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THE PATRIOT

19 VOLUME 53 / ISSUE 8 / MAY 10, 2019 Shawnee Mission South High School 5800 W 107th St, Overland Park, KS 66207 913.993.7500

SENIORS OF 2019

Raiders prepare for their futures after high school.


02 / CONTENTS

SENIORS Stephen Luancing and Anthony Young signed on April 26 to join the U.S. Army. Two other seniors also joined the military. PHOTOS BY NAOMI MITCHELL

THE PATRIOT

ON THE COVER

STAFF

AVERY WOODS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MIAH CLARK ASST. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, A&E EDITOR ANSLEY CHAMBERS COPY EDITOR ABBY COX PHOTO EDITOR EMMA HARDING ASST. PHOTO EDITOR ALI HARRISON NEWS EDITOR MEGAN SMITH SPORTS EDITOR NICHOLE THOMAS FEATURES & INFOGRAPHICS EDITOR LILY WAGNER OPINION EDITOR GINI HORTON WEB EDITOR EVAN SHIBEL ADS EDITOR ADDIE SOYSKI CIRCULATION MANAGER

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGERS MCKENNA PICKERING ANNALIE POLEN BRYNN TAYLOR REPORTERS CATHERINE GUNNIGLE KATIE HIEBL MILAD JAHANI PHOTOGRAPHERS NICOLAS CAMBURAKO TRINITY CLARK HALEY HILL KYLA HUNTER QUINN KASPAR JILLIAN MCCLELLAND NAOMI MITCHELL REESE WOODS ABBY YORK

MISSION STATEMENT The Patriot is a news magazine that aims to objectively present topics affecting Shawnee Mission South High School, as well as connect with readers on issues concerning the student body. Staff members reserve the right to express their views in the Opinions section. These pieces are labeled and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the staff as a whole, except the Staff Editorial, which represents the views of the editors. Each section editor designs their own section’s pages, unless otherwise specified. Under the First Amendment and Kansas Law, The Patriot staff is entitled to freedom of the press and neither the school nor district is responsible for any content or coverage. The staff encourages letters to the editor; they will only be published if signed. The editor-in-chief reserves the right to refuse or edit any letters for reasons of grammar, length and good taste.

THE PATRIOT ONLINE @SMSPATRIOT

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

@SMSPATRIOT

Find the hidden Rocky in the issue and win a gift card!


CONTENTS / 03

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

TABLE OF CONTENTS

04.05 The Calendar 06 Presidential Preview 07 Not Just The Seniors 09 New Basketball Coach 10 Senior’s Last Game 11 Standout Seniors Q&A with 13 Kirsten Womack

in America 08 ABandWeek students host German foreign exchange students for a week.

NEWS

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

12 So We Meet Again

South hosted more track & field meets this year than they have in the past.

SPORTS

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

Our 16.17 Mapping Future

18.19 19 Seniors of 2019 Q&A with 20 Jordyn Martin

A guide to where seniors are headed next year.

FEATURES

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

21 Staff Editorial The Debate: 22 Going to College 24 Build-A-Baby 25 Cost of College 26 Converse vs Vans 27 Capsule Outfits 28 Summer Views & Vibes 29 A Guide to Open Lunch

23

30 PHOTO BY EMMA HARDING

Editor-in-Chief reflects on her time at South.

OPINION

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

Battle of The Brands:

Signing Off

The Look Junior Maria Beach shows off her style.

A&E


SPORTS CLUBS ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OTHER

the CALENDAR

04 / NEWS

THE PATRIOT

S May 12

M May 13

• Boys Golf • Senior Recognition Breakfast • Senior Recognition Assembly • AP Exams

May 20

May 19

• Boys Golf match

T May 14

• AP Exams • Graduation

May 21 • Final Exams • Girls Soccer game

W May 15

• AP Exams

May 22 • Final Exams

DESIGN BY NICHOLE THOMAS Senior Kelly Johnston won first place in the annual game of “Gotcha” in which seniors sign up to receive a person they have to “get”shoot them with a water gun- and they have less than a week to do it. Abby Gerber was second place, and Cas Beiriger was third place. PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

At the senior signing assembly, senior Sofie Erickson signed to Coe College for track and cross country. She was among several seniors who signed for athletics. PHOTO BY NIC CAMBURAKO


NEWS / 05

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

TH

F

• • • • •

May 16

• AP Exams • Girls Diving State

May 23

• Softball game • Final Exams • Baseball game

May 10

Track & Field meet Boys Tennis match Raider Revue Senior last day Yearbook distribution

May 17

• AP Exams • Girls Swim State • Track & Field meet

• • • •

S

May 24

Last Day Baseball match Girls soccer game Track & Field meet

May 11

• Track & Field meet • Boys Tennis match • Raider Revue

$25 student basic airbrush tans $20 for groups of 10 or more Schedule online at shadestanning.com 7810 W 119th Street

May 18

• Girls Swim meet

May 25

• Girls Soccer game • Track & Field meet

KEY

Due to the many spring sport activities, only varsity events are shown on the calendar. Home events are shown in bold.

WHAT’S UP WITH THE WEB

.

smsouthnews.com

For more information visit: Athletics: www.sunflowerleague.org Band: www.smsraiderband.org Theatre: www.smstheatre.com

Choir: www.smschoirs.com General: www.smsouth.smsd.org

MICHAEL KNOWLES’ LECTURE DISRUPTED BY PROTESTORS AT UMKC BY ALI HARRISON NEWS EDITOR

KC SCHOLARS

BY ANNALIE POLEN SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

PODCAST OUT NOW

smsouthnews.com


06 / NEWS

THE PATRIOT

PRESIDENTIAL PREVIEW Meet some of the top candidates for the presidential election in 2020. BY MEGAN SMITH SPORTS EDITOR

DONALD TRUMP is the incumbent Republican president of the United States. While Trump’s stances on many issues are unclear, he has remained staunchly pro-life, anti-business regulation and has proposed a wall to combat illegal immigration. Trump is opposed to Obamacare, and proposed an alternative plan that did not make it through Congress. He is against Medicare For All, The Green New Deal and supports the privatization of Social Security. Photo by (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS).

AMY KLOBUCHAR is a Senator from Minnesota and has served in the Senate since 2006. She was rated a 64 percent by the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Law, indicating a mixed record on crime and prison reform. Klobuchar is also very strong on environmental issues, supporting the transition to 50 percent clean and carbon free electricity by 2030, the development of a national strategy to address global warming and investment in homegrown, renewable energy sources. Photo by (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS).

CORY BOOKER has been a member of the Senate since 2013. His campaign message focuses on unity by addressing racial discrimination and inequality. Before he was a Senator, Booker served as the mayor of Newark, New Jersey. Booker is known for “flip-flopping” his stances on issues as new polls come out. He has previously been opposed to the legalization of marijuana, but reintroduced a bill in February to legalize it on the federal level. Photo by (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS).

BETO O’ROURKE served as the representative for Texas’ 16th congressional district from 2013-’18 and ran against incumbent senator Ted Cruz in 2018 and lost. He has been a vocal proponent of marijuana legalization, calling the war on drugs a “complete failure.” O’Rourke is opposed to repealing Obamacare and supports its reform, but it is unclear whether he supports a Medicare For All amendment. Photo by (Nathan Hunsinger/Dallas Morning News/TNS).

PETE BUTTIGIEG currently serves as the mayor of South Bend, Indiana and has been in that position since 2011. The central message of his campaign is unclear, as are many of his stances on important political issues. Buttigieg has expressed that he is pro-choice and pro-prison reform, specifically regarding the death penalty and mandatory minimums. Buttigieg supported the Green New Deal and the Paris Climate Accord. Photo by (Zbigniew Bzdak/ Chicago Tribune/TNS).

ELIZABETH WARREN is a Senator from Massachusetts and has been in the Senate since 2013. Warren is pro-bank regulation, pro-human rights for all and pro-marijuana legalization. Warren supports a two-state solution to end the conflict in Gaza and is opposed to Palestine joining the U.N. until then. She also supports restricting the Second Amendment, saying that there is a “huge difference” between sportsmen’s guns and assault weapons. Photo by (Ronen Tivony/SIPA USA/TNS).

KAMALA HARRIS has been a Senator from California since 2016 and was district attorney of San Francisco and attorney general of California. Despite her fairly liberal stances on most issues, Harris has not supported prison reform during her time in the Senate and said that police officers should not be required to wear body cameras. Harris also has been a supporter of Israel in the past and supports a two-state solution to the conflict between Israel and Palestine. Photo by (Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times/TNS).

BERNIE SANDERS is a Senator from Vermont and has served in the Senate since 2006. Prior to serving in the Senate, Sanders served as a representative for 16 years and was mayor of Burlington, Vermont from 1981-’89. He supports abortion and civil rights for all and has been a very vocal proponent for both throughout his career. Sanders also has supported extensive economic reform, such as taxing the wealthy at a higher rate and eliminating income inequality. Photo by (Jeff Lange/Akron Beacon Journal/TNS).

JOHN HICKENLOOPER served as the governor of Colorado from 2011-’19 and, prior to that, served as mayor of Denver, Colorado. Hickenlooper is very strong on environmental issues, supporting the closing of coal plants and a transition to more renewable energy sources. Hickenlooper is pro-legalization of marijuana on the federal level and has proposed to use tax revenue from legal marijuana to help combat homelessness. Photo by (Michael Brochstein/Sipa USA/TNS).

JOE BIDEN is the former Vice President of the United States. Prior to being V.P., Biden was a Senator from Delaware from 1973-’09. In the past, Biden has been opposed to gay marriage, but still believed that members of the LGBT+ community deserve equal treatment. He has also held traditionally Republican stances in the past, but has changed his tune on things like “tough-on-crime” candidates, busing to combat segregation and CIA regulation. Photo by (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS).


NEWS / 07

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

NOT JUST THE SENIORS

A significant amount of teachers are also moving on.

BY MILAD JAHANI REPORTER PHOTOS BY NIC CAMBURAKO

A

s a wave of seniors are leaving, entering the next chapter of their lives, so are a handful of teachers and administrators. Latin teacher Lee Dixon, French teachers Rebecca Forsyth and Cathy Goldstein and administrator Charles Golden are all leaving next year to work at another school or retire. Brothers and English teachers Drew and Jordan Baranowski also announced their plans to leave earlier this year. Dixon, who has worked at South as our only Latin teacher for seven years, is moving to Loveland, Colorado with his wife, who is also a Latin teacher. They plan to work together at Loveland Classical Academy school where he plans to teach Latin 4 and 5 exclusively. Although all the teachers who are leaving will miss their students, Dixon and Forsyth will also miss watching them grow through Latin 1-4 and French 1-6, respectively. “[I’ll miss] my students and especially being with my students for four years… That has been my favorite thing here; I get to see my students grow up,” Dixon said. Forsyth, who’s been a French teacher at South for five and a half years, is moving to the outside of Savannah, Georgia with her husband. “My husband is a career army officer and we just recently found out his next job is going to be in Georgia,” Forsyth said. She plans to continue teaching French. Goldstein, another French teacher who is leaving South, started her teaching career in 1997 and was the first and only French teacher to teach at the elementary level at Belinder, Somerset and Westwood View Elementary. Goldstein is retiring to be with her family and plans to continue tutoring along with

CHRIS BERVERT

CATHY GOLDSTEIN

teaching a part time Zumba class. Golden, who had only taught at South this year, plans on moving to be the assistant principal for curriculum and instruction at Blue Valley West with his friend of over 20 years, Brett Pots, who is the principal there. “[One of the best] memories I have is just how much enthusiasm for the school our students have and how much school spirit we have. I’ve been to so many games and our fans were so much louder and into what was going on than the other teams fans and that’s really hard to reproduce... It’s an indicator of how many students love this school so much,” Golden said. Chris Bervert, who has taught math here for three years, is moving to teach in Denver and is going to miss fellow math teacher Andrea Dale the most. Teachers and administrators leaving hasn’t been something new at South over the past few years. Last year, our newest administrator Josie Herrera left to be the principle of Nieman Elementary, and we lost a total of eleven faculty members. It is hard to say whether the high turnover rate is due to chance or due to deeper seeded issues within America’s education system as a whole. “For the most part, almost all of them are achieving a promotion and going to a better job,” principal Todd Dain said. “A lot of them are moving up, more pay, district administration, other opportunities in teaching and learning.” In proportion to other states, Kansas schools spend $9,960 per student while the national average is $11,392. The Shawnee Mission School District has been known to offer some of the best pay in the state and is known for their equal graduation rates among their high schools.

REBECCA FORSYTH

LEE DIXON

CHARLES GOLDEN


08 / NEWS

A WEEK IN AMERICA

THE PATRIOT

Band students host German foreign exchange students for a week.

T

BY ALI HARRISON NEWS EDITOR PHOTOS BY NAOMI MITCHELL

he Rompin’ Stompin’ Raider Band hosted a group of German foreign exchange students for a week in late April. “It’s an exchange. They’re over here. They’ve been up in Chicago for a week and now they’re in Kansas City for a week checking out what Kansas City’s about,” junior Brandon Kirmer said. He hosted Julius Thinnes, a trumpet player. The American hosts did their best to show the Germans Overland Park in the short time they were here. They visited some of the most popular attractions in the area such as Top Golf and the American Jazz Museum in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. However, typical American stores were just as exciting for them: Walmart, Target and even Costco. “They loved [Costco]. They thought it was hilarious how we could sample foods all over. They were like, ‘Why is there so much food here?’” said junior Kate Herrmann. “Welcome to America.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDON KIRMER ARRIVING on May 18, junior Brandon Kirmer met his German, Julius Thinnes, at South that evening.

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL CHEERING at the America v. Germany soccer game, the German girls cheered on their teammates to a 7-5 victory.

The Germans learned all about American customs and culture, but they also taught their hosts about the differences between the two countries, specifically in regards to their laws. For instance, Kirmer and Thinnes talked about speed limits on the highway because there aren’t limits in Germany. Additionally, extracurriculars are not at all associated with the school the Germans go to. They have to go to a different place for music, sports and clubs. For instance, the band kids go to Musikschule im Schloss Bietigheim-Bissingen, which is their music school. May 30, the South band kids will travel the 4,711 miles to Frankfurt, Germany to learn about their culture and stay with their Germans. They will also visit Florence, Italy and fly back home out of Rome, returning June 9.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDON KIRMER VISITING downtown Overland Park, hosts and exchange students visited the sister city plaque.

4,711 MIL

ES

KANSAS C

ITY TO FR A

NKFURT

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL PLAYING in the America v. Germany soccer game, freshman Hank Salzberg went to steal the ball from two opponents.


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

WHAT’S

THE SCORE?

Your update on sports stats. BY MEGAN SMITH SPORTS EDITOR

SPORTS / 09

FRESH FACE ON THE COURT

The girls basketball team gets

GIRLS SWIM & DIVE a new coach for next season. STATE QUALIFIERS: SWIM: OLIVIA RILEY, ELLA BUSS, lydia kernen, sarah ohlde, katie horner dive: OPHE SHAPIRO, MIA MUSSON, EDEN ALDERMAN

BOYS TENNIS

WINS

TIES

LOSSES

6GIRLS 4SOCCER1 WINS

LOSSES

8SOFTBALL4

WINS

LOSSES

3BASEBALL11

WINS

LOSSES

3 13 TRACK & FIELD

ku RELAYS TOP FINISHERS: JACK ROBERTS: 2nd LONG JUMP sam macklin: 3rd long jump

BOYS GOLF LOW SCORERS: GRIFFIN BRASSELL: 80 DYLAN BLOOM: 84 MAJOR CLOSE: 87

AS OF MAY 2, 2019

A

BY ADDIE SOYSKI CIRCULATION MANAGER

new girls basketball coach and I’m excited to get to know him is coming to South next better this summer,” Cooper said. season. Mark Western was For Western, personal the coach at F.L. Schlagel for five connection is a huge part of his years and led them to four 5A state coaching style. He knew and had appearances. a connection with most of the “[Western] brings a young students at Schlagel, which he enthusiasm. And he brings a credits as being one of the reasons record of success and really good behind his success. knowledge of the game,” athletics “I think the process of building director John Johnson said. a strong culture starts with sincere Western attended East Antioch relationships. That’s how you and Antioch Middle School and change the culture of a program.” graduated Western said. from Shawnee Many are M i s s i o n looking forward North in to Western’s 2001. He was take on coaching an assistant and have high coach at North hopes for next for seven year. Much of years and even the feedback student taught received has at South in been very 2013. positive. “I student “I’m really ATHLETIC DIRECTOR taught under excited. I think JOHN JOHNSON Coach Wiles that he has a and Coach really good Thompson… and you always kind record at Schlegel and [was] good of think in the back of your head, as a coach the past couple of years, … ‘What if I could teach here so I’m really excited to be a part of someday?’ And you just don’t his program… I think he can bring know how it’s going to work out… kind of a new perspective and style To say I’m excited would be an of coaching,” Cooper said. understatement… So it was just a Western is excited to be very comfortable feel to be in the coaching an already strong team building,” Western said. and wants to build on that existing But that isn’t the only familiarity success. at South for Western as he coached “My teams in the past have juniors Katie Cooper and Kristina always been very tough… very Bermond when they were in gritty and will play with a chip on elementary school. their shoulder and that’s how we’re “Coach Western was one of going to be, a team that’s not afraid my first coaches when I started to work hard,” Western said. playing basketball in sixth grade so Western has a 87-28 career I think it kind of works that he’s record and led Schlagel to finish going to be my last coach for my third at the 5A state championships senior season. He’s a good coach this year.

[Western] brings a record of success and really good knowledge of the game.


10 / SPORTS

THE PATRIOT

SENIORS’ LAST GAME What it feels like to be a Raider athlete for the last time.

I

BY CATHERINE GUNNIGLE REPORTER

t’s not the countless practices growing up. It’s not the late nights putting in the work. It’s not even the hours and hours of watching film. No, all of that fades away during a “last”. It’s the last pre-game dance party, the last time running out on the field, the last shot at a goal, stepping up to the plate for your last at-bat or playing your last game. There’s no other feeling like the one of your “last.” It’s one of those rare sensations that makes your hands shake a little more, your heart beat a little faster and your head to think a little slower. Reality seems to slow down and you remember being a scrawny, little freshman walking out to try outs. Before all those hours in the weight room, before all of the camps and weekend practices, you remember everyone constantly reminding you “how fast it goes” but not believing them, and you remember how your hours of dedication and hardwork have molded you into the person you are today. “Freshman year you are so young compared to everyone else; most of us were only 14 or 15. I remember being really scared, but I knew it was going to be the start of something great.” senior basketball and track athlete Skylar Roads said. Looking back on high school, you remember how much your sport has affected the person you are today. However, when all that fades and reality comes back into play, you forget all of your “firsts.” All that you can think of is your “last.”

PHOTO BY ABBY COX

An end of an era is never easy. Like reading a really good book and not wanting it to end, no one wants to turn the last page; no one wants it to be over. All seniors go through that feeling, but no matter what you’re into, all that matters is that you remember your last as your best. “The last time I walked on to the court I made sure I wouldn’t regret anything. I gave basketball everything I had and that last game was no different,” senior basketball player Abby Gerber said. “You never think about how fast it goes when you’re experiencing it. The days feel so long, but the years feel so short. My advice to any freshman would be to take it all in while you can,” senior volleyball player Olivia Chudik said. Although everyone tells freshman how fast high school goes, no one ever believes them. It’s a time that day by day goes slowly but year by year speeds by. When constantly told as young athletes to play every game as if it is your last, no one actually prepares you for what to do when you finally reach that last game. Just because the game is over doesn’t mean you aren’t an athlete anymore. Sports have a way of staying in your life forever. The lessons they teach are so much bigger than just a ball or a goal and Shawnee Mission South’s class of 2019 exemplifies that with great honor. Thank you to all of our seniors. We hope you enjoyed your “lasts.”


SPORTS / 11

STANDOUT SENIORS

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

The senior class this year is full of athletic leaders. Here are a few of the best. BY EVAN SHIBEL ADS EDITOR PHOTOS BY KYLA HUNTER, EMMA HARDING, TRINITY CLARK & REESE WOODS

BECCA BEELER

MAJOR CLOSE

What is something that you want passed on from your class to the next?

What is something the team has this year that you hope will be continued for years to come?

SOCCER

“I want to make sure future teams and classes know that nothing is given, especially not in this program. You must work hard for everything that you want to earn.”

MASON FITZMAURICE CROSS COUNTRY

What do you think has been the greatest accomplishment of your career at South?

“I think the biggest one was my junior year when I actually took some time to get to know the younger guys on our team.”

AUSTIN CONNER FOOTBALL

What was your favorite moment of your career in football at South? “This year. After all the seniors quit my sophomore year, a bunch of the core guys in my class made it our goal to turn the program around by senior year and we did that.”

SAM MACKLIN TRACK

What comes with being a senior and being a leader on the team?

“Leading the team; it’s a lot of responsibility. The coaches are on you a lot more about being on time and being responsible and working hard at practice.”

NOLAN THIMMESCH BASEBALL

What is it like to lead the baseball team?

“In team sports there is always a lot going on and... especially with baseball with how slow of a game it is, it is always important to make sure that we keep the younger guys engaged and ready.”

BOYS GOLF

“Our team is solid all the way through. On our Varsity top six team, anyone can be the best on any given day.”

KATIE SCHULTZ SOFTBALL

What is your favorite part about being a senior on the softball team?

“I’ve always loved helping new girls that come in and have never played before. I’ve always enjoyed helping them learn the game and watch them start to have fun.”

ABIGAIL GEORGE VOLLEYBALL

What was the best part of your senior year?

“We had a new coach this year and she totally changed the mentality in the program and it was just fun being apart of the change and getting more people to weights and turning that into a more successful season.”

SAM CALDWELL BOYS BASKETBALL

What is something the team has this year that you hope will be continued for years to come? “The culture of the team is something I want passed down

to future teams, like how close we all were and how we were all fighting for the same goal.”

ABBY GERBER

GIRLS BASKETBALL What is something the team has this year that you hope will be continued for years to come?

“How we were all able to form friendships and working with people that you wouldn’t always work with because it can actually teach you a lot of life lessons as well.”


12 / SPORTS

THE PATRIOT

SO WE MEET AGAIN South hosted more track and field meets this season than they have in the past.

C

BY ANNALIE POLEN SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

hances are if you do a spring sport, you have noticed many track and field meets happening at South as you get out of practice. With South hosting five meets this year, it is clear that there are more home meets than ever. In a normal track and field season, South hosts two to three meets, according to head coach J.J Wannamaker. There is no direct reasoning that there are so many home meets other than that the meets that are on a rotation all happened to hit South this year. It is good timing though, with a new track and new throwing equipment. Having so many meets at South comes with different pros and cons. “Not having to worry about bus transportation, that’s the best part about all the home meets,” Wannamaker said. Junior Mary Ward has been running distance consisting of the one mile and two mile for track for three years now. She also likes the convenience of all the home meets. “Having a lot of meets at South is nice because we don’t have to travel for meets and then also getting to race on your home track is nice,” Ward said. Senior Danny Wiskur has been doing long jump, triple jump and sprints in track and field for the last four years. “It’s actually been kind of nice because just being at South is

like a home environment,” Wiskur said. Javelin coach Aaron Dean also explained that since South now has a nice stadium with new equipment, it makes sense to have so many meets here. There are some disadvantages that come with all the pros of home meets though. “The worst part is that I have to spend more time with meet management than I actually do to coach or watch my athletes and that’s probably the worst part,” Wannamaker said. Wiskur also explained how so many home meets have caused a loss in practices for the teams not participating in the meet. “It’s a lot of work for everyone, especially the JV kids; they don’t even practice some days when we have Varsity meets and then vice versa for Varsity,” Wiskur said. Although all the home track meets can require a lot of work from everyone, they also seem to pay off. The convenience and support that are gained from home meets seem to outweigh the cons that result from the meets. “I think the support that we get from all of the kids that come out and watch us and I think all the other coaches and students coming to support us is huge and I think our athletes really feed off it,” Dean said.

MANY South track athletes enjoy competing in their home stadium, but the high number of meets hosted by South come with disadvantages as well. PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL


Q&A

SPORTS / 13

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

KIRSTEN WOMACK

with Freshman reflects on what it feels like to break the shotput record. BY MILAD JAHANI REPORTER

PHOTO BY JILLIAN MCCLELLAND

Q: What made you want to join track and field/shot put? A: My dad did it so I did it. He told me I should do it because I squat so much. He was like, ‘Oh, it uses your legs so you should do that.’

Q: Were you nervous being a freshman on Varsity? A: Yes I was. I kind of still am since I don’t know that many people so it’s a little awkward.

Q: How long have you trained for this? A: No, I just started when I started high school. Q: Why shot put? A: I don’t know. Everyone was doing javelin and I didn’t want to do that so I was like, ‘Okay I’ll just do shot,’ and I didn’t realize how hard it is.

Q: Did you know that you beat the record at first? A: No, I thought I was a foot off and then Johnson was like, ‘Oh my god,

you beat it.’

Q: How did it feel when you found out? A: I was joking around during basketball season, pointing at the track

records saying, ‘Oh, I’m gonna make it up there. Just watch.’ It was really scary that I just broke a freshman record.

Q:

How did your dad feel when he found out since he holds the record

at Northwest?

A: He was like, ‘Wow, it must be in your genes.’ Q: Did your mom do track and field in high school? A: No, she couldn’t do it because she had asthma so she really wanted me to do it.

Q: Do you do any other events? A: Disk and sprints. Q: How do you find time to practice for all your other events? A: I switch it up. Mondays I usually do shot. Tuesdays I do sprints which

is the hardest. We usually have meets on Friday so I do both in one day.

Q: How do you train for shot put compared to your other events? A: It was really weird because, for one, you have to hold a 10 pound metal ball against your neck and use all the energy you’re generating with your legs.


14 / PHOTO ESSAY

THE PATRIOT

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

CLOSING OUT 2

PHOTO BY NIC CAMBURAKO

1

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

3


PHOTO ESSAY / 15

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

4

1. Junior Anna Crain hands off to sophomore Arann Raven in the Junior Varsity girls four by one-hundred meter relay. There have been four track meets held at South this season. 2. Senior Sofie Erickson and other seniors sign to play their respective sports at the collegiate level. Fourteen seniors signed on April 13. 3. Exchange students from Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany compete in a soccer game against their American host students. American band students will travel to Germany in June as a part of this exchange. 4. Juior Ben Curtis competes in the Varsity one mile race at the Shawnee Mission District track meet. All five Shawnee Mission schools competed in this meet. 5. An environmental education student holds a snake. Enironmental ed. students care for many types of animals as part of the class. 6. SMS band students and soccer players shout in excitement. These students played a soccer game against German exchange students from Bietigheim-Bissingen on April 24. 7. Freshman Macy Brassell throws the javelin at a track and field meet. On April 17, all five Shawnee Mission schools competed in a meet hosted by SMS.

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL PHOTO BY KYLA HUNTER

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

5 6

7

PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL


CARTER HALE

Varsity football player Carter Hale is a hardworking student and employee. He plans to attend the University of St. Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas on a lacrosse scholarship to study athletic training. He hopes to be a high school or college athletic trainer.

19

ABI WANDLING

Wandling is a four year choir letter and a three year forensics letter, a member of Link Crew and NH. She plans on going to John Brown University and studying mechanical engineering and hopes to get her masters and travel.

SENIORS OF 2019

ABHISHEK GUJAR

Abhishek Gujar achieved good grades and made the honor roll. He plans to attend Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey to study science. He hopes to be an astronomer, computer programmer or psychologist.

ANNIE BARRY

Annie Barry took two years of creative writing before being published in Elementia, a local magazine that she has been editing for since. She’s been published in six other magazines and recently published a book of poetry, “Sore Lips.” She will attend the University of Kansas to double major in English and creative writing, and hopes to continue writing or editing and get an internship.

KAREEM HAMMOUDA

Kareem Hammouda is a member of Arabic Club and is fluent in the language. He was a debate and forensics state qualifier. He plans to attend the University of Kansas and might study political science.

Raiders prepare for their futures after high school.

BY ALI HARRISON NEWS EDITOR, GINI HORTON WEB EDITOR, EVAN SHIBEL ADS EDITOR

BERGEN COOPER

Bergen Cooper was a Varsity cheerleader and gymnast for all four years, PLS cadet, Link Crew leader and the Heritage head photo editor. She will attend Kansas State University to study special education in hopes to become an elementary school special needs teacher.

NICK VELICER

An active member of the musical community, Nick Velicer has been a part of the band all four years, a member of the jazz band for three, and is a founding member of the Southland Brass Band. Velicer is a Shooting Stars first place winner. He hopes to go to KU to study computer science and continue to “not die” after college.

MASON HOYT

Mason Hoyt accomplished a lot in theater and choir, and, most importantly, through that he discovered who he is, became comfortable in himself and understand his OCD. He plans to attend Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois and plans to major in commercial music and hopefully minor in theater and creative writing. After college he wants to write and record music, continue acting and write for theater and film.

ISABEL GUSMAN

Founder and manager of South’s Ethics Bowl team, Isabel Gusman was a state viola player and has recently begun learning the violin along with the flute. She plans to attend the University of Kansas and will likely double major in philosophy and field performance. After college, she hopes to either play in a professional orchestra or go to law school with her philosophy degree.


FERNANDA FREGOZO

GAVIN HARRIS

TANNER THURLOW

ABBY WALKER

Fernanda Fregozo has been involved in the art program since her freshman year, participating in the Shooting Stars program, AP art and being published in a local magazine, Elementia. Fregozo plans on going to JCCC in the fall and majoring in art education. She hopes to be able to get a job as an art teacher out of college.

During his time at South, Thurlow was involved in DECA, IPS, Varsity baseball and Link Crew. His favorite examples of school spirit are how exciting our assemblies are and how packed our student section is at sports games. He will be attending Missouri Valley College to play baseball.

Gavin Harris had a successful bowling career in his three years as a Varsity bowler, breaking several records along the way. He plans to attend Missouri Welding Institute to get his welding degree, and he also plans to join the professional bowling tour. Afterwards, he hopes to find work as a welder and continue to bowl.

Abby Walker was this year’s Heritage editorin-chief. She enjoyed getting to work on the yearbook and make all the big decisions regarding it. She will attend the University of Kansas to study environmental engineering. Afterwards, she hopes to go to Washington and eventually get an internship.

EMMA ROSS

Emma Ross was this year’s field captain and got the opportunity to lead the band throughout their season of games and competitions. She will attend Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and continue her athletic career in track. She’s double majoring in PreMed and Spanish in hopes to work internationally.

GRACE SHATZ

Grace Shatz has been a determined distance runner since the beginning of her freshman year. She has also been heavily involved in the art program here at South. After four years, Shatz has her future set on the University of Arkansas to major in biology.

JACK ROBERTS

Varsity quarterback Jack Roberts is extremely proud of his four years at Shawnee Mission South, especially within the football program. He is most proud of the core group of seniors on the team this year that stuck it out after a tough couple of years and turned this year into the great success it was. Roberts plans to attend Pittsburg State University next year and major in business. He will be playing football for the Gorillas and would like to take football as far as possible in his life.

JACK RUNDELL

The first of the two Rundell twins, Jackson will be attending JCCC next year and then plans to transfer to Pittsburg State University to major in graphic design. Jackson thinks that his biggest accomplishment while at South was making principal’s honor roll. He also really enjoyed attending the sports events at South.

VALENTINA MERCADO

Valentina Mercado took on a rigorous course load being the president of the French club. Mercado was accepted into Grinnell College and plans on majoring in political science or French with a concentration on neuroscience. She hopes to later go to medical school or work on political campaigns.

NATE RUNDELL

Leg two of the two Rundell twins, Nate is also going to be attending JCCC along with his brother for his first year then is planning to transfer to Wichita State University to major in sports management. Nate told us that he has always enjoyed the teachers at South, saying they have always been super kind and helpful.


Q&A

20 / FEATURES

THE PATRIOT

Senior discusses going to University of Chicago to study neurology and psychology for free because of Questbridge with Jordyn Martin scholarship.

Q: Where are you going to college? A: University of Chicago. Q: Were there any other colleges you were considering? A: Yes, I also applied to Columbia and Vanderbilt through Questbridge. Q: What is Questbridge? A: Basically it’s a way for colleges to find low income minority students so they don’t have to go out and search for them on their own. It kinda confuses people because a lot of the time they think that the scholarship came from Questbridge when in reality, I didn’t get any money from Questbridge. All the money came from [the University of] Chicago. It’s really just a connecting piece to the students and to the schools so that they can find each other. Q: What did you do to get into Questbridge? A: It started out junior year. I became a college prep scholar, I filled out an application and I had to do a couple essays. I had to get two teacher recommendation letters and I had to fill out an application. Then once I did that, that lasted through all of junior year. Then I had to apply again to become a college match scholar... After that is when I found out I got matched to the school so it was really... three application processes which was a lot of work. Q: How does getting matched to the school work? A: You pick your top schools. Basically so you can pick up to 12; you can pick less than that if you want. Then you apply to them and the schools can match you or not. So if you get matched with your top pick, [and if your] top pick wants you, you go to that school. Otherwise it defers to your second and third, so whichever school you get matched to, that’s the one you go to. Q: Why did you apply? A: I am a first generation which means my

BY KATIE HIEBL REPORTER

parents didn’t go to college and I am also low income, so sure, I could get tuition paid for at some schools, but really the kicker is room and board and those costs. So through Questbridge they also cover my book fees and they cover a couple of my travel expenses too so I can come home if I really wanted to... I wouldn’t have been able to go to University of Chicago because they wouldn’t have given me room and board and I can’t afford $16,000 a year in room and board. I was given the opportunity that a lot of kids get to do; they get to apply to those ivy league schools because they can pay $16,000 a year to live there, which I couldn’t do. So without Questbridge I would have gotten into a college because of my grades because I worked hard for my grades, so I probably could have gotten into a KU, K-State and been ok, but really getting into the ivy leagues is what wouldn’t have been possible if it wasn’t for Questbridge. Q: What do you want to major in? A: I want to double major in neurology and psychology and then go to med school and get my MD. and PHD. Q: What do you want to do? A: One of the reasons that drew me to University of Chicago is that they are partnered with a pediatric hospital and I really want to work with kids. I used to want to work in a psych ward. Actually I haven’t decided if I want to do that yet, but I definitely want to go into neurology at a children’s hospital. Q: Do you have any advice for people applying for scholarships or college in general? A: Put the work in. It might seem like a lot, but in the end it will pay off. You know there are times when I was applying to Questbridge where I really wanted to quit. I was like, ‘Mom I am not writing

PHOTO BY KYLA HUNTER

this essay; it is so dumb. This is so much work.’ If I wouldn’t have put in the work, I wouldn’t have been where I am today. I am literally going to school for free and it’s crazy to think about, so it seems like a lot of work with all the essays and applications, but literally it only lasts a few months and in the end it’s so worth it because now you don’t have to worry about paying that back in a few years; it’s already done.


OPINION / 21

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

CARTOON BY TRINITY CLARK PHOTOGRAPHER

T

STAFF EDITORIAL Is a hot dog a sandwich?

he question of whether a hot dog is a sandwich is one that has long plagued human existence. Well, since 1487, which is when the frankfurter was first developed. The debate has really taken off online and there are many methods, definitions and schools of thought that go into the logic of whether a hot dog is a sandwich. An important distinction we must make is whether we are talking about the bare hot dog itself or the hot dog on a bun. Clearly the bare hot dog is not a sandwich but when the bun gets added it gets complicated. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book does not include hot dogs in their definition of a “closed-faced sandwich,” and are not required to be inspected by the federal government. However, some states like California do define a hot dog as a sandwich under their state-level food codes and New York’s definition of a sandwich is so loose it considers a burrito to be a sandwich. Some people find their answer in the

Cube Rule of Food Identification, which classifies food based on how many sides of the food are starch. According to this method, a hot dog would be a taco, because it has starch on three sides. Others argue that because the shape of a hot dog bun is similar to a sub sandwich roll, a hot dog must be a sandwich. And still more, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says that a hot dog cannot be a sandwich because it is only partially surrounded by the bun, not sandwiched. Even The Patriot staff is divided on whether hot dogs are sandwiches or not. The best part of the “is a hot dog a sandwich” debate is that it gets people of all ages and backgrounds talking. The ability of such a silly topic to get people talking in a time when we are divided, set in our ways and refusing to acknowledge facts is powerful. Imagine if we put the same time and passion into discussing serious issues that impact us. Instead of discussing, we resort to blocking. Instead of researching, we

refer to social media posts that may be misinformed without fact-checking first. Instead of understanding others, we categorize them by their views. With this debate, however, we discuss. We research. We want to know the true definition of a hot dog. We want to know the answer, and we listen to others’ reasoning to find the one that sounds right. Our society is so used to formulating opinions without the facts, because everyone now has to have a stance one way or another. Aligning with one side now means agreeing with everything that side has to say. But when it comes to whether a hot dog is a sandwich, we want to learn more. We discuss thoroughly. We don’t always agree with our friends. And that’s something that’s missing in today’s political climate. Will debates over simple topics like whether a hot dog is a sandwich or not be able to help us as a society communicate better? Only time will tell, but it sure would be bun-derful.

11/11 EDITORS AGREE WITH THE VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THIS EDITORIAL.


22 / OPINION

THE DEBATE:

THE PATRIOT

Going to college.

PRO

BY MCKENNA PICKERING SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

A

fter high school you have two options: go to college or start working. Those who chose to travel down the path of getting a job are

84%

more likely to struggle finding one. Most companies avoid hiring people with no degree. It’s merely because a college degree shows that you have experience or knowledge in the field in which you want to work. I personally think college is a must before finding a career. High school doesn’t prepare you enough to work a nine to five job. College is the part of your life that is getting you ready for the next stage in life. You enter adulthood by getting out of high school and starting new. You don’t just bloom into a fully functioning adult right after high school. College is the last step you take before having to really fend for yourself. I’m not saying you can’t live and be successful without college; I’m just simply implying that it’s a helpful tool given to you if you don’t feel quite ready enough to step out into the real world. I think that college is something you should consider before working because

TWITTER POLL*

it’s going to be harder to find a company that will hire you without a degree. “In today’s competitive job market, it’s becoming more common for employers to require applicants to hold at least a bachelor’s degree in order to qualify for many jobs. That means that without the credential, you’re going to be at a disadvantage - it’s difficult to even get in the door at a new company, or start the conversation with a potential employer, without it, even if you have years of experience in your field,” according to champlain.edu. Money is a key factor when it comes to working and living a sustainable life. Everything in life is made up of price tags, coupons sales, checks and balances, etc. With a degree it’s not as difficult to find a job that provides a substantial income.

16% *of 62 votes

D

eciding what the next step in your life will be after high school is one of the largest decision you will ever make. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016 69.7 percent of people attended college after high school. However, that number continues to decrease as people are choosing alternative methods over college. College is seen as a vital part of everyone’s life; from a very young age you are taught that if you don’t go to college, you won’t be able to obtain a good job and live a comfortable life. In today’s society that is just not true; the world is always changing and advancing. In order to keep up with this, people have started moving away from college and starting their own companies, creating new inventions and innovating without the help of college debt. The military has also become a very popular alternative to college. The benefits PHOTOS BY EMMA HARDING

offered far surpass what college has to offer; the military pays for all of in-state tuition, provides cheaper insurance and also pays you just for being a part of the greater cause. According to the United States Federal Reserve, $1.56 trillion are owed in student loan debts and that substantial debt is dispersed between an astounding 44.7 million Americans. For example, a service member in the United States Air Force serving as a General brings home about $189,600 a year according to business insider. To put that in perspective, a lawyer’s median base pay is about $144,500 a year. The difference between a high paying civilian job and military job is that for an over $100,000 a year salary, anywhere from four to eight years of college are usually required. With the military you are trained and learn through experience; however, you will start your career by attending

AIT (Advanced Individual Training) for anywhere from four to 52 weeks. The upside of that training is that it’s free.

BY QUINN KASPAR PHOTOGRAPHER

CON


OPINION / 23

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

SIGNING

OFF

I

joined the newspaper staff the second semester of my freshman year, amidst one of the most controversial years that The Patriot has ever had. And it wasn’t because the late, great Emily Wilkinson’s investigative stories caused debates among the students; it was because the Patriot was “too liberal.” The day that the last Patriot of my freshman year came out, I witnessed a senior ripping it to shreds in front of the school while yelling obscenities about it. That image was burned into my mind for the rest of my high school years and I was determined to change it. I’ve witnessed many things throughout my career as a high school journalist. The year I witnessed a paper torn apart, The Patriot had decided to cover the lack of feminine influence on the popular club Crowd Control. This led to an all-school uproar – the newspaper was full of feminazis, they were trying to change things that didn’t need to be changed, they were overstepping boundaries. A Girls Crowd Control was created, then died; and through it all, The Patriot was blamed for the tumult. I thought the tide had changed last year when the school erupted over an opinion article that was not liberal at all — an anti-feminism article. But I still hear whispers that the Patriot leans too far left, that nobody reads it. In an age when any sort of publication can be denounced as “fake news” as soon as they print something potentially PHOTO BY NAOMI MITCHELL

Reflections from the editor-in-chief. disagreeable, the media is one of the most important parts of a democracy. Speaking as a journalist, hearing that the student body doesn’t visit our website or look through our paper copies disappoints me. Even as our privacy is infringed upon, as our country is in political turmoil, students still can’t find the effort to read the news — the news that affects them. South’s reception of the paper has improved since my freshman year. I haven’t heard anyone express their outright disgust since that one fateful day. And I think South has changed for the better; the Crowd Control story that gained negative attention from the students caused Crowd Control to admit girls into its ranks. We’ve published plenty of risky stories and haven’t heard any bad feedback. I’m glad I got to see South grow and mature as a school. I’m glad I experienced the things that I did and I’m glad I got to learn from past blunders. Here’s hoping a legacy of improvement lives on with the next staff of the Patriot. Yours faithfully,

AVERY WOODS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


24 / OPINION

THE PATRIOT PHOTOS BY NAOMI MITCHELL

1 2 3 4 5 6

BUILD-A-BABY

The pros and cons of genetic modification.

T

BY ADDIE SOYSKI CIRCULATION MANAGER

he phrase “designer baby” definitely evokes an immediate response for a lot of people. But many aren’t clear on its actual meaning. “Designer babies” happen through in vitro fertilization, the process in which an egg is combined with a sperm outside of the body. Multiple embryos are fertilized and are screened so genetic characteristics can be determined. A couple can decide which baby they want to carry and the other embryos are typically terminated. Right now, most designer babies are just a measure to prevent pregnancies where a child has or is a carrier of a serious disease. Despite concerns that we’re “playing God,” this type of designer baby isn’t immoral. In fact, it’s probably more ethical to not carry babies that have serious medical issues. You’re preventing a lifetime of pain and constant trips to the doctor and stopping potentially

unprepared parents from needing to provide care they may not be able or want to give. It’s not really “playing God” because the genetics achieved had a possibility of occurring naturally. It’s not rewriting DNA; it’s picking from naturally occurring outcomes. It also seems moral enough to use in vitro for a child that has the same blood or tissue type as a sick family member who needs a donor. Some aspects of designer babies have legitimate medical applications. However, we need to be careful with this type of process going forward. It shouldn’t be used to let parents design their dream play thing. “I want her eyes to match mine,” is not a good application of this technology. While parents should have control over their reproduction, they shouldn’t get to design a human being just because. If you want to pick a kid’s features, get a doll. This could have even

more sinister undertones in regards to race. While people striving for Aryan blue eyed, blonde haired babies seems far fetched, it’s more likely there’d be a preference for lighter skin and whiter features. While parents may not be outwardly racist, there might be racial bias in their decision making. This, for obvious reasons, is not the greatest thing in the world. Also, overuse of designer babies could result in a gender imbalance in some parts of the world that have a clear cultural preference for the male sex. Places like India and China already have this problem and would be hit hardest. Gender imbalance can seriously upset the functioning of a society. These concerns are probably far off, but are still important to consider as technology continues to progress. Ethics should always have a place in science.


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

THE COST OF COLLEGE

Skyrocketing tuition rates and student loan debt are taking a toll on America.

A

BY LILY WAGNER OPINION EDITOR

fter the euphoria of getting accepted into a college or university, particularly if it your dream school, it can be devastating to start looking into the financial aid offer only to realize you cannot afford to attend the school that you worked hard to get into. In the fall of 2018, 19.9 million people were enrolled in colleges and universities across the United States. Most Americans choosing to go to college are doing so because some form of college education is becoming more of a necessity when trying to find a well-paying job. According to the May 2018 jobs report, 91% of new jobs created in the previous year went to those with a college degree. And according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, those with college degrees are on average making $18,000 more per year than their peers who only have a high school diploma. But despite earnings for degree-holders being higher than wages for those without, wages have stagnated since the 1970’s. That, coupled with the skyrocketing cost of college has caused 44 million American borrowers to rack up $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. Rising college costs are making it more difficult for average Americans to pay for college without needing loans. The in-state tuition rate for the

University of Kansas was $240 in 1970. Adjusted for inflation, that would be $1,572.38 today. But that is not what KU’s instate tuition rate is today. Instead it is about $10,000. Many private schools are even more expensive. A year of tuition at Harvard University cost $4,070 in 1970, which now would be $26,665 after inflation. But Harvard’s annual tuition rate $47,730. Even with aid and scholarships, many students face difficulty paying for room and board, which can sometimes tack on another $20,000. A survey done by the Hope Center for College, Community and Justice shows that in the past year, 36 percent of college students have experience housing insecurity and 9 percent have been homeless. The rates for community college students are even higher, with 46 percent having experienced housing insecurity and 12 percent having been homeless. In April, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren proposed a plan to cancel debts for more than 95 percent of Americans who have student loan debt and to eliminate the cost of tuition and fees at every public college and university in the U.S. The idea of tuition

f r e e college has grown more popular in recent years. A Business Insider poll shows that 57 percent of Americans somewhat support Warren’s plan. We are living in a world where a college degree is almost a requirement for any chance at job security and financial stability. If the United States really wants to stay at the forefront of development, making a college education more affordable for all is a necessary step that must be taken.

OPINION / 25


26 / A&E

BATTLE

of the

THE PATRIOT

BRANDS

BY ANSLEY CHAMBERS COPY EDITOR & NICHOLE THOMAS FEATURES EDITOR PHOTOS BY HALEY HILL

C

CONVERSE

onverse are defined by many words, but one in particular speaks volumes over all the others: classic. Converse are classic. Created in 1908, they’ve yet to go out of style. They go by many names: Converse, All Stars, Chuck Taylors, Chucks, Cons, Etc. The inferior Vans were made in 1966 and really never championed a style. “Sk8r bois” have adopted the sad shoes to fit their sad style. Besides that, have you ever seen Vans unironically dressed up? No, because Vans turn your whole look into a grungy skater look. Granted, sometimes you need Vans to be edgy in a way that Converse can’t fully achieve. However, it’s impossible to not be edgy with Vans. You don’t always want to be edgy. The strength in edginess that Vans offer is significantly less valuable and important than the versatility and overall strength in every look that Converse so graciously offer.

O

PHOTOS BY TRINITY CLARK

Converse, on the other hand, can define or complement your style with very little effort. Have a super cool outfit of any type - cute, skater, casual, lazy, dressy, etc. - planned out? Throw some lowkey black, white or gray Converse on so as not to subtract attention from the rest of your look. Want your shoes to be a larger focus of your outfit? Buy some brightly colored or designed high-tops and build the rest of your look around the shoes for a super unique vibe. Converse can be bold or passive depending on how you choose to style them. You can’t go wrong with Converse. They’re reliable and their style flexibility is incredible. No wonder Converse have been a staple wardrobe piece for decades. They are inclusive of every style, unlike Vans, which are limited to skaters. Name a more iconic shoe than Converse. I’ll wait.

VS all those outspoken extroverts, vibrant artists, wacky misfits and quirky quiet kids, Vans are made for you. There’s a reason Converse’s biggest market is kids. They are innocent, simple shoes which say a lot about you. Wouldn’t you rather be known for being bold rather than basic? Fun rather than boring? There’s no reason you can’t own both shoes, but it’s the shoes you thrive in that say the most. Those should be Vans. Vans are not for the faint of heart. They might be edgy, but when did that become so despised? There’s a misconception that edgy means stoner kids; this could not be more false. Last time I checked, even basic girls pull off the white slip-on Vans and still manage to look like their daddy paid high dollar for them. These shoes are a canvas that you can paint any personality onto; just make sure it’s a bold one.

42%

58%

VANS

riginally a skateboard shoe and popularized by California culture, Vans has been reborn. It’s iconic “jazz-strip” is an unmistakable sign of the brand. With bold styles to fit everyone’s personality, it’s the perfect shoe to wear for any occasion. White slips-ons with a dress or high tops with cuffed jeans, there is a shoe perfect for every outfit. Converse, on the other hand, are the perfect shoe if needed to dress like a clown. The obnoxious plastic toe should scare everyone away. Not long ago, Converse made a comeback, but died along with Tumblr. These shoes might’ve been fashionable in the 1950s on basketball players, same time when mens’ short-shorts were popular. Some things go out of style for the better. The “skater vibe” does indeed embody the Vans brand. It takes a special person to pull off these shoes. For

RESULTS FROM A @SMSPATRIOT TWITTER POLL OF 19


A&E / 27

SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

ENCAPSULATED Picking the right clothes for the right time.

W

BY BRYNN TAYLOR SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

hen it comes to buying and picking out outfits, it can be quite challenging for many people and could cause elevated stress which is why I chose to do a “decluttering and space-saving” practice called “capsule wardrobing.” Capsule wardrobe is a term made by Susie Faux, the owner of a boutique in London called “Wardrobe” back in the 1970s. According to Faux, a capsule wardrobe is “a collection of a few essential items of clothing that don’t go out of fashion, such as skirts, trousers, and coats, which can then be augmented with seasonal pieces.” I became interested in the concept when I cleaned out my closet about four months ago. I had realized that although I hadn’t actually created a capsule wardrobe, I was essentially dressing as if I had, wearing the same basic, interchangeable items and then dressing them up for special occasions or for different seasons. All of the other stuff was really just never worn, either because it didn’t fit properly, it wasn’t versatile enough or it was entirely just out of style. So I started to embrace the idea and have learned that capsule wardrobes are not only smart from a fashion perspective, but they also help solve my organizational challenges. Having a capsule wardrobe means I have a specific amount of clothing separated into divisions. For me, it is by seasons: winter, spring, summer and autumn. In each of my capsules, whether they be in bags or shoved to the back of my closet on shelves, there are about seven to 12 articles of clothing in each section. By dividing my entire wardrobe into seasonal sections, I am able to have more options when it comes to what I want to wear. So I can choose a spring pants section with a summer top or even winter sweatshirt. Everyone’s capsule wardrobe will be different depending on lifestyle, but for most, the capsule would probably include some combination of the following: a few of pairs of pants in navy and black, several basic t-shirts, a dressy top and a formal coat; for more girls: a black dress, black pumps and/or flats, a versatile pair of sandals and sneakers and a light coat. No, those aren’t the only clothes you own. There is obviously sleepwear, underwear/socks, and workout clothes which don’t have to be considered “extras,” but those are the basics that you wear daily and from which you can create different looks. I hear so many people say that capsule wardrobes are boring and have no creativity; and yes almost every single person who says this has NEVER even tried a capsule wardrobe. Since your capsule wardrobe is individual to you, you can make it as boring or exciting as you want it to be. After all, it’s created from the clothes already hanging in your wardrobe. If you love all black or live in gym clothes or sweatshirts and sweatpants, that is completely fine but just because it’s not someone else’s style doesn’t make it boring. In all reality, if we all had the same style, life would be pretty boring. As for being creative, I know I’ve become bolder and more creative with my styling since creating my capsule wardrobe. I now can focus on what I want to create. Having less has led to thinking more creatively about my wardrobe. I’m now far more likely to play around and try different outfits than I was before. Overlooking trends helped me to create and refine my own personal style in a way that having a bountiful wardrobe never could.

PHOTOS BY BRYNN TAYLOR

CAPSULE CRITERIA REDUCE

Donate or sell old clothes you don’t wear anymore.

ESTABLISH A BASE WARDROBE Create a pile of most used

clothes you wear seasonally.

BUILD WITH STAPLES

Grab the pile of things you wear all the time and section those out by category, such as season or style.


28 / A&E

SUMMER VIEWS & VIBES

THE PATRIOT

Summer is the time for going out, partying (responsibly), and being in the sun constantly on the move. Sometimes you just need a break from the craziness. What better to do with your time to chill than a movie night? It can be by yourself, with some friends, or with a special friend. This can be at a theater, a drive in movie, or at someones house. Here are some movie suggestions that you could choose from. BY MCKENNA PICKERING SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

PARENT TRAP

JAWS% 97

86%

71%

DIRTY DANCING

WHITE CHICKS 15%

FRIDAY THE 13TH

MEAN GIRLS

63%

84%

PICTURES COURTESY OF IMDB

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE FLICK?

RATINGS FROM ROTTEN TOMATOES

“High School Musical 2”

“Camp Rock”

freshman Emma Thurston

junior Jordyn Hunter

“Grease”

“Little Rascals”

senior Faith Danaher

junior Zach Mansi


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

A

GUIDE TO

A&E / 29

OPEN LUNCH

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE OPEN LUNCH SPOT?

BY MIAH CLARK A&E EDITOR, ASST. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

High schoolers wait patiently all four years to be granted true power over the underclassmen: the privilege of open lunch. But no previous class has left a rule book advising where to go, how to get there, and how to do it all within a 25 minute time constraint. To prepare the class of 2020 for their open lunch endeavors, The Patriot has prepared a list of tips and tricks to help you result in ultimate open lunch success.

“Ooooooooh definitely

1. Stay strapped with your student ID

Administrators don’t play when it comes to open lunch and IDs. Be sure to always have yours on person.

McDonalds.”

2. Use your time wisely

senior Alex Montor

3. Eat on the run

“Seven Eleven, for the

25 minutes seems lengthly until your stuck in a drive-thru or in Metcalf traffic, so be sure you’re getting in and out of class as well as in and out of your eatery. Unless you’re best friends with your 5th hour teacher, it’s likely you won’t be able to eat in your remaining class time. It’s best you learn the ways of simultaneously driving and stuffing your face.

9

8

mini tacos.” senior Jack Calderwood

91ST ST

5

7 95TH ST

WHERE TO GRUB & G SAFE SPOT

Sonic Drive Thru

6

10701 Roe Ave Quik Trip

10700 Roe Ave Winsteads MISSION RD

ROE AVE

NALL AVE

LAMAR AVE

METCALF AVE

ANTIOCH RD

10711 Roe Ave

STRETCH Subway

10329 Metcalf Ave McDonalds

3860 w 95th St Sprouts

9628 Nall Ave 4

103RD ST

DANGER ZONE McDonalds

9401 Foster St

S 1 2 107TH ST

HyVee

8501 w 95th St Wendys

3

9161 Metcalf Ave


30 / A&E

THE LOOK.

THE PATRIOT

JUNIOR MARIA BEACH

EARRINGS $15

NECKLACE Italy $120

JEANS Kensie $30

SHOES DSW $80


SMSOUTHNEWS.COM

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32 / FEATURES

THE PATRIOT

MOST LOVED TEACHERS

Seniors reminisce about their favorite teachers. BY ANNALIE POLEN REPORTER, AND KATIE HIEBL REPORTER

KENNEDY RATER Graham and McFall

Me and [Brett McFall] just relate well. We have a lot of beliefs that are the exact same and he’s just a really good teacher. He does a lot for the kids that goes unnoticed and Mrs. Graham because she doesn’t let you slack around in class, even if you are a jokester or an athlete or something; she makes you do your work and she really helps you actually get smarter

EMMA ROSS LaVergne

I have always liked math, but I haven’t loved it until I started taking classes with him and he made me see it from a different perspective… We’ve talked a lot about how to use it for more practical reasons and things that can actually help people. So it has kind of motivated my future decisions and what I want to study… Also he has just encouraged me a lot to keep going in life and… he is always there for me when I have a bad day or when I am really stressed about stuff.

CAROLYN SCHNECK Camacho

Q: Why is [Camacho] your favorite? A: She’s so sweet and really energetic and I can tell she really cares about all of us and teaching us Spanish.

KICE MANSI [Travis] Gatewood

Q: Why is [Gatewood] your favorite? A: He has a very distinct way of teaching. He respects his students. He’s really fun to talk to. He’s always got great stories. He is also a really funny guy and I learned a lot from his class. There wasn’t a day where I didn’t want to go to his class.

JESSICA MARTINEZ-JIMMENEZ Dale

Q: Why is [Dale] your favorite? A: She takes the time [to teach us], I mean a lot of teachers do, but she takes the time specifically to talk to every student and make sure they are doing everything they possibly can to get a good grade in the class and she is very funny and smart.

Profile for Julie Fales

May 2019  

May 2019  

Profile for fales
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