Passions Magazine - Winter 2021

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ISSUE 15 | FALL 2021

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page

(the return of)

Daytrips & Overnighters

Yoga Has Something for Every Body IT'S A SMALL WORLD | UNLIKELY ADVENTURER—FINAL INSTALMENT SHELLY STOUFFER, UNSTOPPABLE COMPETITOR | OCEANSIDE'S FASHION RETAILERS OUR FAVOURITE THING... GIVING | MEET YOUR NEIGHBOURS


CONTENT

4

7

IN THIS ISSUE 4

IT'S A SMALL WORLD

& OVER7 DAYTRIPS NIGHTERS—EXPLORING INDIGENOUS TOURISM ON VANCOUVER ISLAND

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ADVENTURER 9 UNLIKELY — FINAL INSTALMENT

PROFILE 12 FAIRWINDS —A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE RESILIENCE OF 14 THE OCEANSIDE'S FASHION

18

RETAILERS

22

HAS SOMETHING 18 YOGA FOR EVERY BODY

ASSIONATE FOODIE 20 P—THE ROOT OF IT ALL

OUR 22 GIVING... FAVOURITE THING

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MEET YOUR NEIGHBOURS 24 —THE CHAPMANS

25 GOLF TIP 26 GARDENING UPDATE

Cover photo: Miranda Greening by Blair Landry

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PHOTO courtesy of Milner Gardens & Woodlands

EDITOR’S NOTE

AS THE SEASONS TURN Seasonal change is upon us; a particularly wet and blustery autumn will soon give way to winter, and as another unsettled year draws to a close it is time to reflect upon all that is right in the world… even as it continues to challenge us. This time of year is about savouring the comforts of home, while also finding time to enjoy the company of friends and family, and even the larger community. Thankfully this is something we can do more of, as restrictions for dining indoors, events and even travel, are being eased. As the days get shorter and colder, we encourage you to continue looking after yourself with nourishing meals and exercise. Dig into the tasty world of roots vegetables with Sandra Jones, and learn to stretch yourself with some yoga this winter, the perfect indoor activity for mind and body, that any body can benefit from. Check the schedule at the Fairwinds Wellness Club for yoga classes, along with aquacize, tai chi and more. Shopping locally and in-person is back in style and in this issue of Passions we introduce you to a resilient group of independent fashion retailers keeping us looking great through any season. Also on the agenda, we peek in on the wee world of miniatures, catch up on the ongoing explorations of our Unlikely Adventurer, and are once again encouraging you to do some exploring of your own as we reboot our Daytrips & Overnighters feature. We also catch up with Fairwinds’ golf phenom, Shelly Stouffer. And spoiler alert… she wins again! “For everything turn, turn, turn There is a season turn, turn turn…” —Turn! Turn! Turn! written by Pete Seeger and popularized by The Byrds

Julie Jaworski, PASSIONS Editor

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Images Arrowsmith Search and Rescue training and rescue scenes. Note: some photos were taken prior to the outbreak of COVID-19.

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IT'S A smaLL WORLD by Jen Groundwater

From miniature food and other household items such as furniture, waste bins and now laptops, to gritty run-down urban environments and the ubiquitous railway town sometimes occupying an entire floor of a home, miniatures have exploded onto Instagram and other social media platforms as a worldwide phenomenon.

There’s a world out there that’s yours for the taking—or more accurately, yours for the making: the world of miniatures. If you haven’t arranged doll-house furniture or assembled a model plane in decades, pull up a workbench: there’s been an explosion of creativity thanks to improved graphic capabilities; new building materials, tools, and techniques; the invention of 3D printers; and the rise of social media. Miniature makers are having a grand old time sharing their beautiful, tiny creations on Instagram and other platforms. For some, it’s their life’s work: a miniature house, usually built at 1:12 scale (one inch = one foot), can sell for a staggering six figures. Bill Robertson is famous for his historically accurate furniture and objects including items like tiny working microscopes and grandfather clocks. Creators like Chris Toledo, Kwandaa Roberts, and Vonelle build exquisite wee homes as perfectlooking as any contemporary show home, while the husband-and-wife team of Kevin Mulvany and Susie Rogers recreate ornate historic mansions. Bridget McCarty makes magical miniature food and household items, while Joshua Smith and Kévin D’Alenti make gritty, startlingly realistic models of graffitied, run-down urban buildings, shipping containers, and even garbage cans. These folks are Instagram celebrities, with many thousands of followers each. But regular people are also rediscovering the appeal of the miniature. Brett Shuttleworth of the NRC Hobby Shop in Nanaimo says sales of models went way up during the pandemic. Although the shop’s website lists hundreds of items, that’s just “a drop in the ocean of what’s out there,” he says. “There’s a slew of stuff available,” including the materials and tools to make your own models. 5 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


There’s room for everyone in the world of miniatures. A great place to start is by building things from pre-made kits, then customizing them yourself. Many people happily continue doing this for their whole lives. Others get a kick out of building their own items—model sailboats or railroads, scale miniature buildings, and so on—entirely from scratch, with materials and design limited only by their imaginations (and budgets). Either way, modelling is an ideal pastime for those who have (or who want) patience and perseverance. And for anyone who wants to feel the satisfaction of creating something tiny, beautiful, and very realistic. Shuttleworth advises newbies not to panic if their early paint jobs don’t exactly match what’s on the box, and to make it fun: “Take your time. Find something that appeals to you, that you want to build, and enjoy it.”

Check out the incredible miniature artistry on these Instagram accounts @wmrrobertsonminiatures @ibuildsmallthings @tinyhousecalls @lavenderbelle_miniatures @bridgetmccartyminis @joshua_smith_street_artist @kevindalenti @mulvanyandrogers

Local Littles... connect with these island-based miniatures and model enthusiasts. Miniature World Victoria’s attraction celebrates all things small, with 85 marvellous miniature dioramas and displays, including scenes from space, history, and BC’s historic industries, along with doll houses, castles, cityscapes, and more. Oceanside Model Railroaders You can help drive this group’s amazing model railroad at Railyard Games in Parksville! The shop sells must-buy miniatures and runs in-store games and miniature/ model events. PDQ (Parksville District and Qualicum) Flyers If you want to get involved in model aviation, connect with this group, who build radiocontrolled model planes and helicopters and fly them at various sites near Fairwinds.

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D AY T R I P S

& OVERNIGHTERS

Kwa’lilas Hotel

Exploring Indigenous Tourism on Vancouver Island First Nations’ history and culture runs deep and rich here in the Pacific Northwest, and

Yadan with Imas, masks from U’mista Cultural Centre

on Vancouver Island we are fortunate to have many thriving indigenous tourism experiences to partake in. From hotels and nature-based tours to museums and galleries, these cultural assets can both delight your senses and deepen your understanding of life on the west coast. Close to home you can find exhibits from the Qualicum First Nations including the story of The Pentlatch People, a “sleeping language” project at the Qualicum Beach Museum. A quick trip up-Island, the I-Hos Gallery—on the site of the original K’ómoks Village and winners of the 2013 retail award from Aboriginal Tourism BC—has a significant collection of traditional and contemporary Northwest Coast artwork for sale including masks, prints and jewelry. If you venture a little farther along the Island highway and take the ferry from Campbell River to Quadra Island you can visit the Nuyumbalees Cultural Centre, where a priceless and historic collection of original Kwakwaka’wakw artifacts is preserved and displayed. Nearly one hundred carved boulders at thirteen different sites have been located on Quadra Island, and the centre is pleased to have seven of them on site. These stone carvings, known as petroglyphs, are estimated to have been carved over 2500 years ago. Please note that the main lodge and dining room of popular Tsa Kwa Luten (Cape Mudge Resort) are now closed for the season but will re-open—along with a newly expanded RV park—in May 2022. For an overnight stay we highly recommend a road trip to the North Island including a visit to the U’mista Cultural 7 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


Centre near the village of Alert Bay on Cormorant Island, which can be accessed via a short BC Ferries ride from the nearby the town of Port McNeill. U’mista (Canada’s longest running First Nations museum and cultural centre) houses an extensive collection of repatriated ceremonial Potlatch regalia including many stunning masks. The Cenre’s goal is to preserve the cultural artifacts of the Kwakwaka'wakw people for generations to come. The island is also home to the World’s Tallest Totem Pole and historical features including the 'Namgis Traditional Big House and original burial grounds. There are several accommodation options available in Alert Bay and Port McNeill, but if you are open to an additional half hour’s drive north to Port Hardy, the First Nations owned and operated Kwa’lilas Hotel, provides luxurious accommodations that feature a curated selection of indigenous art. The property has also partnered with local operators to offer eco-adventure and wildlife tours, and cultural experiences including cedar weaving. While Tofino and Ucluelet can certainly be accomplished as a day trip from Fairwinds, we highly recommend an overnight stay… there is just so much to see and do! Take the scenic trip along Highway 4 to immerse yourself in the natural and cultural heritage that lives here on the real west coast. There are many places to stay including Indigenous Tourism of BC member properties: Best Western Plus Tin Wis Resort, and Wya Point Resort. In town, the landmark Eagle Aerie Gallery housed in a traditional Northwest Coast longhouse with a carved and painted cedar plank exterior and doors of beaten copper, has been welcoming fans of renowned artist Roy Henry Vickers since 1986. And the gallery at House of Himwitsa features the work of a wide variety of First Nations’ artists, from carved masks and jewelry to woven baskets. If the wilderness is calling your name, sign up for a tour with a local guiding company and see the west coast through eyes that know it well. Moses Martin and his family have been operating Clayoquot Wild: Wildlife & Custom Tours since 1995, taking guests to explore, learn, and to listen to stories of this ancient land and its peoples. A trip to take in the rich heritage and natural beauty of our island home awaits. For more information on exploring indigenous tourism opportunities on Vancouver Island and throughout the province, please visit the Indigenous Tourism BC website (www.indigenousbc.ca).

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Before you Travel Due to the changing landscape of the ongoing pandemic, always check to ensure that the properties listed here will be open when you plan to visit. Learn and be guided by the COVID-19 protocols that have been put in place. These communities are necessarily protective of their residents and are working to keep everyone safe.

from top left Big house near Alert Bay (photo by Owen Lloyd); Haida whale representation; Nuyumbalees petroglyph


The Unlikely ADVENTURER T H E F I N A L I N S TA L M E N T I N T H E 2 0 2 1 S E R I E S by Wendy Maurer

PROXIMITY TO WATER PLAYED A BIG ROLE IN ADVENTURES THIS YEAR—OCEAN, RIVERS, LAKES. It wasn’t planned. The reality

20 21 A YEAR FOR ADVENTURE!

was that not much was pre-planned this year. My husband, Lotar and I fit our adventures into the last-minute windows of opportunity presented by COVID-19 conditions. We chose to be flexible and take on adventures on short notice. Walking the sand of Long Beach—marvelling at the sky reflections on receding waves, absorbing sounds of the crashing waves along The Wild Pacific Trail in Ucluelet, watching the tides come and go along the east coast of Vancouver Island and hearing people play—all fed my soul. My favourite was during the first rain of the fall season while we were camping— hearing the sudden bursts of children laughing as they rode their bicycles through puddles and water sprayed out—real joy! Another favourite moment was while tubing down the Cowichan River as my seven-yearold great-nephew explained to me why we couldn’t wait for his dad to catch up—a young grinning boy saying “the rapids are just making us go fast,” then giggles. Luckily he was on a tube (wearing a life-jacket) and I was faster in a kayak, with a paddle and could stay close and wave back to his mom and dad. There were 14 family members tubing on the river that day and it was a fun, casual, relaxed time to chat and catch up as we social distanced. A great way to beat the summer heat and the series of gentle rapids on the second half of the float did create excitement. This 2 ½ hour float down the river comes with a bus to pick you up and drive you back to your starting point. We were making memories to take us through the coming winter.

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NOTE The Wild Pacific Trail in Ucluelet is worth a trip to the west coast. I’d rather go there than Long Beach. The Trail has amazing viewpoints, you can feel the ocean surges through the ground and there is a lot of variety in flora and fauna. Wear comfortable shoes and be prepared for rain. Be sure to check travel times through Sutton Pass as road construction causes significant delays during the day.

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This year, at our first large family gathering in several years, a realization of my age hit—I am now part of the family’s oldest generation. It came as a revelation and is now an adventure. Suddenly I view my expectations and responsibilities differently. I’m learning how to be an ‘older person’ as I define it for myself, not based on stereotypes. There are multiple generations younger—babies, children, teenagers, 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and now 50 year-olds who are not siblings. I’m now happy to sit in the background and enjoy others doing the planning and organizing, living at an unhurried pace and being content in the moment. As a great-aunt I get to teach children how to stomp on the sand and get clams to squirt, advise on what is suitable to beachcomb for and what is not. Here on Vancouver Island beaches are yearround treasures to share. I get to go on adventures to local attractions with whole new generations as their parents zip off on their own activities. I’m open to suggestions for new activities too. Gold panning certainly wasn’t something on my bucket list. However, when the opportunity came up I got excited. I’m glad I tried it; I had no idea what was involved except a gold pan, water and sand. Add patience, more patience, tweezers, a squeeze bottle, a tiny jar and then more patience. We decided the best word for trying to capture gold flakes was elusive. The gold flakes we found along Salmon River were thin and as soon as we shifted the pan (with water in it) the thin gold flake often disappeared from sight. The trick was to settle into a stable location for balance so that once a bit of gold was seen, the gold flake could be picked up out of the water with tweezers and put into a tiny bottle – along with the drop of water that kept it hooked to the tweezer. It was a very finicky process. My older brother brought the squeeze bottle that allowed him to suck the gold flakes up out of the water. Next time I do this, I plan to take a change of clothes so I can jump into the water if I feel like it. The river pools looked very inviting but we were in someone else’s car and I didn’t want to get it soaked. I think we all went home with rocks in our pockets.


For a few months, ongoing vertigo added a new dimension to what might otherwise have been simple activities. I learned the trick was that it was okay to turn my head side to side, but suddenly looking up and down would throw me off balance. Life, however, was too busy over the summer to stop doing things because of it, so, my hiking poles were put to good use. Happily, we used those months to recharge, refresh, hug family and mentally prepare ourselves for not travelling this winter as planned. The incredible weather meant a bumper crop of garden vegetables were harvested, consumed, and preserved. Thankfully I didn’t plant zucchini this year. Instead, we loved the lemon cucumbers that were especially prolific. Dehydrated cherry tomatoes and our very own raisins will be delicious winter snacks. I was thrilled to beat the racoons to the grapes and didn’t even mind that it took four days for them to fully dry. Stamp River Provincial Park is now on our repeat list. It’s a one-hour drive to a glorious grove of old maples and evergreens with trails right along the river. Each time we go, I can’t wait to see what is around the next corner of the trail and the changes in the river never disappoint. This easy hike, with a waterfall, fish ladder, steep cliffs, and deep pools is well worth the drive. In the spring we saw chocolate lilies. When the fish were spawning, a chocolate coloured bear strolled along the other side of the river; chocolate often just appeared at our campsite; and always, there was that sound of rushing water we love. Lotar and I feel such gratitude for all the blessings in our life. We look forward to our retirement even though we have no idea now what that is going to look like, aside from experiencing joy in the moments when we take in the peace and beauty of living here, rising to the challenge of maintaining our property, staying fit and discovering new places here on the island. Bring on the adventures, whatever they may be! I am more than ready for the next chapter of my life—the possibilities are endless.

A PERSONAL ASIDE During the first three waves of COVID-19 I had no desire to work at my home-based art business—I work at a torch and create glass beads and have for 14 years. I was seriously wondering if my creativity had deserted me and did this mean I was finished working with glass. Then it was announced that the wonderful family that hosts Nanoose Art In The Garden and their friends were again holding this special event. It was like a light switch was turned on and immediately I was back at work and quite enjoying myself. This was a true gift for me artistically and I am so very grateful. The show had double its usual attendance and people who attended were so happy to be out and about. As an artist, it was rewarding on so many levels to be part of this. Since then I have created a grouping of metal and glass flowers for a challenging spot in my garden and have more ideas germinating. My focus is shifting. I recently saw a quote that speaks to me “Working hard for something we love is called Passion.” I had the opportunity several times this year to create special items for friends that envisioned a contribution I could create to their personal journeys. I realized I do still have passion for working with glass.

opposite from top left Gold panning; Equipment: pan and shovel; Gold (does not represent quantities found by the author); Clams squirting all around; Along Wild Pacific Trail above Metal and glass flowers created by the author

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FA I R W I N D S P R O F I L E

a Competitive ADVANTAGE by Kait Burgan

At age 50, 2020 was supposed to be “The Year of I’m not the type of person to let my kids win. They are going to have to beat me... straight out, on their own... SHELLY STOUFFER Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist; Owner, Dynamic Kinesiology Member, Fairwinds Golf Club Golf Champion

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Shelly” but, like so many things, COVID-19 drove that plan into a bunker. Now that we’re approaching the final round of 2021, it isn’t a stretch to say that this year has shaped up nicely for Shelly Stouffer, golf champion, former touring professional golfer, and 2017 Nanaimo Individual Sport Female Athlete of the Year. In July, she won her second consecutive BC Senior Women’s AM Golf Championship at Revelstoke Golf Club, finishing with two straight birdies, and a birdie on the first play-off hole. She followed that by winning both the mid-master and senior division titles at the 50th Canadian Women’s Mid-Amateur and Senior Championship in Bromont, Quebec in early September. She finished that 54-hole tournament at seven over par. “I’m 51, and I wanted to do this last year, but I wasn’t able to because of COVID. It’s been a strange couple of years.” Yes, it has been a difficult period, but Shelly has dealt with it in her trademark competitive style. While competing at the BC Seniors in Revelstoke, she decided to go to on to the Canadian’s in Bromont. “… It was me, Jackie Little and Sandra Turbride. We were the top three, so we all went, and when I got there, I played pretty solid. I didn’t have my best opening round. I shot a 78, two shots back, and that wasn’t too bad but, I knew I could play better.” And so she did, winning the Canadian’s and earning an exemption to the USGA Women’s Senior Amateur in Alabama later in September. Even with the exemption though, she says, “It was a last-minute decision to go,” adding, “I’m very happy that I went… it was an amazing experience. Match play is a different


type of event; once you make it through qualifying into the top 64, you play individual players. If you keep winning, you keep playing. I made it through all the way to the semi-final match, losing to Ellen Port, a seven-time USGA champion, who birdied the 18th hole to win one up.”

LIKE ALL SEMI-FINALISTS SHELLY EARNED EXEMPTIONS INTO THE EVENT FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS AS WELL AS AN EXEMPTION INTO THE 2022 USGA SENIOR WOMEN’S OPEN IN OHIO NEXT YEAR.

“I feel like I’m better now than I was previously,” she says. “When you get older, you get wiser. You get smarter… and you learn from your mistakes… from your past. You just learn there’s so much.” Shelly has never shied away from sports and perhaps because of her strong competitive streak, has done well with whatever sport she picked up. Her name is on the Wall of Fame for basketball at Grand Prairie Regional College in Alberta and she played badminton for a year at Malaspina University College. As for golf, Shelly picked it up at 15 while living in Prince Rupert. A friend of her sister started getting her out to play and she played on her high school team. She remembers not being very good at it, so she ended up taking a series of lessons. In the beginning, golf was just something fun to do with her friends, but when her parents retired to Fairwinds in 1990, she started taking it more seriously. She put in the time, she liked to compete, and she could hit the ball far. She also caught the attention of the late Ben Colk, an honorary lifetime member of the Canadian PGA. “I’m a very competitive person in all aspects,” she says. “I’m not the type of person to let my kids win. They are going to have to beat me straight out, on their own. There was a point when I didn’t even want to play golf unless I was in a competition. It’s probably hard for people to comprehend this, but if I’m not in a competition, I don’t really focus as much. It’s just a different mindset. People ask me, ‘How can you play in competitions all the time?’ but I can’t get enough of it.” Even at her current level of play, Shelly is not yet ready to sit back and bask in her success. At the beginning of this year, she completed Level One with Titleist Performance Institute and decided to carry on through Level Two. Level One, she says, is like a functional assessment for golfers. Level Two prepares your body for better play, based on the assessment. Shelly is focussing on getting rid of limitations, which for her, is the range of motion in her shoulders and hips, likely affected by a shoulder surgery back when she was 15. She continues to work on increasing her lower body strength and says she’s gained a few yards over last year because of the training. Shelly is a member of Fairwinds Golf Club now, a course she knows well and describes as “shorter and narrower with lots of trouble... and that gives you good course management training.” Shelly should know. Aside from her most recent acheivements... SHELLY IS A FORMER PROFESSIONAL GOLFER (19972011) AND PLAYED IN SIX LPGA MAJOR TOURNAMENTS, INCLUDING THE 2001 US WOMEN’S OPEN AND FIVE CANADIAN WOMEN OPEN TOURNAMENTS. She is the 2019 & 2016 BC Women’s Mid-Am and

Mid-Master Champion. Shelly is a competitor. That’s certain.

A FEW RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2017

Nanaimo Individual Sport Female Athlete of the Year 2020 & 2021

Winner of the BC Women’s Senior AM Golf Championship 2021

Winner of the 50th Canadian Women’s Mid-Amateur and Senior Championship

opposite Canadian Senior Am 2021

2021

inset BC Senior Am 2021

Third Place at USGA Women’s Senior Amateur (tied)

“People ask me, ‘How can you play in competitions all the time?’ but I can’t get enough of it.” SS

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the

BEING GOOD AT BUSINESS IS ALWAYS IN FASHION AND GETTING THROUGH A PANDEMIC YEAR THAT SAW DRESSING UP AND GOING OUT REPLACED BY ZOOM CALLS IN SWEAT PANTS, IF ANY PANTS AT ALL, DEMANDS AN ADMIRABLE SENSE OF BUSINESS STYLE THAT CAN ONLY COME WITH EXPERIENCE AND PASSION.

resilience

of OCEANSIDE’S

fashion retailers by Kait Burgan

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opposite Sandy Herle, owner of Oceanside‘s largest fashion retail shop, Close to You Fashion, in Parksville. This fall, the look is put together but comfy and cozy.

THE LAST 18+ MONTHS HIT OCEANSIDE’S FASHION RETAILERS HARD. BUT LIKE MANY OF THE REGION’S FASHION RETAILERS, SANDY HERLE, OWNER OF CLOSE TO YOU FASHIONS IN PARKSVILLE, AND FORMER PARKSVILLE MAYOR, HAS ADAPTED AND IS STARTING TO SEE A RETURN TO SOME SEMBLANCE OF NORMAL. SHE’S ENERGETIC, COMMITTED, GRACEFUL AND RESILIENT. Sandy’s been in retail all her adult life. Along with her ex-husband, she owned three

bicycle stores in the central island area, and even back then, her fashion sense was impossible to repress. At 5' 1", high heels are staples in her wardrobe, even when riding a bicycle. “We’ve changed some of the direction for the store because we were very dressy before COVID—Joseph Ribkoff, Frank Lyman,” says Sandy, naming some of her most popular lines. “We’ve had to tone it down because people are more casual. They want the quality, and they want the look. For Oceanside, it’s a put-together look, things that work. We’ve added lines because of COVID that we didn’t carry before, lines I never thought we would carry, such as Columbia.” She notes that even the lines she carried for years have toned down a bit. They’re using more knits. Things are comfier and cosy. Wilde and Sparrow is another retailer adding to the growing shopping destination experience in downtown Parksville. Owners Trish Smith and Shirra Wall opened ten years ago, carrying lines including Free People, Z Supply and BB Dakota. Parksville is also becoming a destination for boutique consignment shopping. Tina Hayward owns The Kit & Kaboodle Trading Company, with three locations, 15 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


Jean Young of Arbutus Fashion & Lifestyle has been helping women look fabulous for over 30 years, right in the heart of downtown Qualicum Beach.

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Mod Apparel

THERE ARE MANY CHOICES WHEN IT COMES TO FASHION IN THE OCEANSIDE AREA. MANY OF THE BUSINESSES FEATURED HERE DELIVER WORLDWIDE AND INVITE YOU TO BROWSE THEIR WEBSITES AND SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES. ARBUTUS FASHION & LIFESTYLE

147 West Second Avenue, Qualicum Beach (250) 938-9008

CLOSE TO YOU FASHIONS

174 Corfield Street South, Parksville (250) 248-3781 closetoyou.ca

CURVE APPEAL CONSIGNMENT 154 Morrison Avenue, Parksville (250) 514-6580

FRESH BOUTIQUE

#5-220 West Island Highway, Parksville (250) 586-1111 freshboutique.ca

KIT & KABOODLE TRADING COMPANY

151 Harrison Avenue, Parksville (with two additional locations on Morrison Ave) (250) 586-2677 kaboodleboutique.com

MOD APPAREL

671 Beach Road, Qualicum Beach (250) 594-5594 modapparel.ca

OPEN COLLAR MEN

138 West Second Avenue, Qualicum Beach (250) 594-9997

RCUBED CLOTHING

148 Morrison Avenue, Parksville (250) 713-6111 rcubed.ca

WILDE & SPARROW

152 Morrison Avenue , Parksville (250) 586-2010 wildeandsparrow.com

including The Vault, which carries high-end home goods, decor and furniture, and clothing. “There were people from Victoria yesterday and from Saskatchewan the day before. Now that people can go out as a group, they’re making a day of it. They call it doing the circuit.” The circuit also includes RCubed Clothing, a super modern consignment boutique and artisan collective. And just a few doors down from them, Curve Appeal Consignment is owned by Kara McCarthy who says, “I really didn’t want size twelve and up women to feel like they only had one rack in every store. I wanted a place where they felt really confident and beautiful and could build a wardrobe that spoke to them without making them feel any shame around their shapes or themselves.” When asked to describe what Oceanside fashion is, she adds that “people are looking for linen. They’re looking for high-end casual wear.” Small town charm runs through boutique shopping throughout the area. Often, it’s shop owners themselves, who are working behind the counters, helping customers, becoming friends, and then helping those friends feel good about their fashion choices. Arbutus Fashion & Lifestyle in Qualicum Beach, opened more than thirty years ago. “We’re all living a more relaxed lifestyle now. It’s more about comfort,” says owner Jean Young on the evolution of local fashion trends since the beginning of the pandemic. She quickly jokes that might have something to do with a few of us having gained a bit of weight over the last twenty months. “I know with fall, whether it was COVID or not, the designers and the folks developing the fabrics come out with really beautiful soft garments. And it’s wonderful that we can have fall fashion you don’t have to take to the dry cleaners.” Jean carries a wide variety of labels, including Papillion and Papa, both from Vancouver and HUE’s line of versatile, high-quality leggings. Just across the street from Arbutus is Open Collar Men, the only men’s fashion store north of Nanaimo, carrying Vancouver-based 34 Heritage jeans and pants, the Dutch label, Fish Named Fred, Scotch and Soda from Amsterdam and Copenhagen’s Martinique. “I’ve really leaned toward European fashion. They’re usually a few years ahead of us here, and we’re getting a younger demographic moving to Qualicum Beach,” says owner Terrance Doyle. Terrence opened his store after moving here from Vancouver and simply couldn’t find a place where he wanted to shop. He was ready to open on March 30, 2020, right when COVID was peaking. But after sitting at home for a few weeks, he began to see a silver lining. “I started to realize it was probably safer to shop in a little place like this than to go into a grocery store where there are 125 people at any given time,” reflects Terrance. “So, we opened to two people at a time in the store, and it was fine. It’s not as convenient to shop online as we’re led to believe. People wanted to shop local, but they were also more or less forced to shop local because they couldn’t go to another community.” He credits MOD Apparel another hip fashion retailer in Qualicum that offers clothing with an LA vibe, as being especially helpful to him as he established his business. 17 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


Yoga HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY BODY by Jen Groundwater

HERE’S A QUICK MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUIZ FOR YOU. ONE QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT YOGA?

top left Symbol for Om or Aum, a mantra often used as a yogic chant at the beginning of a session to calm the mind, and create a peaceful setting.

A It’s too hard unless you’re young and flexible. If I tried it, I’d probably pull a hamstring.

D Love it! Every time I do it, I feel better afterward. But I don’t really have a serious practice.

B Totally overrated. I went to a class one time, but I was so bored! Never again!

E Please don’t distract me – I’m working on my one-legged crow pose. Namaste.

C I know it involves strange poses and maybe some chanting. I’d feel silly.

IF YOU ANSWERED A), B), OR C), IT MIGHT BE TIME TO OPEN UP YOUR MIND AND GIVE YOGA ANOTHER TRY.

flexibility. Doing yoga regularly has been shown in real, scientific studies to help And here’s the thing: yoga is for people manage stress, feel more relaxed, everybody. And every body. Yes, even you sleep better, and feel more cheerful. and your body. Right? This stuff is GOOD for you. And Let’s do a little yogic myth-busting. it doesn’t have to be hard—every yoga teacher worth their salt will tell you this. YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE YOUNG & FLEXIBLE. Do your best to follow their instructions, If your muscles are tight and you can’t even but listen to your body and don’t push see your toes, let alone reach them, you yourself. If a certain posture feels painful can still do yoga. In fact, you NEED to do or impossible, it’s okay just to lie on your yoga! Becoming more flexible is one of the mat and rest. You can try again another main reasons people take up the practice. day. Improving your physical flexibility helps As far as yoga being only for young you participate more fully in your other people: Come on now, that’s not a very sports and activities—and in your life in Fairwinds attitude! I asked Miranda general. Greening, who teaches yoga at the Other physical benefits of yoga include Fairwinds Wellness Club, “Can someone better balance, reduced pain (it’s even be too old for yoga?” and her answer was a been shown to help with osteoarthritis), resounding, “NO! The whole reason I got increased strength and a healthier heart. into yoga was I knew it was something I The practice also increases your mental would do and enjoy for the rest of my life.” WINTER’S COMING IN—IT’S THE PERFECT TIME TO SWITCH TO INDOOR EXERCISE.

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MYTH-BUSTING FOR THOSE WHO ALREADY DO YOGA

YOGA DOESN’T HAVE TO BE BORING.

It’s been estimated that 300 million people do yoga worldwide, so the practice is constantly evolving and expanding to include new ideas and innovations. There are dozens of different styles of yoga that range from intensely athletic and sweaty to ubermellow. So if you think yoga is slow and snoozy, try a class with “ashtanga,” “vinyasa,” “flow,” or “power” in the name—these types of yoga will keep you wide awake and working hard. NOPE, THERE’S NO WAY AROUND IT. YOGA DOES INVOLVE SOME STRANGE POSES.

As far as chanting goes, some teachers like to lead a good group “OM” at the beginning or end of class, but it’s really not a big deal and you don’t have to participate if you don’t want. But asanas or poses are key to every kind of yoga. The good news is that some are as simple as standing up straight (Tadasana or

mountain pose) or lying flat on your back (Savasana or corpse pose). Poses require you to stand, sit, or move your body in a particular way and hold that position for a certain amount of time while focusing on your breathing. Many poses require stretching or awkwardly aligning limbs, but you never have to push beyond what you feel comfortable with. You ease into the pose, then try to maintain it, which can take a surprising amount of concentration. Distraction vanishes as your body and breath unite in a moment of mini meditation. You’ll soon discover that your body likes some poses more than others. That’s the coolest part about any yoga class, as Miranda explains. “Everybody is experiencing something different. What’s really hard for one person is a cakewalk for someone else.” Her advice? “Focus on the experience of breathing. Just come to yoga to breathe and be in your body.”

“I don’t want to work hard. I just want to stretch and relax.” Guess what? That’s still yoga! The most important part of yoga is that it helps quiet the mind. A practice like yin yoga, with its emphasis on holding simple stretching poses for a long time, is a gateway to that stillness. Miranda says: “The world can make you feel guilty for doing yin, but you’ve got a busy lifestyle. Give yourself permission to relax and take care of yourself.” “There are no in-person classes these days.” Live yoga is back, baby! Since COVID started, many people have missed the experience of doing yoga with other people, under the guidance of a qualified teacher. But at the time of printing, Fairwinds Wellness Club is offering live classes following all COVID protocols. (So are other local yoga studios like Surya Wellness in Nanoose Bay and Red Door Yoga or Find Your Balance Yoga in Lantzville, but you can always find a yoga teacher on Zoom or YouTube.) “I don’t have a serious practice.” Even if you love doing yoga, it sometimes can feel like you’re not doing it often enough or well enough. There’s always a temptation to look at the person on the next mat who’s doing the advanced pose, or to think it doesn’t count if you don’t do #yogaeverydamnday (over 19 million Instagram posts include this hashtag!). Miranda Greening has an answer for this, too: “No practice is ever serious!” Don’t aspire to perfection: whatever yoga you do is going to be good. She adds, “Yoga is a beautiful form of selfexpression. Every body DOESN’T move the same way—and yoga makes room for that.” If you’re completely new to yoga, we recommend you take a class with a real, live instructor who can teach you the poses correctly and offer modifications so you don’t injure yourself. top A yoga class at Fairwinds led by Miranda Greening (left)

photo by Blair Landry

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T H E PA S S I O N AT E F O O D I E

T H E ROOT OF IT ALL

THE UNDERGROUND WORLD OF VEGGIES by Sandra Jones

If vegetables competed in a beauty pageant, root vegetables would never walk away wearing the tiara. However, what they lack in visual appeal is more than made up for in earthy flavour, colour, crunch and nutrition. In fact, because these knobbly, odd-shaped tubers and roots grow underground, they absorb many nutrients from the soil. That means these dietary allstars make a healthy addition to the dinner plate and serve up benefits that run the gamut from reducing oxidative stress to preventing chronic disease.

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20 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


Of course, if you’ve already boiled and mashed your way through bushels of potatoes, carrots and maybe even beets, the concept of root vegetables might seem a bit mundane. But look closer and you’ll find dozens of more exotic options plus new and inventive ways to prepare them.

Celery Root Puree with Celery Leaf Pesto

CELERY ROOT OR CELERIAC

CELERY LEAF PESTO Makes about ½ cup (125 ml) 1 cup (250 ml) packed celery leaves ½ cup (125 ml) flat leaf parsley leaves ½ cup (125 ml) finely grated Parmesan cheese ¼ cup (60 ml) toasted pumpkin seeds 1 T (15 ml) lemon juice 1 tsp (5 ml) grated lemon zest ¼ cup (60 ml) extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and cracked black pepper

Found in virtually every grocery store, this homely root belies its subtle, celery-like flavour. It’s deliciously silky in a soup or try it mashed, roasted in slow-cook dishes or transformed into a remoulade as the French would do. For an alternative to mashed potatoes, try the Celery Root Puree with Celery Leaf Pesto recipe! JICAMA

You may have walked right by this little root beauty in the produce section and not known what to do with it. Globe-shaped with a starchy white interior, it’s an excellent addition as part of a raw crudite platter. Peel it, cut it into matchsticks and refrigerate. Or dip the matchsticks into lime juice, chill powder and salt and crunch away! Often referred to as a superfood, jicama is rich in Vitamin C and A and is loaded with inulin, a prebiotic that contributes to a healthy gut. RUTABAGA

Sometimes described as a cross between a turnip and a cabbage, these yellow-fleshed, purple-shouldered wonders are both buttery and a bit bitter when cooked. At half the calories of potatoes and sweet potatoes, rutabagas can be peeled, cubed, boiled and simply mashed with butter, spiralized like noodles and tossed with olive oil and fresh herbs or oven roasted like fries. PARSNIP

This white tapered root may look like a carrot but it is sweeter, like a sweet potato, and has a slightly nutty flavour. It can be baked, boiled, mashed or even pureed into a soup but a simple toss with olive oil, salt and pepper and roasted in the oven is enough to transform parsnips into caramelized nuggets of deliciousness. TURNIP

If a cabbage and a radish had a baby, it would taste like a turnip. Not to be confused with rutabaga, this round root is smaller with white or white and purple skin and a sweet but slightly spicy undertone that mellows when cooked. Pickled, steamed, mashed or layered into a cheesy gratin, this earthy pick is a good source of dietary fibre, vitamin C and manganese. Don’t forget to steam or stir fry the tops as turnip greens are considered a super food and are packed with nutrients.

(Excerpt from Farm to Table: Cooking Through the Seasons by Lynn Crawford)

CELERY ROOT PUREE 1 celery root (about 2 ½ lbs/1⅛ kg), peeled & cut into 1-in (2 ½ cm) cubes ¼ c (60 ml) heavy cream (35%) 2 T (30 ml) unsalted butter Kosher salt and cracked black pepper Make the Celery Leaf Pesto 1. In a food processor, combine celery leaves, parsley, Parmesan, pumpkin seeds, lemon juice and zest. Process until combined. 2. With processor running, slowly pour oil through feed tube and process until well combined, scraping down sides of the bowl if necessary. Season to taste with salt and pepper and set aside. Make the Celery Root Puree 1. Place celery root in a saucepan of lightly salted cold water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and cook until celery root is fork-tender, about 15 minutes. 2. Drain celery root well, then return to pot and mash with cream and butter until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 3. To serve, spoon puree into a warm bowl, make a well in the centre and fill with a few tablespoons of Celery Leaf Puree. Serve immediately.

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O U R FAV O U R I T E T H I N G S

Giving… our favourite thing! FOR ALL THE HYPE AND HOOPLA SURROUNDING THE HOLIDAY SEASON, IN THE END IT’S THE ACT OF GIVING THAT REALLY MAKES US TRULY FEEL GOOD AT THIS TIME OF YEAR. And we can give in so many ways…from finding that perfect gift, and cooking a celebratory meal, to sharing time with family and friends. This year our holiday Favourite Things is a list of organizations—some assisting close to home and others lending a hand elsewhere—but all working to make the world a better place. Along with your list of gifts for friends and family this year we hope you will also share what you can with one (or many) of these worthy causes. And while your donation could have a cash value, many of these non-profits would also welcome your time, energy, and expertise to keep their services and programs going.

Society of Organized Services is a volunteer-based

non-profit organization meeting the needs and improving the lives of District 69 residents since 1968. sosd69.com

Manna Homeless Society is a registered, completely volunteer run society operating in the Oceanside area, offering emergency outreach and ongoing support to the homeless in our community. mannahs.com

Inclusion Parksville Society supports

adults with developmental disabilities through innovative programs, person-centered planning and advocacy, to enhance the lives of all people in the community. inclusionpv.org

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Haven Society’s mission is to promote the integrity and safety of women, children, youth and families and the development of a respectful and healthy community. havensociety.com

Forward House Community Society provides

adults living with mental health or addiction recovery challenges with the support and tools they need to enjoy full and independent lives. forwardhouse.com

Oceanside Hospice provides

local hospice support in our community. oceansidehospice.com

Nanaimo & District Hospital Foundation

is currently raising $5 million for all the new medical equipment needed for the new Intensive Care Unit at NRGH. nanaimohospitalfoundation.com

Indian Residential School Survivors Society is a BC

organization that provides services, including counselling, to support emotional, mental, and spiritual development, along with healing and recovery, through culturally based values and guiding principles for survivors, their families, and communities. irsss.ca


Nakujali Education Partnerships What

began with assisting a single student from Tanzania receive an education, blossomed into finding donor partners for as many students as possible. Donors support students directly through this volunteerrun organization (founded and managed by three Vancouver Island educators) with 100% of all donations being used to pay for student expenses (fees, school meals programs, etc.) in Tanzania. nakujali.org

top Mary Wendling's class at the orphanage in 2009. Almost all of these kids are now in secondary school thanks to sponsors. above Nakujali kids left School uniforms

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MEET YOUR NEIGHBOURS

Welcome to the Westerly! Chris and Julie Chapman keep having to remind themselves they’re not on holiday. On the contrary, they might be at the peak of their working lives: Julie has been with a large HVAC company for over 20 years, while Chris runs his own promotional marketing and advertising company.

Even before Covid, they both worked from home,

It does feel like a permanent vacation.

which until a few months ago was in Ontario. But now they work—and play—from their new place in the Westerly. “It does feel like a permanent vacation,” says Chris. “We sometimes can’t believe we live here now.”

The pair fell in love with the Island when they visited a few years ago. “Everything was

... just a dream come true.

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so gorgeous, and the people were so fantastic,” says Chris. Like so many easterners, they mentally filed it away as a great place to retire. Then, in the spring of 2021, they’d just completed some renovations on their Ontario house when Julie suggested they move out west. “I said, ‘Seriously?!’” remembers Chris. “And she said, “Well, why not?’” They could work from anywhere—so the earlier they moved, the sooner they could start enjoying Island life. They called a realtor, listed their house, and started looking for waterfront properties on Vancouver Island. Their search led them to the Westerly, and the rest is history. (Okay, it’s a short history, since they only arrived in July, but it’s already proving to be a sweet one.)


GOLF TIPS

They bought the place from afar because they liked pretty

much everything about it: the amenities, the golf course, the Wellness Club, Fairwinds Landing, and the unbelievable surroundings. “Coming from Ontario, it was a huge draw to be in this beautiful part of the country,” reflects Chris. The icing on the cake? “Having a marina right in front of us. It’s just a dream come true.” It didn’t take Chris and Julie long to realize another plus about life at Fairwinds: their neighbours, many of whom also migrated here from somewhere else in Canada. “They’re so friendly, so willing to help,” says Chris. “The people in the building with us are absolutely amazing.” While the Chapmans miss their young-adult kids, who still live in Ontario, they describe themselves as “super-stoked” about this new adventure that they’re on. When they’re not working, they’re making new friends and getting to know the neighbourhood and the great outdoors all around them. “There’s so much we want to do. We’re going to explore, experience everything, and enjoy every moment.”

Welcome to the Westerly, Chris and Julie!

BUNKER Shots Hélène Delisle Head of Instruction, Fairwinds Golf Club WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE MUCH GREEN TO WORK WITH AND A SHORTER DISTANCE TO THE HOLE,

choose a lob wedge (58o or 60o) for a higher ball flight to make the ball stop quicker and choose a sand wedge (54o-56o) when you have more green to work with and longer distance to get to the hole.

• Open the club face and your stance. Use a wide stance.

• Keep your hands close to your legs

Use a light

grip pressure (3 on a scale of 10).

• Line up the ball forward in your stance (inside left heel for a right handed golfer).

• Dig your feet in the sand.

• Make a full swing

but lower your smash factor • Swing upright vertical) with lots of wrist hinge

• Let the club head

thump the ground at impact

Golfing is enjoyed as a year-round activity at Fairwinds

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GARDENING UPDATE

A New Season in the Garden by Sandy Robson

As I write this, the evening temperature has dipped below 10◦ C. It’s time to adjust my mindset and get ready for Fall—and Winter—in the garden. IT HAS BEEN VERY HOT AND DRY THIS SUMMER SO AS MUCH AS I AM SAD TO SEE SUMMER FADE, I AM ALSO TIRED OF ALL THE WATERING BY HAND.

The crickets have been telling me, for a while now, that it is time for shorter days, cooler temperatures and some rain at last! But the onset of Fall on the west coast does not mean the end to gardening; there is still much we can do to enrich our gardens, and to extend the pleasures of being outdoors this season. Pruning and general tidying up chores will replace watering and weeding. Removing

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opposite from top Author‘s last few raspberries on the vine. Strawberry starts waiting to be stowed safely in the greenhouse. Rosehips make beautiful additions to fall bouquets. left Sunflowers right Pumpkin season!

spent annuals and crops makes for better air flow in the garden which helps to slow down transmission of powdery mildew and fungal growth, and allows more light to get through to the last of the ripening fruit and veggies. I have a climbing rose that has some black spot on it this year, so I am removing the affected leaves from both the plant itself and the surrounding soil. All will go into a bag for the garbage … NEVER compost leaves that have black spot or other fungal problems. Once garden and veg beds are cleared of annuals, and the pruning has been done, it is time to tuck everyone in under a nice blanket of compost (keep back from the trunks of shrubs and trees) to protect them over winter and improve the quality of the soil for next year’s growth. To increase the number of plants in my 2022 garden, I have begun taking cuttings to overwinter in the greenhouse—a cold frame or other sheltered area will do as well—where they will wait to be potted up, and then planted out next spring. So far, I have “little sticks” of lavender, rosemary, red valerian, hydrangea, coneflower, and scented geranium (hopefully) rooting themselves in pots of perlite and compost. I also have several little pots with strawberry shoots still attached via runners to the mother plant. As they take hold and produce a few new leaves (in about three to four weeks) I will clip the runners and—fingers crossed—I will have some healthy new plants ready for my garden next spring. And the happy task of harvesting flowers and edibles continues… with late harvest squash and pumpkins, sunflowers, cosmos, the last gasp of raspberries taking centre stage in the garden right now. Then there are the herbs like rosemary and sage to be cut and dried for use throughout the year—I see you turkey stuffing—and October will mean it is it time to plant out the garlic cloves and tulip bulbs. This year I am trying all pots with my spring flowering bulbs, and will be layering them to achieve a succession of blooms in one space. There is always room for learning when it comes to our gardens… and truthfully that is half the fun.

crave a little online garden time, check out some of our fave gardening resources. Based in the UK, Gardeners’ World is the mother of all gardening programming. Their online content from the magazine and the BBC television series of the same name hosted by Monty Don, is like an encyclopedia of gardening wisdom. They have a comprehensive website (gardenersworld.com) and social media accounts, including Facebook and Instagram. Host and gardening guru, Monty Don is also a gifted writer—I am currently making my way through Down to Earth— and has his own website (montydon.com) and social media presence on Facebook, Instagram & Twitter. I also enjoy following the video channel of Bunny Guinness—another UK gardener—on YouTube… full of practical tips and gardening hacks, and tours of her stunning garden design projects. Horticulturist, author, speaker, podcaster, and columnist for the Calgary Herald, Donna Balzer, now makes her home in Qualicum Beach. You can learn more at: donnabalzer.com and subscribe to her YouTube channel, as well as Facebook, Instagram & Twitter! Passions magazine designer, Po Wan, recently introduced me to Linda Vater, a self-taught garden designer and stylist who also writes and produces garden media for broadcast. Her YouTube channel is delightful. So grab a mimosa and enjoy her soft southern drawl as she escorts you through the everchanging garden of her 1935 English Tudor home in Oklahoma City. Do you have any favourite garden gurus and resources to share with Passions readers? Do tell! Email the editor at: passions@fairwinds.ca

May you and your garden continue to grow and thrive together! When your garden is all tucked in for the winter and you 27 PASSIONS | FALL 2021


WHERE FUN MEETS GREAT FOOD Located in Fairwinds Landing, Seascape boasts spectacular ocean and marina views, but don’t let those distract you from our food. We’ve crafted a menu that’s just as compelling as our setting, and an ambiance that’s relaxed and inviting. Join us soon for lunch, dinner or brunch.

3521 DOLPHIN DR, NANOOSE BAY, BC V9P 9K1 MONDAY TO TUESDAY - CLOSED WEDNESDAY - 4:30PM TO 9:00PM THURSDAY TO SUNDAY - 12:00PM TO 9:00PM

RESERVATIONS ARE RECOMMENDED (250) 468 0780 SEASCAPEDINING.CA @SEASCAPEDINING


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