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THE PATRIOT VOLUME 53 / ISSUE 1 / SEPT. 20, 2018

Shawnee Mission South High School 5800 W 107th St, Overland Park, KS 66207 913.993.7500

PUBLICIZED PRIVACY What the district can and can’t see on students’ school-issued devices.


02 / CONTENTS

PEOPLE are often unaware that sites they commonly use are capable of storing and sharing their information.

PHOTO BY ABBY COX

STAFF

AVERY WOODS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MIAH CLARK ASST. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, A&E EDITOR ANSLEY CHAMBERS COPY EDITOR ABBY COX PHOTO EDITOR EMMA HARDING ASST. PHOTO EDITOR ADDIE SOYSKI NEWS EDITOR MEGAN SMITH SPORTS EDITOR NICHOLE THOMAS FEATURES & INFOGRAPHICS EDITOR LILY WAGNER OPINION EDITOR GINI HORTON WEB EDITOR ALI HARRISON ADS EDITOR

THE PATRIOT

ON THE COVER REPORTERS JULIA CALDWELL CIARA DIAZ KATIE HIEBL MILAD JAHANI LEXINGTON LINK MCKENNA PICKERING ANNALIE POLEN MADDI ROBERTSON EVAN SHIBEL PHOTOGRAPHERS HANNAH CARTER TRINITY CLARK KYLA HUNTER QUINN KASPAR JILLIAN MCCLELLAND KATE RILEY ABBY YORK LUCAS SILVA

BRYNN TAYLOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER CLAIRE BRISSETT EDITORIAL CARTOONIST

MISSION STATEMENT

The Patriot is a news magazine that aims to objectively present topics affecting Shawnee Mission South High School, as well as connect with readers on issues concerning the student body. Staff members reserve the right to express their views in the Opinions section. These pieces are labeled and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the staff as a whole, except the Staff Editorial, which represents the views of the editors. Each section editor designs their own section’s pages, unless otherwise specified. Under the First Amendment and Kansas Law, The Patriot staff is entitled to freedom of the press and neither the school nor district is responsible for any content or coverage. The staff encourages letters to the editor; they will only be published if signed. The editor-in-chief reserves the right to refuse or edit any letters for reasons of grammar, length and good taste.

THE PATRIOT ONLINE @SMSPATRIOT

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@SMSPATRIOT Find the hidden Rocky in the issue and win a gift card!


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

04.05 The Calendar Links Tech and 06 Study ADHD 08.09 Fresh Faces

07 Call Me by My Name

Transgender students battle for name changes in Skyward.

NEWS

PHOTO BY KATE RILEY

10 Summer Spirit 11 Practice Dangers 14 Q&A with Ludovica Mariani

12.13 Under the Helmet Highlight of South’s Varsity football seniors.

SPORTS

PHOTO BY HANNAH CARTER

16.17 Q&A with Caroline Ewing 18.19 20 Tech Talk

15

Publicized Privacy

22 26

PHOTO BY EMMA HARDING

Staff Editorial

24.25

An inside look at the students leading IPS.

FEATURES

reminds of the importance of participation in local politics.

Tuned Out? PHOTO BY EMMA HARDING

The Look: Matthias Miller

Quirky Cadets

Out the Vote 23 Get Sports Editor Megan Smith

The Debate: Year Round School

of The Brands: 27 Battle Forever 21 vs H&M 29 Into the Wild

30

CONTENTS / 03

OPINION

28 Take a Slice

Review of Martin City Taproom and Pizza.

PHOTO BY HANNAH CARTER

A&E


the CALENDAR

04 / NEWS

THE PATRIOT

M

T

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KUDOS SEPT. 24 Board of Education Meeting

Senior Amelia Mullen National Merit Semifinalist

SEPT. 25 Varsity Girls Tennis Match

SEPT. 26 Yearbook Retakes Varsity Girls Golf

OCT. 1 Marching Band Festival

OCT. 2 Varsity Volleyball Varsity Boys Soccer

OCT. 3 NHS meeting Varsity Girls Golf Varsity Girls Tennis Future Focus Fiesta

OCT. 8 Marchig Band Festival Rain Date Board of Education

OCT. 9 Varsity Girls Golf Senior Ad Night Varsity Gymnastics

OCT. 10 Early Dismisal National Testing Day SME college fair

OCT. 15 Varsity Girls Golf

OCT. 17 OCT. 16 Varsity Girls Volleyball Math League Varsity Girls Soccer Press


NEWS / 05

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

Stay up to date on South’s activities and events.

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SEPT. 20 The Patriot Issue One comes out

SEPT. 21 Homecoming Assembly, Parade and Game Oktoberfest Kidsfest

SEPT. 27 Varsity Girls Tennis Varsity Girls Volleyball Varsity Football

SEPT. 28

S/S SEPT. 22 Homecoming Dance SEPT. 23

SEPT. 29 Varsity Cross Country Varsity Volleyball Varsity Gymnastics SEPT. 30

OCT. 5 OCT. 4 Varsity Girls Tennis Choir Concert Varsity Gymnsatics Varsity Football Cheer clinic Varsity Girls Volleyball Varsity Boys Soccer

OCT. 6 Band Marching Competition Varsity Girls Tennis Varsity Gymnastics

OCT. 12 No School Girls Varisty Tennis Varsity Boys Soccer Varsity Football

OCT. 13 Varsity Volleyball Varsity Cross Country Varsity Boys Soccer

OCT. 11 End of 1st Quarter

OCT. 7

OCT. 14 OCT. 18 The Patriot Issue two comes out

For more news, be sure to check out

smsouthnews.com and other The Patriot social medias.

TRUMPDATE 09/05 NY Times OpEd comes out about a resistance within the Trump administration 09/11 Fear by Bob Woodward, a nonfiction book painting President Trump as politically ignorant, is released and sells 750,000 copies. 09/13 President Trump falsely claims that 3,000 people did not die in the hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico in 2017. 09/13 President Trump met with FEMA to prepare for Hurricane Florence. Events as of 9/14


06 / NEWS

THE PATRIOT

STUDY LINKS TECH AND ADHD There may be a connection between digital media use and ADHD.

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BY LILY WAGNER OPINION EDITOR recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found links between digital media use and an increase in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms in teens. The study followed 2,587 10th graders at schools in Los Angeles County, California, for two years. They were given self assessments of ADHD symptoms every six months and reported which types of digital media they used the most. At the beginning, none of the students displayed symptoms of ADHD, but by the end, those who had used digital media more frequently were displaying more symptoms. Starting in 2014, with the district’s one to one technology initiative, every student had either an iPad or MacBook in their hands. This shift away from computer labs and paperwork ushered in a new age in the classroom where learning is highly dependent on technology. “As a teacher I’ve seen such a big difference, this is my 15th year at South, and part of that is just we haven’t always had MacBooks,” social studies teacher Heather Sheppard said. “When I started I don’t ever remember seeing a phone out in class and now those are two things that are readily available to everybody.” While the MacBooks are mainly used for school work, it is no secret that many students use them for personal reasons such as messaging or streaming videos, which can create distractions. “I’ll get a notification and it’ll distract me right away and sometimes teachers are like ‘lets do laptop work’...Sometimes I’ve got other homework and I try to do two at once and it doesn’t work,” senior Bergen Cooper said.

The study concludes by saying that more research must be done to prove that the link is more than just a coincidence. The study also only tests symptoms, and at the time it was published, none of the participants had been officially diagnosed with ADHD. “Many people have illnesses because of a chemical imbalance in their brain. They didn’t cause it, it just happened, unfortunately... Whereas a lot of the things that are making the generation today have short attention spans are self inflicted, it’s a choice, lack of self discipline,” Sheppard said. The idea that these symptoms are just a lack of self discipline could be damaging to those who actually have been diagnosed with ADHD, many of whom seek medical help for their disorder. It also could distract from the potential that digital media rewires the brain in a way that presents as ADHD, which could be addressed in the form of societal changes in behavior around technology. “I wish that people would put away their phones on their own accord but that’s probably not going to happen. You have adults in meetings on their phones just like students in class on their phones so I think it all is just how do we set up an environment where we can utilize technology but how we don’t overuse it for the wrong reasons,” Sheppard said, “and that’s a personal decision of school districts, of parents, of classroom teachers. What’s the expectation, what’s the rule, what’s the preference? But everybody’s so different that we can’t get a solid ‘hey, this is the policy across the board,” so the result is we pay for that and students pay for that.” Avoiding developing ADHD symptoms from overuse of digital media seems to be as simple as not using these technologies as frequently, but being able to overhaul how

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY QUINN KASPAR

society uses digital media probably won’t be that easy. For those whose symptoms develop even further, it may be not be able to be medically diagnosed. The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) lists one of the criteria for diagnosing ADHD in people over the age of 17 as having shown symptoms before the age of 12. “They could either raise that limit or make a new form of ADHD,” senior Brandon Shannon said. “You know how you have two types of diseases, one is for people who are born with it, like diabetes type one and type two, have ADHD type one and two, whereas type two would be people who have been using technology for a long time and then all of a sudden at age 30 they’re having ADHD symptoms.” On August 31, the number of children in the United States diagnosed with ADHD hit 10 percent. With increasing use of digital media, this number could be set to rise even higher. “It’s a changing dynamic of the human race, we’re starting to see some of the ramifications of that, as evidenced in your study,” Sheppard said, “but there’s so much more to come.”

Digital Media Use

PERCENTAGE OF ADOLESCENTS WHO PERFORMED THESE MEDIA ACTIVITIES MORE THAN TWICE A DAY

STATS FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

54.1% Checking social media sites 52.1% Texting 42.9% Browsing or viewing images or videos 38.5% Streaming or downloading music 28.5% Liking or commenting


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

CALL ME BY MY NAME

NEWS / 07

Transgender students battle for dead name changes in Skyward.

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BY MCKENNA PICKERING REPORTER s of 2018, there are no official laws prohibiting any type of discrimination towards the transgender community. One of the many reasons other students and faculty know anything about transgender students’ previous identities is because yearbooks and school rosters use birth names instead of their transitioned name. Teachers will be taking role during class and will see the students’ names. Most likely the teacher will be unaware about the circumstances of a dead name or any name, unless told differently. One student unfortunately dealt with a teacher who knew of his circumstances and misused his name. “Freshman year I had a teacher who would take roll and call out my birth name,” sophomore Steven Yuen said, “The entire class heard it and I heard it. Every day he did that for most of the semester… Once he even called out my name as [birth name] Steven, like a hyphenated name. At that point I was in emotional distress. It is sad and I was humiliated and not feeling good about it.” According to the National Education Association, “Students should be addressed by

their preferred names and pronouns without being required to obtain a court-ordered name or gender change or to change their official records. A school’s intentional and persistent refusal to respect a student’s gender identity should be considered discriminatory.” This means that students should be addressed by the name they choose to go by. “The teacher refused to write it down or accept that the name on skyward was incorrect. ...the teacher also used to call me ‘ma’am’ and female pronouns, which isn’t how I identify,” Yuen said. The faculty doesn’t need court order or papers saying to do so. “In another recent survey, 90 percent of transgender students surveyed reported hearing derogatory remarks about their gender identity, often frequently, with nearly a third of transgender students hearing such statements from school staff,” the NEA states. Not only do 10 percent of transgender students hear comments from their peers, but 90 percent hear their teachers and school staff comment or make remarks on their gender identities. “I was to afraid to tell teachers about when I got bullied because I figured they

would do little to nothing to help. These kids that knew you before you transitioned think it’s their right to go around calling you by the wrong name and pronouns to the point where it became a weapon against the rest of the trans kids,” freshman Sam Hale said, “I don’t believe that teachers in the administration really care about how we (the transgender community) feel about the stuff that happens. I’ve had teachers make transphobic comments right in front of me and no one cared.” “Legally, no one under 18 can change their name in any personal record without adult consent. In order to get your name updated to the name of choice in any type of document, the student needs parental consent,” the NEA states. “The laws in Kansas are extremely difficult to do anything legally, especially as a minor,” sophomore Jasper Gish said, “Kansas is one of the three states that doesn’t allow gender changes on birth certificates. It can also cost up to 500 dollars, legal fees, appearing in courts and a very lengthy legal process to be able to change your mind.”

Terms to Know NONBINARY / GENDERQUEER Terms used by those who identify with neither, both, or a combination of genders. GENDER NONCONFORMING A term for people whose gender expression differs from stereotypical expectations. GENDER EXPRESSION The manner in which a person represents or expresses gender to others. TRANSGENDER Describing a person whose gender identity or expression is different from that traditionally associated with an assigned gender at birth.


08 / NEWS

FRESH FACES

Derek Bayless In-building Substitute

Bayless is from Southeast Kansas. He chose South because he had an opportunity to be a Coach. He fell in love with teaching when offered an opportunity to be a coach and work with kids.

Carolyn Cook Debate and Forensics

Carolyne Cook is from Kansas City. She attended high school at Shawnee Mission East. She wanted to become a teacher because she loved her teachers and wanted to make a difference in students’ lives and be a positive influence.

THE PATRIOT

Charles Golden Associate Principal

Charles Golden is from Texas. An interesting fact about Golden is that he worked with Principal Todd Dain in Blue Valley as an English teacher. He’s been teaching for 17 years. He wanted to be a doctor, but had a passion for education.

Lindsay Stephenson Instructional Coach Lindsay Stephenson is from Kansas. The reason she decided to become a teacher is because she likes students and she likes the prospectives. She taught English for 11 years in Olathe. She chose South because she found new and better opportunities. Stephenson’s role is to support teachers by providing resources, extra help,etc. She essentially “teaches” teachers.

Theresa Love FACS

Theresa Love is from Wichita, Kansas. She became a teacher because she loves working with students and learning new things. The reason why Love chose South is because she was looking for diversity and found it here.

Bradley Page Associate Principal

Bradley Page is from Kansas City and taught Special Education for 10 years in Blue Valley and Lawrence schools before becoming an associate principal. Teaching was the only career he considered.

Brad Tennant Math

Brad Tennant is from Kansas City. His daughter graduated from South last year. He previously taught at Shawnee Mission West for 14 years. So far, Tennant has had a very positive experience teaching at South.


NEWS / 09

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

Say hello to the new teachers of South. BY CIARA DIAZ-LOPEZ REPORTER DESIGN BY AVERY WOODS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF PHOTOS BY JILLIAN MCCLELLAND

Joseph Kennard Social Studies and Health Joseph Kennard is from Overland Park, Kansas and graduated from South. The reason he became a teacher is because he likes working with kids and coaching them. He taught in a school in Oklahoma and has been teaching for two years.

Elizabeth Camacho Spanish

Elizabeth Camacho is from Kansas City. She loves the Spanish language. She started her career here in Shawnee Mission. Camacho has been teaching for 10 years. She taught at Blue Valley High School and at a school in Madrid.

Tucker Love Journalism Tucker Love is from Merriam, Kansas. The biggest reason he became a teacher is because Love wants to make a difference in students and wants to give value to who kids are. “South has good kids and it’s a fantastic experience,” Love said.

Tim Walker Special Education

Tim Walker is from Kansas City. “I knew South is a nice school to work at,” Walker said. Walker has taught in Blue Valley South and West. Walker has been teaching for 14 years.

Lynette Stueve Spanish

Lynette Stueve is from Topeka, Kansas, and has lived in Massachusetts. The reason Stueve chose South was because South has a great reputation and strong academic standards. Stueve has been teaching for 18 years.

Jake Caldwell Computer Science Calwell is from Overland Park and graduated from South. This is his first year at South. He taught in Colorado for a year before coming to South.

Danielle Russell Social Studies Danielle Russell is from California. The reason Russell became a teacher is because she had a social studies teacher in eighth grade that inspired her to become a teacher. Russell has been teaching for 10 years She taught in Italy, Puerto Rico and at Trailridge middle school.


10 / SPORTS

SUMMER SPIRIT

THE PATRIOT

The cheerleaders and Pacesetters worked hard in the offseason to prepare for the season ahead. BY MILAD JAHANI REPORTER PHOTOS BY KYLA HUNTER

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he cheerleaders started their summer work in June, coming in every Monday and Wednesday at 7 a.m. to work on their cheers, chants and dances for the upcoming year. “We do have practices throughout the summer, but those are more focused on check-off, which is this huge packet of all of our cheers, chants and dance,s and varsity has to get checked-off on the whole packet before a certain date... If they want to cheer in a game they have to be checked off before that game,” senior and varsity cheerleader Bergen Cooper said. These practices also prepared the cheerleaders for their cheer camp in El Dorado, Kansas, at Butler Community College where they spent four days learning different routines and competing against other schools, bringing home the award for best overall routine. During the school year, their practice schedule isn’t any easier. They practice every day during seventh hour and for one hour after school on Mondays and Wednesdays. For senior captain Blake Hardesty, the hours have added up. She has been doing cheer since her freshman year after she decided she wanted to try something new in high school. “I really like getting to meet all these new girls that I would have not have normally… talked to because everybody comes from different areas throughout the student body,” Hardesty said.

Pace’s Awards SUPERIOR RATING - Home Routine SUPERIOR RATING - Team Routine BRONZE AWARD - Team Routine SHOWMANSHIP AWARD - Night Three PIN IT FORWARD - Christine Carter, Hayley Robinson ALL-AMERICAN TEAM MEMBERS Liv Ciochon, Mia Neaderhisesr, Ellery Vaughn, Hayley Robinson NDA STAF INVITE - Mia Neaderhiser SPIRIT RIBBON - Zeb Lyons, Reese Gilmore, Hayley Robsinson SHOWMANSHIP RIBBON Delila Hermosillo, Maryn Sifrit TECHNIQUE RIBBON - Abby Cox

Cheer’s Awards FIRST PLACE - Game Day Routine FIRST PLACE - Rally Routine UCA CAMP ALL-STARS Hannah Carter, Superia Johnson, Bergen Cooper, Jainai Moore

T

he Pacesetters also had a busy summer this year. In June, they worked with a professional choreographer to help them prepare for their upcoming camp through the National Dance Association at Emporia State University. “We spent many, many hours working with [the choreographer], learning the dances and training for the camp, since it’s a pom dance and this is our second year doing pom. It’s a style that takes a lot more energy because it’s faster movements and we have to be really sharp and precise with our movements… It took a lot of cleaning and a lot of work behind the scenes,” senior officer Christine Carter said. The dance team also worked with the band for a week, coming in every day from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. to work on their field routine for the football games. Similar to cheer, pace has a class dedicated to their craft. Each member has to come in every day at 7 a.m. for practice and they work through first hour. “We’ve had a couple 6 a.m. practices before and then in the fall, during the football season, we have Monday night practices from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m,” Carter said. Every pacesetter is also required to do outside training to help with their technique. “I do dance at Miller Marley. I’m always there too so I’m getting my training,” junior Hayley Robinson said. All of this training and early morning practice paid off though, as 13 different members each got individual awards at the NDA sponsored competition and as a team brought home two superior ratings. Individually senior Liv Ciochon, senior Mia Neaderhiser, junior Ellery Vaughn and sophomore Hayley Robinson each were awarded All-American staff members.


11 / SPORTS

WHAT’S

THE SCORE?

An update on South sports stats. BY EVAN SHIBEL REPORTER

FOOTBALL

WINS

3

LOSSES

0

BOYS SOCCER WINS

0

LOSSES

5

VOLLEYBALL

WINS

2

LOSSES

11

GIRLS TENNIS

WINS

6

LOSSES

1

CROSS COUNTRY PLACERS ODAC MEET

4TH PLACE: HALEY CARTER 8TH PLACE: CHLOE WANNAMAKER 9TH PLACE: HANNAH PICKERT

GYMNASTICS

WINS

1

LOSSES

GOLF

1

RECORDS KATIE SCHULTZ : 88 STROKES AS OF SEPTEMBER 13, 2018

THE PATRIOT

PRACTICE DANGERS Excessive heat can be harmful to high school athletes.

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BY LEXINGTON LINK REPORTER

ver the summer, Jordan McNair, a 19-year-old offensive lineman from Maryland, was practicing in the heat when he collapsed. McNair was taken to a local hospital and showed signs of extreme exhaustion and had a body temperature of 106 degrees before he died two weeks later. According to FOX News, a standard and simple procedure of immersing his body in a tub of ice water could have saved his life, but no one took that action and many athletic programs are being called into question because of the failure to do so. In recent years, we have seen an increase in athletes becoming seriously ill or dying due to practicing in extreme heat and harsh conditions. McNair is just one example. According to USA Today, just last year there were 13 athlete deaths due to cardiac arrest, heat stroke and concussions. In August of this year, 13-year-old Kyrell McBrideJohnson was at his middle school football practice when he collapsed and died later that night. Researchers are saying that these deaths could have been prevented if proper precautions were taken, such as having an athletic trainer on hand, having an ice tub nearby and keeping practices restricted to three hours once a day. According to USA Today, in 2013, over a dozen leading sports medicine groups and the National Federation of State High School Associations created a list of safe practices to save lives, but the University of Connecticut found that 28 states have failed to put half of the measures in place. At South, there is an athletic trainer on staff that remains with the athletes during practice. “We take a lot of preventative steps to make sure players are doing ok. We

make sure players are well hydrated and alert,” Varsity football Coach Brett Oberzan said. “When looking out for dehydration we can typically tell by their attitude and how players are reacting to drills. We look out for how alert they are and if we notice something, we make sure they get hydrated.” South sports and activities operate under the Kansas State High School Activities Association rules. KSHAA supervises most high school sports and activities in Kansas. “KSHAA rules say that we can only practice for three hours a day,” senior football player Carter Hale said. KSHAA also recommends a heat acclimation program where athletes are given time to adapt to practice conditions over time, starting with shorter practices with easier workouts and ending with full-length practice and more difficult workouts. “The majority of heat-related deaths happen during the first few days of practice, usually prompted by doing too much, too soon, and in some cases with too much protective gear on too early in the season. Players must be allowed the time to adapt safely to the environment, intensity, duration and uniform/ equipment,” according to KSHAA. KSHAA regulates weather conditions that athletes are allowed to practice in. A heat index is a combined measurement of temperature and humidity that determines what level of heat people will feel. If there is a heat index of 103 degrees, practice is only allowed to be an hour and if the heat index reaches 124 degrees, there is no practice allowed whatsoever. These rules and regulations can save players’ lives; however, many states and leagues have yet to implement these rules that protect player health.

The reality of EHS

20 ATHLETES died of exertional heat stroke (EHS) from DEHYDRATION & WEIGHT LOSS can cause EHS HOWEVER, they do not need to be present for EHS to occur.


UNDER THE HELMET 12 / SPORTS

THE PATRIOT

With more Varsity seniors on the team than in the last 20 years, Raider football has the potential to do well this season.

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BY ANNALIE POLEN REPORTER

ver the past few years, Shawnee Mission South has faced a lack of seniors on the varsity football team. As they begin the 2018 season, this has completely changed, as there are twenty seniors playing on the varsity team for the first time in over 20 years. With this taking place on the field, there is hope for a change in the spirit around South. Coach Brett Oberzan has been coaching for over 20 years. He thinks that having so many seniors can potentially improve the team from previous years. “From a physical standpoint, it is just bigger, stronger, faster and from a mental standpoint of understanding what it takes to do the job and then from a program standpoint of knowing the system and how things work and us being leaders,” Oberzan said. Senior Austin Connor has been playing football since he was in sixth grade and has been playing on the varsity team for South since his sophomore year. He is an offensive linebacker. With the opportunity of getting to play varsity for three years, Connor feels that the team has lots of potential this year. “I think we could go undefeated. If not, I think we definitely have a winning season so that’s good,” Connor said. “Us all playing our sophomore years gives us more experience than any other school. Most of our starters have played for three years.” Like Connor and many other seniors, senior Nolan Thimmesch has been playing on varsity since his sophomore year and started playing football in fifth grade. He is a running back and linebacker. He also is very optimistic towards this season. “I am really excited. I think we will do much better than we have

PHOTOS BY HANNAH CARTER

AUSTIN CONNOR LINEBACKER AND OFFENSIVE LINE

in the past couple of years,” Thimmesch said. “There is just a lot more leadership which helps lead the way. We all know what we need to do and stuff like that.”

JACK ROBERTS QUARTERBACK

NOLAN THIMMESCH RUNNING BACK AND LINEBACKER


SPORTS / 13

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

Quarterback and senior Jack Roberts has been playing the game for most of his life as he started when he was in first grade and started playing varsity as a sophomore. “I think [this football season] we’ll be more successful than we’ve ever been before,” Roberts said. He looks forward to the potentially successful results of this season. “We’ve come [far] with all my best friends that play on the team with me and we’re all together now for the senior year. It’s our last season together so it’s the most fun thing ever,” Roberts said. Senior Hunter Carpenter is a running back and free safety. He has been playing football since he was in kindergarten and varsity since his sophomore year.

HUNTER CARPENTER RUNNING BACK AND FREE SAFETY

SAM MACKLIN WIDE RECEIVER AND CORNERBACK

“We’ve been ready to change the spirit around South,” Carpenter said. “We’re like a big family. Since sophomore year, we’ve all been through a lot.” Senior Sam Macklin has been playing football for four years. He feels that it is not only important to be successful now, but also to set the younger players up to have a winning team for years to come. “We talk to a lot of the young guys and just lead by example and just try to get them to the spot where we are at right now,” Macklin said. On the field Macklin is a wide receiver and corner. “I think we will be much better than last year,” senior John Foster said, “I just like that I feel like a family with them and the physicality of it.” Foster has been playing varsity since sophomore year and football since fifth grade. “People actually have a goal… Last year the seniors didn’t really care. There [were] only… three of them anyways and then before that most of the seniors quit the team. We’re all going towards this one goal to win state,” senior Danny Wiskur said. Wiskur has been playing since third grade and is a safety and outside offense. In order for the team to succeed he thinks they need to “have a good O-line and good D-line, make the right plays, give 100 percent every play and just do our thing.” Senior Sidney Hales, who plays cornerback defense, has lots of experience in hockey and only two years in football, yet he scored a touchdown in the first game of the season. “It was actually probably the coolest thing that ever happened to me,” Hales said. “That was my first interception, my first touchdown ever playing football. I’ve played hockey my whole life so… [that was] a moment for sure. The energy was insane.” He explained how the team has been working really hard all throughout the summer to prepare to dominate this season. To Hales, the most important thing to do in order to expect a great season will be to “work together, respect the coaches and other players and just [do] every rep like it’s your last and just try as much as you can in practice so the games are just like normal.” With three games down as of Sept. 14th and three wins, things are looking on the bright side for South football.

SIDNEY HALES CORNERBACK


Q&A

14 / SPORTS

THE PATRIOT

Foreign exchange student gets first cheerleading experience in America.

with Ludovica Mariani

BY KATHLEEN HIEBL REPORTER

Q: Where are you from? A: Milan, Italy, which is in the northern part of Italy. Q: What grade are you in? A: 12th grade. Q: Did you do cheerleading in Italy? A: No, I used to do rhythmic gymnastics but I’ve always liked cheerleading so I decided to tryout for cheer.

Q: Are there any major differences? A: It is very different from rhythmic gymnastics, because

rhythmic gymnastics is a combination of gymnastics and ballet. It is quite different and we don’t have to yell chants.

Q: What made you want to join the cheer team here? A: It’s a very American thing and I have always wanted to try out for

cheer; I think it is a lot of fun. I [have] met lots of cool girls.

Q: What cheerleading position are you? A: I am on JV and I am first base. Q: Is there anything you wish we did here that you do in Italy? A: Honestly, I prefer cheerleading... [to] rhythmic gymnastics because I love stunting and cheering with the other girls.

Q: Is there something you are most excited for this season? A: I love football because we don’t have football in Italy so I am very excited for the games and I can’t wait to cheer on the field.

Q: Are you going to continue cheerleading? In college? A: I don’t think I will be able to continue cheerleading because we don’t have cheerleading in Italy and I think I will attend university in Italy so I probably won’t.

Q: Do you do club cheer? Have you ever traveled for cheer? A: No, I have just started so I am very new, but for rhythmic gymnastics

we… [traveled] when we had to do our national competitions. We used to travel quite a bit.

PHOTO BY JILLIAN MCCLELLAND

Visit smsouthnews.com for a video of the full interview.


FEATURES / 15

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

QUIRKY CADETS

An inside look at a class where students mentor students.

E

BY ALI HARRISON ADS EDITOR

very fifth hour, seniors Tanner Thurlow, Sylvia Shapiro and junior Lily Murdock walk into their classroom and are greeted by their friend and special student senior Cole Fronall. He doesn’t call them by their actual names, though, but instead the nicknames he’s gifted them: Thurlow is Hulk, Murdock is Supergirl and Shapiro is Wonder Woman. This may seem uncommon anywhere else, but it’s just another day in IPS for these Raiders. Interpersonal Skills, more commonly known as IPS, is a class for students with special needs. The students work with both teachers and cadets, mostly juniors and seniors. These students are kind, helpful and patient individuals who are first nominated then interviewed before being chosen as a cadet. The main focus of the class is learning about social skills. At the beginning of this year, the class discussed different levels of relationships: stranger, acquaintance, friend, close friend and dating. The cadets and students grouped together and filmed short videos explaining each level and what they should look like. The cadets also help the students learn how to do certain jobs, like stocking products or name-tagging. In the spring, they take their abilities to Johnson County Community College and compete in the Job Olympics. All the Shawnee Mission schools attend and are ranked according to their school and job to earn medals and trophies. The class isn’t all work, though. Fronall said they play a lot of games together. These

games include color wars, tug-of-war and frisbee, as well as participating in the annual Halloween Trunk-or-Treat. Almost everything that IPS students do is done with the cadets. To say the cadets play a crucial role in the class is an understatement. In a way, they’re the communication between teachers and students because of their closer relationships. “It’s opened my eyes quite a bit,” second-

“ ”

[IPS has] opened my eyes quite a bit. SENIOR TANNER THURLOW year cadet Thurlow said. “Seeing these kids and being more personal with them is a really good experience. It’s awesome.” For Murdock, this is more than a class - it’s her future. After being a cadet for two years, the only junior with that many years of experience, Murdock realized she wanted to pursue early childhood special education in college and as a career. It wasn’t just one thing that made her passionate for the program - it was the whole classroom environment. “Everyone’s always so happy,” Murdock said. “Even if there’s a bad day, there’s at

least one person who’s in an extremely good mood. You always have a happy environment to look forward to. Even though it sounds like it would be [stressful], it’s really not.” An important aspect of the class is talking, and it’s important that cadets specifically communicate not just with the students and teachers, but with each other also. A lot of the talking is done to the whole class, so cadets get a lot of experience and practice with public speaking, at least to a whole classroom. “IPS as a whole is just super close,” Murdock said. “We’re all one big family.”

Be sure to check out the KSMS YouTube for video coverage of the story. PHOTOS BY EMMA HARDING

BACK FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Seniors Michael Lippert, Jarod Moore, Lainie Stein, Meredith Bunker and Sophomore Maryn Sifrit FRONT: Seniors Tanner Thurlow, Nolan Thimmesch , Sophomore Madigan Sanders, Senior Sam Slaven , Sophomore Avery Woods, Senior Deja Wake, Sophomores Lily Murock and Mia Musson


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18 / FEATURES

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What the district can and can’t see on students’ school-issued devices. public ClipMe() {

super(“Clipping Example” add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “Nort add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); MenuBar mb = new Menu import java.io.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.datatransfe import java.awt.event.*;

super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); BY AVERY WOODS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); nce students are finished with body before receiving this technology. that we can inspect the traffic, look MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); their work in class, become “I get why they have it, because it is and see if the traffic applies to or public class ClipMe extends importit’s java.io.*; custom to play games or watch school property, but we shouldpublic at least does extends not apply to forbidden sites and Frame import java.awt.*; class ClipMe Netflix on their laptops. Teachers can find know or be told that, what it is and what it those types of things and then pass implements ActionListener import java.awt.datatransfer.*; Frame import java.awt.event.*; { this disrespectful, especially if students does, so we know what to expectimplements and how ActionListener the traffic along to the requester based pay more attention to their show than to go about it,” senior Brenna Dulaney said. on what the content filter decides private TextField tf; privatethe TextField tf; its appropriateness,” Lane said. private TextArea ta; to the class. It can also be detrimental The school has yet to mention about public class ClipMe extends private TextArea ta; to students’ grades if they are more new capability that teachers have to Though it may seem like the school Frame public static void focused on other things besides their see{ a student’s screen, but the Shawnee just doesn’t want students to see certain main(String[] args) { implements ActionListener public static void work. But now there’s a way teachers Mission School District Responsible Use args) sites,{ Lane says that content filtering new ClipMe().show(); main(String[] can control the amount of idleness Policy (RUP) that every studentnew signs is a result of the law. The Children’s } private TextFieldthat tf; ClipMe().show(); } happens in their class private and keep students Internet Protection Act (CIPA), TextArea is ta; enabled on track. This capability enacted by Congress in 2001, promises public ClipMe() { public ClipMe() by a software called Mosyle Manager. E-rate funding{ to schools that are in public super(“Clipping Example” Teachers can “see what applications compliance. The E-rate funding helps static void super(“Clipping add(tf = new are open…. [and] monitor how much time schools pay for the cost of devices used TextField(“Welcome”), “Nort Example”); students are spending on one application toadd(tf create data connections. The district add(ta = new TextArea(), = new versus another,” according to Executive currently receives 60 percent of their “Center”); TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); Information and Communications network device spending back from MenuBar mb = new Menu add(ta = new Technologies (ICT) Director Drew Lane. the government as a result of CIPA. import java.io.*; TextArea(), This means teachers can devote “A lot“Center”); of the equipment that the district import java.awt.*; MenuBar mb = new import java.awt.datatransfe more class time to productivity, requires to make those networks work is import java.awt.event.*; MenuBar(); because they can redirect students very expensive. import java.io.*; E-rate is a program that who are off task. Additionally, teachers helps offset some of those costs,” Lane said. import java.awt.*; who notice that a student isn’t doing Tojava.awt. receive E-rate funding, schools public class ClipMe extends import datatransfer.*; particularly well can go back in time must “block or filter Internet access to Frame import java.awt.event.*; through the program and view what pictures that are: (a) obscene; (b) child implements ActionListener

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I think that as long as I’m in their classroom, they have every right to see what’s on my screen...If you’re using the school’s materials, the school gets to make the rules.

the student had been doing previously, pornography; or (c) harmful to minors,” private TextField tf; according to Librarian Julie Fales. according to the Federal Communications private TextArea ta; public class ClipMe “I think teachers will be excited Commission. extends Frame Additional to the E-rate to have it,” computer science funding and regardless of whether the public static void implements ActionListener { it or not, the state requires main(String[] args) { teacher Vince LaVergne said. district accepts According to a Patriot Twitter poll, that the district comply with CIPA. new ClipMe().show(); private TextField tf; believe that the content } 76% of students said they were not OK Some students private TextArea ta; JUNIOR with teachers having this capability. filtering required by the state and federal public ClipMe() { “It’s kind of an an invasion of privacy,” government is too strict. They also ELIAS HENDERSON public static void junior Jayden Dewey said. “I understand believe thatargs) because teachers, clubs and super(“Clipping Example” main(String[] { that the MacBooks are a responsibility, at the beginning of each year to new receive coaches all use social media to send out add(tf = new main(String[] args) { ClipMe().show(); new ClipMe().show(); } but by doing that, they’re taking that technology states, “District security will information to the student body, social TextField(“Welcome”), “Nort } monitoring us.” allow for the tracking of all computer media restrictions are inconvenient. add(ta = new TextArea(), trust away from us by public ClipMe() { “I don’t think half of the stuff that’s “Center”); Other students, however, think that activity by username and password.” ClipMe() { teachers are justifiedpublic in that ability. While teachers can see what you’re restricted needs to be restricted,” senior MenuBar mb = new Menu super(“Clipping Example”); import java.io.*; “I think that as super(“Clipping long as I’m Example”); in doing only when you’re on theadd(tf school = newCynthia Flores said. “I don’t think import java.awt.*; their classroom, they have are still Facebook should be restricted. I don’t import java.awt.datatransfe add(tf = new every wifi, like the RUP says, thingsTextField(“Welcome”), “North”); right to see what’sTextField(“Welcome”), on my screen,” “North”); recorded to some extent at home. Content Twitter should be restricted.” import java.awt.event.*; add(ta = newthink TextArea(), add(ta =said. new TextArea(), “Center”); junior Elias Henderson “If filtering is what causes you to not be able The restrictions are cause for “Center”); materials, to access social media or gaming MenuBar = new MenuBar(); you’re using the school’s sites. mbcomplaint from many students. The MenuBar = new MenuBar(); import java.io.*; the school gets to make thembrules.” “We have software and hardware Verified Private Network (VPN) is also an public class ClipMe extends import java.io.*; import java.awt.*; Frame Other students felt that this information in place that funnels traffic to and from issue. In order for content filtering to work, import java.awt.*; import java.awt.datatransfer.*; implements ActionListener wasn’t clearly laid out to java.awt.datatransfer.*; the student the internet through those devices so students must have the VPN in place. import import java.awt.event.*;

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super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); import java.io.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.datatransfer.*; import java.awt.event.*;

public class ClipMe extends Frame implements ActionListener { private TextField tf; private TextArea ta; public static void main(String[] args) { “The traffic that have at home newyou ClipMe().show(); has to be filtered } through the district’s

content filtering hardware and then back to your device,”public LaneClipMe() said. { According to super(“Clipping Lane, as soon Example”); as a student tries to access the web without add(tf = new the VPN connection, the web access is TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); = newtry TextArea(), turned off. Whenadd(ta students to bypass the VPN, Lane“Center”); says that’s where the MenuBar mb = Responsible Use Policy (RUP) comes new MenuBar(); in. Every year, students are required to sign the RUP, agreeing that they won’t use the internet in a way that isn’t school appropriate. “That filter is there for a reason,” Lane said. “There are places where they could potentially get around that content filter. But then we also rely on students being responsible users and referring to the RUP to take care of those gaps in coverage.” The VPN is also used as just one part of a multilayered security against outside attackers into the district database. Lane says that he is confident in the school’s security system. With the VPN and content filtering in place, the school can do more than just see what students are doing on their computers; it can also intervene. “We only do that when there is a credible threat; there is a student saying they are going to harm themselves, something like that, and we conduct an actual investigation,” Lane said. “We have to have hands on the device to do it.” Usually these threats are reported by a teacher, parent or building mb.add(makeEditMenu()); administrator. For the most part, the setMenuBar(mb); setSize(250, 250); district isn’t analyzing everything on import java.io.*; school-issued devices, but students are import java.awt.*; required to be responsible. import java.awt.datatransfer.*; Students worry they’re being watched import java.awt.event.*; by the school, but outside attackers can also be an issue. Browsing the web public class ClipMe extends online, entering passwords or putting Frame confidential information into a computer implements ActionListener { is an opportunity to get hacked as well. While many web browsers have private TextField tf; privacy private TextArea ta;

public static void main(String[] args) { new ClipMe().show(); } public ClipMe() {

super(“Clipping Ex add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome add(ta = new Text COVERSTORY/ 19 “Center”); MenuBar mb = ne }

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policies and protect against identity private TextArea ta; after Facebook allowed apps that one private Menu make theft, there is still a considerable risk. person downloaded to take personal static void “Privacy is nonexistentpublic in the data regarding that person’s Facebook tf.setText(“”); main(String[] args) { friends. The app then used the data digital age. Anyone can see anything, implements ActionL new ClipMe().show(); everything. Once you post it, deleting however it saw fit. Though this policy } private TextField tf; doesn’t really exist. It just makes it not was prohibited in 2015, Facebook had private TextArea ta; public,” Henderson said. public “Any skilled no way of tracking earlier data thefts ClipMe() { computer hacker can find anything they from before 2014, leading to the recent public static void super(“Clipping Example”); outrage. main(String[] args) { add(tf = new Amazon also recently came undernew ClipMe().show } fire after releasing the Amazon Alexa, a device that could listen, respond and public ClipMe() { perform simple commands if someone said, “Hey Alexa.” However, it was super(“Clipping Ex revealed that Alexa had been recording add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome the conversations between a Seattle add(ta couple and sending the recordings to a = new Text “Center”); random contact. Amazon apologized and MenuBar mb = ne said that Alexa must have interpreted mb.add(makeEdit words in the conversation as commands. setMenuBar(mb); setSize(250, 250); They said this was a rare occurrence. import java.io.*; In terms of school-issued MacBooks, import java.awt.*; Lane says that he’s confident in the import java.awt.data district’s defense system, though import there’sjava.awt.even always a chance of an attack. “I would give us a good high score in public terms of what we are able to deflect andclass ClipMe e Frame how well we’ve done that in the past,” implements ActionL Lane said. According to Lane, some kinds of private TextField tf; hacks are harder to defend against,private like TextArea ta; EXECUTIVE INFORMATION “phishing scams,” which are completed AND COMMUNICATIONS public static void by the victim themselves. main(String[] args) { TECHNOLOGIES (ICT) “In that situation, a student could new ClipMe().show DIRECTOR potentially give information to an } unknown party, and they would do DREW LANE it willingly, and they would do it public ClipMe() { want about you if they really wanted to.” unknowingly, and that is really, really TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); super(“Clipping Ex Recent privacy and security hard to stop,” Lane said. add(tascandals = new TextArea(), add(tf = new that have occurred with“Center”); big companies Though it’s been drilled into people’s TextField(“Welcome MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); have brought privacy in the digital age heads for years, the true danger of add(ta = new Text import java.io.*; to light. technology is especially real to students “Center”); import java.awt.*; MenuBar mb = ne In March 2018, it wasimport discovered now, who each have a highly powerful, java.awt.datatransfer.*; that Facebook had known about a easily hackable piece of technologyimport java.io.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.awt.*; massive data theft and had done nothing in their backpacks, and along withimport java.awt.data about it, prompting user outrage. In a goldmine of information at theirimport java.awt.even public class ClipMe extends response, Mark Zuckerberg went on an fingertips, a landmine of dangers hidden Frame apology tour and changed Facebook’s underneath. implements ActionListener { public class ClipMe e policies. This data theft had happened

We only [look through a student’s computer] when there is a credible threat: there is a student saying they are going to harm themselves, something like that, and we conduct an actual investigation. We have to have hands on the device to do it.

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20 / FEATURES

TECH TALK public static void main(String[] args) { new ClipMe().show(); } public ClipMe() {

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public ClipMe() { super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); import java.io.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.datatransfer.*; import java.awt.event.*;

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Everything you need to know regarding technology. super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); CISCO: Students must import java.io.*; connect toimport the java.awt.*; CISCO server import java.awt.datatransfer.*; once joining a verified import java.awt.event.*;

network before browsing the internet. public class ClipMe extends

VPN

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super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”) add(ta = new TextArea(), SOFTWARE VS HARDWARE “Center”); PHISHING: private TextField tf; private TextArea ta; public ClipMe() { MenuBar mb = new MenuBa Software is any code that is installed Illegally gathering personal information import java.io.*; your hard drive whereas hardware public static void Example”); import java.awt.*; such as passwords, usernames or banking super(“Clippingon is the physical parts in or on your main(String[] args) { add(tf = new import java.awt.datatransfer.*; information. Gathered by pretending to be a TextField(“Welcome”), new ClipMe().show(); “North”); import java.awt.event.*; computer. add(ta = new TextArea(), trustworthy} organization. “Center”); public ClipMe() { MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); public class ClipMe extends import java.io.*; Frame super(“Clipping Example”); import java.awt.*; implements ActionListener { CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act): import java.awt.datatransfer.*; add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”); get discounts on import java.awt.event.*; private TextField tf; Requires schools or libraries add(ta = new TextArea(), private TextArea ta; STUDENTS, ARE YOU OK WITH internet access “Center”);through the E-rate program. TEACHERS BEING ABLE TO MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); public class ClipMe extends public static void import java.io.*; Frame main(String[] SEE WHAT YOU’RE DOING ONargs) { import java.awt.*; implements ActionListener { new ClipMe().show(); YOUR COMPUTERS DURING import java.awt.datatransfer.*; } E-RATE PROGRAM: import java.awt.event.*; private TextField tf; CLASS THROUGH THEIR Communications services and products private TextArea ta; public ClipMe() { Frame implements ActionListener {

are more affordable for certain schools and class ClipMe extends libraries. public Frame implements ActionListener { private TextField tf; private TextArea ta; public static void main(String[] args) { new ClipMe().show(); }

I don’t think half of the stuff Example”); that’s super(“Clipping restricted needs to be add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), restricted. I don’t “North”); think Facebook add(ta = new TextArea(), should be restricted. I don’t think “Center”); MenuBar mb = new MenuBar(); Twitterimport should be restricted. java.io.*; public ClipMe() {

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LAPTOPS?

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super(“Clipping Example”); add(tf = new TextField(“Welcome”), “North”) add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); MenuBar mb = new MenuBa import java.io.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.datatransfer.*; import java.awt.event.*; public class ClipMe extends Frame implements ActionListener { private TextField tf; private TextArea ta; public static void main(String[] args) { new ClipMe().show(); } public ClipMe() {

public static void super(“Clipping Example”); Results from an @SMSPatriot Twitter poll add(tf of 117 =people. main(String[] args) { new new ClipMe().show(); TextField(“Welcome”), “North”) } add(ta = new TextArea(), “Center”); public ClipMe() { MenuBar mb = new MenuBa import java.io.*;


PHOTO ESSAY / 21

SOUTH SPORTS SPIRIT

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

1

PHOTO BY KYLA HUNTER

PHOTO BY TRINITY CLARK

3

PHOTO BY KYLA HUNTER

PHOTO BY ABBY YORK

PHOTO BY TRINITY CLARK

5

PHOTO BY ABBY COX

2

4

6

1. At the assembly, junior Dylan Bloom runs across the backs of his fellow soccer teammates. The Varsity boys soccer team performed a dance at their introduction to the school. 2. Senior Bergen Cooper hugs gymnastics coach Allie Stankewsky at the gymnastics senior night. As of Sept. 14, the Varsity gymnastics team has won their only meet. 3. Juniors Abby Cox and Ellery Vaughn do the splits in midair during their Pacesetter performance at the school assembly. The Pacesetters practiced and competed over the summer. 4. Senior Omar Sanyang dribbles up to a defender at a home game. As of Sept. 14, the Varsity boys soccer team has yet to win a game. 5. A Varsity volleyball player serves the ball. As of Sept. 14, the Varsity volleyball team has two wins and eleven losses. 6. Senior Bergen Cooper holds up a sign for the crowd at the assembly. Cooper has been on the Varsity cheer team for four years.


22 / OPINION

THE PATRIOT

CARTOON BY CLAIRE BRISSETT EDITORIAL CARTOONIST

STAFF EDITORIAL

I

Students should take more precaution when it comes to digital privacy.

n this age of technology, privacy is often neglected. Whether it’s Facebook allowing third-party apps to collect and profit from personal data on us and our friends, Amazon selling devices that might be listening to the conversations we have or even from hackers gaining our information through passwords that are too weak or through insecure sites, our privacy is jeopardized constantly by technology. With the district’s 2014 one-toone technology initiative, there is now a powerful device in every student’s backpack. While our MacBooks have many benefits, they also bring about many problems, problems that go beyond just WiFi issues. Somehow, the district is managing to simultaneously protect its students from outside cybersecurity threats, while also invading their privacy from the inside. As would be expected, the school can monitor almost everything we do on our MacBooks.

The issue here lies within transparency about this monitoring. Most students don’t know how their technology use is being surveilled by the district, which is unsettling. Teachers can now view students screens through the Manager app, while this is intended to ensure students aren’t cheating on tests or are staying on task in class, no one the students themselves about this new feature so it feels invasive. But the district is also here to protect its students. Except for a few occasional hiccups, the Cisco AnyConnect Virtual Private Network (VPN) works well. They keep us from harm and even work with requests and complaints when restrictions are too heavy or too light. However, by keeping us in a bubble, the district is not preparing us well for the internet of the outside world. When we leave there will be no VPN, no forced password changes, no bully referral. As a society, we’ve turned a blind eye to these dangers. We’ve ignored the warnings

against creating similar passwords and have instead opted to make our passwords the same combinations of numbers and letters with slight variations or common themes. Any time we make a new account, we ‘accept’ the terms and conditions with little to no thought, despite what may be in the fine print. We post pictures and words and then delete them, unaware that there is a digital footprint somewhere of that post, no matter how hard we try to make them go away. The internet never forgets and new risks arise every day. We should all be more wary of the consequences of a few keystrokes or clicks of the mouse. People have lost their reputations, their identities, even their lives through mistakes made on the Internet. We must shake ourselves from the false sense of security we have found because the dangers and pitfalls of the internet are constantly changing. It’s up to us to keep on top of them.

11/11 EDITORS AGREE WITH THE VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THIS EDITORIAL.


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

GET OUT THE VOTE

OPINION / 23

Participation in local elections is vital this November. BY MEGAN SMITH SPORTS EDITOR

T

he results of local elections may not seem like they have nationwide implications, but there is no arguing that they aren’t significant. Local politicians make laws that directly affect our communities. It is easiest to change laws you don’t agree with and get to know your representatives at the local level. Now, more than ever, young people’s political involvement will determine the results of local elections across the United States. We have the power to elect our mayors, city counselors and representatives. This November, Kansas’s Third Congressional District is having an election. The incumbent, Republican Kevin Yoder, won the nomination from his party. Democratic nominee Sharice Davids will be competing for a seat in the House as well. In the Kansas governor’s race, incumbent Jeff Colyer was defeated in the primary by conservative Kris Kobach. Kobach is now running against Democrat Laura Kelly and Independent Greg Orman. In elections like these, a high voter turnout is a rarity. Normally, only about 40 percent of the eligible voters in an area actually vote in midterm elections, according to Fairvote.org. Kansas had the 15th highest turnout in the 2014 election; however, only 43.4 percent of eligible voters participated in this election. States like Texas and Alabama had as low as a 28 percent turnout in the 2014 midterms. Everyone who can vote, should. Voter turnout is a cornerstone of democracy and every single vote counts, especially in local elections. In the Republican primary, Kris Kobach overcame Jeff Colyer by just under 200 votes. Voter participation is incredibly important to the results of these elections. If young people go out and vote, especially in primary elections, we can ensure that those in power represent all of us, not just those with power. Our local government is responsible for education quality, prison and police reform, affordable housing and public transit. Unless you want politicians who don’t represent your values and the future you want to see, I suggest you vote. It’s extremely easy to get involved in local government, especially during an election season. You can intern for a candidate, attend town halls or debates, go to City Council meetings or go to protests and marches in our community. These events are almost always advertised on social media or online, through news outlets or candidates themselves. You can also plan and host events, similar to the way that the victims of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, created a movement out of their tragedy. These students planned events, created artwork and literature about their movement and inspired hundreds of thousands of people to become involved in their communities. However, the easiest way to get involved in local politics is to vote. Voting is the most important and simultaneously one of the simplest things to do if you want to impact your community. Kansas is one of the thirty-seven states in which you can register to vote online and absentee ballots are available in every state in the event that you are unable to vote on the election date. It is imperative that everyone who is of voting age registers to vote by the deadline, October 16, and gets out to vote on November 7.

Normally, only about

40 percent

of the eligible voters in an area actually vote in midterm elections.

BY ABBY COX PHOTO EDITOR

Local Elections Third Congressional District Kevin Yoder (R) vs. Sharice Davids (D) Kansas Governor’s Race Kris Kobach (R) vs. Laura Kelly (D) Election Day: Nov. 7


24 / OPINION

THE PATRIOT

THE DEBATE: PRO

BY LEXINGTON LINK REPORTER

I Winnwood Started in the bottom 15th percentile Days added to the school calendar: 30 MAP scores raised by:

16 percent in math 26 percent in reading

PHOTOS BY JILLIAN MCCLELLAND PHOTOGRAPHER

n the age of overcrowded schools and budget cuts, districts are looking for unique solutions to a variety of problems. One of these solutions has been the transition to full year schooling. Full year schools have no summer breaks, but instead have multiple two to five week breaks scattered throughout the year. School calendars originally included summer vacation in order to match the agrarian farming calendar in order for students to help their families. This calendar is outdated and unnecessary in more modern times. Many school districts have made the switch to full year schooling and have seen many benefits because of it. Winwood High School was one of the lowest ranking schools in the state, performing at the bottom 15th percentile. In attempt to improve academic success and increase retention rates, Winnwood switched to full year schooling and added 30 days to the school calendar. Since the switch to full year schooling, Winnwood has seen an increase in Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) scores by 16 percent in mathematics and 26 percent in English language arts. Other schools use full year school to help ease overcrowding. Of the schools in Wake County, 37 use a “multi-track system” to ease overcrowding. Students are divided into three groups and while two groups are attending school, the other is having a break. This system reduces overcrowding in districts that can’t afford to build a new school. When students return to school after summer vacation it takes weeks to dust off the cobwebs in their brains and get back into

the rhythm of doing their schoolwork. It has also been shown that students tend to retain less information over three month summer breaks than students who have shorter, more frequent breaks. More frequent breaks scattered throughout the year give students more time to regroup throughout the school year. A five month block of school from August to December with no breaks can be intimidating to students. A two week break every month or so gives students a chance to breathe and destress. Breaks scattered throughout the school year also let student have better vacations. Vacation spots and theme parks get extremely crowded during weeks when regular schools have breaks. Disney World frequently has to close its doors when it reaches capacity during the last week of December and the first week of January. Whereas, in February and September they have their lowest attendance during the year. Cruise lines also tend to lower their prices during the offseason. These lower prices give families more ability to travel more. Students who attend full year school have the ability to travel when most others are in school without the fear of missing school. Although, the idea of losing summer vacation is intimidating, once you realize that you would still have vacation time and have much more academic success it becomes clear that, overall, full year school is better for students’ learning capabilities, stress levels and vacations. Full year school is the better option of the two.

23 77 percent

percent

Results from @SMSPatriot Twitter Poll of 70 students


OPINION / 25

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

Year Round School CON BY BRYNN TAYLOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

S

ummer vacation is a recurring part of the U.S. education system and for some students, that is where it could potentially come to a halt. Year long school has been being encouraged in many school districts in the KC metro area, but according to Fox4KC.com, Winnwood Elementary and Crestview Elementary school in the North Kansas City School District added 3 days to their academic calendars in 2015. Having year long schools that have an abundance of small breaks seems like it would be a great way to keep students academically inclined, but for some students, it can cause severe anxiety or mental withdrawals. In a high school environment or even a middle school environment, students can develop many mental conditions including depression, anxiety, common forms of PTSD, according to medium.com. Becoming diagnosed with disorders involving any of these examples can really take a toll on a student’s outlook on school and themselves. In the hypothetical situation that South did have year round school, there would be more stress put on the students about grades and social status, even though grades would be improved and priorities may be effected. In the KC metro, the elementary schools that participate in year long school have less scholastic and education related responsibilities, homework, college issues, sports and many more things. Younger kids don’t need to be micromanaged as much as “rebellious teens.” Along with students becoming more susceptible to mental illnesses, there are many more reasons to not adopt year long schooling in your district. According to theedadvocate.org, there are three reasons not to adopt year-round schooling. One main reason is cost. While districts save money from maximizing capacity with year long schooling, operational costs can be more expensive than at traditional schools. As you are well aware, teachers have a school

credit which is used for scholastic supplies such as papers, writing utensils, science supplies and many other things in that realm. Another factor regarding this subject is bus and electric fees. If students attended year long schooling, the electricity bill would be through the roof. The months of June and July have been noticed to have the highest utility and cooling cost and if schools are using the school during those months, then it will cost more. As the market prices rise, the suppliers purchasing electricity off the market must pay more for that electricity. It’s the same as natural gas and cold weather. That’s why electricity rates rise in the summer. So if schools are paying most of their money to utility companies, then there isn’t as much funding to other school activities, sports or clubs or the actual school, would be going down the drain by something that could have easily been avoided. “According to the National Climatic Data Center, it’s more than 300 times more expensive to cool schools in August than October and March — the months when year-round schools are closed for half the month,” descretenews.com said. There are many other alternatives to year long school. The school year for the 500 students at Westfield High School in Westfield, Indiana, has divided their school into trimesters. Students have less classes but more time in each class. According to educationworld.com, teachers have said they love it because they teach only four courses per trimester and have a third fewer students. Extended learning time is another option. From the belief that most students can be educated in 180 six-hour days or less, certain states include days devoted to staff work days; but many educators believe that some students need extra time to accomplish more. As students face the idea of additional school time, brighter students may benefit from a more compliant schedule, classes that may allow them to take higher level classes to amplify their learning.

Cons Heating and cooling is 300 times more expensive Student summer employment becomes

virtually impossible Studies have not confirmed any benefits to year round schooling


26 / OPINION

TUNED OUT?

Music can be distracting when studying. BY KATIE HIEBL REPORTER

M

usic is all around us constantly, in the halls, classrooms and on the streets. Music can lift your mood and help with relaxation, but I know when I am trying to learn something new or stay focused, it doesn’t seem to help. The main argument is that music helps with productivity, but not focus. When listening to music, your brain is not able to focus on the task at hand. Researchers at the University of Wales Institute in Cardiff say if you are trying to memorize something and listen to music at the same time, the music impairs cognitive abilities. At this time it is best to keep the music off. The way that music actually helps you focus is if you are able to listen to the same music that you were listening to while studying while you are taking the test. Music could possibly also help if you are repeating a task that you have done many times before. Personally, I can’t work when I am listening to music

because I end up getting distracted and not getting good grades on homework and tests. When researching for this article I learned out about conscious and unconscious attention. Your conscious attention is on the task you are trying to complete; your unconscious attention is noticing any distractions wherever you are. Your unconscious attention is stronger than your conscious attention, so

When listening to music, your brain is not able to focus on the task at hand. before you know it, you will be paying more attention to the music or the noise in the background instead of finishing the task at hand. One example of when your unconscious attention is doing its job is when you are in class trying to focus on a test or worksheet, but the material is so boring that you start to notice other people making noise. When I am taking a test I notice when people click their pen, or when someone is moving their chair or coughing. When that happens that

THE PATRIOT

is the effect of your unconscious attention. If you listen to music you like before trying to do your homework, rather than while you are doing your homework, your memorization would be better. If you listen to music while you are doing your homework it disrupts your focus, and, therefore, lessens your memorization. According to Nick Perham, a lecturer in the school of Health Sciences at the University of Wales Institute, you should listen to music before doing your homework because it engages your “arousal and mood effect” and if you do something you like before doing your homework it can give off the same positive effect on performance. This shows that if you do something you like before doing your homework it helps you memorize things better. One study shows that people report doing worse on work when they listen to music that they don’t like and doing better when listening to music that they do like. But that is not true. No matter what music you listen to it makes your scores equally worse. According to Perham if you can understand the lyrics it will impair your performance. While some people love listening to music while they study, it has not been scientifically proven to aid your learning capabilities in any way. So take your headphones out and start studying.


A&E / 27

BATTLE BRANDS SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

of the

Reporters go head to head over which brand is best.

I

BY MADDI ROBERTSON REPORTER & BRYNN TAYLOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

forever 21

magine walking through the Forever 21 threshold and immediately seeing all of the latest trends at your fingertips; new and exciting pieces full of potential. The store plays an important part in the world of fast fashion and quite often gets compared to other stores, including H&M. When it comes to the general shopping atmosphere, F21 couldn’t be more different. F21 is superior in many ways, from its happy yellow accents, to its popping playlists no one can resist singing along to. They’re known to sell everything from colorful statement pieces, to all the basics one might need for a cute layered look. It offers a very extensive basics collection, but when it comes to being bold and daring, their racks contain a certain je ne sais quoi. To be frank, F21 is faster and cheaper. The internationally spread store uses the fast fashion model as a way to produce the most up to date fashion trends in as little time as possible, for less than its leading competitors. For example, F21 sells the majority of their jeans starting at $15, where other teen retailers’ typical starting price is around $30. The store is branded to be a cheap, consignment store, but they hold their fair share of higher end items at slightly more expensive rates. Whereas, most other stores items’ style qualities tend to be more of a hit or miss for the same prices. Taking this analysis into consideration, I think we can come to an obvious victor: Forever 21 takes the cake.

H

PHOTOS BY ABBY YORK H&M is ranked eleventh on Instagram’s top followed brands list with

23.9

million followers

the brand opened in

1947 they are ranked

483

out of the top 2000 most profitable businesses

&M is becoming more and more popular as autumn comes into play. As its new clothes come in for the season, layering basic articles have started to become quite popular. H&M’s founder Erling Persson, got the idea to open his store by following a “post-World War II trip to the United States” as he was very impressed by “efficient, high-volume stores,” successstory.com said. The Swedish company used to be called Hennes, which in Swedish means “hers”, but after creating a mens line the name changed. A retailer for hunting apparel, Mauritz Widforss, inspired the name change to Hennes & Mauritz. Along with having two great clothes for a great price, accessories and decor, H&M has been working on expanding their social blade and involving themselves in bigger issues. Showing that they have strong morals, H&M currently has a foundation to provide donations to flood victims in India. The H&M group does not own factories: “Our products are made by independent suppliers, often in developing countries,” H&M.com/about said. Regarding their employees, H&M has created over 1.6 million jobs around the world. Yes, H&M does have cheap clothes, but the online website offers many more things you wouldn’t be able to find in stores. From corduroy and paisley print skirts to velvet throw pillows, H&M is the place to go.

57%

43%

RESULTS FROM @SMSPATRIOT TWITTER POLL OF 89 STUDENTS

Forever 21’s sale revenue is over

4

billion dollars

the brand operates over

600 stores worldwide

they are ranked

103

for America’s Largest Private-Owned Companies 2017

h&m


28 / A&E

THE PATRIOT

TAKE A

SLICE

LOCATED at 135th and Locust, Martin City Brewing Co is a small building with symbols painted on the outside.

Martin City Pizza opens new Overland Park location. BY JULIA CALDWELL REPORTER

M

artin City Pizza and Taproom is a specialty pizza shop that first opened in Martin City, Kansas, in 2001. They specialize in hand crafted specialty pizzas, sandwiches and salads. Their Martin City location, at 410 E. 135th St, Kansas City, MO, is quite a drive as it took me 35 minutes to get there. If that location is too far away, there is a more convenient location in Mission Farms located at 4000 Indian Creek Pkwy, Overland Park, KS. The Mission Farms location opened in May 2018. As soon as we walked in, the aroma of baking pizzas and freshly tossed salads greeted us. After pondering the menu, a waitress came over to take my order. She really made me feel welcome and left me wanting to come back. Their customer service is unbeatable, which for a pizza restaurant was unexpected. It took about twenty minutes for the food to arrive at the table and it was well worth the wait. As soon as the food was laid on the table my mouth was watering. I couldn’t wait to dig in. If you like taking pictures of pretty food to put on Snapchat to up your aesthetic, this is your place. We chose the stuffed cheese bread as our appetizer and decided to order the margarita pizza and the BBQ pork pizza as our main courses. The stuffed cheese bread was a delicious way to start our meal, as a pizza dough filled with their blend of pizza cheese and fresh mozzarella. There is also a side of marinara sauce to dip the cheese bread in. As for the pizzas, they were delicious; much better than any delivery pizza. Anyone who is nervous to venture out into the world of inventive pizza will be satisfied with the BBQ pork pizza that includes their handmade crust, with barbecue sauce and topped with pulled pork, roasted onions, bacon bits and jalapenos. If you are one of those classic pizza lovers who stick to cheese, you will thoroughly enjoy the margarita pizza. The main ingredients are fresh mozzarella, basil and parmesan cheese and a bruschetta mix. It was just like a classic cheese with a marvelous twist, ensuring you’ll never get bored with the taste. The meal totaled 33 dollars. All in all, this was a wonderful restaurant. Next time I go back, I am looking forward to trying their pizza pocket of the week that you specialize to your taste. It seems like a fun surprise.

WITH different sizes available, the pizzas can serve four to six people.

PHOTOS BY HANNAH CARTER

MARTIN CITY PIZZA & TAPROOM

410 E 135TH STREET, KC, MO 64145 MARTINCITYBREWINGCOMPANY.COM 816.214.6637

STARTERS

SANDWICHES

PRETZELS 8 STUFFED CHEESE BREAD 10 PIZZA POCKET OF THE WEEK 10 BRUSCHETTA 8 CLASSIC ITALIAN MEATBALLS 8 FLATBREAD OF THE WEEK 10 ROASTED TOMATO FLATBREAD 10 FRESH MOZZARELLA PINWHEELS 10 CHICKEN WINGS 10 ANTIPASTO PLATTER 20

TUSCAN SANDWICH 11 MEATBALL 9 GRILLED CHICKEN PANINI 9 CUBAN 10 SMOKED SALMON BLT 12 JALAPENO CHICKEN WRAP 10 TURKEY AND PEPPERONI PANINI 9

DESSERTS TIRAMISU 6 DESSERT PIZZA 10

SALADS

TASTE OF ITALY SM 6 LG 10 HOUSE SALAD SM 6 LG 10 CAESAR SM 6 LG 10 PANZANELLA SM 6 LG 10 WARM BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD SM 6 LG 11 STRAWBERRY SPINACH SALAD SM 8 LG 12

MENU & LOGO PROVIDED BY MARTINCITYPIZZA.COM


A&E / 29

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

where to pose Loose Park Rose Garden 5200 Pennsylvania Ave, Kansas City, MO 64112

Brookridge Country Club 8223 W 103rd St, Overland Park, KS 66212

World War I Museum 2 Memorial Dr, Kansas City, MO 64108

where to eat

Cheesecake Factory $ 6675 W 119th St, Overland Park, KS 66209 Saturdays 10 a.m. - 12 a.m.

Bravo! $$

5005 W 117th St, Leawood, KS 66211 Saturdays 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.

Buca di Beppo $$$

310 W 47th St, Kansas City, MO 64112 Saturdays 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.

where to play

Power Play

13110 W 62nd Terr., Shawnee, KS 66216 Saturdays 10 a.m.-12 a.m.

Dave & Busters

6811 W 135th St, Overland Park, KS 66223 Saturdays 11 a.m. - 1 a.m.

Chuck E. Cheese

10510 Metcalf Ln, Overland Park, KS 66212 Saturdays 10 a.m. - 10 p.m.

A behind the scenes look into Student Council’s dance committee. BY GINI HORTON WEB EDITOR

T

he sound of Africa by Toto fills the Drew and I started with about 10 different air as the smell of spray paint fills the ideas and slowly narrowed it down,” Ross lungs of dedicated Student Council said, “We knocked theme ideas out if members. Spending hours working hard they were too similar to recent themes, on paper maché and meticulous details is seemed too hard to execute or potentially not a preferred pastime, but to a member unappealing to the student body.” of StuCo it’s just homecoming season. Not only is decorating a long “The theme was suggested to us by the process, so is picking just the theme. executive board, but Drew Wollard and I “A lot goes into picking a theme for a dance. have developed it and added our own ideas One has to consider recent themes of dances, along the way,” head of the dance committee what decorations we have readily available, senior Emma Ross said. ”Our theme is ‘Into how the theme could potentially be taken the Wild’ and we are trying to capture the inappropriately, a name for the dance based vibes of a camping trip in a national park.” on the theme, the student body’s probable StuCo not only spends weekends making reaction to a theme and more,” Ross said. the decorations StuCo work days for homecoming, are spent making they also come in the decorations that early on the day of fill the gym, such as Homecoming to get paper maché rocks, everything set up. So painted backdrops while you are getting and a centerpiece your beauty sleep in decoration. preparation for the “Setting up a long night, StuCo is dance means that hanging lights and we come in at… nine SENIOR dragging cardboard and we bring all of EMMA ROSS through the gym. the decorations that “We’ve had one we’ve made from work day so far in which 22 members worked work days and things we’ve ordered online for 2.5 hours on decorations,” Ross said. “We and we get together with the dance committee started a Park Ranger Office, a mountain heads, who are Drew Wollard and Emma scene, a life size Smokey the Bear, paper Ross,” secretary Sadie Holloway said, “Then mache rocks, and more! We have another 2.5 we oversee the overall setup and layout of hour workday coming up to finish everything. the decorations, the props and the lights and The Saturday of the dance we will... set up basically everything that goes into the dance.” and after the dance take [everything] down.” StuCo spends their time on the weekends There is a lot more to a dance than just making decorations and gathering supplies. showing up to the gym and hanging out During fourth hour, StuCo sponsor Joe for an hour. StuCo spends weeks planning Cline has a class for the StuCo executives every detail, picking out every sparkle to plan. This includes getting larger that adds to the magic of homecoming. supplies for events, planning day to day to “For homecoming theme brainstorming, do lists and ordering flowers and crowns.

Our theme is ‘Into the Wild’ and we are trying to capture the vibes of a camping trip in a national park.

*BACKGROUND IS OFFICIAL HOMECOMING TICKET DESIGN PROVIDED BY SADIE HOLLOWAY


30 / A&E

THE LOOK. THE PATRIOT

Highlights of student’s weekly fashion. BY MIAH CLARK ASST. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & A&E EDITOR

SHOES reebok $45

SHIRT lorde concert $40

JUNIOR MATTHIAS MILLER SHIRT handed down OVERALLS forever 21 $30 SHOES doc martens $90

“My thought process when putting together an outfit is ‘Are people going to be confused by this?’ because if not, why am I wearing it?” - Matthias Miller visit smsouthnews.com for the full gallery.

SWEATER savers $6 JEANS ASOS $40 SHOES savers $3

JACKET savers $20

SHIRT savers $8 JACKET savers $10 SHIRT goodwill $3 JEANS ASOS $20 SHOES nike $90

PHOTOS BY EMMA HARDING


FEATURES / 17

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

ADVERTISE WITH US!

Email adspatriot@gmail.com for more information about how you can see your company in The Patriot.

SEPTEMBER HIGHLIGHTS

PERFORMING in a concert, German orchestra students stayed with students for a week.

PHOTO BY HANNAH CARTER

WARMING up for the annual Green and Gold Jamboree, Varsity and JV football players prepare for the first event of the season.

PHOTO BY ABBY COX


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

PATRI

FEATURES /32

T PICKS

Social Media stars from South. Drowsy

Spotify

@gracerichards_ Sophomore 82 songs in playlist

• “Down the Line” // Beach Fossils • “Lipstick” // Ariel Pink • “4EVER” // Clairo • “Seventeen” // Haley Blais • “Window” // Kid Bloom • “Pale Blue Eyes” // Velvet Underground • “Sara Smile” // Hall & Oate • “Dope on a Rope” // The Growlers

Instagram

@madisoncardin03 Sophomore Posted since Aug 26

Twitter

@tonybudetti Government and Economics teacher

VSCO @ddwake Senior

Posted since December 10, 2017

Worried about the future? Don’t. Gonna make the call after a week: class of 2019 is solid. Great kids. Kind, intellectual curiosity, thoughtful and know how to act during a challenge. So far, seniors are on fire! Much love! June 17

@jordyrae2 I have a bad habit of giving people more than they deserve

You ready for the first day with students tomorrow? Not even remotely ready... Aug. 9

Replying to @jordyrae2 Can I borrow 20 dollars? Sept. 9

September 2018  
September 2018  
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