully considered. “And by that I mean, a society, which is becoming more and more fragile ... because of an over-dependence on unhealthy technology and digital platforms. That might not necessarily mean less screens per se, but more engaging and better directed content on those screens.”

EVOLVING workstations Situated in the iconic JT Ross Glass House on uMhlanga Rocks Drive is a global professional services company called Marsh McLennan. Lauren Horsfall and Kelly Andries – co-owners and founders of Durban based Dwell Interior Architects – were tasked with creating a visually dynamic office space to express Marsh McLennan’s culture and articulate its brand. Their brief was explicit and challenging – they had to meet their client’s global objectives to improve space utilisation and reduce real estate costs, and cater to an agile work team – providing staff with greater choice and control over when, where and how they work to increase productivity. This was Marsh McLennan’s first agile office (Smart Office) in Africa so expectations were high. The emphasis was on the creation of a vibrant, flexible office with a better range of work settings for different interactions. The company’s international standards in terms of technology,


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Happy spaces profitable BUSINESS

ABOVE: SITUATED IN THE ICONIC JT ROSS GLASS HOUSE ON UMHLANGA ROCKS DRIVE IS A GLOBAL PROFESSIONAL SERVICES COMPANY CALLED MARSH MCLENNAN.

acoustics, quality of product and functionality had to be delivered within tight timeframes and carefully controlled budget parameters. Andries said: “When designing we had to ensure that meeting spaces were easily accessible off circulation pathways and that they were evenly distributed throughout the office for ease of connectivity.” Moveable elements such as focus pods and mobile screens incorporating storage, writing boards and plants were used to delineate team environments and provide acoustic privacy between teams. All of this needed to be supported by appropriate technology so Dwell had to focus on mobility, access and appropriate devices. All meeting rooms are equipped with smart boards and various internet communication platforms. In keeping with global office space trends all workstations are open plan and are unassigned – no exclusive use offices are provided. “Work points are provided according to a desk shared ratio,

typically between 60 and 70% – six desks may only be provided for every 10 colleagues. These work points then take the form of both conventional workstations, collaborative facilities and other focused individual work zones. The staff are able to book their workspaces according to the task at hand and for the required timeframes only.” Andries said the way we work has

“The staff are able to book their workspaces according to the task at hand and for the required timeframes only” evolved and space requirements have changed. There was a desire to refresh, to shift from the traditional conservative culture to a more collaborative and creative working environment enabled by technology. “Companies are increasingly recognising that staff don’t need to be in the office on a full-time basis and that when they are in the office, providing them with a dedicated workstation may not be the best use of space.”

There’s no denying the uMhlanga Arch is an iconic R2-billion landmark and the lifestyle hub exemplifying the notion of convenience – living, working and playing in one space. This aligned perfectly with the SMG vision of revolutionising the motor retail experience for customers in Durban. SMG knew this would be the space that was a perfect fit for the BMW brand, and today the company’s 8 000m² workspace at the base of The Arch houses 92 staff in office, retail and workshop designated areas. Inherent to SMG’s story is the company ethos elaborated by group founder Sean McCarthy who believes a safe, positive, happy and comfortable environment is a huge contributor to creating a great customer experience. “This is an extremely important factor which SMG endeavours to build into all our workplaces: employee satisfaction is paramount. It is impossible to achieve a high level of customer satisfaction with a disenchanted workforce.” When designing their new offices, various factors came into play. “With beautiful sea views directly in front of the dealership it was a given to make use of expansive glass surroundings and double volume ceilings allowing brilliant natural light to flood in and lending itself to the extensive open plan feeling that has been created. The well-being of our employees was at the forefront of our design. Our employees are seated in spacious open-plan settings, each with their own designated workspaces allowing them to have a feeling of openness, while still having their own privacy. This layout creates team spirit and breaks down communication barriers. The openplan layout is also very much in line with our open-door policy. Outdoor seating areas and the in-house LDV Cafe allow employees the flexibility to hold meetings in a different environment or take some time out for creative thinking.” The view provides relief from computer screens, reducing eye tension, headaches and fatigue. The double


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than another corporate block. They created a facility with over 80 offices, multiple boardrooms and shared spaces with a great mix of tenants. Umhlali is steeped in the history of the North Coast and The Workstation concept retains this charm. It is centrally located close to most of the large-scale developments on the North Coast, making it easily accessible to residents who don’t have to spend hours stuck in traffic. The business model is high quality offices at affordable prices where tenants enjoy a relaxed and casual environment – and the decor reflects this. The offices are serviced, have good internet and IT infrastructure, as well as a full power back-up for load shedding. Both Nalson and Cogan work on the property and are on hand to assist tenants. Chef Jacobson, a well-known local chef, weaves his magic in the in-house cafe and pumps out delicious meals alongside the onsite coffee roaster Science of Coffee.

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ABOVE: BASED AT THE ICONIC UMHLANGA ARCH, SMG’S OFFICE SPACE IS THE PERFECT FIT FOR THE BMW BRAND. RIGHT: THE WORKSTATION IN UMHLALI OFFERS THE IDEAL ENVIRONMENT FOR THOSE LIVING UP THE COAST.

volume means light pours into the dealership which is also decorated with calming indoor plants. And, a winner is a lift inside the dealership that takes employees directly to the Legacy Yard restaurants and shops upstairs.

Where to WORK? Many people find it difficult to work from home all the time due to distractions, connectivity issues and load shedding. People may not need to go to the office as often, but they have an innate need to interact. The shared service model works well as it reduces the operating costs for the individual business. The Workstation in uMhlali is a collaboration between Conrad Nalson and Snow Cogan who repurposed a furniture and home decor showroom into an incredible office facility. Both Nalson and Cogan have a long association with uMhlali and had a clear idea around developing a workspace that reflected the culture and lifestyle of the North Coast and its people, rather


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A D V E RTO R I A L

R

adius Point Investments is a dynamic commercial and residential development company that is the largest independent land owner in uMhlanga. The pride and joy of Radius Point is our first beautiful and exclusive development, Sera Bella, which is situated in the heart of Izinga, uMhlanga. Sera Bella consists of stunning architecturally designed contemporary villas, embracing a sense of space and elegance,” explains Rakhee Singh, who heads up the property development company along with her husband, Vishal. Vishal and Rakhee Singh went from being high school sweethearts to perfect partners in life and business. This power couple is the brains behind Radius Point Investments. Rakhee admits the couple’s entry into property development was probably “purely incidental” and the end result of a joint passion for property. Vishal is a mechanical engineering graduate from the Durban University of Technology while Rakhee is a pharmacist with an MBA. Looking back, Vishal says his 25-year journey into property started with handing out pamphlets for uMhlanga Manors as a student and realising just what could be achieved. He began his career in the stationery industry, exiting a senior executive position at paper giant, SAPPI, to set up his own stationery manufacturing company, African Paper Products, in 2003. Because the stationery business is seasonal, he focuses on this company during the busy build- up to the school year between September and March, and

Passion for PROPERTY No transfer duty payable

Stunning architecturally designed modern contemporary / balinese inspired homes embracing a sense of space and elegance situated in a prime position in the prestigious Izinga open suburb, Umhlanga making it one of the most sought after addresses in the area. Gated with an electrified perimeter fence and surveillance cameras with a 24 hour security guard manning the access control from the guardhouse providing residents with absolute peace of mind. The guardhouse area will also incorporate domestic help washrooms, change rooms and toilets. Only a few kilometres away from the famous Gateway Theatre of Shopping complex, as well as in close proximity to some of KwaZulu Natal’s most prestigious schools and hospitals. A short drive to the Umhlanga coastline beaches.

For Vishal and Rakhee Singh, what started as a dream 25 years ago has turned into a reality then turns his attention to property for the remainder of the year. His wife, who is responsible for marketing and advertising, keeps an eye on all “the finer details”. She also recently registered her own interior design business, The Glamour Room, after positive feedback from design projects at Sera Bella began drawing attention from as far afield as Johannesburg. However, the couple’s heart has always been in uMhlanga. “We’ve always loved uMhlanga. After we married we settled here. This is home,” she says. Rakhee recalls how the couple used to go for weekend drives looking at land and properties. An enquiry directed to Tongaat

Hulett Properties resulted in an opportunity to purchase the land on which they developed Sera Bella. Although they started with no property development or building experience, the couple has delivered an upmarket estate with 19 units which has represented an exciting learning curve for both of them. Right now, Radius Point Investments is about to develop two properties within the Hawaan Estate, one in Cornubia and one in Glenashley as well as two further properties within Izinga Park. One – known as Izinga Park 3 – is a residential and commercial lifestyle estate that is expected to include a service station, grocery stores, a fivestar boutique hotel as well

as 60 luxurious apartments that have unlimited sea views and access to a 6 000m² clubhouse. Already, the company employs over 500 people and continues to create job opportunities in all sectors. “Radius Point Investments prides itself in constructing architecturally beautiful buildings with no compromise on aesthetics and finishes. We invest in high-end property in KwaZulu-Natal and believe the province offers tremendous growth opportunities. We prioritise supporting other KwaZuluNatal businesses and spend millions of rands annually with businesses based in this province. We strongly believe that supporting local businesses will lead to a better and brighter future and will help attract further investment and create growth,” says Vishal. 083 786 8999 www.serabella.co.za sales@serabella.co.za


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A D V E RTO R I A L

Hammarsdale Cato Ridge Development Association a mahhala e-Outer

Isatshalalisw ngenhloso West Durban ibhizinisi kanye yokusondelisa ndawonye. nomphakathi ale Cato Ishicilelwe iHammarsd nt Association Ridge Developme 6/08. NPC 2020/67459

Sebenza Cato Ridge Hammarsdale

10’000 copies

| Quarterly | Issue

org

IMerlog isekela ukolon nokuphepha komph dolozwa akathi

September 2021

.org | www.hcrda.

1, 2021 | info@hcrda

IAssociation iqala West impumelelo ye-Outer

RSDALE naI ZASEHAMMA IZINKAMPAN ndawonye ekwakheni seCato Ridge zihlanganele Development AssoCato Ridge i-Hammarsdale yenzuzo ciation (HCRDA). akuyona ikampani IAssociation futhi umboCompany NPC) West ibe (Not for Profit indawo yaseOuter , ngano wayo ukwenza yokusebenza nokuphila , ukuqashyindawo engcono ukudlondlobala leyo ndlela ukusekela wa kanye noguquko. ekusebenzeni I-HCRDA inNjengamanje i, imisebenzi, kwezabasebenz kwayo igxile , ukuphepha kanye gqalasizinda (infrastructure) lisuselwa kulwazi le-HCRDA owodnemvelo. Igunya eziningi zinombono lokuthi izinkampani a kanye nabasenangokusebenz wa ngele ndawo, abalingani bakahulumeni benzi, umphakathi, ababalulekile, ababambe iqhaza kanye nabanye ukufeza izinezisebenzayo singathola izindlela hloso ezifanayo. kwemisebenokukhulu Ngesimo sokuntuleka esizinzile sokugukudala isimo ukuheha zi, esikudingayo amabhizinisi akhona, cina nokukhulisa ngaleyondlela endaweni eziningi izinkampani emisebenzi amaningi. ukudala amathuba

Ukulahla kwadoti ngokungemthetho okwenzeka eHarrison abadlulayo kanye nezinkomo ezidla Flats kwakunobungozi utshani kulendawo. kubantu

Ababhaki be-DoMore bahlela ukukhuphukela phezul u

NGOKUNGAPHA THEKI KAHLEUKUBONA abantu behamba phakathi eHarrison Flats, yasendaweni emahlathini, ifemu i-Merlog kanye noMaspala we-Thekwini bahlanganyelile ekuvuseleleninoku londolozwa leyondawo. “Sibonile ukuthi ipulazi laliqhubeka ukusetshenziswa laseRiet Vallei njengendawo yokulahla izibi futhi yayigcwele izitshalo ezingalungile. Izinkomo ezidla lapha nazo besisengozini ebangwa ilezibi futhi bekunzima

ukuthola utshani ngenxa yesihlabathi esikhiwa ngokungekho emthethweni. Sihlanganyele ngempumelelo Kanye neThekwini Municipality Biodiversity Planning Unit, Cleaning and Solid Waste (CSW), Amaphoyisa akaMetro namakhansela, ukuvuselela le ndawo,” kusho uMalcolm UFuller, Umphathi Wokusebenza eMerlog. Ukulahlwa kwenkunkuma okungekho emthethweni kufanele kubikwe kule number yocingo 031 311 8804.

NGOKUBAMBISA NA NABABAMBIQHA ZA iDoMore Foundation ngokunikela ezikhungwini ihole ukusebenzisana kweGreater Hammardale ECD ngezinkwa esibhakiwe ezingama-30 zeCommunity Developmasonto onke. ment Initiative #DoMore4Hamma U-Ackermans ube ngumlingani osemqoka rsdale. Lokhu kuhlose ekusekela i-ECD ukunika amandla eHammarsdale ngokunikeza umphakathi futhi ubuyisele izingane ukudla ezingaphezu kuka-30 ithemba ngokuthuthukiswa kwamabhizinisi 000 izingane ezingama-30 namaphrojekthi Izikhungo ze-ECD e-ECD ngaphakathi kwamaWard njalo ngenyanga. Iphinde yanikela ngamathoyizi amahlanu. I-DoMore Bakery, evela angama-30 wamaphazili, kwi-Township Economy izincwadi ezinemibala, kwashayeka kakhulu. Programme, iyasebenza neCato Ridge izinto zokubhala, arsdale kanye izincwadi zezindaba futhi iyasekelwa ngoJulayi.IHamm ngokwakhiwa kweakhiwo nonodoli, kanye nezifonyo kwasha kwangqomgqa ezintsha. Ngenxa zezingane kanye ye-AEkanye nemisebenzi nama-saniCI kanye ne-Anchor tizer amancane. Amabhizinisi Yeast, indawo yokubhaka isiifakwe imishini U-Ackermans avule yokubhaka esezingeni kabusha izikhungo eliphezulu. ezingama-65 ze-Hammarsdale ECD ngesikhaAbabhaki abancane thi sobhubhane befaka baphinde bathole isandla ama-PPE wasekhaya. ukuqeqeshwa starter kits (aqukethe izisebenzi emnothweni Kusukela kwesesinxele: kwezobuchwephes ibiphindela emuva zokuhlanza ezijulile, he nokwamabhizinisi ekwebiweni lendawo yaseHCRDA, uKapteni uGraham Hood (Mr Price DC General izibhamu zokushisa, Ezinye izinkampani Kuze kufikwe Manager kanye neSafety Ngubane, Hammarsdale, ukwandisa imikhiqizo. okuxhaswe yi-AECI ukukhiqiza amagilavu, insipho (Mr Price DC Head kanye ngcono ezokuphepha. Chairperson uKapteni Ngema namengakaze ibonwe, abhakede). Lokhu Manje osomabhizinisi of People). (SAPS Inchanga), ukutshalwa kwezimali bekuxhaswe ngomkhankaso jabulela intuthuko esifundeni kwaqaRichard Shezi nokuvusa intshisebayaxhasa zibambezelise kanye wabo kwebiwa emafemini ongaphakathi. ubunziemsebenzi. amathuba emisebenzi Julayi nokudale i abeseza. nokudala amathuba ezinkulu la ngeSonto 11 phansi kwezitolo kelo enkulu kumaphrojekth khona nezinkamabahlali • Ukucekelwa abangaba ma obukhulu. zabo kusho ukuthi Abatshalizimali baqinisekiswe balahlekelwa izimpilo kanye nabathengisi kanye nesikhathi eskudingeki ukuthi kwabo. • Abantu abaningi enkulu siphinde ZA pani ezintsha izimpahla phezu EHambachitha imali sangoJulayi ngeke NA NESEBEN ukuze ngenxa yokuwelwa I-HCRDA IHLANGANISE beyothenga kude. MAYELA ukuthi isgameko e-HCRDA ziyakholel000 iningi behamba kwafanele zivalwe imihlangano neSouth African azikwazi Mall cishe bangu-2 Izinkampani ezingamalungu • Izinkampani page leHyindawo ephephe aenzeke. ukugcina umphakathi esezinye zazo Police Services marsdale Junction kwi Facebook kakhulu. Lokhu wa ekutheni kubalulekile njengoba kubonakala (SAPS), zilungiswe futhi emakhaya isikhathi ibe Durban Metro Police kuzoheThatha isibambiso ha amabhizinisi abasebenzi abahleli IHamkanye nezinkampani ekwenzeni lendawo amaningi, kudale usesimweni ngentuthuko ukuholela abasebenzi. kwezotshalomali (inamathuba zokuphepha ezizimele. kuyo. lethu linokuxhumana. emisebenzi amaningi, CRDA ukuzibophezela ukuthi ikusasa iye izophrintwa futhi ingaphezulu kwenyanga. kuhlawumbiselwa Wonke umuntu yokusebenza nokuhlala kuthuthukise izimpilo Ridge Sebenza emseuvumelene nokuthi • Imali ekwakumele ezintathu. yindawo engcono marsdale Cato zabahlali kuphinde ukuxhumana okwengeziwe nokudala amathuba Ukulahleka kwamaholo iningi lalo elizonjalo ezinyangeni kwehlise nobgebengu.” vestment) kanye eziningi isatshaliswe kabanzi kanye nengqalasizinda Bonke abahlali elinguR10 million, kuinthanethi www.hcrda.org/ ukuba izinkampani ethuthukisiwe iyadingkwinani lethu bayakhuthazeka kudingeke Izotholakala futhi ekhasini benzi nokwenza eka ukuvimbela nokubamba ukuthi babike ubugebengu. izindaba eziningi ukwakha kabusha sebenza. Thola yiziphi izindaba izigebengu. Ngokubika ubugebengu ziyisebenzisele uthumela noma Indawo enethiwekhi iziteshi zasendaweni le-Facebook bese g. ebanzi yekhamze-SAPS zizonikezwa era iyafakwa. Usihlalo noma imivu ku-info@hcrda.or ngaphezulu izinsiza. kanye I-HCRDA weSafty Work Stream, UMASIPALA uGraham Hood, lwe-SMRT. ETHEKWINI noGeneral kwe Uhlelo Price Group Distribution Managr yaka-Mr isekela ukukhishwa SAPS Camperdown okuxhumaniwebhusayithi uthe: “Ngenkathi 031 785 9009 noma sisasebenza kahle mahhala. BIO. I-SMRT.BIO ndawonye esikhathini 031 785 9019 umsebenzi nabaqashi SAPS Mpumalanga esedlule akukaze kube isa abafuna Ibhikawozi yaka-DO io / emadolobheni khona isidingo esikhulu MORE FOUNDATION ku-www.smrt.b 031 771 8000 noma nangaskusebenzisana Ukubhaliswa ihambisa izinkwa 031 771 8038 eHamRidge kusukenabomthetho. Ukusebenezikhungwini zaseECD engaphansi kwe-10 SAPS Umsunduzi isisebenzele eCato ibambisane nomenzi eHammarsdale. za ngokubambisana kuthatha imizuzu basentshona031 782 8952 ISAFAL STEEL • LeFoundation eyedlule ihlinzeka 000 abahlali iyona kuphela SAPS Hammarsdale intsha engasebenewu-12 futhi iPhini indle yokuvikela amabhizinisi, phezulu Bangu-2 yi-NPO esekelwa 031 736 1191 la iminyakeni kuka-250. marsdale ukuthuthukisa UTakalani Ratiyaya, uthe: i (machinist) Lenamba yamahala abasebenzi kanye MR PRICE FOUNDATION ukunika amankubantu abangaphezu ngonomamishin ingasetshenziselwa langa ababhalisile. nomphakathi obanzi leSafal ngemisebenzi a Kwezomnotho zi ukuze ibe izinkampani ukushayela amaphoyisa futhi lokhu kwenza iswa nelinye iqembu ikala engIKERRY fu-INGRIDIENTS Mr. Price nezinye amaningi. kube ucingo ezweni lonke. leNhloko Ukuthuthukisw ama-cvs, aprinte Umakuqhathan iyona izwa ukuthi abanamakhono ezolimo ifinyelela ngokugcwele kiswa iSouth Afrika mibilifuthi dla intsha ukuthi fundisa amakhono imitapo yolwazi yasendaweni yowebiwa okwengeziwe. “Kuyabiza ukuthuthukisa isusa izindleko nangokuthuthu kanye lakwamanye amazwe, • I-HandPicked Njengoba kuhlange intI-SMRT.BIO kanzima i-Covid-19 khona ngemfundo intsheni engasebenzi. shontshelwe aba nisi awalethe. ngubani, i-COVID-19, eshayeke isibandakanyeka thi amakhompyutha ezama khulukazi ukufinyelela ku-inthanethi nawosomabhizi Sisekela noma LeFoundation abo amaningi, yeLockdown kwiziza ezingasetyangena futhi yanikela kwamakhono. nama-imeyili sekubaluleke kulula ukuyisebenzisa. abesifazane, nemithetho kahulumenia kwayo. avunngamakhompyutha Iphrojekthi isebenzela kusukela ngo-2017. kakhulu njengoba intsha engasebenzi, ayi-15.ezemzithoAmanzi emvula eHammarsdale Ezokuphepha kumtapo abantu bafuna imininingwane ikakhulukazi ezingama-31 ukumisa ukubhebhethek kusuka ekuvalelekeni shenziswa zase-DC. uthengiselwezincwadi kanye nama-veteran kanye amathuwase-Hammarsdal • Izikole zasenkulisa Developmen (ECD) futhi umkhiqizo ba omsebenzi. IKerry abakhubazekile Izinkampani kwabe“Izinyanga eziningi e nase-Inchanga zithuthuwa esakhiweni iphinde Ingridients, njengamani-cv I-SMRT.BIO. kisiwe, la iEarly Childhood Unlimited Child. ekuvulekeni ngezigaba futhi yase-DC. I-canteen kanye amakhompyutha pi ukwenza je etholakala ePinetown uhlelo ukuqasha.” okuphelele kuya a neThe we i-canteen avikeleke kangcono naseHillcrest, izobe ukusebenzisa Steel ezivivinyweni ngokubambisan abaphafuthi kumakwe ukunciphisa ukuqeqesha othisha zizokhuthazwa iqala ukusebenza ka umndeni we-Safal isetshenziselwa isekela othishanhloko, esikhungweni esisha ingozi yokokukhulu okwenzizamamaphrojekthi. • I-EduRise sha eKeystone Park ngonyaka nabafundi ezikoleni ngamangala ngokuzidela Ngiyanibonga nina nabaphathi kwamanye ibuye ihlinzeka ka-2021. thi, othisha kanye abasebenzi. ukuwe yibo bonke ezingama-20. IMr Price Foundation abaningi bezSteel futhi ngidlulisa la abanga aphansi ukuthi isokudla kubasebenzi umkhombandle basebenzi be-Safal kusho yena iqeqesha intsha ngamaphasela abasafufuza nabathengisi • I-JumpStart kulo lonke iqembu,” ISWAN base-OutI-HCRDA IHLANGANISA Intsha eqeqeshiwe PLASTICS inyuse Yebhizabonga kwami inkampani ezincane ukusebenzwa wabantu abansundu www.mrpfound akuHeerden, iNhloko ebenze kumaReatail. ukuthola kwayo ngokuphinde wama-SMME ekuphangeni. sifazane masonto UWillem van nokuqinile namathuba emisebenzi nezivule enye indawo abathintekile onke. Lapho uqoqwe, kuzosiza amabhizinisi nokuthi okusheshayo ixhunyaniswa yokukh- iqizo (DC) iqiza er West. Lokhu imikhngonyaka ka-2019 akhona asendaweiqoqwa, Ikhokhelwe inisi. Ngokuhlelela Price Distribution tion.org eCato Ridge. Ikhiqiza Ama-SMME maRetail eMr ezempilo nokuphepha zokuqaizifako zapulastiki ukuthi yimaphi indawo yi-batch elandelayo futhi yathathelwa namalungiselelo ingafanisa amabhizinisi kanye namapayipi yemikhiqizo yokuhindawo ezizungezile. ukwenzela langana yayingenye yezinkampani webhiziniukweseka enzani. I-HCRDA imboni ngesikhathi Umnikazi ni, iSafal Steel nokupakisha. yokwakha. ukuqala imisebenzi amakhulu ngama-SMME. Selokhuwe-ErUThulile Luthuli, la ukuvunyelwe mo zayo zezemu-Anthony Mkhabela yavulwa isiqashe abantu omunye wabesifazane nezinqubo-mgo abanga- abasebenza si wasendaweni, phezu kanje: futhi zaseLevel 4, kanye kulo msebenzi, uthi: Enterprise, ubeke kwa-140 abaqashwe ngokugcwele. zamukelwa kabanzi “Sijabule kaISwan khulu ngaleli Bengikhabenezer Business Plastic iqhaza. iphinde pilo nezokuphepha ICovid-19 nayo ibe insizakusebenza ekubambeni thuba. UKULETHWA KWENTUTHUK Abaningi businesses. (outsource) genamsebenzi “Ngizimiselei bethu babenukugcinwa iStrucsetshenziswa Group kungani singenasokwemikhiqizo umnotho wasekhaO ENGCONO: Njengona isikhathi eside ngakho entsha endaweni yeqembu labantu kuomkhulu kuyo thazekile ngokuthi be- liyisibusiso.” leli thuba sifazane iza nethemba lemisebenzi, amathuba yonke intuthuko baseBhobhonono. ibe nomthelela nokungavikeleki nokunikeza I-Swan Plastics kamaspala awusayigcineke. Ihambisa izingxenye kukhomba ukuthi kwemisebenzi yami Ithemba ukuthi ture sokuthuthukisa zomkhiqizo entulayo. a ngensekelo ukukhula kwezinhlelo eminye imisebenzi ya. Ukulahleka kanye nezinto zokupakisha Lokho kuthikabeza imiphakathi Umaspala weTheku zayo zebhizinisi ezinjenamabhizinisi kanye yamakhekula be- galokhu ma-SMME. Ungaqinisekisek uyakuqonda loko kokudla kuhlukumeze ISafal Steel igxile ekusizenomphakathi. kuzokhula. Bader, inkampani futhi esebenzisana kangcono isimo samanzi, egcwele.” IScott neHCRDA ukuze nase-HammarsNgengciciyela yezinsiza, nomphakathi wendawo. ugesi kanye neminye enze umhlaba ekhona kanye imisebenzi. liyayisekela mikhali ezinze e-immune ni abasebenzi bayo, ilunga le-HCRDA ngamaphakethe dale iphinde ibe Iphinde yanikela mahhaAma-SMME angabhalisa abasebenzi, bahlolwa futhi usungulo lweDirectory. tory booster kubo bonke org/smme-direc njengoba kudingeka, ku-www.hcrda. la behlolela i-Covid-19 ngamaphasela okudla. yeHandPicked. eswele akusayithi yabo yaseGeorgedale basiza nemindeni okuncane bekubaluAgri-business konke eAmagalelo Ngalesi sikhathi, ndawonye Lawa ngamalunga Steel ibambisene lekile, futhi iSAFAL ungenza. yimuphi umndeni njengoba noma

FAL Umndeni wase-SA anile Steel ubambis

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HINDE KWENZ MAKUNGAP

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usa U-Mr Price unyha amakhono ents

Ukubambisana ngokup hepha

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IKerry Ingridients

inikele ngamakho mpyutha ayi-15

E Inkampani iSwan IDirectory ye-SMM Plasics

ithuthukisa umphaka thi

SEBENZA – A HCRDA PUBLICATION TO COMMUNICATE BUSINESS’S POSITIVE IMPACT WITH THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND DRIVE A COMMON VISION FOR THE AREA.

Formed in January 2021, the Hammarsdale Cato Ridge Development Association (HCRDA) is a voluntary association of Outer West businesses and stakeholders working together to advance Hammarsdale and Cato Ridge as a better place to work and live, thereby supporting growth, employment and transformation. Currently 36 members represent 7 000 jobs. The HCRDA focuses on leveraging the scale and expertise of members to effectively address commonly experienced challenges. Current focus areas are Human Resources, Supply Chain, Infrastructure, Safety and the Environment.  Members are: Bakers Transport, Big Build, Blaze Braai Products, Buckman Laboratories, Catchway Properties (Hammarsdale Industrial Park), Cato Pallet, Cato Ridge Electrical Construction, Cobro Concrete, Cretemix, Crusader Logistics, Deratek Packaging, DoMore Foundation, Fibertex Nonwovens, GEO Plastic & Plumbing Sales, Gforce Employment Solutions, Global Safety Textiles, Inno Textiles, Kerry Ingredients, LAD Security Services, Malda Pack, Merlog Foods Mr Price, Precool Cold Storage, RCL Foods, Robertson & Poole Construction, RP Steel, Safal Steel, SAPY, Scott Bader, Share-List Property, Sequence Logistics, SRF Flexipak, Stimela Consulting, Swan Plastics, The Document Warehouse, United Distribution and Transport Services, USE-IT, and Value Logistics. The HCRDA is a Not-for-Profit Company overseen by an Executive Committee comprising senior managers of member companies. www.hcrda.org (031) 942 3656

TOO MUCH AT STAKE BUSINESSES IN THE AREA WHERE THE HAMMARSDALE CATO RIDGE DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION OPERATE WERE AMONG THE FIRST HIT BY UNREST – BUT HAVE BOUNCED BACK REMARKABLY.  The association says many retailers, wholesalers, a number of warehouses and some factories came under attack. The impact of jobs lost and investment foregone is not easily measured.  But, the association says only one firm is definitely not rebuilding, while many affected firms are using the repairs as an opportunity to upgrade. Most firms are using the crisis to drive necessary change.  The association says Durban’s Outer West simply has too much promise to overlook it as an investment destination. Government may want Gqeberha to be the main container port (at nearly double the distance to Gauteng), but the market wants Durban and Cato Ridge as the natural inland container port.   Plans for this are advanced and ground will break in months, not years. The association says it will save importers and exporters here significant time and money by aligning their container needs and stopping the ferrying of empty containers.  Rob McInerney, Principal and Broker at Share-List says zoned industrial land prices range from around R300/m² to R1 650/m². The opportunities for development or truck staging are vast. Rentals range from around R40/ m² to R90/m² so there is something for everyone. Plus, road upgrades are either in full swing or on the cards.  While local police were found wanting during the unrest, the association says there are plans for a significantly beefedup armed response unit to service the region. “Firms are also looking to drive a change in the hearts and minds of the community. Nearly a decade of anti-business sentiment has ingrained a deep distrust. This is being countered through engaging community leaders, via social and print media that shares all that business means and does for the community.”   The association says the government too is being engaged productively. That the state has limited resources, but the potholes can be fixed and plans approved quicker, verges cut and rubbish collected more regularly. Truly working together, the positive momentum is being accelerated.

*

Hammarsdale & Cato Ridge continue to grow Hammarsdale, including Keystone Park, Cato Ridge and surrounding areas, is continuing to grow, with the most visible growth in Keystone Park where the new PEPKOR Distribution Centre is fast heading towards completion.

Commercial & Industrial Brokers on the N3 Rob McInerney from Share-List Property, who specialise in the area, believes that the following factors are contributing to the attraction of these areas along the N3 Corridor: • Great access to the N3 with the Hammarsdale Interchange already complete, and a second interchange under construction at Dardanelles, with a third one planned for Cato Ridge. • Close proximity to the proposed Cato Ridge Dry Port/Intermodal Hub. • Close enough to Durban and the port. • Plenty of land available which has already been zoned for industrial and logistics purposes in sizes varying from 3 000m² to 300ha. • Land prices ranging from as low as R350/m² to some of the more exclusive sites situated within precincts, going for up to R1 650/m². • Ready availability of semi-skilled staff. • Electricity supply directly from Eskom resulting in cost savings up to and as high as 25%. • Reasonable rentals in the older area of Hammarsdale, where a number of the old textile plants have been converted to multi-user industrial parks.    These factors make it an ideal area for logistics, truck staging and industrial uses. It is no wonder that the area is attracting large national and international companies in addition to SME’s. With the wide range of available options in the area, there are optimum solutions for all companies.        Crea ng an Efficient Market

FOR MORE INFO Peter Edmonds: 082 574 8801 Rob McInerney: 084 370 8733 rob@sharelist.co.za

Commercial & Industrial Brokers on the N3

Crea ng an Efficient Market


The depictions herein are for illustration purposes only and are subject to change without prior notice.

We l c o m e s

FREESTANDIN G HOMES

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Issue 14

SPRING 2021

R E S I D E N T I A L P R O P E RT Y

KZN RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY

Buoyant, battered or BRUISED? Too soon to panic? Some of KZN’s leading real estate professionals weigh in on market sentiment since the impact of the pandemic and the recent unrest, writes Anne Schauffer

I

t was the best of times, it was the worst of times, said Charles Dickens in his Tale of Two Cities and he could have been writing about the KZN property market in 2020 and 2021. Rising from the ashes because of the pandemic, sales soared for most property brands and some experienced their most buoyant spell ever.

“Weird,” was the wry description from KIM WOODS, Durban managing partner of Tyson Properties. She saw the market flourish during Covid, and she wasn’t alone in her reaction. It took everyone by surprise. The real estate fraternity’s analysis of the phenomenon put it down to a cocktail of pent-up demand, the lowest interest rates in 50 years, and bank willingness to

offer home loans. Cumulatively this propelled many renters to buy. But there were other factors in play, prompted, exacerbated or accelerated by the pandemic rollercoaster. Semigration was one. There is nothing new about this general coastal move to the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, as the yearning for a less stressed, balanced lifestyle grows. But with Covid, semigration developed further impetus as the working-fromhome reality not only meant many could work from almost anywhere – even permanently – but it presented another possibility too. Smaller towns or suburbs away from the city offered affordability, which translated into less work, more leisure. This move fed into the mental health truism of “reconnection with nature” as a healer, so outdoor country living, hiking and biking trails, natural social distancing, the beach and eco living are all big drawcards.

The KZN South Coast was a case in point, where affordability meets the beach life. JOLEEN GIRAUDEAU, manager for Seeff South Coast says, “The South Coast received a great boost following the Covid pandemic, driven by buyers looking to escape the confines of their homes.”

MOHAMMED AMRA, Pam Golding Properties’ area principal for Durban, is convinced the most fundamental change has been this shift to universal remote working: “As time

passes and, in places, a growing percentage of the population is vaccinated, there is an increasing focus on trying to figure out how we will work in future. Many employers are looking to influence how and where their employees work, while reassessing their office space requirements. This means there is likely to be an increase in new residential stock in some hubs. In South Africa, a significant portion of housing demand comes from first-time buyers as a significant proportion of the population are young and not yet in the formal housing market. This suggests that a


R E S I D E N T I A L P R O P E RT Y

possible proliferation of more affordable, mixeduse developments close to public transport and business hubs may well be a key growth sector in the future. “What we know at the very least is that demand for office space is likely to be reduced and that at least some of that space will be repurposed for residential accommodation. “This year we have already seen the central city area – particularly around the Durban City Hall and Samora Machel Street (formerly Aliwal Street) – rapidly becoming a student hub, with large office buildings being converted and reconfigured into

sectional title residential apartments particularly well suited to student accommodation.” The market buoyancy through Covid lockdowns has also been around space. Against the steady gated-estate flow, families sought bigger freestanding properties with the ever-popular granny flat highest on the shopping list, whether for granny, an office or a source of income. On the flip side, spending time at home gave many homeowners the opportunity to reassess their priorities, and for others, loss of income forced a downsize. Home alterations and extensions were plotted countrywide.

Upsize, downsize, resize meant movement for property. And then there was the unrest. Most KZN residential property practitioners say it is too soon to tell the impact. But, clearly, there’s a knee-jerk reaction, as people process what went down, with reactions ranging from: Sell, become liquid and rent? Sell and emigrate? Sell and semigrate? I’m Not Going Anywhere! I’m absolutely out of here, but not yet. Realistically, many people don’t follow through on talk of emigration. But for some (and the numbers have yet

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to be tallied) the mayhem accelerated a decision to go.

Property is an emotional purchase, greatly driven by sentiment. As MYLES WAKEFIELD, CEO of Wakefields Real Estate, says: “Uncertainty is never going to be a positive – sentiment and confidence has been knocked, and that could well have an effect on the property market. Certainly for


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opportunity to regroup, rethink, and to pull diverse groups of people together for the common good. I do believe if we’re given the certainty we need, see a host of bold, long overdue economic, labour and social reforms being implemented, we can make this work for us.”

those homeowners who’ve been considering moving south or emigrating, this could be the nudge they needed.”

And while most are still firmly of the view it’s too soon to assess the landscape, most concur. ANDREAS WASSENAAR, licensee and principal for Seeff Zimbali, said: “The week of lawlessness and looting was a tipping point for people who were already close to emigrating, and a spike in emigration figures can be expected over the next six months.”

SAMUEL SEEFF, chairman of the Seeff Property Group, hasn’t seen any “panic” listing of people looking to sell up and move, but added: “Possibly those who were thinking of emigrating, might now think about it a bit more seriously.”

ANDREW THOMPSON, managing broker of eXp Realty South Africa believes uncertainty may lead wealthy people to look at established economies and attractive markets such as Mauritius and Portugal.

The number of homeowners requesting valuations is up, says LEE ELLIS, principal of Tyson Properties Westville, Pinetown, Upper Highway, Queensburgh and Shelly Beach. “They’re seriously considering their options moving forward such as relocating to another province, moving overseas, sectional title complexes, and so on.” But, he does have a rider: “It should always be remembered that most South Africans do not have the luxury of being able to relocate at a whim, life is much more complicated than that.”

Thompson says KZN will see a lot of rebuilding: “There is trepidation and a general sense of ‘unease’ influencing decision making. The unrest has stimulated interest in gated estates and secure villages. “No doubt, secure gated estate living with the ‘safety in numbers’ factor, is fuelling increased interest in that sector.” In addition, South Africans are being far more rigorous in researching municipalities/governance, with a noticeable shift in relocation away from poorly managed municipalities – and Eastern and Western Cape towns have benefitted.

Chas Everitt International director BARRY DAVIES says the community solidarity that emerged during the riots and the mass clean-ups and food-drives in the aftermath actually grew property confidence. “Demand has resumed and we ended July strongly, with transaction volumes back up to around 75% of our monthly average and rising.” Wakefield sees opportunity. “If this storm is a one-off, it gives us – and hopefully, the government – an

“The unrest unsettled the landscape, and impacted market sentiment at a sensitive time,” says Pam Golding Properties’ CAROL REYNOLDS, area principal for Durban Coastal. But she says there’s an air of optimism among some who believe this is a pivotal moment for positive change.

TONY CLARKE, managing director of the Rawson Property Group, doesn’t see the unrest as having a longlasting effect on the market: “Immediate focus has turned to the most pivotal factors, namely the recovery of businesses, getting people back to work, and creating more opportunities to reduce the unemployment, thus contributing to slowly rebuilding our economy and consumer confidence. It’s gratifying to know that there has been some progress, despite all the odds stacked against us with Covid restrictions as well.”

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TO THE PROVINCE

SECTORS AGRICULTURE/ BUSINESS SERVICES/ MANUFACTURING/ ENERGY AND WATER/ MINING AND BENEFICIATION/ TOURISM AND PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT

2

KNOWLEDGE IS THE POWER

20% OF EMPLOYMENT

SELECT THE RIGHT PARTNER AND LOCATION

THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR CONTRIBUTES

Trade & Investment KwaZuluNatal is a South African trade and inward investment promotion agency (IPA), established to promote the province of KwaZulu-Natal as an investment destination and to facilitate trade by assisting local companies to access international markets.

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Best of both WORLDS At the beautiful Crowhurst Manor, TWIMS provides structured programmes with the aim of developing Africa’s manufacturing leaders

“haven for bees, butterflies and birds and full of colour year round”. Dean says she kept this mantra in mind in the metamorphosis: to provide feeding, breeding, nesting and resting places in an enticing space. The garden has wide walking paths flanked by colourful borders. Succulents, aloes, grasses and small trees mingle close to the old stone walls and create a wild space that is a magnet for insects and birds. “There is a mini woodland of lavender trees underplanted with seasonal bulbs; blood red Scadoxus in spring, and orange flaming Crocosmia in autumn. Crossberry is host to 19 moths, two butterflies and has little yellow fruit for birds. “The African Dog Rose has beautiful white flowers and is host to the Acraea butterfly. Its leaves are decimated by caterpillars every year – and this attracts cuckoos – the emerald jewels of the garden,” says Dean.

STORY GREG ARDE PICTURES ROGAN WARD

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rowhurst Manor in Everton Road looks like something out of Downton Abbey. Beyond the imposing gates lies a beautiful garden surrounding a stone manor house. It’s not as posh or as imposing as the Yorkshire country estate of the aristocratic Crawleys in the BBC series, but it makes an impact and its appearance belies its significant function. In 2018 the building was purchased and remodelled into the campus for TWIMS – the Toyota Wessels Institute for Manufacturing Studies. Albert Wessels brought Toyota to South Africa in 1961, and in the decades that followed became one of the country’s leading industrialists. Donations from his family trust helped establish TWIMS, a not-for-profit initiative dedicated to the development of manufacturing executives in Africa. The formation of TWIMS was spearheaded by Dr Justin Barnes, perhaps the country’s foremost expert on manufacturing, and it teaches graduate students from all industries. Crowhurst was built by the Hulett sugar barons at the turn of the 20th century. It was later bought by Sir William and Lady Firth and named after their Elizabethan homestead in Surrey, England. The manufacturing management institute has been crafted around the heritage building and interior changes were kept to a minimum. Landscaper Jenny Dean transformed the gardens from a shady and sterile spot dominated by exotic shrubs and trees. Now it is enchanting and full of life, a

DR LISA KINNEAR, HEAD OF ACADEMICS AT TWIMS.

DR JUSTIN BARNES SPEARHEADED THE FORMATION OF TWIMS.

GLEN ROBBINS, HEAD OF RESEARCH AT TWIMS.


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Crowhurst and the institute of learning it is home to, is a wonderful place to work. Research head Glen Robbins says not many people associate the tree-lined roads of Kloof with the hustle and bustle of manufacturing, so it is often a surprise when people discover what goes on there. “This grand old building and its wonderful gardens, thanks to those who have supported TWIMS, is emerging as an African centre of excellence in manufacturing management development and research. “Everyday we have the privilege of interacting with an incredible diversity of MBA students, company leaders and those working in the broader manufacturing ecosystem, drawn not just from South Africa, but also from across the continent.” Robbins adds that by locating TWIMS outside a major industrial or office estate, the institution has been able to give those working in industry a space away from the

RIGHT & ABOVE: CROWHURST IN KLOOF IS THE HOME TO TWIMS, A MANUFACTURING INSTITUTE FOR GRADUATES THAT IS SET IN A HISTORIC MANOR HOUSE BUILT AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY AND ENHANCED BY VARIOUS OWNERS.

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hectic factory floor to reflect and learn. “The neighbourhood sounds of the Trumpeter Hornbills might at times interfere with online teaching, but they are a pleasant reminder that our campus, and the firms we work with, share a fascinating planet,” says Robbins. Dr Lisa Kinnear, head of academics at TWIMS, says the initial move to Crowhurst campus felt a little like working at Faulty Towers. Before the renovation the grand old building needed lots of tender loving care. “We rotated through a number of the impressive rooms as office spaces while the renovations were happening, all crammed into one room as we worked at getting TWIMS off the ground,” she says. In October 2019 a modern state-of-the-art Harvard style auditorium and break-away stable rooms were completed, creating an engaging space with the feel of a real academic institution. Kinnear says she feels privileged to work in a space which has the best of both worlds: a dynamic modern teaching facility and the magnificent stone manor house. “The offices, meeting spaces, cosy nooks for reading and spiral staircases are somewhat reminiscent of a magical Hogwarts at the southern tip of Africa. “But the best experience of ‘both worlds’ on the campus is being able to take a stroll to think and reflect in the peaceful gardens, while experiencing the buzz of learning that takes place amongst the manufacturing community in these wonderful surroundings.” Hornbills might at times interfere with online teaching, but they are a pleasant reminder that our campus, and the firms we work with, share a fascinating planet,” says Robbins.

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https://twimsafrica.com


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BOOSTING manufacture

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TWIMS promises to be a boon to manufacturing in KZN

his sounds like lofty, cliched business gobbledygook – the sort of thing you would typically read in a boring business rag and yawn as you turn the page. And if you didn’t know about its fancy campus or what its odd acronym stands for, would you give TWIMS a second thought? TWIMS is the Toyota Wessels Institute for Manufacturing Studies and its staff did a remarkable thing earlier this year that best explains what they are about. They hosted a meeting of extraordinary business influence on their campus. TWIMS founder, Professor Justin Barnes, brought together the CEOs of giants TFG, Illovo Africa, Metair, and Toyota who together pledged R18-million to advance manufacturing learning in KZN. TWIMS has an academic partnership with the Gordon Institute of Business Science and offers the country’s only manufacturing-focused business school and research institution with a tailored

manufacturing focused MBA and executive short courses. Each of the CEOs agreed to fund dedicated academic chairs to focus on four issues relating to the advancement of manufacturing on the continent. Welcoming guests, Barnes quoted Henry Ford who said: Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success. TWIMS brought together four major corporates dedicated to the development of industrial capabilities in South Africa and has assembled an impressive academic team that will be working together to advance core programmes over three years. Their progress is the sort of thing that would make Henry Ford proud and hopefully create an environment in KZN that will incubate a bunch of manufacturing greats just like Ford. These are the academic chairs and their heads: • Dr Kruschen Govender, the TFG-sponsored Head of Future

Manufacturing; • Ms Liesel Kassier, the Metair-sponsored Head of Green Manufacturing; • Mr Mbongeni Ndlovu, the Illovosponsored Head of African Trade and Industrialisation; and • Ms Khavitha Singh, the Toyotasponsored Head of Lean Management. Barnes and the CEOs he brought together at TWIMS considered how best to support the development of the next generation of manufacturing leaders. They will need to build off the manufacturing legacy base that exists in KZN. And, as Barnes said, they will also have to embrace the latest digital technologies, respond to the region’s environmental challenges, and drive value chain competitiveness in sustainable African-centric businesses. Barnes said TWIMS would not be measured by individual academic achievements, but by how the institution positively impacted manufacturing to support the growth of enterprises that


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FROM LEFT: KHAVITHA SINGH, RESEARCH HEAD: LEAN MANAGEMENT; DR KRUSCHEN GOVENDER, RESEARCH HEAD: FUTURE OF MANUFACTURING; PROFESSOR JUSTIN BARNES, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR; LIESEL KASSIER, RESEARCH HEAD: GREEN MANUFACTURING; AND MBONGENI NDLOVU, RESEARCH HEAD: AFRICAN TRADE AND INDUSTRY.

created prosperity and jobs. Former TWIMS Chairman, Dr Johan van Zyl – who recently died of Covid – made these comments at the gathering. “The only way for an economy to grow sustainably is through industrialisation. Unfortunately, South Africa has lagged the rest of the developing world in harnessing manufacturing for this purpose. In the 20 years to 2018, South Africa’s average value addition per capita through manufacturing was only 0,5%, compared to 8% in Vietnam and 5,7% in India.” Barnes said there was immense, dormant capacity for economic growth in Africa. “We urgently need to develop a passion for and commitment to manufacturing in order to unlock this and benefit from the rapid change in technology that

we currently see around the world.” Gavin Dalgleish, Group MD of Illovo Sugar Africa said TWIMS aligned perfectly with Illovo’s purpose for a thriving African community; Riaz Haffejee, CEO of Metair said the drive for more sustainable automotive products placed increasing importance on green manufacturing processes; Anthony Thunstrom, CEO of TFG said technological disruption of manufacturing was

both a threat and an opportunity for African manufacturers. “We hope we will be able to help position the continent to benefit from this change”; and Andrew Kirby, CEO of Toyota said manufacturers had to constantly innovate to remain viable. “This is especially true given the many disruptions to our logistical infrastructure, electricity supply, labour force and raw material inputs.”

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hat was once growing tunnels on an old mushroom farm, has been converted into memorable trading spaces for a handful of contemporary artists, foodies, coffee roasters and restaurateurs. Nick and Mandy’s daughter Phillipa, is the owner and curator at Rock Paper Scissors. Her store, Crooks, is just one of the retail stores utilising the unique space available on the property. After a decade in Cape Town, Phillipa – an art and fashion graduate – came home in lockdown and joined her family in their innovative and artisanal ventures at The Old Mushroom Farm. “It’s been great to come home and experience Howick with fresh eyes. I’m surprised by how many young people and young families are

ARTISINAL hot house

An old mushroom farm on 20 hectares of beautiful farmland just outside of Howick in KZN has been repurposed by owners Nick and Mandy Crooks into a charming Midlands tourism attraction, writes Antoinette McDonald coming back to the area.” With new businesses popping up and so many people doing interesting things, she’s enjoying living on the property where she works and creates, while taking full advantage of long nature walks and hikes as well as eating off the land and generally soaking up the change of pace. She is no stranger to The Mushroom Farm. As a youngster she played there and remembers it well for its stinky compost smell – a far cry from the hip and happening joint it is today. Mushrooms have been traded in for artists and coffee roasters, allotment gardens, and short-term accommodation. There’s even a gym. The place is abuzz with creativity, poised on a magnificent hill off the


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The place is abuzz with creativity, poised on a magnificent hill off the Karkloof Road

Karkloof Road. “Dad got tired of farming and pursued his other passion – architecture. He has fixed up the place and I am thrilled to be able to join in on what he has created here.” The dome-shaped store spaces make for interesting retail and eatery spots with surrounding views of Albert Falls. In Crooks’ own store she has her branded pieces which she sells with other local designers’ goods too. She showcases homeware, cosmetics, jewellery, clothing, plants and furniture. When Crooks is not sewing or selling, she’s getting her hands stuck into the gardens on the farm. “That was another lockdown thing. It was just a bank which has subsequently

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been levelled out and is now bursting with herbs and vegetables. The gardens are rented out to locals for a small fee. You bring your seeds and join in the gardening fun.” The Resilient Garden Club – led by a local farmer, Tim – meets weekly to share gardening tips and encourage each other. “We are sharing with all the staff here and even encourage visitors to pick out the garden – it all adds to this unique experience. If you order a pizza from The Spot – it’s not uncommon to see chefs scuttling to the veggie gardens to grab fresh chillies and rocket.” The buzz is electric at The Old Mushroom Farm every weekend and more recently they have just started First

Thursdays, where you can enjoy live music, a movie screening for children, and extended opening hours. You can also rent a hot desk and work from the farm or rent out the workshop space for demos or meetings. “The local artisanal space here is so cool. There is so much happening and it’s really great to be with like-minded people who are passionate about their craft.” Crooks rates her morning coffee from the onsite roastery Bluebird, fresh bread daily from the DoughM bakery next door, and Home Slice Cafe for the best vegan or gluten-free menu items, adding that The Tom and Jerry Soup is a favourite. Add a little grocery store and a hairdresser and you have a one-stop shop.

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Your furry friends are welcome guests at The Old Mushroom Farm. There’s space to sit indoors at The Spot, Home Slice Cafe, Bluebird Coffee Roasters and at Skew Space art gallery – but the owners also encourage you to bring a picnic blanket, find a grassy patch in the sunshine or underneath the glorious trees on the property and enjoy the majestic views. Trail runners and mountain bikers can access the Sappi Trail Network from the farm. And if it’s all too good to leave – pack an overnight bag and check in at 11 Karkloof self-catering accommodation just a stone’s throw from all the action. The property can accommodate 47 people in the two houses and five cottages, and each unit is fully furnished with 100% cotton linen and an equipped kitchen. To book email: 11karkloof@gmail.com or visit www.11karkloof.co.za

Open Thursdays to Mondays: 7.30am-8pm; 11 Karkloof Road, Howick KZN, 6,5km from Howick; www.theoldmushroomfarm.co.za BLUEBIRD COFFEE ROASTERY: www.bluebirdcoffeeroastery.co.za DOUGHM: Bakery & Deli; ACTIV8: Fitness facility: www.activ8performance.co.za SKEW SPACE: Art gallery: www.facebook.com/skewspace; HOME SLICE CAFE: homeslicecafe.com ROCK PAPER SCISSORS: Contemporary goods store: www.rockpaperscissorsshop.info THE WORKSHOP: A space to host classes, talks and demonstrations: info@theoldmushroomfarm.co.za; THE SPOT: Wood oven bistro: thespotbistro.co.za SALLY’S MIDLANDS MIXES: Homemade granola: sallysmidlandsmixes.co.za/shop


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Making WAVES

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he new Passenger Terminal in the Durban port is a spectacular design. These frames were taken by talented photographer Prakash Bhikha at 7am on a Saturday morning in September with a Fuji Film XPro3 using a 9mm lens set at f5.6 ISO 200. Bhika, not a man of many words, described the terminal building as “a welcome modern intervention on the harbour skyline”. Amen to that.

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KZN Invest 14  

KZN INVEST is a business and lifestyle publication that critically unpacks accomplishment and critical challenges in KwaZulu-Natal. The maga...

KZN Invest 14  

KZN INVEST is a business and lifestyle publication that critically unpacks accomplishment and critical challenges in KwaZulu-Natal. The maga...

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